US3487620A - Smoke cleaning apparatus - Google Patents

Smoke cleaning apparatus Download PDF

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US3487620A
US3487620A US3487620DA US3487620A US 3487620 A US3487620 A US 3487620A US 3487620D A US3487620D A US 3487620DA US 3487620 A US3487620 A US 3487620A
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water
smoke
screen
stack
steam
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Nicholas Klein
Yeshaye Levy
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Nicholas Klein
Yeshaye Levy
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B01PHYSICAL OR CHEMICAL PROCESSES OR APPARATUS IN GENERAL
    • B01DSEPARATION
    • B01D46/00Filters, i.e. particle separators or filtering processes specially modified for separating dispersed particles from gases or vapours
    • B01D46/18Particle separators, e.g. dust precipitators, using filtering belts
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F23COMBUSTION APPARATUS; COMBUSTION PROCESSES
    • F23JREMOVAL OR TREATMENT OF COMBUSTION PRODUCTS OR COMBUSTION RESIDUES; FLUES 
    • F23J15/00Arrangements of devices for treating smoke or fumes
    • F23J15/02Arrangements of devices for treating smoke or fumes of purifiers, e.g. for removing noxious material
    • F23J15/04Arrangements of devices for treating smoke or fumes of purifiers, e.g. for removing noxious material using washing fluids
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S261/00Gas and liquid contact apparatus
    • Y10S261/09Furnace gas scrubbers
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S261/00Gas and liquid contact apparatus
    • Y10S261/76Steam

Description

Jan. 6, 1970 KLE|N ET AL SMOKE CLEANING APPARATUS 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Feb. 16. 1968 TO SEWER WATER INVENTORS T0 SEWER To POWER SUPPLY NICHOLAS KL W 9L YESHAYE LEVY ATTORNEYS,

Jan. 6, 1970 N. KLEIN ET AL 3,487,620

SMOKE CLEANING APPARATUS Filed Feb. 16, 1968 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 TO POWER SUPPLY FIG 3.

/74 T0 SEWER WATER SUPPLY T0 SEWER DISINFECTANT a DEODORAN T WATER SUPPLY )wcnous KLEIN YESHAYE LEVY FIG; 4. /5a

ATTORNEYS.

INVENTORS.

Jan. 6, 1970 N. KLEIN ET AL 3,487,620

SMOKE CLEANING APPARATUS Filed Feb. 16. 1968 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 TO PO WER SUPPLY lZO WATER SUPPLY TO SEWER DISINFECTANT a DEOD ORAN T WATER SUPPLY INVENTORS.

F161 6. 3,, ms KLEINV YESHAYE LEVY ATTORNEYS,

United States Patent 3,487,620 SMOKE CLEANING APPARATUS Nicholas Klein, 2043 Creston Ave., Bronx, N.Y. 11253,

and Yeshaye Levy, Bronx, N.Y. (127 Penn St., Brooklyn, N.Y. 11211) Filed Feb. 16, 1968, Ser. No. 705,957 Int. Cl. B0141 47/02 US. Cl. 55222 1 Claim ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE Apparatus for filtering and Washing smoke containing solid particles passing upwardly through a smoke stack is described. A steam generating heat exchanger is located in a combustion chamber where the smoke is generated. A mixture of smoke and steam passes up the smoke stack to a water-cooled screen where the steam condenses to water drops entrapping solid particles. The screen and water film thereon hold back the solid particles. The waste water is collected in a trough and is drained off from the trough. The screen can be a double layer moving screen belt continuously washed by a brush in the trough. The screen can be stationary and conical in form. A disinfectant-deodorant such as ozone or the like, is volatilized in the heat exchanger and is discharged with the steam into the smoke in the stack.

The invention relates to the art of smoke cleaning apparatus and more particularly is concerned with means for continuously cleaning smoke generated in a garbage and refuse incinerator so that the fumes discharged from a stack are free of solid particles.

Heretofore apparatus for reducing air pollution caused by smoke discharging incinerators has been limited to filters of various kinds, generally screens placed at outlets of the smoke stacks. Such filters have not been found satisfactory because they quickly become clogged and reduce the draft required to operate the incinerators effectively. If clogging is to be avoided, the filter mesh is of such coarseness that an excessive amount of solid particles are discharged from the stack.

The present invention is directed at solving this problem by washing the smoke in a draft of steam and draining oif the condensed steam containing solid particles removed from the smoke.

According to the invention the heat of combustion of the incinerator is used to generate steam in a coiled, tubular heat exchanger continuously supplied with fresh water. The steam travels up the smoke stack or chimney of an incinerator and impinges on a Water-cooled moving screen which travels across the stack. The screen is scrubbed continuously and polluted water containing solid particles is drained off to a sewer. A disinfectant and deodorant is mixed with the water entering the heat exchanger and is volatalized therein. In a modification of the invention, a two-stage smoke cleaning apparatus is provided. In a first stage, cold water is discharged on a stationary conical screen which catches solid particles in the smoke. The condensed steam and solid particles are drained off at the first cleaning stage. In the second stage, a field of finely divided streams of cold water is maintained across the stack. Any fine particles in the smoke passing through the rapidly moving streams is caught and carried away to a drain. In a simplified form of the invention, second cleaning stage is omitted. In all forms of the invention, the discharge of the disinfectantdeodorant into the water supplied to the heat exchanger is coordinated with discharge of the water into a mixing tank which supplies the heat exchanger.

For further comprehension of the invention, and of the objects and advantages thereof, reference will be had to the following description and accompanying drawings and to the appended claims in which the various novel features of the invention are more particularly set forth.

In the accompanying drawings forming a material part of this disclosure:

FIG. 1 is a vertical sectional view, partially diagrammatic in form and with parts omitted, of a smoke cleaning apparatus embodying the invention.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of a roller screen employed in the apparatus of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a vertical sectional view similar to FIG. 1 showing a two-stage smoke cleaning apparatus.

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of water discharge manifold employed in the apparatus of FIG. 3.

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of a filter screen employed in the apparatus of FIG. 3.

FIG. 6 is a vertical sectional view similar to FIGS. 1 and 3, showing another smoke cleaning apparatus.

Referring first to FIG. 1, there is shown apparatus 10 having a generally rectangular furnace 12 in which is a chamber 14. Garbage and refuse is deposited in chamber 14 via a side door 16 on to a grate 18. The contents of the chamber are incinerated by flames 20 emitted by a fuel oil or gas burner 22 mounted on side wall 24.

Located in an axially vertical position in chamber 14 is a heat exchanger 25 comprising an axially vertical, helically coiled tube to obtain maximum heat transfer from chamber 14. The lower end 27 of the tube is connected to a water storage tank 26 which has a side wall 28 exposed to chamber 14 so that the water 30 in tank 26 is preheated. The upper end 29 of the tube is axially vertical and terminates in a funnel 31. A conical deflector 32 is held in the open mouth of the funnel by brackets 34.

The water 30 is fed to tank 26 via a supply pipe 36 connected to a mixer valve 38. A ball float 40 is carried by arm 41 pivotally supported by bracket 42 at side wall 44 of the tank. When the level of water in tank 26 falls, operating member 46 of the valve 38 is released by arm 41 supporting float 40 so that Water is discharged into the tank. A liquid disinfectant and deodorant 49 is contained in a storage container or tank 50 on top of tank 26. Outlet pipe 52 of tank 50 communicates with an inlet of mixer valve 38. Thus each time water is discharged into tank 26 the disinfectant-deodorant 49 is discharged at a predetermined rate into tank 26 along with water 30. Tank 50 has a filler tube 54 and removable cap 56.

Funnel 31 and the upper end 29 of the heater tube are located in the axially vertical rectangular smoke stack or chimney 60 mounted on top of the furnace 12. The stack has opposed slots 62, 64 formed in opposite sides 61, 63. Surrounding these slots is a generally rectangular trough having two communicating chambers 66 and 68. Cold water 67 is supplied to these chambers via water supply pipe 70 controlled by electromagnetic valve 72. Pipe 70 communicates with side wall 72 of the trough. The smoke stack 60 extends upwardly through hole 74 in cover plate 76 of the trough. A drain pipe 78 is located at side wall 80 of the trough above the bottom of the trough and conveys dirty waste water to a sewer. The bottom 82 of the trough is formed with a sump 84 having a valve 86 which can be opened to discharge water containing settled particles to a sewer via drain pipe 88.

An endless mesh screen belt 90 extends across the stack and through slots 62, 64 into chambers 66, 68 of the trough. Screen belt 90 is carried on a drive roller 92 and idler roller 94 at opposite end loops. Screen belt 90 is horizontal and the rollers are axially horizontal. The bottom course 90' of the screen belt is supported on idler rollers 96, 97. The rollers are journaled in opposite vertical walls 98 of the trough. Roller 92 has a drive shaft 100 carrying a pulley 102 best shown in FIG. 2. A drive belt 104 is engaged on pulley 102 and on drive pulley 106 of motor 108. Adjacent the roller 92 is an axially horizontal cylindrical brush 110. The brush has a drive shaft 112 carrying a pulley 114 which is smaller than pulley 102. Belt 116 is engaged on pulley 114 and on drive pulley 106 of the motor. The brush bears against right end loop 90a of the screen belt 90 as indicated in FIGS. 1 and 2. Since pulley 114 is smaller than pulley 102, the brush will rotate faster than roller 92 and will effectively brush the end 90a of the screen belt 90. Both rollers 92, 94 and brush 110 are at least partially immersed in water 67 and all rotate in the same direction.

The electrical system of the apparatus includes power supply wires 120 connected via a double-pole switch 122 to ignition 124 and blower 126 of the burner 22. Connected to wires 120 via wires 121 and another doublepole switch 128 is coil 130 of the electromagnetically operated valve 72. Also connected to wires 121 are wires 125 which supply power to motor 106. It will be apparent from an inspection of FIG. 1, that the burner 22 is actuated when switch 122 is closed. Both motor 106 and valve 72 are actuated when both switches 122 and 128 are closed.

In operation of the apparatus 10, when the burner is operating, flame will heat the heat exchanger which is supplied with water from tank 26. The water in heat exchanger 25 will be turned to steam and the disinfectant-deodorant will evaporate. The steam will mix with smoke produced by combustion of refuse in compartment 14 of the furnace and by combustion of fuel burned in burner 22. The mixture of smoke and steam is deflected to the sides of the smoke stack by funnel 31. The mixture of smoke and steam impinges on the moving screen belt 90 which catches solid particles in the smoke and steam. The steam condenses to water drops which wash the smoke leaving it substantially free of solid particles as it passes through the lower and upper courses of the screen. The screen is kept cold by the cold water in trough 75. Furthermore the interstices in the screen are closed by a film of water which serves to wash and strain the smoke and fumes passing through the screen. The screen is kept in continuous motion as long as the burner 22 is operating since they are connected in a common power supply circuit. In addition water 67 is fed continuously to trough 75 while the screen belt 90 is moving. As the lower course 90 of the screen belt reaches the brush 110 the belt is cleaned and the particles pass into the water 67. Floating particles are drawn off via drain pipe 78. Heavier particles which sink are collected in sump 84 and are periodically drawn oil when valve 86 is opened.

Each time the ball 40 descends sufficiently to open valve 38, a mixture of disinfectant-deodorant 49 and water 30 is discharged into tank 26 to keep it filled. The rising ball automatically shuts off the supply of water to tank 26 when the tank is filled.

By the arrangement described, the gases discharged from the top of stack 60 are scrubbed clean of solid particles. The screen 90 serves as a two-stage cleaner. At the first stage, the solid particles are stopped by the fine mesh of the screen and the water film on lower course 90 and the steam partially condenses. At the second stage, when the smoke and steam mixture reaches upper course 90" condensation of the steam is completed and the smoke is scrubbed again by the fine mesh of the screen and the water film carried by the upper course.

The gas or fumes discharged from the stack 60 retain the disinfectant which sterilizes the fumes and the deodorant which imparts a pleasant aroma to the fumes. The apparatus thus operates automatically and eflectively to accomplish its intended purposes.

FIGS. 3, 4 and 5 show another system 10A which is generally similar to system 10 and corresponding parts are identically numbered. In system 10A, the stack 60 has a lower cylindrical portion 60a and a rectangular upper section 6011 provided with opposed slots 150, 152

in opposite sides 151, 153. A tubular manifold pipe 154 closed at opposite ends is mounted at slot 150. This pipe, as clearly shown in FIGS. 3 and 4, has an inlet fitting 155 to which water supply pipe 156 is connected. The pipe 154 has a long, narrow discharge nozzle 158 having many openings 160. The water 162 which is discharged by nozzle 158 forms a muultiplicity of closely spaced overlapping fine streams which pass transversely across rectangular section 60a" and out through slot 152. The Water 162 is collected in a drain trough and passes to a sewer via a drain pipe 172.

Just below the rectangular section 60a in cylindrical lower portion 600' is a conical mesh screen 174 axially vertical and held by bracket arms 173. The screen 174 is apically uppermost. Just below screen 174 is a baflle ring .175 which has a tapered annular upper portion 176. An annular trough 178 is defined between ring portion 176 and the inner side of stack portion 60a. A drain pipe 180 extends laterally and downwardly from opening 182 in the side of stack portion 60a at trough 178. Water 179 is discharged in a conical spray on the conical mesh screen 174 from a water discharge pipe 184 extending radially of stack portion 60a and provided with a water spreader 185. Both pipes 156 and 184 are connected to a common water supply pipe 186 via an electromagnetically operated mixer valve 188.

Tank 50a containing the disinfectant-deodorant 49a is fed via pipe 190 to mixer valve 38a in water storage tank 26a. Branch pipe 192 supplies the disinfectant-deodorant via a pump 194 and pipe 193 to mixer valve 188.

In the electrical system of the apparatus, both valve 188 and pump 194 are connected via wires 196 and switch 128a to the power supply wires 120. In operation of the apparatus screen 174 and ring 175 constitute the first stage of a two-stage cleaning system. The mixture of steam and smoke rising in the lower portion 60a of the smake stack are filtered by both the fine mesh of stationary screen 174 and the film of water which flows around and down the screen to trough 178. The steam is also condensed to water drops which condense on the fine particles which are drained into channel 178. There the dirty water 179' is drained oil through drain pipe 180.

In the second stage of cleaning, the gas fumes pass through the fine streams of water spray 162. Condensation of steam is completed as well as entraining of fine particles which are drawn off via trough 170 and drain pipe 172.

The pump 194 is activated while the water is being discharged in both the first and second cleaning stages of the apparatus so that the water at both stages contains the disinfectant and deodorant. The volatile disinfectant and deodorant is carried upwardly in the gases discharged from the top of smoke stack section 60a.

The system 10A is almost fully as effective as system 10 except that there is only one stage of mechanical filtering by a mesh screen 174 and the mesh screen is stationary. In system 10, the screen belt 90 moves and is cleaned in the stationary water bath in trough 75, while in system 10A the screen 174 is stationary and is cleaned by the flowing water film passing down and around the screen. Since the second cleaning stage employs water containing disinfectant and deodorant, the fumes discharged from the smoke stack will contain fresher disinfectant and deodorant which is desirable.

I In FIG. 6 is shown system 10B which is generally similar to systems 10 and 10A and corresponding parts are identically numbered. In system 10B, the disinfectantdeodorant is supplied to tank 26b from tank 50b as in system 10. The conical filter screen 174 and baflle ring 175 are mounted in stack 60b which is cylindrical throughout. Water is supplied by supply pipe 186a via va vefi n p p 134% Wi s 214 are n e t n parallel with the power supply to oil burner 22b. Thus when burner 22b is running, scrubbing water 179 is discharged upon screen 174 as in system A. System 10B is somewhat simpler in structure than systems 10 and 10A for installations where a more economical apparatus is desired and where the smoke scrubbing load is less severe.

All the arrangements of apparatus described operate automatically and require only routine inspection and replenishment of disinfectant-deodorant, and setting of the manually controllable valves.

What is claimed is:

1. Apparatus for removing solid particles from smoke generated by a furnace, comprising a tubular heat exchanger containing circulating water disposed in a chamber in the furnace for turning the water to steam by heat in said chamber; a vertical smoke stack communicating with said chamber; said heat exchanger having an outlet in said smoke stack so that steam emitted by the heat exchanger mixes with smoke containing solid particles, in the smoke stack; a fine mesh screen in the smoke stack in the path of upward travel of the mixture of smoke and steam; said screen including a stationary conical screen member axially aligned with the smoke stack positioned above said heat exchanger; a source of fresh cold water including means in said stack arranged to deposit a film of cold water on the screen so that the screen causes condensation of steam impinging thereon to drops of Water containing said solid particles; both the screen and the film of water on the screen cooperating in removing further solid particles from the smoke passing through the screen; an annular trough disposed in said stack beneath said screen to collect the water passing from said screen containing solid particles removed from the smoke; a drain communicating with the trough including an opening in said stack for draining off the water containing solid particles removed from the smoke; a manifold pipe mounted at the smoke stack above said screen and connected to said source of cold water, said manifold pipe having a horizontal nozzle with a multiplicity of openings in the smoke stack arranged to discharge a multiplicity of fine streams of water across the smoke stack for catching any further particles in the smoke which have passed through the screen; another trough disposed at the smoke stack wall including an opening in the wall of the stack aligned with said nozzle openings to collect the water passing across the smoke stack from said nozzle; and another drain at said other trough arranged to carry away the water collected in said other trough.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 537,509 4/1895 Wardle et al. 261-17 538,718 5/1895 Wills -263 605,280 6/1898 Green 2611 16 758,789 5/1904 Slining 55528 1,189,777 7/ 1916 Bartholomew 55--290 1,291,840 1/1919 Gran 261116 1,673,732 6/ 1928 Brooks 55-227 1,810,410 6/1931 Alldredge 55227 1,818,143 8/1931 Lyons 55--220 1,983,620 12/1934 Lewellen 55--222 2,172,399 9/1939 Mueller 55233 2,646,263 7/1953 Goldberg 55-220 3,327,455 6/1967 Wertheimer 55-223 3,336,733 8/1967 Wisting 26l--89 FOREIGN PATENTS 568,287 10/1957 Italy.

FRANK W. LUTTER, Primary Examiner B. NOZICK, Assistant Examiner US. Cl. X.R.

55-233, 234, 243, 279, 290, 354, 521; 26l1l7, 118, 126; 1l0119; 266--15

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Cited By (27)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3668839A (en) * 1971-05-28 1972-06-13 Combustion Control Devices Air pollution controller
US3782074A (en) * 1972-07-21 1974-01-01 Aronetics Inc Process and apparatus for cleansing and pumping contaminated industrial gases using a nozzle having a variable throat area
US3793808A (en) * 1971-12-13 1974-02-26 Polycarbona Chemie Gmbh Process for the purification of gases
US3814394A (en) * 1971-11-17 1974-06-04 M Murray Apparatus for encapsulating hot gases from high stacks
US3834132A (en) * 1971-06-30 1974-09-10 Alusuisse Apparatus for cleaning exhaust air from a workshop
US3847094A (en) * 1972-09-06 1974-11-12 Belgonucleaire Sa Treatment of combustible residue
US3923956A (en) * 1972-11-13 1975-12-02 Bowman Enterprises Inc Smokeless anti-toxic burner method
US3995567A (en) * 1975-06-20 1976-12-07 Enertherm, Inc. Waste fuel incinerator and pollutant removal system
US4135894A (en) * 1975-06-25 1979-01-23 Andersen 2000, Inc. Air filtration apparatus and method of operation thereof
US4205412A (en) * 1978-12-04 1980-06-03 Weber Ronald W Automotive brake dust recovery unit
US4257792A (en) * 1979-08-03 1981-03-24 Cremo John J Steam-pressured smoke eliminator for tall smoke stacks
US4294596A (en) * 1980-04-25 1981-10-13 Dan Taverez Air-filter apparatus in combination with a turbine engine
US5180405A (en) * 1992-06-09 1993-01-19 Chi Chang Enterprises Co., Ltd. Oily smoke purifying apparatus of central processing system type
US5192345A (en) * 1989-12-22 1993-03-09 Luca Pala System and process for the purification treatment of smokes, dusts and exhaust gases after combustion
US5217514A (en) * 1990-11-22 1993-06-08 H. Krantz Gmbh & Co. Filtering device for tenter treatment gases
US5370722A (en) * 1993-11-30 1994-12-06 Air Solution Company Filtering assembly for air intake
WO2000012937A1 (en) * 1997-02-14 2000-03-09 Anderson Berris Sr Incinerator for medical waste
US6063170A (en) * 1996-05-20 2000-05-16 Air-A-Medic Corporation Air filtration system
US6102991A (en) * 1998-03-17 2000-08-15 Mikami; Tatuya Exhaust gas cleaner and exhaust gas cleaner assembly using a plurality of exhaust gas cleaners
US6162286A (en) * 1996-06-01 2000-12-19 Kabushiki Kaisha Toteku Japan Exhaust cleaning system
US6514303B2 (en) * 2001-01-09 2003-02-04 Case Corporation Rotary air screen for a work machine
US6578830B2 (en) * 2000-05-10 2003-06-17 Eaton-Williams Group Limited Gas-fired humidifier
US20050081495A1 (en) * 2003-10-20 2005-04-21 Benq Corporation Filter device and cleaning method therefor
US20060070358A1 (en) * 2004-09-02 2006-04-06 Fujitsu General Limited Air conditioner
US20090188268A1 (en) * 2008-01-24 2009-07-30 Lg Electronics Inc. Ceiling type air conditioner
US20090288655A1 (en) * 2008-05-20 2009-11-26 Chiung-Yao Tsai Grease filter assembly for
US20100107575A1 (en) * 2007-04-18 2010-05-06 Haier Group Corproation Self-cleaning device of filtering net of air conditioner

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Cited By (31)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3668839A (en) * 1971-05-28 1972-06-13 Combustion Control Devices Air pollution controller
US3834132A (en) * 1971-06-30 1974-09-10 Alusuisse Apparatus for cleaning exhaust air from a workshop
US3814394A (en) * 1971-11-17 1974-06-04 M Murray Apparatus for encapsulating hot gases from high stacks
US3793808A (en) * 1971-12-13 1974-02-26 Polycarbona Chemie Gmbh Process for the purification of gases
US3782074A (en) * 1972-07-21 1974-01-01 Aronetics Inc Process and apparatus for cleansing and pumping contaminated industrial gases using a nozzle having a variable throat area
US3847094A (en) * 1972-09-06 1974-11-12 Belgonucleaire Sa Treatment of combustible residue
US3923956A (en) * 1972-11-13 1975-12-02 Bowman Enterprises Inc Smokeless anti-toxic burner method
US3995567A (en) * 1975-06-20 1976-12-07 Enertherm, Inc. Waste fuel incinerator and pollutant removal system
US4135894A (en) * 1975-06-25 1979-01-23 Andersen 2000, Inc. Air filtration apparatus and method of operation thereof
US4205412A (en) * 1978-12-04 1980-06-03 Weber Ronald W Automotive brake dust recovery unit
US4257792A (en) * 1979-08-03 1981-03-24 Cremo John J Steam-pressured smoke eliminator for tall smoke stacks
US4294596A (en) * 1980-04-25 1981-10-13 Dan Taverez Air-filter apparatus in combination with a turbine engine
US5192345A (en) * 1989-12-22 1993-03-09 Luca Pala System and process for the purification treatment of smokes, dusts and exhaust gases after combustion
US5217514A (en) * 1990-11-22 1993-06-08 H. Krantz Gmbh & Co. Filtering device for tenter treatment gases
US5180405A (en) * 1992-06-09 1993-01-19 Chi Chang Enterprises Co., Ltd. Oily smoke purifying apparatus of central processing system type
US5370722A (en) * 1993-11-30 1994-12-06 Air Solution Company Filtering assembly for air intake
US6063170A (en) * 1996-05-20 2000-05-16 Air-A-Medic Corporation Air filtration system
US6162286A (en) * 1996-06-01 2000-12-19 Kabushiki Kaisha Toteku Japan Exhaust cleaning system
WO2000012937A1 (en) * 1997-02-14 2000-03-09 Anderson Berris Sr Incinerator for medical waste
US6102991A (en) * 1998-03-17 2000-08-15 Mikami; Tatuya Exhaust gas cleaner and exhaust gas cleaner assembly using a plurality of exhaust gas cleaners
US6578830B2 (en) * 2000-05-10 2003-06-17 Eaton-Williams Group Limited Gas-fired humidifier
US6514303B2 (en) * 2001-01-09 2003-02-04 Case Corporation Rotary air screen for a work machine
US20050081495A1 (en) * 2003-10-20 2005-04-21 Benq Corporation Filter device and cleaning method therefor
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