US3491997A - Swimming aid capable of undergoing porpoise-like leaping movement - Google Patents

Swimming aid capable of undergoing porpoise-like leaping movement Download PDF

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US3491997A
US3491997A US3491997DA US3491997A US 3491997 A US3491997 A US 3491997A US 3491997D A US3491997D A US 3491997DA US 3491997 A US3491997 A US 3491997A
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body
means
apparatus
keel
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Mary M Winters
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Mary M Winters
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63HTOYS, e.g. TOPS, DOLLS, HOOPS, BUILDING BLOCKS
    • A63H23/00Toy boats; Floating toys; Other aquatic toy devices
    • A63H23/10Other water toys, floating toys, or like buoyant toys

Description

Jan. 21, 1970 M. M. wm'rERs SWIMMING AID CAPABLE OF UNDERGOING PORPOISE-LIKE LEAPING MOVEMENT 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed May 6, 1966 now .0@ Now v NL MARY M. WINTERS Jan'. 27, '1970 M. M. WINTERS I 3,491,997

SWIMMING AID CAPABLE OF UNDERGOING PORPOISE-LIKE LEAPING MOVEMENT Filed May 6, 1965 2 Sheets-Sheet z INVENTOR MARY M. WINTERS mifvwewmmm ATTORNEYS United States Patent O 3,491,997 SWIMMING AID CAPABLE OF UNDERGOING PORPOISE-LIKE LEAPING MOVEMENT Mary M. Winters, Miami, Fla. (3815 NW. 193rd Terrace, Opa-Locka, Fla. 33054) Filed May 6, 1966, Ser. No. 548,251 Int. Cl. A63g 31/00; B63h 1/30; B63c 9/08 U.S. Cl. 2721 9 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A swimming aid configured to resemble a dolphin (i.e. porpoise), which swimming aid is submersible and capable of undergoing dolphin or porpoise-like leaping movement. A stabilizing, unobstructed, hollow keel is provided. A removably attached hollow fin shaped member is provided and an air transmitting conduit extends through the body of the swimming aid. The swimming aid body contains water which is abruptly movable therein, and a bifurcated tail having first and second flippers is attached to the rear end.

General background, object and summary of invention This invention relates to an aquatic apparatus. In particular it relates to a device designed to function as a swimming aid, floating article support, or floating divers flag support, and which has the appearance and operating characteristics of a natural porpoise.

A variety of buoyant devices have previously been developed which simulated natural fishes and were designed to function as swimming aids. However, these devices generally failed to provide a realistic fish-like action. In addition these devices were limited in their utility to supporting swimmers on the surface of a water body.

Recently, significant attention has been paid to the playful antics of porpoises. These fish have captured the imagination of children because of their leaping and frolicking swimming actions as well as their high degree of intelligence.

Obviously, children would be attracted to a swimming aid which could serve a safety function by supporting them in the water and also simulate the swimming and leaping movements of a porpoise, both on the surface of a body of water and beneath a body of water.

While swimming aids have been in use for a considerable period of time, their general range of utility has been limited to buoyantly supporting swimmers on the surface of a body of water. It would be unusual and advantageous to provide a swimming aid which could operate over a wide range of movements including generally horizontal movement along the top of a body of water, movement beneath a body of water, porpoise-like leaping movement, and movement from a horizontal to a substantially vertical orientation within the water, much in the way that a porpoise moves from a swimming position in a stattionary, nearly vertical position.

Scuba divers have experienced difliculty in certain areas in supporting spare tanks of air effectively, buoyantly sup porting a scuba divers flag to warn boats of their underwater activity, and effectively deterring predatory fish such as sharks. A buoyant device which could deter sharks from entering an area, support articles such as spare air tanks, and effectively support a scuba divers flag would obviously be of immense value.

Recognizing the need for an improved aquatic aid, it is an object of the invention to provide an apparatus which fulfills all of the needs above indicated.

It is a specific object of the invention to provide such a swimming aid which simulates the natural movements of a porpoise, i.e. dolphin.

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It is also a principal object of the invention to provide such an apparatus which is uniquely stable although capable of undergoing a wide range of movements including porpoise like leaping action.

Another object of the invention is to provide an apparatus which may be effectively and safely employed either as a swimming aid floating on the surface of a body of water or as a buoyant device. In this connection, it is an object of the invention to provide such a device, which, in response to the exertions of a swimmer, may be submerged, =but which will naturally return to the surface when the swimmers exertions to effect submersion are stopped.

It is likewise an object of the invention to provide such an apparatus which will effectively serve to support articles such as scuba diver tanks and which will support a scuba diver flag.

It is also an object of the invention to provide such an apparatus including, as integral components, a variety of swimming aids.

Yet another object of the invention is to provide such an apparatus which may be readily adjusted to suit the body characteristics of a person who wishes to use the apparatus as a swimming aid.

An apparatus presented through the invention for accomplishing at least some of the foregoing objectives comprises generally elongate and at least partially hollow body means, having a closed hollow interior. In this apparatus support means are connected with the body means to support a person in generally longitudinal alignment with the body means. A body of fluid occupies a portion only of the interior of the body means and is abruptly movable longitudinally of this interior.

Another independently significant facet of the invention resides in a keel mounted on the underside of the elongate body means. This keel includes wall means extending longitudinally of the body means and defining a passage extending generally longitudinally along the underside of the body means. The passage has front and rear openings spaced longitudinally of the body means, which passage enables a substantially free flow of fluid supporting the apparatus longitudinally through the keel.

Yet another independently significant facet of the invention pertains to a bifurcated tail assembly which extends from one end of the body means. This tail assembly includes a first flipper and hinge means connecting the first flipper to the body means for pivotable movement about an axis extending generally horizontally when the apparatus is buoyantly supported on a fluid body. The tail assembly further includes a second flipper and second hinge means connecting the second flipper to the body means for pivotable movement about an axis extending generally horizontally when the apparatus is buoyantly supported. First and second feet-engaging means on the first and second flippers, respectively, secure the feet of a person supported on the body means.

Still another independently novel and significant aspect of the invention resides in a fin-simulating member. First and second mounting means are provided for securing the fin-simulating member, respectively, to the top of the body means and the underside of the keel. A transparent window is carried by.the fin-simulating member. Wall means define a passage extending through the fin-simulating member away from the transparent window so as to enable the fin, when detached from the apparatus, to be employed as an underwater view glass.

Other independently significant advantages reside in detailed structural characteristics of swimming aids associated with the apparatus and devices for adjusting the apparatus to the individual body characteristics of a user.

Obviously, the full advantages of the invention are de- 3 rived from the combination of the individual aspects above noted.

Drawings In describing the invention reference will be made to a preferred embodiment shown in the apparatus drawings.

In the drawings:

FIGURE 1 provides a vertically sectioned, elevational view of the porpoise-simulating swimming aquatic aid of the present invention;

FIGURE 2 provides a top plan view of the FIGURE 1 swimming aid;

FIGURE 3 provides a sectional view of the FIGURE 1 aid as viewed along the section line 3-3 of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 4 provides a transverse sectional view of the FIGURE 1 aid as viewed along the section line 44 of FIGURE 1; and

FIGURE 5 is a partially, and generally longitudinally, sectioned view of a fin-si'mulating member mounted on the top of the FIGURE 1 swimming aid illustrating internal details of a transparent window and passage which cooperate to function as an underwater view glass.

Structure The apparatus 1 illustrated in FIGURES 1 through 5 is configured externally so as to closely resemble the natural shape of a porpoise.

Apparatus 1 includes buoyant, closed body means 2, a bifurcated tail assembly 3 a hollow keel 4, a fin simulating member 5, a snorkel tube 6, and side handles 7 and 8.

Body 2 comprises a closed shell 201 which may be fabricated of plastic, such as polyethylene, so as to have structural integrity, i.e., self-supporting walls. An inlet 202 may be provided in the body. Inlet 202 may comprise a conventional, threaded closure, type of material inlet. Fluid ballast 203, such as water, is admitted through the closure 202 into the hollow interior 204 of the body.

Fluid ballast 203 occupies a portion only of the elongate interior 200 of the elongate body means 2. This fluid ballast 203 may thus move longitudinally and abruptly through the cavity 204. One or more hollow, closed balls 205 may be movably disposed within the cavity 204 so as to provide assurance of at least marginal buoyancy for the over-all apparatus 1.

The bifurcated tail assembly 3 includes a first flipper 301 and a first elongate hinge portion 302 extending from the flipper 301 to a web 303. Assembly 3 further includes a second flipper 304 connected by an elongate hinge 305 which also extends to the web 303.

Web 303, hinges 302 and 305, and flippers 301 and 304 may be fabricated as unitary components of a sheet of flexible plastic material.

A plurality of eye-like, tail assembly anchors 206 are mounted in two longitudinally extending, transversely spaced, rows on the underside of the buoyant body 2, generally as shown in FIGURE 3. A pair of snap type fastener means 306 are carried by the web 303. By securing the fasteners 306 to particular eyes 206, the length of the tail assembly projecting from the rear end 207 of the body 2 may be selectively adjusted.

A tail securing strap-like, flexible fastener 307 extends between anchor connections 208 and 209 at the rear end 207 of the underside of the body means 2. This strap passes under the hinges 302 and 305 of the tail assembly 2 so as to secure a portion of the tail assembly in the vicinity of the body end 207 to the underside of the body. As will be appreciated, this straps 307 serves to define a generally horizontal pivot axis for the hinges 302 and 307 when the apparatus 1 is buoyantly supported in a body of water.

Strap 307 may comprise a cord extending between eyelet type anchors 208 and 209. One end of the cord 307 may be detachably secured to one of the anchors 208 and 209 by a knot or by a snap type, hook fastener.

The flippers 301 and 304 are provided with feet engaging means 308 and 309, respectively. These feet engaging means or pockets 308 and 309 serve to secure the feet of a person using the apparatus 1. As the feet engaging means 308 and 309 are identical, one only of these elements of the apparatus will be described.

Feet engaging means 308 may comprise a flexible strap 310 passing slideably through longitudinally extending slots 311 and 312 in flipper 301. A second strap member 313, secured to and extending transversely from the top and bottom of a strap 310 in a U-type fashion, has a closed end 313a which passes slidably through a transverse slot 314 in flipper 301.

As will be appreciated, with this arrangement the pocket assembly 308 may be moved vertically from the position shown in FIGURE 1, where a foot receiving pocket is defined beneath the flipper 301, upwardly through the slots 311, 312 and 314 to define a foot receiving pocket on the top of the flipper 301.

If desired, the strap 310 may be provided with a conventional fastening means to enable its circumferential dimension to be selectively adjusted to the circumferential dimension of a persons foot.

A pair of vertically thin, elongate, buoyant chambers 315 and 316 may be mounted on the tops of the tail assembly hinges 302 and 305, respectively. The compartments 315 and 316 are flexible in character and may be provided with conventional, valved air inlets 317 and 318. When the compartments 315 and 316 are inflated, the tail hinges are rendered somewhat buoyant. In addition, the top of the tail assembly projecting from the body means is thickened so as to provide an external appearance more closely resembling the tail portion of a natural porpoise.

Keel assembly 4 comprises a wall 401 curved about the longitudinal axis of the apparatus 1 in a generally semioval form so as to smoothly merge with the semi-oval, cross-sectional configuration of the chamber 2. Thus, as is shown in FIGURE 4, keel 4 cooperates with a portion of body 2 to provide a generally oval cross section for the mid-portion of the apparatus 1, resembling the natural cross section of the mid-portion of a porpoise.

Wall 401 defines a longitudinally extending passage 402 extending along the underside of the body 2. Passage 402 has a front facing water inlet 403 and a rearwardly facing water outlet 404. Passage 402 is substantially unobstructed and permits a substantially free flow of water therethrough.

The inlet 403 of the passage 402 may be configured, in combination with the superposed portion of the underside of the body 2, so as to provide a forwardly diverging, representation of the open mouth of a porpoise. There is thus provided a scoop-like, water receiving entrance 403 for the passage 402.

The wall 401 of keel 4 may be fabricated of plastic, such as polyethylene, so as to have self-sustaining character, i.e., structural integrity. A longitudinal slot 405 extends through a central lower portion of the keel 4. The function of this slot 405 will be subsequently described in the context of its relation to the snorkel conduit 6.

Fin assembly 5 may be fabricated from plastic and comprises a body 501 formed to simulate the external shape of a porpoise fin. A transparent view glass 502 is mounted in the underside of the fin body 501. Internal wall means 503 extend generally upwardly from view glass 502 to define a passage having an open top 504.

Fin 5 may be provided with a rear locking web 505 and an apertured front locking web 506.

The top of body 2 may be provided with a pocket 507 adapted to receive the fin web 505. A threaded stud 508, which may be fabricated of plastic, projects upwardly from the top of the body 2 and is adapted to receive the aperture of fin web 506. A threaded nut 509 may be our ployed to engage the stud 508 and secure the Web 506 to the body 2, with the other web 505 being slidably inserted into the pocket 507.

As will be appreciated, this arrangement enables the web 5 to be selectively secured to or detached from the body means 2.

Another pocket 510 and threaded stud 511 and threaded nut 512 may be provided on the underside of the keel wall 401. Pocket 510, threaded stud 511, and threaded fastener 512 may be employed to selectively secure the fin 5 to the underside of the apparatus 1 in the exact manner in which the fin 5 is detachably secured to the top of the body 2.

As is shown in FIGURE 1, the outer periphery of fin 5 may be provided with indicia simulating a scuba diver flag. This indicia, which may be provided on each side of the fin 5, includes first and second red portions 513 and 514 separated by a diagonal white stripe 515.

Snorkel 6 may comprise a conduit 601 having an opening 602 on the top of the body means 2 and a mid-portion 603 which passes through the interior 204 of the body means 2. A flexible and resilient conduit portion 604 extends from the conduit 603, downwardly through the keel passage 402, and outwardly through the keel slot 405 to terminate in a conventional mouthpiece 605.

Tue mouthpiece 605 is horizontally elongate in character and is dimensioned such that its narrowest portion will pass through the slot 405. By turning the mouthpiece 605 so that its narrowest portion is longitudinally aligned with the slot 405, the mouthpiece may be inserted upwardly through the slot 405. The natural resilience of the conduit 604 will automatically effect a ninety degree reorientation of the mouthpiece 605 so that its widest dimension extends transversely of the keel slot 405. In this fashion, the mouthpiece or free end of the snorkel 604 may be secured to the keel 4. Obviously, manipulations in reverse to those described to effect the securing of the mouthpiece 605 may be employed to free this mouthpiece from the keel 4.

The handles 7 and 8 are substantially identical in configuration such that one only need be described.

Handle 7, which is disposed on the right side of the apparatus 1, when it is viewed from the front end, extends generally longitudinally along the right side of the apparatus. Bar-like, handle 7 may be anchored by conventional fastening means to the area in the vicinity of the junction of the keel wall 401 with the underside of the buoyant body means 2.

As illustrated in FIGURES 2 and 4, handles 7 and 8 may be substantially coplanar and extend generally horizontally of the apparatus when it is buoyantly supported in a body of water. Preferably, handles 7 and 8 are rigid in character.

Mode of operation A person may use the apparatus 1 by removing the fin 5 from its top mounting, and laying longitudinally along the top of the body 2. In this position the person grasps the handles 7 and 8 with his feet secured in the flipper sockets 308 and 309 (i.e. with the straps of the sockets pulled to the top of the flippers). While in this position the fin 5 may be secured to the underside of the keel 4.

The person thus supported on the apparatus 1 may effect a quite realistic, porpoise-like movement through the water by kicking his feet so as to cause the flippers 301 and 304 to hinge about generally horizontal axes. A porpoise-like, leaping action may be effected by rocking the body 2 through a longitudinal plane. This rocking action will induce an abrupt sloshing of the water ballast 203 so as to produce an overall leaping effect. As will be appreciated the use of the movable buoyant compartments 205 longitudinally within the chamber 204 will further contribute to this leaping action by abruptly shifting longitudinally within the interior of the body 2.

The hollow keel 4 serves to effectively stabilize the apparatus 1 against undue lateral rolling. However, the

existence of the passage 402 enables water to flow freely through the keel without impeding the forward movement.

With the fin disposed on the top of the body 2 as shown in FIGURE 1, and with the feet sockets 308 and 309 disposed as shown in FIGURE 1, a person may be supported f.om the underside of the apparatus 1.

Such support is effected by the person moving beneath the keel 4 in longitudinal, face-down, alignment with the apparatus. The persons feet are inserted into the feet sockets 308 and 309 and the person reaches upwardly with his arms to grasp the handles 7 and 8. In this position, of course, the person is submerged such that he must have the mouthpiece 605 of the snorkle 6 inserted in his mouth.

The buoyancy of the apparatus 1 may be such that a person, supported from its underside, will remain close to the surface of the body of water, although submerged, because the'apparatus is too buoyant to be carried down into the body of water bythe exertion of the swimmer. Alternatively, sufficient ballast may be introduced through the closure 202 into the body interior 204 such that the overall apparatus 1 possesses only marginal buoyancy. In this event the swimmer, by kicking his feet so as to induce a propelling effect on the part of the flippers 301 and 304, and by pulling down on the handles 7 and 8, may induce submersion and underwater movement of the apparatus 1.

When the person surfaces he may expel any water which has entered the snorkle conduit 6 by blowing through the mouthpiece 605. This water expulsion will produce an amusing whale-like spouting effect from the snorkle air inlet 602.

The tail compartments 315 and 316, if inflated, will provide a buoyant lifting effect tending to support the persons legs. This will lessen the tiring of the person while engaged in such underwater swimming.

With a person supported either on the top or from the bottom of the apparatus 1, the person may drop his legs so as to bring the porpoise apparatus 1 to a substantially upright position. In this upright position children may simulate playing with a real porpoise by tossing articles into the outwardly diverging, mouth-simulating inlet 403 of the porpoise.

In order to facilitate additional freedom of action of a persons legs, articularly when it is desired to manipulate the apparatus 1 to a position of vertical or near vertical orientation, or when a person is supported from beneath the apparatus 1, it may be appropriate to undo the tail securing strap 307 so as to allow the tail to pivot, with it being connected only at the locations of the snaptype hook fasteners 306. This will allow a lower positioning of the persons feet.

Scuba divers may effectively utilize the apparatus 1 as a buoyant scuba diver and tank support. The apparatus 1 may be moved to the desired location where diver operations are to take place. Spare tanks may be secured by straps or other fastening devices to the handles 7 or 8. The porpoise-like configuration of the apparatus may tend to discourage sharks from entering the area as sharks possess a natural antipathy toward porpoises.

At any point during the use of the apparatus a person may detach the fin 5 and employ the fin 5 as an underwater viewing glass. To use the fin 5 in this manner, it is merely necessary to submerge the transparent glass 502 and look through the passage defined by the wall 503, with the passage opening 504 being above the water.

As will be appreciated the length of the tail assembly 3 may be accommodated to the height and leg length of an individual user by merely securing the tail fasteners 306 to appropriate eyelets 206. Similarly, the tranverse straps of foot sockets 308 and 309, such as the strap 310 of the socket 308, may be circumferentially adjusted so as to snugly engage a persons foot.

From the foregoing it will be clear that the body of fluid contained within the buoyant body 2 and the wall means of the buoyant body 2 cooperate to provide means carried by the body 2 and operable in response to manipulations of a person to sequentially cause movement of the apparatus on the surface of a body of water, submergence of the apparatus beneath the surface of the water body, movement of the apparatus beneath the water surface, and movement of the apparatus generally back to the surface.

Advantages and scope of the invention A principal advantage of the invention resides in the manner in which the buoyant body, keel, and tail assembly cooperate to provide a realistic porpoise-like action in response to the manual manipulation of an individual supported by the apparatus.

Other principal advantages result from the manner in which the apparatus will enable a person to swim either on the surface of the water or submerged, and in positions ranging from horizontal to substantial vertical orientation.

Still other principal advantages pertain to the manner in which the apparatus provides a buoyant scuba diver flag support in combination with a support which can adequately carry divers gear, such as spare tanks.

The use of the abruptly movable body of ballasting fluid Within the apparatus is specially advantageous in that it contributes to a unique leaping, porpoise-like action.

The hollow keel 4 advantageously stabilizes the apparatus without impeding forward movement of the apparatus or excessively weighting the apparatus.

The bifurcated tail assembly is uniquely advantageous in that it facilitates propulsion of the apparatus in response to a natural vertical kicking action of a user.

Other principal advantages of the invention reside in the unique adaptability of the apparatus to the configuration of an individual user, and in the unique manner in which the apparatus supports swimming aids.

In describing the invention reference has been made to a preferred embodiment. However, those skilled in the ant and familiar with the disclosure of the invention may well recognize additions, deletions, substitutions, or other modifications which would follow within the purview of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A submersible swimming aid apparatus comprising:

generally elongate and at least partially hollow body means having a closed hollow interior;

wall means providing a dolphin-like exterior configuration for said body means;

support means connected with said body means to support a person in generally longitudinal alignment 'with said body means;

a body of liquid occupying a portion only of the interior of said body means and abruptly movable longitudinally of said interior;

buoyancy means carried by said body means and operable in response to manipulations of said person, to sequentially cause movement of said apparatus generally on the surface of a body of water,

submergence of said apparatus beneath said surface,

movement of said apparatus beneath said surface,

and

movement of said apparatus generally back to said surface;

said body of liquid having suflicient inertia to be cooperable with said body means in response to longitudinal rocking of said body means by said person, to produce a dolphin-like, leaping movement of said apparatus and person;

said 'wall means fully enclosing said body of liquid and being operable to isolate said body of liquid from said body of water; and

a keel mounted on the underside of said elongate body means, said keel including wall means extending generally longitudinally of said body means and defining a generally unobstructed passage extending generally longitudinally along the underside of said body means, said passage having an inlet and an outlet spaced longitudinally of said body means, said passage enabling a substantially free and unobstructed flow of fluid longitudinally through said keel.

2. A swimming aid apparatus comprising:

generally elongate and at least partially hollow body means having a closed hollow interior;

support means connected with said body means to support a person in generally longitudinal alignment with said body means;

a body of fluid occupying a portion only of the interior of said body means and abruptly movable longitudinally of said interior; and

a bifurcated :tail assembly extending from one end of said body means, said bifurcated tail assembly including first hinge means connecting said first flipper to said body means for pivotal movement about an axis extending generally horizontally when said apparatus is buoyantly supported on a fluid body,

a second flipper,

second hinge means connecting said second flipper to said body means for pivotal movement about an axis extending generally horizontally when said apparatus is buoyantly supported on a fluid body,

first feet engaging means on said first flipper to secure one foot of a person supported on said body means, and

second feet engaging means on said second flipper to secure a second foot of a person supported on said body means.

3. An apparatus as described in claim 2 including at least one hollow structure movably contained within the hollow interior of said body means.

4. An apparatus as described in claim 3 including:

a member having a shape simulating a fin;

first mounting means for securing said fin simulating member to the top of said body means;

second mounting means for securing said fin simulating member to the underside of said keel;

a transparent window carried by said fin simulating member; and

wall means defining a passage extending within said fin simulating member away from said transparent window.

5. An apparatus as described in claim 4 including:

air transmitting, conduit means extending from the top if said body means through said body means and said conduit means having a flexible portion projecting from the underside of said keel.

6. An apparatus as described in claim 5:

wherein said apparatus further includes a pair of handles comprising a portion of said support means, carried on opposite sides of said apparatus, and extending generally longitudinally along the sides of said apparatus;

wherein said keel smoothly merges with the underside of said body means to define a generally oval cross section of said apparatus;

wherein said keel and said body means include portions defining an opening for said passage diverging generally away from said keel passage;

wherein said keel includes a slot through which said flexible portion of said conduit member is adapted to be yield-ably passed;

wherein said apparatus further includes a plurality of tail anchoring means spaced longitudinally along the underside of said body means;

wherein said bifurcated tail assembly includes fastening means adapted to be selectively connected with each of said anchoring means on the underside of said body means;

wherein said apparatus further includes securing means adapted to releasably secure said bifurcated tail assembly to the underside of the end of said body means from which said itail projects, said securing means, when released from said bifurcated tail assembly, allowing the hinge portions of said tail means to move downwardly through the outlet portion of said keel passage;

wherein said apparatus includes closable inlet means for selectively admitting fluid into the hollow interior of said body means; and

wherein said apparatus further includes a first inflatable chamber carried by and extending longitudinally along the top of said first hinge portion of said bifurcated tail assembly and a second inflatable chamber carried by and extending longitudinally along a top portion of said second hinge portion of said bifurcated tail assembly.

7. A swimming aid comprising:

buoyant body means;

a keel mounted on the underside of said body means, said keel including wall means extending along of said body means and defining a passage extending generally along the underside of said body means, said passage having an inlet and an outlet spaced along said body means, said passage enabling a substantially free flow of fluid through said keel;

a member having a shape simulating a fin;

first mounting means for securing said fin simulating member to the top of said body means;

second mounting means for securing said fin simulating member to the underside of said keel;

a transparent window carried by said fin simulating member; and

'wall means defining a passage extending within said fin simulating member away from said transparent window.

8. A buoyant apparatus comprising:

buoyant body means;

a member having a shape simulating a fin;

mounting means for detachably securing said fin simulating member to said body means;

a transparent window carried by said fin simulating member; and

'wall means defining a passage extending within said fin simulating member away from said transparent window.

9. A submersible swimming aid apparatus comprising:

generally elongate and at least partially hollow body means having a closed hollow interior;

wall means providing an exterior configuration for said body means;

support means connected with said body means to support a person;

a body of liquid occupying a portion only of the interior of said body means and abruptly movable longitudinally of said interior;

means carried by said body means and operable in response to manipulations of said person, to sequentially cause movement of said apparatus generally on the surface of a body of water,

submergence of said apparatus beneath said surface,

movement of said apparatus beneath said surface,

and

movement of said apparatus generally back to said surface;

said wall means fully enclosing said body of liquid and being operable to isolate said body of liquid from said body of water; and

a keel mounted on the underside of said elongate body means, said keel including wall means extending generally longitudinally of said body means and defining a generally unobstructed passage extending generally longitudinally along the underside of said body means, said passage having an inlet and an outlet spaced longitudinally of said body means, said passage enabling a substantially free and unobstructed flow of fluid longitudinally through said keel.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 566,423 8/1896 Smith 1l5-42 985,187 2/1911 Lindgren 42 1,112,057 9/ 19 14 Dudash 115 42 1,530,560 3/1925 Heminger 1l5-26.3 2,962,283 11/1960 Casex 272-1 2,991,076 7/1961 Hale 2721 3,124,815 3/1964 Harvey 272-71 3,203,694 8/ 1965 Kobashikawa 272-l 3,204,951 9/1965 Grain 2721 3,232,608 2/ 1966 Vlacancich 272-1 2,405,715 8/ 1946 Sabini 46-94 3,193,286 7/1965 Sitten 272-1 3,254,441? 6/1966 Bramson 4694 FOREIGN PATENTS 573,287 3/1924 France.

ANTON O. OECHSLE, Primary Examiner R. W. DIAZ, Assistant Examiner US. Cl. X.R.

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US3714921A (en) * 1970-08-07 1973-02-06 S Gibson Water float with paddle extension means
US3718109A (en) * 1968-07-10 1973-02-27 M Skitsko Aquatic vehicle
US3751030A (en) * 1972-01-13 1973-08-07 M Winters Aquatic apparatus with buoyancy control structure
US3779202A (en) * 1971-08-10 1973-12-18 Holiday Recreation Products In Manually propelled water craft
US4385579A (en) * 1979-07-27 1983-05-31 Baulard Caugan Gerard Sailing craft
US5318467A (en) * 1993-03-22 1994-06-07 Mcintyre Jonothon M W Body board
US5389023A (en) * 1993-03-22 1995-02-14 Mcintyre; Jonothon M. W. Body surfing board
US6050868A (en) * 1996-01-11 2000-04-18 Mccarthy; Peter T. High efficiency hydrofoil and swim fin designs
US6095879A (en) * 1998-05-14 2000-08-01 Mccarthy; Peter T. Methods for creating consistent large scale blade deflections
US20020025744A1 (en) * 1998-05-14 2002-02-28 Mccarthy Peter T. Methods for creating large scale focused blade deflections
US6371821B1 (en) 1996-01-11 2002-04-16 Nature's Wing Fin Designs, Llc High efficiency hydrofoil and swim fin designs
US6482059B2 (en) 1997-05-09 2002-11-19 Mccarthy Peter T. High efficiency hydrofoil and swim fin designs
US20040127117A1 (en) * 2002-07-19 2004-07-01 Mccarthy Peter T. High deflection hydrofoils and swim fins
US6814634B2 (en) 2003-01-30 2004-11-09 Seagoon Boat Building Self-propelled aquatic toy
US8007337B1 (en) * 1999-05-14 2011-08-30 Demasi Sr Douglas D Universal flying hawk
FR3004359A1 (en) * 2013-04-15 2014-10-17 Didier Jost A device for assisting the static swim
US9919777B2 (en) * 2015-04-28 2018-03-20 K Bowler II Roland Towable recreational craft

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US3718109A (en) * 1968-07-10 1973-02-27 M Skitsko Aquatic vehicle
US3677539A (en) * 1970-03-19 1972-07-18 Maureen Constance Bennet Buoyant aquatic amusement device with reinforcing cover
US3714921A (en) * 1970-08-07 1973-02-06 S Gibson Water float with paddle extension means
US3779202A (en) * 1971-08-10 1973-12-18 Holiday Recreation Products In Manually propelled water craft
US3751030A (en) * 1972-01-13 1973-08-07 M Winters Aquatic apparatus with buoyancy control structure
US4385579A (en) * 1979-07-27 1983-05-31 Baulard Caugan Gerard Sailing craft
US5318467A (en) * 1993-03-22 1994-06-07 Mcintyre Jonothon M W Body board
US5389023A (en) * 1993-03-22 1995-02-14 Mcintyre; Jonothon M. W. Body surfing board
US7101240B2 (en) 1996-01-11 2006-09-05 Mccarthy Peter T High efficiency hydrofoil and swim fin designs
US6050868A (en) * 1996-01-11 2000-04-18 Mccarthy; Peter T. High efficiency hydrofoil and swim fin designs
US6146224A (en) * 1996-01-11 2000-11-14 Mccarthy; Peter T. High efficiency hydrofoil and swim fin designs
US20070173143A1 (en) * 1996-01-11 2007-07-26 Mccarthy Peter T High efficiency hydrofoil and swim fin designs
US6371821B1 (en) 1996-01-11 2002-04-16 Nature's Wing Fin Designs, Llc High efficiency hydrofoil and swim fin designs
US20040248481A1 (en) * 1996-01-11 2004-12-09 Mccarthy Peter T. High efficiency hydrofoil and swim fin designs
US6607411B1 (en) 1996-01-11 2003-08-19 Mccarthy Peter T. High efficiency hydrofoil and swim fin designs
US6497597B2 (en) 1996-01-11 2002-12-24 Mccarthy Peter T. High efficiency hydrofoil and swim fin designs
US6585548B2 (en) 1996-01-11 2003-07-01 Mccarthy Peter T. High efficiency hydrofoil and swim fin designs
US6719599B2 (en) 1996-01-11 2004-04-13 Mccarthy Peter T. High efficiency hydrofoil and swim fin designs
US6482059B2 (en) 1997-05-09 2002-11-19 Mccarthy Peter T. High efficiency hydrofoil and swim fin designs
US20080032574A1 (en) * 1998-05-14 2008-02-07 Amy L. Goldman Method for creating consistent large scale blade deflections
US7862395B2 (en) 1998-05-14 2011-01-04 Mccarthy Peter T Methods for creating consistent large scale blade deflections
US20040152376A1 (en) * 1998-05-14 2004-08-05 Mccarthy Peter T. Methods for creating consistent large scale blade blade deflections
US6712656B2 (en) 1998-05-14 2004-03-30 Mccarthy Peter T. Methods for creating consistent large scale blade deflections
US6413133B1 (en) 1998-05-14 2002-07-02 Mccarthy Peter T. Methods for creating consistent large scale blade deflections
US6843693B2 (en) 1998-05-14 2005-01-18 Mccarthy Peter T. Methods for creating large scale focused blade deflections
US20020025744A1 (en) * 1998-05-14 2002-02-28 Mccarthy Peter T. Methods for creating large scale focused blade deflections
US6918805B2 (en) 1998-05-14 2005-07-19 Mccarthy Peter T. Methods for creating consistent large scale blade deflections
US7465205B2 (en) 1998-05-14 2008-12-16 Mccarthy Peter T Methods for creating consistent large scale blade deflections
US20050181689A1 (en) * 1998-05-14 2005-08-18 Mccarthy Peter T. Methods for creating consistent large scale blade deflections
US7018256B2 (en) 1998-05-14 2006-03-28 Mccarthy Peter T Methods for creating large scale focused blade deflections
US6095879A (en) * 1998-05-14 2000-08-01 Mccarthy; Peter T. Methods for creating consistent large scale blade deflections
US20080045095A1 (en) * 1998-05-14 2008-02-21 Mccarthy Peter T Methods for creating consistent large scale blade deflections
US7581997B2 (en) 1998-05-14 2009-09-01 Mccarthy Peter T Method for creating consistent large scale blade deflections
US20070173142A1 (en) * 1998-05-14 2007-07-26 Mccarthy Peter T Methods for creating consistent large scale blade deflections
US8007337B1 (en) * 1999-05-14 2011-08-30 Demasi Sr Douglas D Universal flying hawk
US20040127117A1 (en) * 2002-07-19 2004-07-01 Mccarthy Peter T. High deflection hydrofoils and swim fins
US20070037459A1 (en) * 2002-07-19 2007-02-15 Mccarthy Peter T High deflection hydrofoils and swim fins
US20050176318A1 (en) * 2002-07-19 2005-08-11 Mccarthy Peter T. High deflection hydrofoils and swim fins
US6884134B2 (en) 2002-07-19 2005-04-26 Mccarthy Peter T. High deflection hydrofoils and swim fins
US7601041B2 (en) 2002-07-19 2009-10-13 Mccarthy Peter T High deflection hydrofoils and swim fins
US20070049140A1 (en) * 2002-07-19 2007-03-01 Mccarthy Peter T High deflection hydrofoils and swim fins
US6814634B2 (en) 2003-01-30 2004-11-09 Seagoon Boat Building Self-propelled aquatic toy
FR3004359A1 (en) * 2013-04-15 2014-10-17 Didier Jost A device for assisting the static swim
US9919777B2 (en) * 2015-04-28 2018-03-20 K Bowler II Roland Towable recreational craft

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