US3371247A - Antistatic carpet and method of fabrication - Google Patents

Antistatic carpet and method of fabrication Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US3371247A
US3371247A US549480A US54948066A US3371247A US 3371247 A US3371247 A US 3371247A US 549480 A US549480 A US 549480A US 54948066 A US54948066 A US 54948066A US 3371247 A US3371247 A US 3371247A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
leather
carpet
series
electric
material
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US549480A
Inventor
Keith E Mullenger
Original Assignee
Keith E. Mullenger
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Keith E. Mullenger filed Critical Keith E. Mullenger
Priority to US549480A priority Critical patent/US3371247A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US3371247A publication Critical patent/US3371247A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Application status is Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical

Links

Classifications

    • HELECTRICITY
    • H05ELECTRIC TECHNIQUES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05FSTATIC ELECTRICITY; NATURALLY-OCCURRING ELECTRICITY
    • H05F3/00Carrying-off electrostatic charges
    • H05F3/02Carrying-off electrostatic charges by means of earthing connections
    • H05F3/025Floors or floor coverings specially adapted for discharging static charges
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S57/00Textiles: spinning, twisting, and twining
    • Y10S57/901Antistatic

Description

United States Patent ABSTRACT OF THE DISQLURE An antistatic carpet fabricated from a blend of a first fiber material which is positive with respect to leather in the tribe-electric series and a second fiber material which is negative with respect to leather in tribo-electric series.

The present invention relates generally to a method for controlling the generation of tribo-electrie charges of static electricity and more particularly to a method for producing carpets having excellent antistatic characteristics.

In the past, considerable research, attention and effort have been directed by the textile industry to the problem of eliminating or reducing friction produced static electricity in carpets. Que solution that has been proposed by a number of workers in the field involves the application of a surface spray coating which sufficiently increases electrical surface conductivity of the fibres so that electric charges produced by frictional contact with leather shoe soles are quickly redistributed and dissipated. The recognized problem with such coatings is that they are removed by vacuum sweepers and normal trafiic wear and the carpets must therefore be retreated at regular intervals.

Another proposed solution is that of mixing conductive metal fibers (i.e., stainless steel, copper, etc.) in with the conventional textile fibers or filaments to increase the carpet electrical conductivity. Production of such carpets has been found to be expensive and the problem of increased wear and duiling of expensive cutting blades in the manufacture of the carpets is now believed to be a troublesome one.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a method of fabricating carpets from conventional textile materials using normal manufacturing techniques, which carpets will permanently exhibit greatly improved antistatic characteristics.

ln accordance with the present invention, a carpet having a greatly improved antistatic characteristic is provided by blending two different suitable carpet fibers together which are selected on the basis of their relative positions in the tribo-electric or electro-static series with respect to leather so that a net zero electrical charge is accumulated on leather shoe soles frictionally contacting the composite rug surface. It is generally known that when two different materials are rubbed together, one becomes positively charged and the other correspondingly negatively charged. Charts have been prepared by workers in the textile field relating various materials in a series which has become known as a tribe-electric or electro-static series. From such a series one can predict that when any two materials in the series are rubbed together, the higher one will become positively charged and the lower one will become negatively charged. Described otherwise, the higher more positive A (above) material in the series is a donor of electrons to the lower B (below) material which accepts and temporarily holds the donated electrons.

By properly blending two selected fibers, an A fiber or filament which is above leather in the electro-static series with a B fiber or filament which is below leather in the series, it is possible, in accordance with the present invention, to provide a carpet which produces a neutral or net zero transfer of electrical charge to the leather shoe soles of persons walking on the carpet. In other words,

the A material donates substantially the same number of electrons to the leather soles as are removed or accepted from the leather by the lower B material. With the desired blend of selected A and B fibers, the net transfer of electrical charge to leather shoe soles produced by frictional contact with the surfaces of the blended fibers is substantially zero and electrical shock annoyance is thereby eliminated.

Suitable A materials which are more positive than leather in the tribo-electric series include, by way of example, wool and nylon. Suitable B materials which are more negative than leather in the tribe-electric series include, by way of example, Dacron (copolyester of ethylene glycol and terephthalic acid), Orlon (vinyl polymer of acrylo-nitrile), Velon (vinyl copolymer of vinylidene chloride and vinyl chloride), Dynel (vinyl copolymer of acrylonitrile and vinyl chloride), polyvinyl-chloride, polyethylene and polypropylene.

Using a blend of nylon (A material) and Dynel (B material) with the surface areas of the A and B materials proportioned in approximately a 1:2 ratio, the frictional charge produced on shoe soles contacting the composite surface was measured as substantially zero.

Using a blend of wool and Dynel, the optimum ratio of surface areas was measured as being approximately 1:1. By altering the optimum ratio to favor the A material, the transfer of a net negative charge to shoe soles rubbed on the carpet can be readily measured with respect to ground by holding the input probe of a vacuum tube voltmeter in the wearers hand and grounding the return terimnal. in like manner, if the optimum ratio of surfaces is altered to favor the B material, the transfer of a net positive charge results and this is readily measured.

Thus, it is apparent that optimum blends of various A material and B material combinations may be readily determined by relatively simple measurements either as described above or by the use of available laboratory electrometer apparatus such as that described by S. P. Hersh and D. I. Montgomery in an article entitled Static Electrification of Filaments Experimental Techniques and Results, published in Textile Research Journal, vol. XXV, No. 4, April 1955.

In many applications, it may be preferred to combine the A and B fibers or filaments together to form a composite yarn from which the antistatic carpet may be fabricated. In other applications, it may be preferable to fabricate the antistatic carpet from separate yarns of A and B materials. In the latter case, the pattern distribution of the separate A and B materials should preferably be small relative to the average area of a shoe sole so that the predetermined desired ratio of surface areas is substantially constant and independent of position or angular orientation of contacting shoe soles.

While preferred embodiments of the present invention have been described, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that various changes may be made without departing from the scope of the invention as defined in the claims.

What is claimed is:

l. The method of making an antistatic carpet comprising the steps of:

(a) selecting a first fiber material A which is positive with respect to leather in the tribo-electric series,

(b) selecting a second fiber material B which is nega tive with respect to leather in the tribo-electric series, and

(c) fabricating a carpet with a blend of the A and B fibers so proportioned that the respective surface areas of the A and B fibers produce a nominal zero tribo-electric charge on leather shoe soles frictionally contacting the carpet surface.

3 2. The method of making an antistatic carpet comprising the steps of:

(a) selecting a first fiber material A which is positive With respect to leather in the tribo-electric series, (b) selecting a second fiber material B which is negative with respect to leather in the tribe-electric series, and (c) fabricating a composite carpet with the A and B fibers proportionally blended so that the electron charge transferred to and from contacting leather shoe soles with respective A and B surfaces is substantially neutralized. 3. A composite yarn for use in the manufacture of antistatic carpets comprising:

(a) a blend of a first fiber material A which is positive With respect to leather in the tribO-electric series with (b) a second fiber material B which is negative with respect to leather in the tribe-electric series,

(1 (c) the blend being so proportioned that the respective surface areas of the A and B fiber materials produce a nominal zero tribo-electric charge on leather shoe soles frictionally contacting the yarn surface. 4. An antistatic carpet fabricated from a blend of a first fiber material A which is positive with respect to leather in the tribo-electric series with a second fiber material B which is negative with respect to leather in the tribe-electric series, the blend being so proportioned that the respective surface areas of the A and B fiber materials produce a nominal zero tribo-electric charge on leather shoe soles frictionally contacting the carpet surface.

No references cited.

MILTON O. HIRSHFIELD, Primary Examiner.

J. A. SILVERMAN, Assistant Examiner.

US549480A 1966-05-12 1966-05-12 Antistatic carpet and method of fabrication Expired - Lifetime US3371247A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US549480A US3371247A (en) 1966-05-12 1966-05-12 Antistatic carpet and method of fabrication

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US549480A US3371247A (en) 1966-05-12 1966-05-12 Antistatic carpet and method of fabrication

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US3371247A true US3371247A (en) 1968-02-27

Family

ID=24193189

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US549480A Expired - Lifetime US3371247A (en) 1966-05-12 1966-05-12 Antistatic carpet and method of fabrication

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US3371247A (en)

Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3510386A (en) * 1966-06-23 1970-05-05 Gaf Corp Antistatic carpet structure
US3541390A (en) * 1967-05-02 1970-11-17 Berckheim Graf Von Steady-field generating arrangement
US3703073A (en) * 1970-08-14 1972-11-21 Riegel Textile Corp Antistatic yarn production
US3861429A (en) * 1970-06-24 1975-01-21 Burlington Industries Inc Method and apparatus for eliminating static charges in pile fabric
JPS5975016A (en) * 1982-10-22 1984-04-27 Nihon Keori Kk Anti-electrostatic carpet
US4661689A (en) * 1985-10-28 1987-04-28 Collins & Aikman Corporation Electrical heating pad with antistatic surface
US4725717A (en) * 1985-10-28 1988-02-16 Collins & Aikman Corporation Impact-resistant electrical heating pad with antistatic upper and lower surfaces
US4771596A (en) * 1970-04-20 1988-09-20 Brunswick Corporation Method of making fiber composite
US4856769A (en) * 1986-11-08 1989-08-15 Edward W. Andrew, Ltd. Apparatus for conveying sheets

Non-Patent Citations (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Title
None *

Cited By (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3510386A (en) * 1966-06-23 1970-05-05 Gaf Corp Antistatic carpet structure
US3541390A (en) * 1967-05-02 1970-11-17 Berckheim Graf Von Steady-field generating arrangement
US4771596A (en) * 1970-04-20 1988-09-20 Brunswick Corporation Method of making fiber composite
US3861429A (en) * 1970-06-24 1975-01-21 Burlington Industries Inc Method and apparatus for eliminating static charges in pile fabric
US3703073A (en) * 1970-08-14 1972-11-21 Riegel Textile Corp Antistatic yarn production
JPS5975016A (en) * 1982-10-22 1984-04-27 Nihon Keori Kk Anti-electrostatic carpet
JPS6349483B2 (en) * 1982-10-22 1988-10-04 Nippon Keori Kk
US4661689A (en) * 1985-10-28 1987-04-28 Collins & Aikman Corporation Electrical heating pad with antistatic surface
US4725717A (en) * 1985-10-28 1988-02-16 Collins & Aikman Corporation Impact-resistant electrical heating pad with antistatic upper and lower surfaces
US4856769A (en) * 1986-11-08 1989-08-15 Edward W. Andrew, Ltd. Apparatus for conveying sheets

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3987613A (en) Process for preparing textiles without static charge accumulation and resulting product
US3454460A (en) Bicomponent polyester textile fiber
US3422460A (en) Static-inhibiting garment
US3582445A (en) Carpet having durable antistatic properties
US3358436A (en) Process for spreading or dividing textile materials
US3314845A (en) Method of flocking and subsequently developing latently crimpable fibers and article produced thereby
US2939201A (en) Trilobal textile filament
Lee Possible C-Noninvariant Effects in the 3 π Decay Modes of η 0 and ω 0
US4356220A (en) Artificial turf-like product of thermoplastic polymers
US3215584A (en) Composite fabric and method of manufacture thereof
US6497951B1 (en) Temperature dependent electrically resistive yarn
De Gennes On a relation between percolation theory and the elasticity of gels
US5102727A (en) Electrically conductive textile fabric having conductivity gradient
US6720539B2 (en) Woven thermal textile
CA1081416A (en) Antistatic biconstituent polymeric filament with partially encapsulated constituent containing carbon black
US2937066A (en) Method for treating polyethylene and treated polyethylene articles thereby obtained
US3582448A (en) Garments having durable antistatic properties
US3865678A (en) Suede-like raised woven fabric and process for the preparation thereof
US3053609A (en) Textile
CA1281767C (en) Conductive wrist band
US4511615A (en) Method for manufacturing an adhesive interlining and fabric produced thereby
US3678675A (en) Antistatic fabric
US4307144A (en) Static-dissipating fabrics
CA1224518A (en) Heating element for textiles
US20030134052A1 (en) Electrostatic impregnation of powders on substrates