US3466798A - Toy vessel for use in water - Google Patents

Toy vessel for use in water Download PDF

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US3466798A
US3466798A US3466798DA US3466798A US 3466798 A US3466798 A US 3466798A US 3466798D A US3466798D A US 3466798DA US 3466798 A US3466798 A US 3466798A
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toy
water
hull
vessel
hollow
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Samuel F Speers
Norman L Jacques
Anthony C Guglielmi
Leonard Gray
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Hasbro Inc
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Hasbro Ind Inc
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63HTOYS, e.g. TOPS, DOLLS, HOOPS, BUILDING BLOCKS
    • A63H23/00Toy boats; Floating toys; Other aquatic toy devices
    • A63H23/10Other water toys, floating toys, or like buoyant toys

Description

Sept. 16, 1969 5, SPEERS ET AL 3,466,798

- TOY VESSEL FOR USE IN WATER Filed Oct. 10, 1966 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTORS SAMUEL F. SPEERS NORMAN L. JACQUES ANTHONY C. GUGLIELMI BY LEONARD GRAY ATTORNEYS Sept. 16, 1969 5, SPEERS ET AL 3,466,798

TOY VESSEL FOR USE IN WATER Filed 001.- 10, 1966 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTORS I SAMUEL F. SPEERS NORMAN L. JACQUES g ANTHONY c. GUGLIELMI BY LEONARD GRAY ATTORNEYS p ,1969 s. F. SPEERS ETAL 3,466,798

TOY VESSEL FOR USE IN WATER 5 Sheets-Sheets Filed Oct. 10, 1966 INVENTORS SAMUEL F. SPEERS NORMAN L. JACQUES ANTHONY C. GUGUELMI LEONARD GRAY ATTORNEYS Sept. 16, 1969 5, F. s s ET AL 3,466,798

TOY VESSEL FOR USE IN WATER Filed Oct. 10, 1966 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTORS SAMUEL F.SPEERS NORMAN L JACQUES ANTHONY c. GUGLIELMI B LEONARD GRAY ATTORNEYS Sept. 16, 1969 SPEERS ET AL 3,466,798

TOY VESSEL FOR USE IN WATER Filed Oct. 10, 1966 5 Sheets-Sheet s INVENTORS SAMUEL F.- SPEERS NORMAN L. JACQUES FIG g4 BY EEJSXSE 'GSW mzw I ATTORNEYS United States Patent 3,466,798 TOY VESSEL FOR USE IN WATER Samuel F. Speers, North Attleboro, Mass., Norman L.

Jacques, Pawtucket, and Anthony C. Guglielmi, Providence, R.I., and Leonard Gray, Sharon, Mass., assignors to Hasbro Industries, Inc., Pawtucket, R.I., a corporation of Rhode Island Filed Oct. 10, 1966, Ser. No. 585,382 Int. Cl. B63c 11/46; A63b 35/12 US. Cl. 46-243 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A toy vessel for use in water having an elongated, hollow bull in the rear portion of which a motor is sealed in waterproof relation, a propeller being interconnected to the motor for producing forward movement of the toy in the water, and hollow pontoons located adjacent to the hull for maintaining the hull on the surface of the water, a toy figure that is substantially hollow in construction being securable to the upper surface of the hull and cooperating with the hollow pontoons to maintain the hull in the normal position on the surface of the water and providing sufiicient buoyancy for the bull to prevent sinking thereof when the hull is permitted to submerge in an inclined dive upon filling of the pontoons with water.

The present invention relates to a toy vessel for use in water. More particularly, the present invention relates a toy vessel that is formed with a hull to which hollow means are joined, the hollow means being controllable for the admission of water therein for submerging of the toy vessel as desired.

One of the principal objects of the invention is to provide a toy for use in water that includes a hull to the deck of which hollow members are secured for normally causing the toy vessel to remain on the surface of the Water.

Another object of the invention is to provide a submergible toy vessel having a hull in which a motor and battery pack are located in sealed relation, the battery pack being operative to drive a propeller that promotes forward motion of the toy vessel, and hollow members being secured to the hull for normally locating the toy vessel on the surface of the water but being adapted to receive water therein for causing the toy vessel to submerge.

Another object is to provide a submergible toy vessel to the deck of which a hollow toy figure is adapted to be secured, the buoyancy of the toy figure cooperating with the vessel to prevent it from sinking during the submerging operation and after the hollow members have been filled with water.

Still another object is to provide a submergible toy vessel that is propelled through the water by a battery operated motor and that is submergible as desired, the toy vessel being moved in a submerging direction by directing a diving plane located rearwardly of the propeller in an attitude for effecting the desired diving angle.

Other objects, features and advantages of the invention will become apparent as the description thereof proceeds when considered in connection with the accompanying illustrative drawings.

In the drawings which illustrate the best mode presently contemplated for carrying out the present invention:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the toy vessel embodied in the present invention on the deck of which a toy figure is mounted;

3,466,798 Patented Sept. 16, 1969 FIIgICIi. 2 is a sectional view taken along lines 2-2 in FIG. 3 is a sectional view of one of the hollow pontoon members that is joined to the hull of the toy vessel illustrated in FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged plan view of the rear portion of the deck of the toy vessel showing the location of the rudder and diving plane joined thereto;

FIG. 5 is a top plan view of the rear portion of the toy vessel illustrating an interconnection between the valves of the hollow pontoon members;

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of the rear portion of the toy vessel showing the rudder and diving plane thereof as joined to the deck and further illustrating a valve that is secured to one of the hollow pontoon members;

FIG. 7 is a sectional view of the forward portion of the hull of the toy vessel illustrating the location of the switch assembly mounted thereon;

FIG. 8 is a perspective view of the power unit of the toy vessel showing the electrical interconnection of the switch assembly to the motor and propeller assembly;

FIG. 9 is a sectional view with portions shown in elevation of the rear portion of the hull and deck of the toy vessel illustrating the sealed position of the motor and the propeller driven thereby;

FIG. 10 is a sectional view of the forward portion of the hull showing a modified form of switch construction that interconnects the power unit to the motor;

FIG. 11 is a sectional view of the forward portion of the hull showing a means for discharging trapped air therefrom during submerging of the toy vessel;

FIG. 12 is a view similar to FIG. 11 illustrating another form of air discharge means;

FIG. 13 is a view similar to FIGS. 11 and 12 illustrating yet another form of air discharge means; and

FIG. 14 is a side elevational view of the rear portion of the toy vessel showing the use of fins in the toy figure that may be utilized to direct the toy vessel in an inclined drive when submerging.

Referring now to the drawings and particularly to FIG. 1, the water toy embodied in the present invention is generally indicated at 10 and includes a vessel defined by a hull generally indicated at 12 and spaced hollow pontoons generally indicated at 14 that are interconnected to the hull 12. In use of the toy, a toy figure generally indicated at 16 that simulates a skin-diver in costume and apparatus is adapted to be secured to the upper surface or deck of the hull 12 and cooperates with the pontoons 14 to normally maintain the toy vessel on the surface of the water, as will hereinafter be described. In connection with the dress of the toy figure 16, a suit normally of rubberized material is located on the body thereof, the suit including a helmet, as is usually worn by skin-divers. A simulated tank unit 18 is strapped to the back of the toy figure 16 and cooperates with the hollow toy figure to produce a buoyant effect for preventing the toy vessel 10 from sinking during the submerging operation, as will be described. Flippers or fins 20 are mounted on the feet of the toy figure 16 and, as will hereinafter be described, may be employed for affecting the angle of dive of the toy when such action is desired. A strap 22 that is secured to the deck of the vessel mounts the toy figure 16 in fixed position on the vessel.

Referring to FIGS. 1, 2 and 5, the hull 12 is shown including a rounded bottom portion 24, to the uppermost edges of which a deck 26 is removably mounted. The deck 26 is substantially flat along the length thereof but terminates at the forward portion thereof in a rounded cowling 28, the configuration of which conforms to that of the hull 12 at its forward portion so as to present a symmetrical appearance. A windshield 30 is mounted on the cowling 28 to simulate the appearance of an actual vessel of the kind illustrated.

As illustrated in FIGS. 4 and 6, the deck 26 extends beyond the aft end of the hull and has a vertical rudder 32 mounted thereon, the rudder having a slot 33 formed therein into which the overhanging end of the deck is inserted. As further illustrated in FIG. 9, the rudder 32 extends below the deck line so as to be immersed in water when the toy vessel is in use and thereby defines a steering means for the toy. A segment portion 34 is formed on the upper surface of the deck 26 and is provided with detents for locating the rudder 32 in a fixed position. Pivotally secured to the rudder 32 at the lower end thereof is a diving plane 36, which, as shown in FIG. 9, is located just rearwardly of a propeller 38, which, as will be described, provides for the propulsion for the toy vessel. The diving plane 36 may be adjusted angularly with respect to the horizontal for controlling the angle of dive of the toy vessel during the submerging operation thereof.

Formed integrally with the top edges of the hull 24 at the sides thereof are outwardly extending web portions 40, to which the hollow pontoon members 14 are integrally connected. As shown more clearly in FIGS. 1 and 3, each of the hollow pontoon members 14 is substantially elongated in dimension and is enclosed at the forward end thereof which is tapered to provide for streamlining. An inclined rear wall 42 is formed on both of the hollow pontoon members 14. the rear walls 42 having openings 44 formed therein in which rubber grommets 46 are located. In order to seal the openings 44 in the rear wall 42 of each pontoon member 14, a valve plate 48 is provided, on the forward surface of which a tapered projection 50 is joined, the projections 50 being movable within the rubber grommets 46 to seal the openings 44. Each of the valve plates 48 is formed with an inclined tail portion 52 and is further pivotally connected to an adjacent rear wall 42 through a hinge pin connection 54. Thus it is seen that the valve plate 48 of each pontoon member may be pivotally moved to an open or closed position by manipulation of its tail portion 52. Located on the bottom wall of each of the hollow pontoon members 14 and adjacent to the forward end thereof is an opening 56 that provides for the ingress of water into the interior of the pontoon member when the valve plate 48 is moved to the open position, as illustrated in dotted lines in FIG. 3. It is understood that when the toy is to be submerged. the pontoon members must be filled with water to reduce the buoyant action thereof. In order to effect the submerging operation, the valve plates 48 are moved to the open position, thereby releasing entrapped air within the pontoon members and permitting water to enter therein by wav of the openings 56. As further illustrated in FIG. 1, each of the pontoon members has mounted on the upper surface thereof a simulated water gun 58 that acts to produce a more realistic effect for the toy.

Located in the hollow hull 12 at the rear end thereof is a motor box 60 in which a motor 62 is mounted in sealed relation. The motor 62. which is of the small DC tvne, is adapted to drive a shaft 64 on which a gear 66 is mounted. A second gear 68 is drivingly connected to the gear 66 and is mounted on a shaft 70 that extends through a cover plate 72, the cover plate 72 being sealingly fixed to the motor box 60. As illustrated in FIG. 9, the motor box cover plate 72 is provided with an annular slot 76 into which the outer portion of the motor box walls extend in sealing relation. In order to seal the shaft 72, a stuffing box 78 is provided and cooperates with a stuffing material 80 that surrounds the shaft 70 for efiecting the sealing action. The propeller 38 is mounted on the outer end of the shaft 70 and is driven by the motor 62 through the gears 66 and 68. It is understood that the propeller 38 provides the propulsive action for the toy as it is moved through the water.

In order to drive the .propeller 38, the motor 62 is energized by a battery pack generally indicated at 82. The battery pack 82 is located within the hollow hull 12 and is confined between the motor box 60 and a forward wall 84 (FIG. 11). The forward wall 84 is integrally joined to the bottom portion 24 of the hull 12 and extends upwardly for a substantial portion thereof. Fixed to the forward wall 84 is a spring contact 86 that is adapted to be electrically interconnected to a wire lead 88 through a pivotally mounted switch 90. As illustrated in FIG. 8, the lead 88 is interconnected to the motor 62, and, as will be described below, a complete circuit is established from the battery pack 82 to the motor 62 through the movement of the manually operated switch 90. The battery pack 82 further includes a plastic tube 92 on the ends of which covers 94 and 96 are located in sealing engagement. Each cover is provided with a contact button 98 that projects therethrough and is adapted to be electrically interconnected to the terminal of a battery 100 located within the tube 92. The electrical circuit is thus established through the batteries 100 and contacts 98, forward spring contact 86, switch 90, motor 62 and a rear spring contact 102.

The pivotally mounted switch 90 is selectively moved into engagement with the forward spring contact 86 to energize the motor 62, the movement of the switch 90 being accomplished by lateral shifting of a control bar 104, the ends 106 of which project through the cowling 28, as more clearly illustrated in FIG. 7. The switch 90 projects through a bracket 108 mounted on the control bar 104 and thus is responsive to movement of the control bar for selective engagement with the spring contact 86. It is understood that when the switch 90 is moved into engagement with the spring contact 86, the motor 62 is energized for rotating the propeller 38.

Referring now to FIG. 10, an alternative form of switch control is illustrated and includes a metal contact 110 that is mounted in the forward portion of the hull in electrical communication with the spring contact 86. A spring contact arm 112 is fixed to the forward portion of the hull and is provided with a contcat button 114 thereon. The lead 88 is joined to the spring contact 112 and is interconnected to the motor 62, as previously described. In order to move the spring contact 112 into engagement with the fixed contact 110, a weight 116 is provided, to which a rod 118 is joined, the rod 118 in turn being controlled for vertical movement by a rope 120 that projects through the cowling 28. It is understood that release of the rope 120 will allow the weight 116 to move downwardly into engagement with the spring contact 112, thereby moving the contact button 114 into engagement with the fixed contact 110. If desired, vertical movement of the weight 116 may be confined between guides 122 that are joined to the inner surface of the cowling 28.

In use of the water toy, the lower portion 24 of the hull .is normally submerged in water and receives water therein, as indicated in FIG. 2. Since the battery pack 82 is sealed in water-tight relation, together with the motor 62 and the motor box 60, the electrical connections of the unit are sufficiently protected for energizing the motor as required.

When the entire vessel is to be completely submerged together with the toy figure .16 mounted thereon, any air that may be entrapped within the cowling 28 should be discharged therefrom to aid in the submerging operation. For this purpose, an inverted saucer-like member 124 is located within the cowling 28 and directs entrapped air therein toward an opening 126 formed in the forward portion of the deck 26 that extends over the bow of the toy. The member 12.4 is preferably joined to the forward portion of the deck 26, as seen in FIG. 11; and, because of the configuration as illustrated, the entrapped air therein is directed through the opening 126.

A modified version of the inverted saucer-like member 124 is illustrated in FIG. 12 wherein the cowling 28 is formed with a semi-spherical configuration indicated at 128 that directs the entrapped air through the opening 126 formed in the forward portion of the deck 26. In FIG. 13, a still further modified version of the means for discharging the entrapped air is illustrated and includes a vertical wall 130 that is secured to the underside of the forward portion of the deck 26 and cooperates with the cowling 28 to provide for discharging of the entrapped air therebetween through the opening 126.

As will be described in the operation of the toy vessel, the hull 12 is completely submerged when the pontoon members 14 are filled with water. This occurs when the plate valves 48 are moved to the open position to permit water to enter through the openings 56 in the pontoon members. In order to provide for simultaneous opening of the plate valve 48 in both pontoon members 14, a rod 124 is fixed to the tail portions 52 of the plate valves 48 and extends beneath the deck 26 as illustrated in FIG. 5.

In operation of the toy vessel, the toy figure 16 is strapped to the deck 26 by the strap 21, the outer edges of which extend into slots 126 formed on raised portions of the deck 26 as illustrated in FIG. 2. Since the toy figure 16 is hollow, as further illustrated in FIG. 2, and carries the hollow tanks 18 on its back, the air entrapped within the hollow figure and the tanks 18 promotes the buoyant effect of the toy so as to maintain the toy on the surface of the water when the pontoon valve plates 48 are located in the closed position thereof. Thus, with the pontoon members 14 filled with air, the buoyant effect produced thereby will locate the vessel on the surface of the water, and the toy vessel may the propelled over the surface of the water by shifting the control bar 104 laterally to energize the motor 62 and thereby rotate the propeller 38.

If it is desired to submerge the toy, this may be accomplished by opening the plate valves 48 which results in the escape of the air within the pontoon members 14, water thereafter entering the pontoon members through the openings 56 therein. When the pontoon members 14 are filled with Water, sufiicient weight is added to the unit to cause it to submerge. In this connection as the vessel submerges, the buoyant effect of the hollow toy figure and tanks 18 strapped thereto, prevents the vessel from sinking. The submerging operation may be accomplished in an interesting manner by allowing the toy vessel to enter the water at an inclined attitude while being moved forwardly through propulsion of the propeller 38. The downwardly submerging attitude of the toy may be assumed by adjusting the diving plane 56 to the required angular position, such as illustrated in dotted lines in FIG. 9. The wash of the propeller 38 striking the inclined diving plane 36 will cause the hull 12 to assume an inclined position which, with the forward propulsion effect of the propeller 38, will cause the toy to submerge in an inclined dive. As the vessel submerges, air that is entrapped in the cowling 28 is forced outwardly therefrom through the opening 126 formed in the forward portion of the deck 126. In all forward movement of the toy, the direction thereof may be varied in accordance with the movement of the rudder 32, one such angular position of the rudder 32 being illustrated in FIG. 4.

It is also contemplated to adjust the diving attitude of the toy by utilizing the fins 20 that are mounted on the feet of the toy figure 16. The toy figure is of that type that is provided with feet that are articulated, thereby enabling the fins 20 to be moved to any desired angular position. By locating the fins 20 in the required angular position, the wash of the propeller thereagainst will further act to move the hull to the angular position required for moving the toy downwardly in submerging relation and at the desired attitude. Although the fins 20 are shown being used in conjunction with the diving plane 36, it is possible to eliminate the diving plane and only employ the fins for effecting the desired diving attitude. It is understood that the location of the angular position of the diving plane 36 or fins 20 will determine to some degree the depth to which the toy may be submerged.

Although not illustrated, it is further contemplated to provide an automatic timing circuit that will be interconnected with the motor 62 and that will cause the toy to be moved forwardly and downwardly at predetermined intervals.

What is claimed is:

1. In a toy vessel for use in water, an elongated hollow hull in the rear portion of which a motor is sealed in waterproof relation, a propeller interconnected to said motor for producing forward movement of said toy in the Water, hollow means in which air is normally trapped joined to said hull for maintaining said hull on the surface of the water, said hollow means extending longitudinally of said hull for a substantial portion of the length thereof and being located externally of said hull and parallel thereto, means for admitting water into said hollow means to displace the air therefrom for causing said hull to submerge, and means associated with said hull and located adjacent to said propeller for directing the bull in a downwardly inclined direction during the submerging thereof and as it is moved forwardly by said propeller.

2. In a toy as set forth in claim 1, said hollow means including spaced hollow members, each of which has an opening located at the forward end thereof, an opening at the rear end thereof and a pivotally mounted control valve that normally seals the rear opening to trap air in the hollow members, the control valve of each hollow member being movable to the open position when the hull is to be submerged to allow the air in the hollow members to escape through the rearward openings therein, thereby permitting water to flow through the forward openings for filling the hollow members.

3. In a toy as set forth in claim 1, said directing means including a plate that is located adjacent to said hollow means and just rearwardly of said propeller, said plate being pivotally mounted about a horizontal axis and receiving the wash of the propeller thereagainst, the angle of said plate with respect to the horizontal determining the diving angle of said hull.

4. In a toy vessel for use in water, an elongated hollow bull in the rear portion of which a motor is sealed in waterproof relation, a propeller interconnected to said motor for producing forward movement of said toy in the water, hollow means in which air is normally trapped joined to said hull for maintaining said hull on the surface of the water, means for admitting water into said hollow means to displace the air therefrom for causing said hull to submerge, means associated with said hull and located adjacent to said propeller for directing the hull in a downwardly inclined direction during the submerging thereof and as it is moved forwardly by said propeller, and a toy figure that is substantially hollow in construction, means for securing the toy figure to the upper surface of said hull, wherein said toy figure cooperates with said hollow means to maintain the hull in the normal position on the surface of the water and provides sufiicient buoyancy to the hull to prevent sinking thereof when the hull is permitted to submerge in an inclined dive upon filling of the hollow means with water.

5. In a toy as set forth in claim 4, said directing means including a plate that is pivotal about a horizontal axis and that is located just rearwardly of said propeller, wherein the wash of said propeller is directed into engagement with said plate, the angle of said plate with respect to the horizontal determining the diving angle of said hull.

6. In a toy as set forth in claim 4, a battery pack located in said hull, and switch means, the control of which extends exteriorly of said hull for establishing an electrical circuit between said battery pack and said motor for energizing said motor.

7. In a toy as set forth in claim 6, a waterproof container located in said hull in which the battery pack is sealed.

8. In a toy as set forth in claim 4, said hollow means including spaced hollow members, each of which has an opening located at the forward end thereof, an opening at the rear end thereof and a pivotally mounted control valve that normally seals the rear opening to trap air in the hollow members, the control valve of each hollow member being movable t the open position when the hull is to be submerged to allow the air in the hollow members to escape through the rearward openings therein, thereby permitting water to flow through the forward openings for filling the hollow members.

9. In a toy as set forth in claim 8, said directing means including a plate that is located between said hollow members and just rearwardly of said propeller, said plate being pivotally mounted about a horizontal axis and receiving the wash of the propeller thereagainst,

the angle of said plate with respect to the horizontal determining the diving angle of said hull.

10. In a toy as set forth in claim 4, means for ejecting air that is trapped in the forward portion of said hull when the hull is submreged, said air ejecting means including an inverted saucer-like portion that directs the entrapped air through outlet ports communicating with the interior of the hull.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,918,889 12/1959 Rebikoff. 3,010,255 11/1961 Gordon 46-94 X LOUIS G. MANCENE, Primary Examiner ROBERT F. CUTTING, Assistant Examiner us. 01. X.R. 46-94; 6

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Cited By (17)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3628281A (en) * 1970-09-18 1971-12-21 Gary Horace Whitman Submarine with remotely controlled diving and surfacing means
US3638353A (en) * 1970-02-03 1972-02-01 Mattel Inc Aquanaut toy propulsion assembly
US3827181A (en) * 1972-03-23 1974-08-06 Mabuchi Motor Co Electrically driven model airplane
US4167830A (en) * 1977-05-06 1979-09-18 Takara Co., Ltd. Random indicator amphibious vehicle assembly
US4673370A (en) * 1980-02-14 1987-06-16 Adolph E. Goldfarb Toy four-wheel-drive climbing vehicle operable on land, over water, and under water
US5303666A (en) * 1992-10-09 1994-04-19 Mode Industries, Inc. Submersible marine vessel
US5423278A (en) * 1992-10-09 1995-06-13 Mode Industries, Inc. Submersible marine vessel
US6461204B1 (en) * 1999-05-25 2002-10-08 Toshiba Tec Kabushiki Kaisha Swimming assistance apparatus
US6615761B2 (en) * 2000-04-07 2003-09-09 Stidd Systems Inc. Swimmer transport device
US20040259463A1 (en) * 1999-11-04 2004-12-23 Warner Jon A. Hand-launchable underwater projectile toy
US20050118903A1 (en) * 2003-11-12 2005-06-02 Vladimir Leonov Screw drive vehicle
US20070123139A1 (en) * 2005-05-18 2007-05-31 Warner Jon A Self-propelled hydrodynamic underwater toy
US7775174B1 (en) 2008-08-29 2010-08-17 Vehicle Control Technologies, Inc. Self-propelled tow body
US8145369B1 (en) 2007-11-01 2012-03-27 Vehicle Control Technologles, Inc. Docking apparatuses and methods
US8205570B1 (en) 2010-02-01 2012-06-26 Vehicle Control Technologies, Inc. Autonomous unmanned underwater vehicle with buoyancy engine
US8430049B1 (en) 2009-07-13 2013-04-30 Vehicle Control Technologies, Inc. Launch and recovery systems and methods
US20140259863A1 (en) * 2013-03-15 2014-09-18 Larry D. Martinez Mechanized Trolling Device

Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2918889A (en) * 1955-12-07 1959-12-29 Cinefot Internat Corp Control means for underwater vehicle
US3010255A (en) * 1958-08-15 1961-11-28 Stanley H Gordon Submarine toy

Patent Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2918889A (en) * 1955-12-07 1959-12-29 Cinefot Internat Corp Control means for underwater vehicle
US3010255A (en) * 1958-08-15 1961-11-28 Stanley H Gordon Submarine toy

Cited By (22)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3638353A (en) * 1970-02-03 1972-02-01 Mattel Inc Aquanaut toy propulsion assembly
US3628281A (en) * 1970-09-18 1971-12-21 Gary Horace Whitman Submarine with remotely controlled diving and surfacing means
US3827181A (en) * 1972-03-23 1974-08-06 Mabuchi Motor Co Electrically driven model airplane
US4167830A (en) * 1977-05-06 1979-09-18 Takara Co., Ltd. Random indicator amphibious vehicle assembly
US4673370A (en) * 1980-02-14 1987-06-16 Adolph E. Goldfarb Toy four-wheel-drive climbing vehicle operable on land, over water, and under water
US5303666A (en) * 1992-10-09 1994-04-19 Mode Industries, Inc. Submersible marine vessel
WO1994008842A1 (en) * 1992-10-09 1994-04-28 Mode Industries, Incorporated Submersible marine vessel
US5423278A (en) * 1992-10-09 1995-06-13 Mode Industries, Inc. Submersible marine vessel
US6461204B1 (en) * 1999-05-25 2002-10-08 Toshiba Tec Kabushiki Kaisha Swimming assistance apparatus
US20040259463A1 (en) * 1999-11-04 2004-12-23 Warner Jon A. Hand-launchable underwater projectile toy
US6615761B2 (en) * 2000-04-07 2003-09-09 Stidd Systems Inc. Swimmer transport device
US7255618B2 (en) 2003-11-12 2007-08-14 Mattel, Inc. Screw drive vehicle
US6966807B2 (en) 2003-11-12 2005-11-22 Mattel, Inc. Screw drive vehicle
US20050118903A1 (en) * 2003-11-12 2005-06-02 Vladimir Leonov Screw drive vehicle
US20070123139A1 (en) * 2005-05-18 2007-05-31 Warner Jon A Self-propelled hydrodynamic underwater toy
US8033890B2 (en) 2005-05-18 2011-10-11 Warner Jon A Self-propelled hydrodynamic underwater toy
US8145369B1 (en) 2007-11-01 2012-03-27 Vehicle Control Technologles, Inc. Docking apparatuses and methods
US8364331B2 (en) 2007-11-01 2013-01-29 Vehicle Control Technologies, Inc. Docking apparatuses and methods
US7775174B1 (en) 2008-08-29 2010-08-17 Vehicle Control Technologies, Inc. Self-propelled tow body
US8430049B1 (en) 2009-07-13 2013-04-30 Vehicle Control Technologies, Inc. Launch and recovery systems and methods
US8205570B1 (en) 2010-02-01 2012-06-26 Vehicle Control Technologies, Inc. Autonomous unmanned underwater vehicle with buoyancy engine
US20140259863A1 (en) * 2013-03-15 2014-09-18 Larry D. Martinez Mechanized Trolling Device

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