US3464168A - Portable shelter - Google Patents

Portable shelter Download PDF

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US3464168A
US3464168A US3464168DA US3464168A US 3464168 A US3464168 A US 3464168A US 3464168D A US3464168D A US 3464168DA US 3464168 A US3464168 A US 3464168A
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Prior art keywords
arches
arch
roof
sections
floor
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Frank L Russell
Thomas P Lyons Jr
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US Secretary of Army
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US Secretary of Army
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04HBUILDINGS OR LIKE STRUCTURES FOR PARTICULAR PURPOSES; SWIMMING OR SPLASH BATHS OR POOLS; MASTS; FENCING; TENTS OR CANOPIES, IN GENERAL
    • E04H9/00Buildings, or groups of buildings, or shelters adapted to withstand or provide protection against abnormal external influences, e.g. war-like action, earthquake, extreme climate
    • E04H9/16Buildings, or groups of buildings, or shelters adapted to withstand or provide protection against abnormal external influences, e.g. war-like action, earthquake, extreme climate against adverse conditions, e.g. extreme climate, pests
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04BGENERAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTIONS; WALLS, e.g. PARTITIONS; ROOFS; FLOORS; CEILINGS; INSULATION OR OTHER PROTECTION OF BUILDINGS
    • E04B1/00Constructions in general; Structures which are not restricted either to walls, e.g. partitions, or floors or ceilings or roofs
    • E04B1/32Arched structures; Vaulted structures; Folded structures
    • E04B1/3205Structures with a longitudinal horizontal axis, e.g. cylindrical or prismatic structures
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04BGENERAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTIONS; WALLS, e.g. PARTITIONS; ROOFS; FLOORS; CEILINGS; INSULATION OR OTHER PROTECTION OF BUILDINGS
    • E04B1/00Constructions in general; Structures which are not restricted either to walls, e.g. partitions, or floors or ceilings or roofs
    • E04B1/343Structures characterised by movable, separable, or collapsible parts, e.g. for transport
    • E04B1/34315Structures characterised by movable, separable, or collapsible parts, e.g. for transport characterised by separable parts
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04BGENERAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTIONS; WALLS, e.g. PARTITIONS; ROOFS; FLOORS; CEILINGS; INSULATION OR OTHER PROTECTION OF BUILDINGS
    • E04B1/00Constructions in general; Structures which are not restricted either to walls, e.g. partitions, or floors or ceilings or roofs
    • E04B1/32Arched structures; Vaulted structures; Folded structures
    • E04B2001/3235Arched structures; Vaulted structures; Folded structures having a grid frame
    • E04B2001/3241Frame connection details
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04BGENERAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTIONS; WALLS, e.g. PARTITIONS; ROOFS; FLOORS; CEILINGS; INSULATION OR OTHER PROTECTION OF BUILDINGS
    • E04B1/00Constructions in general; Structures which are not restricted either to walls, e.g. partitions, or floors or ceilings or roofs
    • E04B1/32Arched structures; Vaulted structures; Folded structures
    • E04B2001/3235Arched structures; Vaulted structures; Folded structures having a grid frame
    • E04B2001/3252Covering details

Description

Sept. 2, 1969 F. L. RUSSELL ET AL 3,454,168

PORTABLE SHELTER Filed Nov. 25, 1967 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 T T E I I I I I I I l l I I 1 J I 12220922202.-

' FmML.BucseZ7/, Tfiozzaas BLyom,J3 ay 4 4 w- N. WW--W v I Sept. 2, 1969 RUSSELL ETAL 3,464,168

PORTABLE SHELTER Filed Nov. 1967 4 Sheets-Sheet 5 Izwea-afofis: mazzfllmsseii,

Toam B Lyon's,J8*. by p I a Sept. 2, 1969 RUSSELL ET AL 3,464,168

PORTABLE SHELTER Filed Nov. 5, 1967 4 Sheets-Sheet Fz anifl LllwsseZZ,

Tizozzaa-s R L 302%, J2

United States Patent 3,464,168 PORTABLE SHELTER Frank L. Russell, West Lebanon, N.H., and Thomas P. Lyons, Jr., Middlehorough, Mass., assignors to the United States of America as represented by the Secretary of the Army Filed Nov. 3, 1967, Ser. No. 681,066 Int. Cl. E04!) 1/343, 7/10 US. CI. 5263 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE The invention described herein may be manufactured, used, and licensed by or for the Government for governmental purposes without the payment to us of any royalty thereon.

This invention relates to a completely prefabricated, lightweight, weathertight, portable shelter, which may be easily and quickly erected at the shelter site by inexperienced personnel without special tools.

While there are presently available many different types of lightweight structures, notably of the tent variety, which can be easily and quickly erected on a desired site to provide a certain measure of protection against the elements, such structures are not considered suitable for use under adverse weather conditions involving high winds, heavy rain or snow, or low temperatures. Other shelters, which are rigid rather than flexible in nature, are able to withstand and provide protection against extreme environmental conditions but are normally quite heavy, difiicult to assemble and erect, and occupy a great deal of space even when disassembled. This invention, on the other hand, provides a shelter that is lightweight, small in cube when disassembled and therefore eminently air-transportable; in addition, it is Weathertight, can successfully withstand winds as high as 100 knots, wind loads of 40 p.s.f. and snow loads of 40 p.s.f., and because of the low thermal conductivity of the materials used in its construction is suitable for use in both polar and tropical climates.

The objects and advantages of the present invention will become apparent in the following detailed description of the invention taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, which illustrate preferred embodiments of the invention and wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of a structure according to the present invention;

FIGURE 2 is a perspective view of the structure of FIGURE 1 without the end walls and roof covering;

FIGURE 3 is a view in elevation of one end of the structure of FIGURE 1; I

FIGURE 4 is a. detail section at the joint between the floor boxes;

FIGURE 5 is a detail section of a portion of 'the roof taken on the line 55 of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 6 is a view in section taken on the line 66 of FIGURE 1; 7

FIGURE 7 is a view in section taken on the line 77 of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 8 is a view in section taken on the line 8-8 of FIGURE 1;

3,464,168 Patented Sept. 2, 1969 FIGURE 9 is a top plan view of a roof section.

A completely assembled building structure in accordance with the present invention, is shown in FIGURE 1. This structure is formed of a plurality of interchangeable modular units which are connected to each other to form an integral structure of any desired length. Each modular unit is designed and constructed so that all of its individual components will be contained within a single packing case forming a relatively lightweight, compact shipping unit. Since each modular unit contains the components for one end wall, it is necessary to employ at least two units to complete a shelter. As will become apparent hereinafter, the structure of this invention is designed so as to be quickly and easily erected on site by unskilled personnel using simple tools in order that a protective shelter may be quickly set up even under adverse conditions.

Since the assembled structure must be both wind and Weatherproof, it is essential that all components be rigidly locked together and gasketed where necessary. While any mechanical fastening means may be employed to hold together the components of the structure, it is preferred that the fastening means be both rapid and foolproof in operation. It is also desirable that the fastening elements be fixed to or integral with the components to be joined together so as to reduce the chance of loss and to facilitate the rapid set-up of the structure. One such fastening means found to be satisfactory consists of a cammed hook or key which enters into and engages a recessed crossbar or loop within a female element. Such a cam locking device offers two noteworthy advantages; it requires but one tool, usually a hexagonal key or wrench, to accomplish the locking or unlocking operation and the locking operation serves to progressively draw the components together in a tight fitting relationship. While such a locking or fastening device is used to make all connections in the preferred embodiment of this invention and reference, hereinafter, to a locking device or fastener will be understood to mean such a cam locking device, it is obvious that other locking means may be employed in this invention. It is, however, advantageous to use one common type of locking or fastening means throughout the structure since such an arrangement will facilitate assembly and eliminate the need for special tools.

The various components of the structure must of necessity be lightweight, of sufiicient strength to withstand the expected loads, have good insulative qualities and be tough enough to withstand the rigors of assembly and use. Many materials are available which will meet these requirements to some degree, e.g., metal or resin impregnated glass fiber structures having foam insulation laminated thereon. One material found to have excellent qualities of strength, toughness and insulation as well as being lightweight and easy to fabrictae into complex shapes is a composite of glass cloth and organic foam wherein the glass cloth forms the exterior surface of the structure and the opposing larger surfaces are connected at regular intervals by ties of glass cloth which are either perpendicular to the faces or set at angles to the surface. Slabs of urethane or styrene foam of appropriate configuration are inserted within the glass cloth pockets. The resulting flexible member is placed in a mold of suitable configuration and resin is injected under pressure to impregnate the cloth and to tie the components together into a rigid unit. With this type of construction, delamination of foam insulation from the matrix is impossible. Unless otherwise specifically indicated herein, all structural components of this invention are constructed of this material which is commercially available under the trade name, Raypan, manufactured by Raymond Industries, Inc., Huntington Park, Calif.

FIGURE 1 of the drawings illustrates an assembled structure designated generally as 10 which is constructed of three modular units. The principal components of the structure can be seen in this view and comprise a floor 11, laterally spaced, parallel, upright, rigid arches 12 spanning the floor, roof covering sections 13 positioned between said arches and an end wall 14 having a doorway 15, ventilator 16 and smoke-pipe jack 17.

The three modular units comprising the structure of FIGURE 1 are delivered to the site in three packing cases each of which contains the components for a single module, such as two arches, two roof covering sections, one end wall, and a plurality of cable sections. To save on weight and space, the packing case itself does double duty, in that it also serves as the floor for each module. The packing case is constructed of two identical halfsections each of which, for example, measures 16 feet by 4 feet and is inches deep. As shown in FIGURE 2 and in more detail FIGURE 4, the half-sections are positioned so that the long side walls 22 are in abutting relationship, and then secured together by means of mating fasteners 20 and 21. In similar fashion, the floor sections of the different modules are secured together. The long side walls 22 double as floor joists and assure adequate support of the long fioor span or surface 23. It has been found to be desirable to lock the floor sections together with splines 24 to insure a wind and weatherproof joint and to increase the rigidity of the fioor surface.

After the floor has been assembled, arches 12 are set in place as shown in FIGURE 2. While a half-round arch configuration would be desirable from a strength standpoint, such a configuration drastically curtails the amount of usable space within the structure. To satisfy the twin objectives of maximum strength and usable space, the arch configuration shown in FIGURE 3 is used. A typical arch, thus formed, is 8 feet above the fioor at its midpoint and consists of a 2 foot straight vertical section as each leg of the arch surmounted by a compound curve section having a 12 foot radius extending 2230 each side of center and a 5.5 foot radius are connecting the ends of the 12 foot radius arc to the top of the vertical legs. With little sacrifice in strength as compared with a simple 8 foot radius semi-circle, this configuration will permit a 6 foot tall man to stand erect within 2 feet of the sidewall. In order to accommodate the arch within the 4 x 12' package, it is formed of identical half sections which are subsequently releasably secured together at the mid-point 25 of the arch by fasteners to form the rigid arch.

In transverse section each arch has an inverted T-shape as shown in FIGURES 6 and 7 which shape functions both to stiffen the arch and to provide a seat for the roof covering sections 13. The bottom or end of each arch is releasably secured by fasteners 27 and 28 to the floor end walls 26 preferably at the joint between each floor section as depicted in FIGURE 2. Spaced radially about each arch are six openings 32 which extend transversely through the arch and are aligned with similar openings on other erected arches.

After the arches have been assembled and locked in place to the floor, a separate thin steel cable 30 is drawn through each of the six sets of openings 32, and held in place or locked to the end arches by oversize wing nuts 31 threadably attached to either end of the cable. The individual openings 32 are somewhat oversize as shown in FIGURES 6 and 7 so that the cable 30 may readily be drawn through. The cable is of modular construction and is formed of a plurality of approximately 4 foot lengths of galvanized steel wire rope which is substantially equal to the space between adjacent arches. Each individual length of wire rope has female, internally threaded sleeves 33 aflixed at each end thereof. An externally threaded stud 34 with a wrench grip 35 located midway between the ends thereof which constitutes means for turning same is threadably insertable at either end within a sleeve 33 so as to connect two lengths of wire rope. By connecting short lengths of wire rope together in this manner, wire cables 30 may be assembled of sufficient length to extend through and tie together all of the arches in the completed structure. Oversize wingnuts 31 are threadably engaged to the end of studs 34 at each end of the cable externally of the end arches to prevent the cable from being pulled through the openings 32 in the end arches.

Each roof covering section 13, shown in plan view in FIGURE 9, is constructed of a plurality of rigid, block segments 36 which are affixed to a continuous waterproof cloth covering 37, e.g., rubber impregnated nylon cloth. The blocks are dimensioned to ride on the seat formed by the inverted T of a pair of arches with the width of each block as well as its degree of curvature being determined by the shape of the arch. When in place and resting on the arches, the blocks of each section are in abutting edge to edge relationship providing a solid covering between each pair of arches. It should also be noted that when in place between the arches the section is substantially rigid in a direction perpendicular to the plane of the arches. The number of blocks is not critical but should be such as will permit folding of the roof section 13 along its longitudinal axis and enclosure within the packing case. In the present example, there are 14 blocks in each section. Provision is made for a cable slot or transverse channel 38 in the underside of the block segments to accommodate the wire cable 30 spanning the arches. The waterproof cloth covering 37 has excess material 37 extending laterally on either side thereof dimensionedto extend over and cover each adjacent arch. This excess of material is held in place along the opposite side of each arch by a tensioned nylon rope 39 contained within a loop 40 running along each marginal edge of the cloth covering. The ends of the nylon rope are tied down to the opposite ends of each arch. All arches, save the arch on either end of the structure, will, when the roof is completely in place, be covered with two overlapping layers of fabric as shown in FIGURE 6. The end arches will be covered with one layer of fabric and require an additional nylon rope 41 to hold the fabric in place about the end arch as shown in FIGURE 7.

The block segments 42 at either end of the roofing section 13 are gasketed and contain fastening means 43 which mate with fastener 44 on the floor as shown in FIGURE 8 holding the segments 42 tightly to the floor to ensure an air-tight joint. While the roof covering section 13 has been described as being a plurality of blocks attached to an oversize cloth covering, it is not essential that there be excess lateral material on either side of the blocks or that there be a cloth covering. Since the abutting edges of the blocks are beveled so as to fit snugly together, the blocks will provide an essentially weathertight roof. The cloth covering, however, does provide an additional measure of insurance to ensure a weathertight covering and also facilitates assembly of the roof.

When all the roof sections are in place, the steel cables between the end arches are shortened by threadably advancing the wing nuts at either end. As the cables shorten, the arches are drawn tightly against the block segments of the roof sections, post tensioning the entire structure and locking the block segments to the arches by compressive friction producing a rigid, weathertight roof covering that can withstand wind, snow and rain. The steel cables, therefore, function as adjustable tensioning means to maintain the arches and roof covering in tight fitting end to end relationship to hold the roof tightly in place.

The end wall 14 of the structure shown in FIGURES 1 and 3 disposed substantially within the plane defined by the end arch consists of five panels with the central panel 48 containing the door 15 and ventilation ports 16 and 17 The panels are locked together along their vertical side edges and form an integral wall with the joints being gasketed to provide a weathertight closure. A tongue 46 shown in FIGURE 7 extends upwardly from the top of each panel and is adapted to be inserted and retained within a groove 47 in the arch. Gaskets 48 are located on either side of the tongue. The bottom of the endwalls is attached or locked to the floor by means of angle clips 49 which are fastened to the floor side wall 22 and which extend upwardly into a groove 50 in the lower portion of the endwall. An advantage of this endwall is that it may serve as an outside endwall or an interior partition 51 as shown in FIGURE 2. Location of any interior partition will be beneath any arch with the tongue and groove connection in the arch serving to hold the partition in place.

It will be apparent from the foregoing description that this invention provides a lightweight portable, easilyerected shelter that is suitable for use in all environments ranging from tropical to polar. The use of modules allows for flexibility with respect to the length of the shelter to be constructed and in the event of loss of one modular unit. Since each component of each module is standardized, the use of mass production techniques is feasible and results in substantial lowering of costs of the shelter. Standardization of the components and modules simplifies the assembly of the shelter and the use of common integral fasteners also facilitates assembly. The use of steel cables to tension the arches against the roof 'blocks placing the latter under compression materially increases the strength and rigidity of the structure.

We claim:

1. A portable building structure assembled of modular units and comprising in combination:

(a) A floor constructed of modular components releasably fastened together to form a rigid platform,

(b) A plurality of parallel, upright, spaced-apart, rigid, support arches positioned over said floor and having the ends of each of said arches releasably fastened to said floor, each of said arches having a shape of an inverted Tee in cross section and being formed of a plurality of sections having releasable fasteners associated therewith for joining said sections into the arch,

(c) A roof covering comprising a plurality of roof sections, each roof section adapted to span the space between a pair of adjacent arches and to be supported by said adjacent pair of arches, said roof section formed of a plurality of blocks of rigid material adapted to be held together in tight fitting relationship, said blocks being attached to and covered by an external, continuous, flexible, waterproof covering,

(d) End walls disposed substantially within the plane defined by the arches at either end of the structure, and

(e) Adjustable tension means disposed between the end arches of the structure to maintain the arches and roof covering in tight fitting relationship end to end of the structure whereby each roof section is held in place between the arches by compressive friction, said adjustable tension means being a plurality of separate, horizontally disposed cables spaced radially about said arches and having means for adjusting the length thereof, each of said cables being constructed of a plurality of cable sections having an internally threaded sleeve on each end of said section and externally threaded studs having means for turning same located between the ends of said cable sections, said studs being threadably receivable in said sleeve to connect said sections of cable into a single length, each of said sections of said cable having a length substantially equal to the space between adjacent arches of said structure.

2. A portable building structure according to claim 1 wherein said arches are provided with a plurality of radially spaced aligned openings therein, said cables passing through said openings.

3. A portable building structure according to claim 2 wherein said roof sections are provided with transverse channels in the interior surface thereof aligned with said radially spaced openings in said arches to receive said cables.

4. A portable building structure according to claim 3 wherein said modular components of said floor maybe releasably joined to form a containerfor receiving the said sections of two complete arches, two of said roof sections, one end wall, and a plurality of said cable sections and studs whereby the components of said building structure may be packed in modular units for storage and transport.

5. A portable building structure according to claim 1 wherein said means for adjusting said cables comprises a threaded stud fixed to the ends thereof and a wing nut threadably engaged on each stud externally of the end arch.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,377,500 5/1921 Nissen 52-86 2,874,812 2/1959 Clevett 5286 X 2,877,506 3/1959 Almoslino 52-4227 2,896,271 7/1959 Kloote et al 5263 3,088,558 5/1963 Dickinson 52-227 X 3,156,018 11/1964 Slayter 5290 X 3,280,522 10/1966 Palfey et al 52-584 X FRANK L. ABBOTT, Primary Examiner PRICE C. PAW, JR., Assistant Examiner US. Cl. X.R. 52--86, 227, 496

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Cited By (26)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3731440A (en) * 1971-04-13 1973-05-08 H Welz Collapsible prefabricated building
US3763618A (en) * 1971-02-22 1973-10-09 Dow Chemical Co Method of preparing arched structures
US3943672A (en) * 1975-01-03 1976-03-16 Sheeran John H O Prefabricated, modular structure formed by laterally spaced cantilever arch frame assemblies
US4065907A (en) * 1970-11-27 1978-01-03 Unicon Parking Structures, Inc. Demountable multiple level building structures
US4191002A (en) * 1973-03-13 1980-03-04 Unicon Parking Structures, Inc. Demountable multiple level building structure
US4195454A (en) * 1978-05-11 1980-04-01 Reinhold Sauder Roof structure
US4528785A (en) * 1982-08-20 1985-07-16 Jager Johannes A De Displaceable roof structure
US4707953A (en) * 1983-03-30 1987-11-24 Brunswick Corporation Expandable shelter system providing collective protection
US4739597A (en) * 1985-08-16 1988-04-26 Voegeli Ronald C Easily disassemblable enclosure and method for assembling same
US4745713A (en) * 1987-02-13 1988-05-24 Yoshiharu Gotoh Prefabricated PC shelter structure
US4765103A (en) * 1984-06-25 1988-08-23 Neville Clarke Building structure and components thereof
US4890437A (en) * 1987-07-09 1990-01-02 Quaile Allan T Segmented arch structure
US4907383A (en) * 1987-04-27 1990-03-13 Winter Amos G Iv Bowed roof structure, structure panel and method for using same
US5224315A (en) * 1987-04-27 1993-07-06 Winter Amos G Iv Prefabricated building panel having an insect and fungicide deterrent therein
FR2743834A1 (en) * 1996-01-22 1997-07-25 Perrot Rene Mobile shelter, especially for covering a pool
US6240686B1 (en) 1999-01-19 2001-06-05 Donald R. Mill Prestressed unitary building method and structure
US20070175105A1 (en) * 2005-12-23 2007-08-02 Remy Desbiens Ready to assemble shelter
US20100266349A1 (en) * 2009-02-27 2010-10-21 Jennmar Corporation Impact Resistant Lagging, Method For Designing Impact Resistant Lagging, and Apparatus for Testing Impact Resistant Lagging
US20130118092A1 (en) * 2010-07-19 2013-05-16 Richard H. Kramer Prefabricated Building and Kit
US8615934B1 (en) * 2011-10-07 2013-12-31 Stephen C. Webb Panelized portable shelter
US20140202091A1 (en) * 2013-01-24 2014-07-24 Walton W. McCarthy Hexoid arch and shelter structure
US9021750B1 (en) * 2015-01-07 2015-05-05 Frederick Matulin Portable modular tornado and hurricane survival shelter kit
US9388564B2 (en) * 2013-01-28 2016-07-12 Airbus Defense And Space, S.A. Modular adaptable housing architecture
USD774208S1 (en) * 2014-11-13 2016-12-13 Kt-Shelter Oy Shelter
USD788319S1 (en) * 2014-06-30 2017-05-30 Shelterlogic Corp. Canopy
US10364568B2 (en) 2015-01-23 2019-07-30 Richard Kramer Fabricated building

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US1377500A (en) * 1917-03-12 1921-05-10 Nissen Peter Norman Portable building
US2874812A (en) * 1955-06-28 1959-02-24 Jr Merton L Clevett Knock-down structural member with collapsible members
US2877506A (en) * 1953-08-10 1959-03-17 Hans A Almoslino Transformable rigid structural unit for a body or article supporting assemblage
US2896271A (en) * 1955-01-31 1959-07-28 Haskelite Mfg Corp Enclosures for refrigerated areas
US3088558A (en) * 1958-11-17 1963-05-07 Harvey Aluminum Inc Prefabricated building assembly
US3156018A (en) * 1961-12-21 1964-11-10 John H Slayter Plant-manufactured building structure
US3280522A (en) * 1963-09-16 1966-10-25 Dow Chemical Co Building panels and fastener means therefor

Patent Citations (7)

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1377500A (en) * 1917-03-12 1921-05-10 Nissen Peter Norman Portable building
US2877506A (en) * 1953-08-10 1959-03-17 Hans A Almoslino Transformable rigid structural unit for a body or article supporting assemblage
US2896271A (en) * 1955-01-31 1959-07-28 Haskelite Mfg Corp Enclosures for refrigerated areas
US2874812A (en) * 1955-06-28 1959-02-24 Jr Merton L Clevett Knock-down structural member with collapsible members
US3088558A (en) * 1958-11-17 1963-05-07 Harvey Aluminum Inc Prefabricated building assembly
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Cited By (31)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4065907A (en) * 1970-11-27 1978-01-03 Unicon Parking Structures, Inc. Demountable multiple level building structures
US4068420A (en) * 1970-11-27 1978-01-17 Unicon Parking Structures, Inc. Demountable multiple level building structures
US3763618A (en) * 1971-02-22 1973-10-09 Dow Chemical Co Method of preparing arched structures
US3731440A (en) * 1971-04-13 1973-05-08 H Welz Collapsible prefabricated building
US4191002A (en) * 1973-03-13 1980-03-04 Unicon Parking Structures, Inc. Demountable multiple level building structure
US3943672A (en) * 1975-01-03 1976-03-16 Sheeran John H O Prefabricated, modular structure formed by laterally spaced cantilever arch frame assemblies
US4195454A (en) * 1978-05-11 1980-04-01 Reinhold Sauder Roof structure
US4528785A (en) * 1982-08-20 1985-07-16 Jager Johannes A De Displaceable roof structure
US4707953A (en) * 1983-03-30 1987-11-24 Brunswick Corporation Expandable shelter system providing collective protection
US4765103A (en) * 1984-06-25 1988-08-23 Neville Clarke Building structure and components thereof
US4739597A (en) * 1985-08-16 1988-04-26 Voegeli Ronald C Easily disassemblable enclosure and method for assembling same
US4745713A (en) * 1987-02-13 1988-05-24 Yoshiharu Gotoh Prefabricated PC shelter structure
US4907383A (en) * 1987-04-27 1990-03-13 Winter Amos G Iv Bowed roof structure, structure panel and method for using same
US5224315A (en) * 1987-04-27 1993-07-06 Winter Amos G Iv Prefabricated building panel having an insect and fungicide deterrent therein
US4890437A (en) * 1987-07-09 1990-01-02 Quaile Allan T Segmented arch structure
WO1997027374A1 (en) * 1996-01-22 1997-07-31 Perrot Rene Movable shelter, in particular for covering a swimming pool
FR2743834A1 (en) * 1996-01-22 1997-07-25 Perrot Rene Mobile shelter, especially for covering a pool
US6240686B1 (en) 1999-01-19 2001-06-05 Donald R. Mill Prestressed unitary building method and structure
US20070175105A1 (en) * 2005-12-23 2007-08-02 Remy Desbiens Ready to assemble shelter
US20100266349A1 (en) * 2009-02-27 2010-10-21 Jennmar Corporation Impact Resistant Lagging, Method For Designing Impact Resistant Lagging, and Apparatus for Testing Impact Resistant Lagging
US9249663B2 (en) * 2009-02-27 2016-02-02 Fci Holdings Delaware, Inc. Impact resistant lagging, method for designing impact resistant lagging, and apparatus for testing impact resistant lagging
US20130118092A1 (en) * 2010-07-19 2013-05-16 Richard H. Kramer Prefabricated Building and Kit
US9428926B2 (en) * 2010-07-19 2016-08-30 Richard H. Kramer Prefabricated building and kit
US8615934B1 (en) * 2011-10-07 2013-12-31 Stephen C. Webb Panelized portable shelter
US20140202091A1 (en) * 2013-01-24 2014-07-24 Walton W. McCarthy Hexoid arch and shelter structure
US9388564B2 (en) * 2013-01-28 2016-07-12 Airbus Defense And Space, S.A. Modular adaptable housing architecture
USD844824S1 (en) 2014-06-30 2019-04-02 Shelterlogic Corp. Canopy
USD788319S1 (en) * 2014-06-30 2017-05-30 Shelterlogic Corp. Canopy
USD774208S1 (en) * 2014-11-13 2016-12-13 Kt-Shelter Oy Shelter
US9021750B1 (en) * 2015-01-07 2015-05-05 Frederick Matulin Portable modular tornado and hurricane survival shelter kit
US10364568B2 (en) 2015-01-23 2019-07-30 Richard Kramer Fabricated building

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