US3466770A - Self-propelled earth excavating and leveling apparatus - Google Patents

Self-propelled earth excavating and leveling apparatus Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US3466770A
US3466770A US3466770DA US3466770A US 3466770 A US3466770 A US 3466770A US 3466770D A US3466770D A US 3466770DA US 3466770 A US3466770 A US 3466770A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
frame
blade
backhoe
pair
conduit
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Inventor
Frank W Morrison
Jerry E Morrison
Original Assignee
Frank W Morrison
Jerry E Morrison
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Frank W Morrison, Jerry E Morrison filed Critical Frank W Morrison
Priority to US57986966A priority Critical
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US3466770A publication Critical patent/US3466770A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E02HYDRAULIC ENGINEERING; FOUNDATIONS; SOIL SHIFTING
    • E02FDREDGING; SOIL-SHIFTING
    • E02F3/00Dredgers; Soil-shifting machines
    • E02F3/04Dredgers; Soil-shifting machines mechanically-driven
    • E02F3/28Dredgers; Soil-shifting machines mechanically-driven with digging tools mounted on a dipper- or bucket-arm, i.e. there is either one arm or a pair of arms, e.g. dippers, buckets
    • E02F3/30Dredgers; Soil-shifting machines mechanically-driven with digging tools mounted on a dipper- or bucket-arm, i.e. there is either one arm or a pair of arms, e.g. dippers, buckets with a dipper-arm pivoted on a cantilever beam, i.e. boom
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E02HYDRAULIC ENGINEERING; FOUNDATIONS; SOIL SHIFTING
    • E02FDREDGING; SOIL-SHIFTING
    • E02F3/00Dredgers; Soil-shifting machines
    • E02F3/04Dredgers; Soil-shifting machines mechanically-driven
    • E02F3/28Dredgers; Soil-shifting machines mechanically-driven with digging tools mounted on a dipper- or bucket-arm, i.e. there is either one arm or a pair of arms, e.g. dippers, buckets
    • E02F3/30Dredgers; Soil-shifting machines mechanically-driven with digging tools mounted on a dipper- or bucket-arm, i.e. there is either one arm or a pair of arms, e.g. dippers, buckets with a dipper-arm pivoted on a cantilever beam, i.e. boom
    • E02F3/32Dredgers; Soil-shifting machines mechanically-driven with digging tools mounted on a dipper- or bucket-arm, i.e. there is either one arm or a pair of arms, e.g. dippers, buckets with a dipper-arm pivoted on a cantilever beam, i.e. boom working downwardly and towards the machine, e.g. with backhoes
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E02HYDRAULIC ENGINEERING; FOUNDATIONS; SOIL SHIFTING
    • E02FDREDGING; SOIL-SHIFTING
    • E02F3/00Dredgers; Soil-shifting machines
    • E02F3/04Dredgers; Soil-shifting machines mechanically-driven
    • E02F3/28Dredgers; Soil-shifting machines mechanically-driven with digging tools mounted on a dipper- or bucket-arm, i.e. there is either one arm or a pair of arms, e.g. dippers, buckets
    • E02F3/36Component parts
    • E02F3/38Cantilever beams, i.e. booms;, e.g. manufacturing processes, forms, geometry or materials used for booms; Dipper-arms, e.g. manufacturing processes, forms, geometry or materials used for dipper-arms; Bucket-arms
    • E02F3/382Connections to the frame; Supports for booms or arms
    • E02F3/384Connections to the frame; Supports for booms or arms the boom being pivotable relative to the frame about a vertical axis
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E02HYDRAULIC ENGINEERING; FOUNDATIONS; SOIL SHIFTING
    • E02FDREDGING; SOIL-SHIFTING
    • E02F3/00Dredgers; Soil-shifting machines
    • E02F3/04Dredgers; Soil-shifting machines mechanically-driven
    • E02F3/28Dredgers; Soil-shifting machines mechanically-driven with digging tools mounted on a dipper- or bucket-arm, i.e. there is either one arm or a pair of arms, e.g. dippers, buckets
    • E02F3/36Component parts
    • E02F3/42Drives for dippers, buckets, dipper-arms or bucket-arms
    • E02F3/425Drive systems for dipper-arms, backhoes or the like
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E02HYDRAULIC ENGINEERING; FOUNDATIONS; SOIL SHIFTING
    • E02FDREDGING; SOIL-SHIFTING
    • E02F3/00Dredgers; Soil-shifting machines
    • E02F3/04Dredgers; Soil-shifting machines mechanically-driven
    • E02F3/76Graders, bulldozers, or the like with scraper plates or ploughshare-like elements; Levelling scarifying devices
    • E02F3/7609Scraper blade mounted forwardly of the tractor on a pair of pivoting arms which are linked to the sides of the tractor, e.g. bulldozers
    • E02F3/7613Scraper blade mounted forwardly of the tractor on a pair of pivoting arms which are linked to the sides of the tractor, e.g. bulldozers with the scraper blade adjustable relative to the pivoting arms about a vertical axis, e.g. angle dozers
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E02HYDRAULIC ENGINEERING; FOUNDATIONS; SOIL SHIFTING
    • E02FDREDGING; SOIL-SHIFTING
    • E02F3/00Dredgers; Soil-shifting machines
    • E02F3/04Dredgers; Soil-shifting machines mechanically-driven
    • E02F3/96Dredgers; Soil-shifting machines mechanically-driven with arrangements for alternate or simultaneous use of different digging elements
    • E02F3/963Arrangements on backhoes for alternate use of different tools
    • E02F3/964Arrangements on backhoes for alternate use of different tools of several tools mounted on one machine
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E02HYDRAULIC ENGINEERING; FOUNDATIONS; SOIL SHIFTING
    • E02FDREDGING; SOIL-SHIFTING
    • E02F9/00Component parts of dredgers or soil-shifting machines, not restricted to one of the kinds covered by groups E02F3/00 - E02F7/00
    • E02F9/20Drives; Control devices
    • E02F9/22Hydraulic or pneumatic drives
    • E02F9/2253Controlling the travelling speed of vehicles, e.g. adjusting travelling speed according to implement loads, control of hydrostatic transmission

Description

p 1969 F. w. MORRISON ET SELF'PRQPELLED EARTH EXCAVATING AND LEVELING APPARATUS Filed Sept. 16, 1966 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Frank W.Morr'iso'n Jerry E Morrlson BY INVENTORS E EN Q E Nu E 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 F. W. MORRISON ET AL SELF'PROPELLED EARTH EXCAVATING AND LEVELING APPARATUS Frank WMorr'ison BY INVENTORS 42W Jerry E .Morrison Sept. 16, 1969 Filed Sept. 16, 1966 United States Patent 0 3,466,770 SELF-PROPELLED EARTH EXCAVATING AND LEVELING APPARATUS Frank W. Morrison, 784 NE. 14th St., Rte. 1, and Jerry E. Morrison, Rte. 1, both of The Dalles, Oreg. 97058 Filed Sept. 16, 1966, Ser. No. 579,869 Int. Cl. E02f 3/86; B66c 23/54 US. Cl. 37--117.5 7 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A pair of endless tracks is mounted one about each of a pair of laterally spaced elongated plates secured to a vehicle frame extension and driven by separate hydraulic motors coupled to drive sprockets at one end of each plate. The vehicle frame supports a backhoe unit pivotable about the axis of a vertical post by a cable reeved intermediate its ends about a pulley on the post and connected at its opposite ends to a pair of extensible hydraulic cylinders mounted horizontally on the frame. The frame also supports a dozer blade for vertical adjustment about a horizontal axis disposed transversely of the frame, for rotational adjustment about a horizontal axis disposed longitudinally of the frame and for rotational adjustment about a vertical axis.
This invention pertains to self-propelled earth excavating and leveling apparatus of miniature size, useful particularly in making forest service and other trails in rugged, inaccessible areas.
It is the general object of the present invention to provide self-propelled earth excavating and leveling apparatus which is small in size, i.e., about 2 feet wide and 4 feet long, exclusive of its boom structure; highly maneuverable; and easily disassemblable and reassemblable into component parts transportable by helicopter or otherwise to remote regions.
It is another object of the present invention to provide earth-working apparatus which is highly versatile in its application to digging, trenching, rock-removing, stump pulling, soil-loosening and earth-leveling operations.
Still a further object of the present invention is the provision of earth-working apparatus which, though small in size, is rugged in construction and hence well suited to its preferred application in trail making and ditch digging in rugged geographic areas.
It is another object of the present invention to provide earth-working apparatus which is versatile in its application to various earth-working functions, yet simple in construction and reliable in operation.
Yet another object of the present invention is the provision of earth-working apparatus which is all hy draulic in its operation, being free from mechanical clutches and transmissions, and gear boxes.
Still a further object of the present invention is the provision of track driven, earth-working apparatus equipped with a backhoe unit which is positionable easily and accurately to various working angles of inclination and tilt; and with tracks which are self-cleaning.
The manner in which the foregoing and other objects of this invention are accomplished will be apparent from the accompanying specification and claims, considered together with the drawings, wherein:
FIG. 1 is a view in side elevation of the herein described excavating, trenching and leveling apparatus;
FIG. 2 is a detail view in plan of a dozer blade unit included in the apparatus, illustrating its horizontal adjustment, taken along line 22 of FIG. 1;
FIG. 3 is a view in elevation, partly in section, taken along line 3-3 of FIG. 2, illustrating the vertical adjustment of the dozer blade unit;
3,466,770 Patented Sept. 16,, 1969 FIG. 4 is a plan detail view, partly in section, taken along line 44 of FIG. 1 and illustrating the drive employed for swinging the boom of the backhoe unit included in the apparatus;
FIG. 5 is a fragmentary detail view in elevation of the 'boom drive of FIG. 4;
FIG. 6 is a detail view in section taken along line 66 of FIG. 1 illustrating the hydraulic direct drive for driving a single track of the apparatus and also for cleaning the same automatically; and
FIG. 7 is a schematic diagram illustrating the integrated hydraulic circuit employed in driving the apparatus and its various operating units.
Generally stated, the self-propelled excavating and earth leveling apparatus of our invention includes a central frame having a central, longitudinally-arranged, downwardly directed, frame extension. A pair of driving track assemblies are positioned one on each side of the frame extension and detachably secured thereto. A pair of hydraulic motors are connected separately one to each of the track assemblies for independent direct driving of the same.
A backhoe unit and a dozer blade unit are mounted forwardly of the body of the apparatus. These also are hydraulically driven and are adjustable as required for their eflicient, versatile operation.
The entire apparatus, exclusive of the backhoe and dozer blade units, measure only about 2 x 4 feet. Also, it is disassemblable into parts of small size which are transported easily by air. The apparatus thus is particularly well suited for application as a self-propelled earthworking unit for trenching, trail making and general earthworking operations in rugged, inaccessible areas.
Considering the foregoing in greater detail and with particular reference to the drawings:
THE TRACK DRIVE As shown in FIG. 1, the apparatus is supported on a small but rugged frame, indicated generally at 10. A central longitudinal extension 12 extends downwardly to a predetermined ground clearance. An operators seat 14 is mgunted on the frame, as is a gasoline engine indicated at 1 Frame extension 12 supports independently driven endless track assemblies, the construction of which is shown particularly in FIGS. 1 and 6.
Each track assembly includes a pair of spaced, parallel, heavy duty side plates, one of which is indicated at 18. The side plates are bolted demountably to frame extension 12 by means of bolts 20. The side plates also mount bearings 22 which in turn support the shafts of track support wheels 24.
The track, indicated generally at 26, supported on the Wheels preferably is of the endless conveyor type being constituted of overlapped pairs of chain links 28 pinned together and supporting transversely arranged angle iron cleats 30.
The tracks are driven by hydraulic motors 32, 33, FIG. 6, each bolted to the inner one of a pair of spaced, rearwardly extending arms 34, which in turn are fastened one to each of track side plates 18.
The shaft of the motor penetrates both arms. Its outer end is supported in a bearing 38.
Motor shaft 36 mounts a sprocket 40 which meshes with track chain 26. It will be apparent that in so doing the teeth of the sprocket enter the spaces between the cross pins holding together overlapped chain links 28, thus rendering the track self-cleaning by pushing out stones and accumulations of mud which may have lodged in the spaces.
3 THE BACKHOE UNIT The construction of the backhoe unit mounted on the driving assembly above described also is illustrated in FIG. 1.
The forward end of frame mounts a pair of vertically spaced bearings 50. The ends of a heavy vertical post 52 are journaled in the bearings. A pair of forwardly extending plates 54 is welded to the post.
A boom 56 is pivoted to plates 54 at 58. A dipper stick 60 is pivoted to the outer end of boom 56 at pivot point 62. A bucket 64 is pivoted to the outer end of the dipper stick by means of pivot pin 66.
The vertical angle of the boom is adjusted by means of a hydraulic cylinder 68, the case of which is pivoted to plates 54 by means of pivot pin and the piston rod of which is pivoted to an intermediate segment of boom 56 by pivot pin 72.
Angular movement of dip stick 60 relative to boom 56 is accomplished by means of double acting cylinder 73 interconnecting these two elements of the apparatus through pivotal mountings.
Vertical adjustment of the bucket is secured by means of a second hydraulic cylinder 74, the case of which is pivoted to an extension of dipper stick 60 by pivot pin 76 and the piston rod of which is pivoted to the bucket by pivot pin 78.
Swinging adjustment of the backhoe is accomplished by means of a novel drive, the construction of which is illustrated in FIGS. 1, 4 and 5.
A pair of hydraulic cylinders 80 are mounted in longitudinally extending, parallel spaced relation on frame 10. The piston rods of the cylinders extend forwardly. Each mounts a hollow cable retainer 82.
The ends of a cable 84 are bent around pear-shaped plugs 86 dimensioned to fit within the tapered ends of cable retainers 82, thus frictionally retaining the cable ends when the cable is under stress.
Cable 84 is reeved around a pulley 88 which in turn is keyed to post 52. It will be noted from FIGS. 4 and 5 that pulley 88 is provided with an annular groove 90 designed frictionally to receive the cable.
The core of the pulley also is provided with a marginal angled passageway 92 dimensioned to receive a segment of the cable in frictional, releasable locking engagement. A transverse aperture 94 communicates with the passageway.
Thus in setting up the drive for swinging the backhoe, cable 84 may be reeved around pulley 88 and threaded through passageway 92, using transverse aperture 94 to assist in the threading operation. The ends of the cable direction. A positive, trouble-free drive independent of gears or other complicated linkages thus is provided.
THE DOZER BLADE UNIT The construction of the dozer blade unit which is a component of the herein described assembly is illustrated in FIGS. 1, 2 and 3.
Extension plates 12 mount between them a pair of forwardly extending parallel bars 100. The inner ends of bars are pivoted to the plate extensions by means of pivot pins 102. The outer ends of bars 100 are fixed to an angular horizontal plate 104, arranged with the apex of the angle extending forwardly.
Arms 100 and hence the dozer blade unit in its entirety are reciprocated between their lifted and depressed positions by means of a vertically arranged pneumatic cylinder 105, the case of which is pivoted to the frame of the apparatus at 107 and the piston rod of which is pivotally connected to arms 100 at 109.
The apex of plate 104 mounts a forwardly extending bearing 106 having a vertically directed bearing opening. A heavy horizontal bar 108 is located forwardly of bearing 106. It mounts a pair of vertically spaced, rearwardly extending, perforated tabs 110. A pivot bolt 112 extends through the tabs and through the bearing opening, thus mounting the bar pivotally in a horizontal plane.
A horizontal pivot pin 114 is mounted on, and extends forwardly from, bar 108. It penetrates a central opening in the back of an angled dozer blade 116, thus mounting the same pivotally in a vertical plane.
Means thus are provided for angling and tilting the blade as required for various applications. Means further are provided for locking the blade releasably in a desired position of angle or tilt. Such means are shown particularly in FIG. 2.
Forwardly projecting angled plate 104 mounts along its outer faces a matching pair of perforated plates 120, each having, in the illustrated form of the invention, a series of three aligned openings 122. Horizontal bar 108 mounts at each of its ends vertically spaced pairs of perforated tabs 124.
The forward ends of connecting rods 126 pivotally are connected between one or the other of tab pairs 124 by means of pivot bolts 128. The rearward ends of connecting rods 126 releasably are fastened in a selected one of openings 122 by means of pivot bolts 130.
Thus by mounting connecting rods 126 in selected ones of openings 122, the desired blade angle may be obtained.
The desired angle of blade tilt may be obtained by adjusting a pair of adjustment screws 132 each of which is threaded through one of a pair of vertically threaded tabs 134 mounted on and extending rearwardly from the upper margin of the dozer blade. As is apparent from FIGS. 2 and 3, the bearing ends of the adjustment screws bear against the upper surface of bar 108. Their adjustment relative to each other accordingly tilts the blade clockwise or counterclockwise about blade mounting pin 114.
THE HYDRAULIC SYSTEM The construction and mode of operation of the integrated hydraulic drive and control system is shown schematically in FIG. 7.
The shaft of gasoline engine 16 mounts a pair of drive sprockets 142, 143. Sprocket 142 is connected through a chain 144 to a sprocket 146 which drives first hydraulic pump 148. Sprocket 143 is connected through a chain 150 which meshes with a sprocket 152 driving a second hydraulic pump 154. Pump 148 draws from reservoir 156 via filter 158 and conduit 160. Pump 154 draws also from reservoir 156, but through filter 162 and conduit 164.
Pumps 148, 154 drive the various operating units of the assembly including motors 32, 33 attached independently to the respective tracks of the apparatus.
Thus hydraulic fluid under pressure normally cycles through conduit 166, conduit 168, throttle valve 170, conduit 172 and thence via conduit 174 back to reservoir 156.
This circuit also includes a branch conduit 176 having a relief valve 178 set for example at 1500 pounds, and designed to cycle fluid back to reservoir 156 via conduit 180 by-passing throttle valve and the other elements of the circuit in the inadvertent circumstance that the pressure in the system rises above the indicated level due to striking an immovable object with one of the working units of the apparatus.
Throttle valve 170 is a four-way, open-center valve which controls the operation of left hand track drive motor 32. It circulates fluid under pressure to the motor via infeed conduit 182 and outfeed conduit 184.
Companion track drive motor 33 is driven independently by pump 154.
The latter pump passes hydraulic fluid under pressure through conduit 188 and conduit 190 to throttle valve 192. Thence the fluid traverses conduit 194 and enters a manifold 196. The fluid leaves the manifold via conduit 198, which includes filter 200, and returns to reservoir 156 via conduit 180.
Like the previously described circuit, this circuit also includes a shunt circuit containing conduit 202 and relief valve 204. The latter valve may be set at a suitable level. Its function is to return the fluid to reservoir 156 in the event that through some inadvertence pressure in the system rises to a dangerous level, e.g., above 1500 p.s.i.
Like throttle valve 170, throttle valve 192 may be a four-way open-center valve which serves to pass hydraulic fluid under pressure to right hand track drive motor 33. Thus it passes the fluid through motor infeed conduit 208 and motor outfeed conduit 210, driving motor 33 at the desired speed and completely independently of track motor 32. The hydraulic fluid under pressure passed into manifold 196 by valve 192 serves to drive the earth-working elements of the apparatus, i.e., the backhoe and dozer blade units.
To this end manifold 196 supplies a bank of five independent spool valves.
The first valve, indicated at 211, controls the up and down motion of the blade by actuation of cylinder 105. This cylinder alternates the blade between its elevated and lowered positions upon circulation of fluid through infeed line 212 and outfeed line 214.
The second valve, valve 216, energizes single acting cylinders 80 by means of which the backhoe is swung about vertical shaft 52.
Thus actuation of the valve sends fluid through conduit 218, check valve 220, pressure relief valve 222, set for example at 800 p.s.i., and through line 174 back to the reservoir. It further circulates fluid under pressure through conduit 224to right hand single acting cylinder 80, actuating it in the appropriate direction.
contemporaneously, valve 216 operates to circulate fluid appropriately through a conduit 226 including a throttle valve 228 which, like throttle valve 220, is set at a relatively low pressure of about 800 p.s.i. Thence the fluid under pressure is fed to a common relief valve 222 and passes via conduit 174 into reservoir 156.
Alternatively, depending upon the setting of valve 216, fluid under pressure may pass through conduit 230 behind the piston of left hand single acting cylinder 80, thus swinging the backhoe in the desired direction.
The third valve, valve 240, controls the action of double acting cylinder 68 which in turn controls the vertical movement of boom 56. Fluid under pressure is fed to one side or the other of the double acting cylinder via conduits 242, 244, thus actuating the boom.
Valve 246, the fourth valve, controls the movement of double acting cylinder 73 which in turn regulates the angular position of dip stick 60 relative to boom 56. Hydraulic fluid under pressure is circulated to one side or the other of the cylinder via conduits 248, 250, respectively.
Valve 252 is the fifth valve. It operates double acting cylinder 74 which works bucket 64. In this case fluid under pressure passes into the cylinder via one or the other of conduits 254, 256, depending upon the valve setting.
As noted above, all of the foregoing elements of the apparatus are miniaturized to provide a total assembly which, exclusive of the boom and dozer blade, may measure only 2 feet wide by 4 feet long. The apparatus nevertheless is rugged in its construction and versatile in its operation in that it performs efiiciently the various operations to which earth moving apparatus is suited, viz., trenching, clearing, sloping banks, pulling stumps, moving boulders, leveling ground, etc.
The direct independent drive of the tracks makes the apparatus highly maneuverable. The integrated hydraulic system makes the apparatus sensitive to accurate control.
Freedom from clutches, transmission assemblies, and other gear boxes spells out freedom from mechanical problems. Divisibility of the apparatus into five or more easily assemblable parts makes the apparatus Well suited for transportation to remote places by helicopter. This, considered together with its other features, outlined above, renders the apparatus ideally suited for carrying on the operations necessary for trail making in national forests, private timber lands and other remote regions.
It is to be understood that the form of our invention herein shown and described is to be taken as a preferred example of the same and that various changes in the shape, size and arrangement of parts may be resorted to without departing from the spirit of our invention or the scope of the subjoined claims.
Having thus described our invention, we claim:
1. Self-propelled earth excavating and leveling apparatus comprising (a) a frame including a central, longitudinal, downwardly directed frame extension,
(b) a pair of driving track assemblies positioned one on each side of the frame extension and each comprising a central plate, a plurality of wheels journaled at spaced intervals longitudinally of the plate with their uppermost portions extending above the upper edge of the central plate, and an endless lug-equipped chain mounted on the plate in contact with the wheels,
(c) securing means for securing the track assemblies to the frame extension,
(d) a pair of rotary hydraulic track drive motors separately associated one with each of the track assemblies for independently driving the same, each motor being mounted on the plate adjacent one end of the latter, each motor having a driven sprocket meshing with the associated chain,
(e) backhoe means pivoted to the frame, and
(f) backhoe motor means connected to the backhoe means for operation thereof.
2. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the mounting means for pivoting the backhoe means to the frame comprises a vertical post journaled to the frame, and a pulley fixed to the vertical post; and wherein the backhoe motor means comprises a pair of hydraulic cylinders mounted in spaced, horizontal relation on the frame longitudinally thereof, adjacent and substantially in the horizontal plane of the pulley, and a flexible cable reeved about the pulley and having its respective ends attached to the piston rods of the cylinders for securing swinging motion of the backhoe means.
3. The apparatus of claim 2 wherein the pulley has a core provided with an angled passageway dimensioned to receive a segment of the reeved portion of the cable, thereby preventing slippage of the cable about the pulley.
4. The apparatus of claim 1 including dozer blade means comprising (a) a forwardly extending arm,
(b) pivot means pivoting the rearward end of the arm to the frame,
(0) a dozer blade attached in operative position to the forward end of the arm,
(d) a vertically arranged fluid-operated cylinder pivotally interconnecting the frame of the arm for raising and lowering the blade, and
(e) means for angling the blade, comprising an angled plate mounted on the forward end of the arm with the apex of the angle extending forwardly, a vertical bearing on the apex of the plate, a horizontal bar having centrally therethrough bearings designed to overlap the bearing on the plate, pivot pin means extending through the bearings and pivoting the bar to the plate, a pin extending forwardly of the bar centrally thereof and pivotally mounting the blade thereon, and connecting rod means interconnecting the bar and one of a plurality of selected positions 7 on the angled plate for determining the angle of the blade. 5. The apparatus of claim 1 including dozer blade means comprising (a) a forwardly extending arm,
(b) pivot means pivoting the rearward end of the arm to the frame,
() a dozer blade attached in operative position to the forward end of the arm,
(d) a vertically arranged fluid-operated cylinder pivotally interconnecting the frame and the arm for raising and lowering the blade, and
(e) means for tilting the blade, comprising an angled plate mounted on the forward end of the arm with the apex of the angle extending forwardly, a vertical opening in the apex of the plate, a horizontal bar having centrally therethrough openings designed to overlap the opening on the plate, pivot pin means extending through the openings and pivoting the bar to the plate, a mounting pin extending forwardly of the bar centrally thereof and pivotally mounting the blade, and a pair of cooperating adjustment screws mounted on the blade one on each side of the forwardly extending mounting pin, the adjustment screws bearing against the bar for determining the tilt of the blade.
6. Self-propelled earth excavating and leveling apparatus comprising (a) a frame including a central, longitudinal, downwardly directed frame extension,
(b) a pair of driving track assemblies positioned one on each side of the frame extension,
(c) securing means for securing the track assemblies to the frame extension,
(d) a pair of track drive motor means separately connected one to each of the track assemblies for independently driving the same,
(e) backhoe means pivoted to the frame,
(f) backhoe motor means connected to the backhoe means for operation thereof,
(g) dozer blade means comprising a forwardly extending arm, pivot means pivoting the rearward end of the arm to the frame, a dozer blade attached in operative position to the forward end of the arm, a vertically arranged fluid-operated cylinder pivotally interconnecting the frame and the arm for raising and lowering the blade, and
(h) means for angling the dozer blade, comprising an angled plate mounted on the forward end of the arm with the apex of the angle extending forwardly, a vertical bearing on the apex of the plate, a horizontal bar having centrally therethrough bearings designed to overlap the bearing on the plate, pivot pin means extending through the bearings and pivoting the bar to the plate, a pin extending forwardly of the bar centrally thereof and pivotally mounting the blade thereon, and connecting rod means interconnecting the bar and one of a plurality of selected 8 positions on the angled plate for determining the angle of the blade. 7. Self-propelled earth excavating and leveling apparatus comprising (a) a frame including a central, longitudinal, downwardly directed frame extension,
(b) a pair of driving track assemblies positioned one on each side of the frame extension,
(c) securing means for securing the track assemblies to the frame extension,
(d) a pair of track drive motor means separately connected one to each of the track assemblies for independently driving the same,
(e) backhoe means pivoted to the frame,
(f) backhoe motor means connected to the backhoe means for operation thereof,
(g) dozer blade means comprising a forwardly extending arm, pivot means pivoting the rearward end of the arm to the frame, a dozer blade attached in operative position to the forward end of the arm, a vertically arranged fluid-operated cylinder pivotally interconnecting the frame and the arm for raising and lowering the blade, and
(h) means for tilting the blade comprising an angled plate mounted on the forward end of the arm with the apex of the angle extending forwardly, a ver-.
tical opening on the apex of the plate, a horizontal bar having centrally therethrough openings designed to overlap the opening on the plate, pivot pin means extending through the openings and pivoting the bar to the plate, a mounting pin extending forwardly of the bar centrally thereof and pivotally mounting the blade, and a pair of cooperating adjustment screws mounted on the blade, one on each side of the forwardly extending mounting pin, the adjustment screws bearing against the bar for determining the tilt of the blade.
References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,660,816 12/1953 Maxwell 37-1 17.5 2,846,094 8/ 1958 Pilch 3.7-103 2,858,626 11/1958 Toulmin 37117.5 2,927,706 3/1960 Mork 214-138 3,042,233 7/ 1962 Wills 214-138 3,071,265 1/1963 Andre et a1 37-103 3,092,919 6/1963 Reynolds et a1. 37-1175 XR 3,099,098 7/ 1963 Davis 3,7-86 3,172,552 3/1965 Metailler 214-138 3,238,648 3/1966 Cobb et a1. 37117.5 XR
FOREIGN PATENTS 627,203 8/ 1949 England. 1,258,415 3/ 1961 France.
EDGAR S. BURR, Primary Examiner US. Cl. X.R.
US3466770D 1966-09-16 1966-09-16 Self-propelled earth excavating and leveling apparatus Expired - Lifetime US3466770A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US57986966A true 1966-09-16 1966-09-16

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US3466770A true US3466770A (en) 1969-09-16

Family

ID=24318688

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US3466770D Expired - Lifetime US3466770A (en) 1966-09-16 1966-09-16 Self-propelled earth excavating and leveling apparatus

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US3466770A (en)

Cited By (17)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3704754A (en) * 1970-02-19 1972-12-05 Layton Mfg Co Articulated vehicle having an adjustable grader blade thereon
JPS50846B1 (en) * 1970-01-20 1975-01-13
JPS5014703U (en) * 1973-06-01 1975-02-17
US3909962A (en) * 1973-06-29 1975-10-07 Poclain Sa Back-acting shovel having cooperating turret mounted blade
US3909963A (en) * 1973-06-28 1975-10-07 Poclain Sa Back-acting shovel with cooperating shield
FR2376258A1 (en) * 1976-12-28 1978-07-28 Kubota Ltd HYDRAULIC CONTROLLED MACHINE, IN PARTICULAR CONSTRUCTION MACHINE
FR2407300A1 (en) * 1977-10-31 1979-05-25 Kubota Ltd CIRCUIT ASSEMBLY FOR MACHINE THAT CAN OPERATE AS A BACKHOE LOADER AS WELL AS A DOZER
DE3204328A1 (en) * 1981-02-09 1982-09-09 Naigai Kensetsu Kogyo K K Bucket excavator
AT386437B (en) * 1986-02-18 1988-08-25 Posch Leopold Attachment for a front-end loader
US4808061A (en) * 1987-09-24 1989-02-28 Cook David K Single arm backhoe
US6615514B2 (en) * 2000-06-07 2003-09-09 Eloy Ayala Ruiz Perfected loading machine with excavator supplement and chassis for the same
US6651426B2 (en) 2002-03-07 2003-11-25 Leon's Mfg. Company, Inc. Loader drive system
US6668471B1 (en) * 2000-09-01 2003-12-30 Excavation Technology Corporation Towable earth digging apparatus
US20070124964A1 (en) * 2005-12-02 2007-06-07 Clark Equipment Company Compact excavator implement interface
US20130202397A1 (en) * 2010-10-11 2013-08-08 Joong-Ho Kim Tractor installed rotatable arm
US20170071140A1 (en) * 2015-09-10 2017-03-16 Komatsu Ltd. Work vehicle
US20170167110A1 (en) * 2014-03-21 2017-06-15 Donald Murtha Excavator

Citations (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB627203A (en) * 1947-09-03 1949-08-02 Guy Taite Shoosmith Improvements in and relating to bulldozers
US2660816A (en) * 1949-02-17 1953-12-01 Willard A Maxwell Combination bulldozer and shovel arrangement
US2846094A (en) * 1954-06-22 1958-08-05 John S Pilch Tractor operated trencher
US2858626A (en) * 1954-11-24 1958-11-04 Ohio Commw Eng Co Excavating apparatus
US2927706A (en) * 1956-07-20 1960-03-08 Bucyrus Erie Co Hydraulically-operated dipper
FR1258415A (en) * 1960-02-24 1961-04-14 Bruaysienne De Const Soc Crawler tractor equipped to serve as a front and rear loader or as a bulldozer
US3042233A (en) * 1958-12-15 1962-07-03 Koehring Co Multiple joint backhoe
US3071265A (en) * 1958-10-30 1963-01-01 J & L Engineering Co Inc Sugar-cane loader and ditcher combination
US3092919A (en) * 1961-01-03 1963-06-11 Int Harvester Co Vehicular framework
US3099098A (en) * 1961-11-20 1963-07-30 Charles J Davis Crawler trencher with tiltable body
US3172552A (en) * 1962-04-04 1965-03-09 Auxiliaire De L Entpr Soc Hydraulic control system for selfpropelled excavator
US3238648A (en) * 1963-12-23 1966-03-08 Caterpillar Tractor Co Bulldozer with adjustable stinger bit

Patent Citations (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB627203A (en) * 1947-09-03 1949-08-02 Guy Taite Shoosmith Improvements in and relating to bulldozers
US2660816A (en) * 1949-02-17 1953-12-01 Willard A Maxwell Combination bulldozer and shovel arrangement
US2846094A (en) * 1954-06-22 1958-08-05 John S Pilch Tractor operated trencher
US2858626A (en) * 1954-11-24 1958-11-04 Ohio Commw Eng Co Excavating apparatus
US2927706A (en) * 1956-07-20 1960-03-08 Bucyrus Erie Co Hydraulically-operated dipper
US3071265A (en) * 1958-10-30 1963-01-01 J & L Engineering Co Inc Sugar-cane loader and ditcher combination
US3042233A (en) * 1958-12-15 1962-07-03 Koehring Co Multiple joint backhoe
FR1258415A (en) * 1960-02-24 1961-04-14 Bruaysienne De Const Soc Crawler tractor equipped to serve as a front and rear loader or as a bulldozer
US3092919A (en) * 1961-01-03 1963-06-11 Int Harvester Co Vehicular framework
US3099098A (en) * 1961-11-20 1963-07-30 Charles J Davis Crawler trencher with tiltable body
US3172552A (en) * 1962-04-04 1965-03-09 Auxiliaire De L Entpr Soc Hydraulic control system for selfpropelled excavator
US3238648A (en) * 1963-12-23 1966-03-08 Caterpillar Tractor Co Bulldozer with adjustable stinger bit

Cited By (20)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
JPS50846B1 (en) * 1970-01-20 1975-01-13
US3704754A (en) * 1970-02-19 1972-12-05 Layton Mfg Co Articulated vehicle having an adjustable grader blade thereon
JPS5014703U (en) * 1973-06-01 1975-02-17
JPS536965Y2 (en) * 1973-06-01 1978-02-22
US3909963A (en) * 1973-06-28 1975-10-07 Poclain Sa Back-acting shovel with cooperating shield
US3909962A (en) * 1973-06-29 1975-10-07 Poclain Sa Back-acting shovel having cooperating turret mounted blade
FR2376258A1 (en) * 1976-12-28 1978-07-28 Kubota Ltd HYDRAULIC CONTROLLED MACHINE, IN PARTICULAR CONSTRUCTION MACHINE
FR2407300A1 (en) * 1977-10-31 1979-05-25 Kubota Ltd CIRCUIT ASSEMBLY FOR MACHINE THAT CAN OPERATE AS A BACKHOE LOADER AS WELL AS A DOZER
DE3204328A1 (en) * 1981-02-09 1982-09-09 Naigai Kensetsu Kogyo K K Bucket excavator
AT386437B (en) * 1986-02-18 1988-08-25 Posch Leopold Attachment for a front-end loader
US4808061A (en) * 1987-09-24 1989-02-28 Cook David K Single arm backhoe
US6615514B2 (en) * 2000-06-07 2003-09-09 Eloy Ayala Ruiz Perfected loading machine with excavator supplement and chassis for the same
US6668471B1 (en) * 2000-09-01 2003-12-30 Excavation Technology Corporation Towable earth digging apparatus
US6651426B2 (en) 2002-03-07 2003-11-25 Leon's Mfg. Company, Inc. Loader drive system
US20070124964A1 (en) * 2005-12-02 2007-06-07 Clark Equipment Company Compact excavator implement interface
US8024875B2 (en) 2005-12-02 2011-09-27 Clark Equipment Company Compact excavator implement interface
US20130202397A1 (en) * 2010-10-11 2013-08-08 Joong-Ho Kim Tractor installed rotatable arm
US20170167110A1 (en) * 2014-03-21 2017-06-15 Donald Murtha Excavator
US20170071140A1 (en) * 2015-09-10 2017-03-16 Komatsu Ltd. Work vehicle
US10362738B2 (en) * 2015-09-10 2019-07-30 Komatsu Ltd. Work vehicle

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3503456A (en) Mounting linkage for rippers
US4041623A (en) Grade cutting machine
CA2413584C (en) Apparatus for connecting an accessory to an excavator
US3495727A (en) Backhoe
US4662684A (en) Rotary rock and trench cutting saw
US2969844A (en) Earth boring implement
US4199033A (en) Augering accessory for backhoe or the like
US3471953A (en) Back-fill and tamping attachment for a self-propelled loader
US2103530A (en) System of equalizing the lifting speed of differently loaded hydraulic jacks
US3273729A (en) Clamping device
US4061194A (en) Tractor mounted scraper blade
US2899760A (en) Multi-purpose bulldozer blade
CN104452843B (en) A kind of Multifunctional small size wheel excavator
US3862697A (en) Front loading hydraulic excavator
US2319921A (en) Power shovel
US3587887A (en) Bucket loader attachment
US20040172865A1 (en) Trencher unit
US2702137A (en) Tractor attached excavator
US3155250A (en) Earth working implement
US4833797A (en) Trencher attachment
DE112008003445T5 (en) Loader and loader control system
US20080296083A1 (en) Steerable series two speed motor configuration
US7415999B1 (en) Tree grubber and push bar attachment device
CA2105961A1 (en) Tractor-loader-backhoe
US5413181A (en) Rake attachment for a skid steer