US3272901A - Textile filament having apparent variable denier - Google Patents

Textile filament having apparent variable denier Download PDF

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US3272901A
US3272901A US31337563A US3272901A US 3272901 A US3272901 A US 3272901A US 31337563 A US31337563 A US 31337563A US 3272901 A US3272901 A US 3272901A
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filament
polymer
stream
substantially
channel
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James G Sims
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Monsanto Co
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Monsanto Co
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D01NATURAL OR ARTIFICIAL THREADS OR FIBRES; SPINNING
    • D01DMECHANICAL METHODS OR APPARATUS IN THE MANUFACTURE OF ARTIFICIAL FILAMENTS, THREADS, FIBRES, BRISTLES OR RIBBONS
    • D01D5/00Formation of filaments, threads, or the like
    • D01D5/28Formation of filaments, threads, or the like while mixing different spinning solutions or melts during the spinning operation; Spinnerette packs therefor
    • D01D5/30Conjugate filaments; Spinnerette packs therefor
    • D01D5/32Side-by-side structure; Spinnerette packs therefor
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D01NATURAL OR ARTIFICIAL THREADS OR FIBRES; SPINNING
    • D01DMECHANICAL METHODS OR APPARATUS IN THE MANUFACTURE OF ARTIFICIAL FILAMENTS, THREADS, FIBRES, BRISTLES OR RIBBONS
    • D01D5/00Formation of filaments, threads, or the like
    • D01D5/20Formation of filaments, threads, or the like with varying denier along their length
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D01NATURAL OR ARTIFICIAL THREADS OR FIBRES; SPINNING
    • D01DMECHANICAL METHODS OR APPARATUS IN THE MANUFACTURE OF ARTIFICIAL FILAMENTS, THREADS, FIBRES, BRISTLES OR RIBBONS
    • D01D5/00Formation of filaments, threads, or the like
    • D01D5/253Formation of filaments, threads, or the like with a non-circular cross section; Spinnerette packs therefor
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D01NATURAL OR ARTIFICIAL THREADS OR FIBRES; SPINNING
    • D01DMECHANICAL METHODS OR APPARATUS IN THE MANUFACTURE OF ARTIFICIAL FILAMENTS, THREADS, FIBRES, BRISTLES OR RIBBONS
    • D01D5/00Formation of filaments, threads, or the like
    • D01D5/28Formation of filaments, threads, or the like while mixing different spinning solutions or melts during the spinning operation; Spinnerette packs therefor
    • D01D5/30Conjugate filaments; Spinnerette packs therefor
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/29Coated or structually defined flake, particle, cell, strand, strand portion, rod, filament, macroscopic fiber or mass thereof
    • Y10T428/2913Rod, strand, filament or fiber
    • Y10T428/2929Bicomponent, conjugate, composite or collateral fibers or filaments [i.e., coextruded sheath-core or side-by-side type]
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/29Coated or structually defined flake, particle, cell, strand, strand portion, rod, filament, macroscopic fiber or mass thereof
    • Y10T428/2913Rod, strand, filament or fiber
    • Y10T428/2929Bicomponent, conjugate, composite or collateral fibers or filaments [i.e., coextruded sheath-core or side-by-side type]
    • Y10T428/2931Fibers or filaments nonconcentric [e.g., side-by-side or eccentric, etc.]
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/29Coated or structually defined flake, particle, cell, strand, strand portion, rod, filament, macroscopic fiber or mass thereof
    • Y10T428/2913Rod, strand, filament or fiber
    • Y10T428/2973Particular cross section
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/29Coated or structually defined flake, particle, cell, strand, strand portion, rod, filament, macroscopic fiber or mass thereof
    • Y10T428/2913Rod, strand, filament or fiber
    • Y10T428/2973Particular cross section
    • Y10T428/2976Longitudinally varying
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/29Coated or structually defined flake, particle, cell, strand, strand portion, rod, filament, macroscopic fiber or mass thereof
    • Y10T428/2913Rod, strand, filament or fiber
    • Y10T428/2973Particular cross section
    • Y10T428/2978Surface characteristic

Description

Se t. 13, 1966 J. G. SIMS 3,272,901

TEXTILE FILAMENT HAVING APPARENT VARIABLE DENIER INVENTOR BY y/ggww ATTORNEY United States Patent 3,272,901 TEXTILE FILAMENT HAVING APPARENT VARIABLE DENIER James G. Sims, Pensacola, Fla., assiguor to Monsanto Company, a corporation of Delaware Original application Nov. 21, 1962, Ser. No. 239,189, now

Patent No. 3,138,516, dated June 23, 1964. Divided and this application Oct. 2, 1963, Ser. No. 313,375

4 Claims. (Cl. 264177) The present invention relates to a novelty textile filament having an appearance resembling a variable denier filament together with the method and apparatus for producing the filament. More particularly, the novel filament according to the present invention has a substantially constant cross-sectional area but has a cross-sectional configuration which varies along its length.

This application is a division of my copending application Serial No. 239,189, filed November 21, 1962, and now U.S. Patent No. 3,138,516, entitled, Textile Filament Having Apparent Variable Denier.

Variable denier yarns made according to the prior art presented several problems in processing the filaments into yarns and the yarns into fabrics. Such prior art filaments were typically produced by variably drawing the filaments, thus producing portions of the filaments which had been considerably stretched and leaving other portions substantially unstretched. The large portions occasionally would catch in a restricted area, such as the eye of a needle. Furthermore, the differences in physical properties resulting from the variable drawing produced undesirable non-uniform physical properties in the filaments. Such prior art filaments usually had to be further treated to provide high-contrast variable dye receptivity.

Accordingly, it is an object of the invention to provide a constant denier filament having an apparent variable denier and an actual variable covering power.

A further object is to provide a filament of the above character in which the cross-sectional shape varies although the cross-sectional area remains constant along the filament.

A further object is to facilitate provision of a selfcrimping filament wherein the crimping is random in kind and extent.

A further object is to provide a filament of the above character which possesses random receptivity to dyeing.

A further object is to provide a filament of the above character which imparts 'novel desirable handle, luster, and porosity to textile fabrics.

A further object is to provide a novel method and apparatus for producing filaments of the above character.

Other objects of the invention will in part be obvious and will in part appear hereinafter.

The invention accordingly comprises the several steps and the relation of one or more of said steps with respect to each of the others, and the article possessing the features, properties, and relation of elements which are exemplified in the following detailed disclosure and the scope of the invention will be indicated in the claims.

For a more complete understanding of the nature and objects of the invention, reference should be made to the following detailed description taken in connection with the drawing in which:

FIGURE 1 is an enlarged plan view of a fragment of a spinneret;

FIGURE 2 is a perspective view of a portion of a novel filament according to the present invention;

FIGURE 3 is a schematic cross-sectional view of particular apparatus for producing the novel filament of FIGURE 2;

FIGURE 4 is a sectional view taken along line 44 of FIGURE 3; and

FIGURE 5 is a sectional view taken along line 5-5 of FIGURE 3.

Referring now to FIGURE 1, a molten polymer after being extruded through a non-circular orifice such as shown at 22 becomes solidified to form a continuous filament. It has been found that the cross-sectional shape of the solidified filament formed after extrusion through a given non-circular orifice is controlled primarily by the sheer viscosity and the dynamic surface tension of the extruding melt. Within the constraints of the system, surface tension acts to reduce the surface free energy to a minimum, corresponding to a circular cross-section; conversely, viscous forces resist flow within the molten filament. Hence, a filament of high viscosity polymer tends to retain the general cross-sectional configuration of the non-circular orifice, but a low viscosity molten filament tends to become circular before solid-ification.

The above considerations permit the formation of a novel filament having a substantially constant denier but a variable cross section. Upon extruding a non-circular stream composed of macroscopically discrete polymer components differing widely in their respective ratios of viscosity to surface tension, a filament is produced having a variable cross-sectional shape along the length of the filament, as illustrated in FIGURE 2. As shown therein, the filament 24 has an upper portion 26 which is substantially cruciform in shape, corresponding approximately to the shape of the spinneret orifice 22. The lower portion 2 8 of filament 24 has a substantially circular cross-sectional shape and is considerably smaller in diameter than the apparent width of portion 26, indicated in the circumscribing dotted projection at 30, although the cross-sectional areas of portions 26 and 28 are the same.

Such a filament configuration has many applications as a novelty filament when the appearance of a variable denier or extended slub is desired. The variations in apparent thickness impart greater natural bulk to the filament and provide for substantial internfilament friction. Since the filament actually has an approximately constant denier throughout its length, its physical strength is substantially uniform. The filament may be readily drawn on conventional drawing equipment with only minor modifications without the likelihood of excessive breakage or other problems in handling.

An exemplary apparatus for producing the novel filament shown in FIGURE 2 is illustrated in FIGURES 3-5.

Referring to FIGURE 3, the spinneret block 20 includes a channel 32 communicating with the inlet of conventional constant-volume metering pump 33. A small channel 37 delivers polymer from the outlet of metering pump 33 to the back side of spinneret 18 from whence the polymer extrudes through non-circular orifice 22. A pair of tubular polymer supply channels 34 and 36 extend downwardly through block 20 and are alternately connected to channel 32 by a metering mechanism 38. The metering mechanism 38, in the exemplary form illustrated, includes a shaft 46 extending through and rotatably journaled in block 20, intersecting channels 34 and 36. A metering passage 42 extends through shaft 40 in alignment with channel 34, and connects this chanthe ploymer extrudes through non-circular orifice 22. A similar metering passage 44 is provided in shaft 40 for connecting channel 36 to channel 32 when channel 34 is not so connected. The axes of passages 42 and 44 are arranged at right angles to one another when viewed parallel to the axis of rod 40. Means is provided for rotating shaft 40, such as the illustrated gear 46, which may be driven by a motor, for example.

In the position illustrated in FIGURE 3, channel 34 is connected to channel 32 by passage 42, while channel 36 is isolated from chamber 32 due to the relative orientation of passages 42 and 44. Upon rotation of shaft 40 approximately 90, this situation will be reversed and the polymer in channel 36 will then be supplied through passage 44 to channel 32 for delivery to the inlet of metering pump 33. At intermediate positions of rotation, both channel 34 and channel 36 are connected to channel 32 but to differing extents, providing a supply of polymer at all times to metering pump 33. The entire spinning block assembly is surrounded by a heating jacket (not shown) to control temperature at the level required for proper flowing of the molten polymers.

To form the novel textured filament of FIGURE 2, polymers having substantially differing ratios of viscosity to surface tension at the spinning temperature are supplied under pressure to channels 34 and 36 by suitable pumping equipment (not shown). The polymers should be compatible; i.e., they should be miscible so that a strong bond forms between the components. Thus, the polymer in channel 34 may have a relatively high ratio of viscosity to surface tension as compared to the polymer in channel 36.

Metering shaft 40 is rotated, either at a constant or variable angular velocity, to alternately supply polymer to channel 32 from channel 34 and from channel 36. Thus the stream extruded from orifice 22 will have portions composed primarily or entirely of the polymer from channel 34, and portions composed primarily or entirely of polymer from channel 36, together with intermediate or transition regions as shown at 48 having a composition across the section including polymer components from both supply channels.

The stream thus extruded is cooled and solidified at an appropriate rate such that the polymer components from channel 34 tend to retain the shape of orifice 22 (see portion 26 in FIGURE 2), while the components from channel 36 tends to coalesce into a circular cross-section. The cooling may, for example, be provided by a stream of air directed onto the extruded polymer stream.

If necessary, various other means may be employed to ensure extrusion of a constant total volume of polymer in a given time. Thus, different pump pressures may be used for the polymers in channels 34 and 36, or metering passages 42 and 44 may have different cross-sections in order to compensate for differences in polymer viscosities.

If polymers are chosen that differ not only in the ratio of viscosity to surface tension, but also in the latent degree of shrinkage under the influence of heat or moisture,

-a self-crimping yarn results. Self-crimping yarns have been produced heretofore by conjugate spinning under conditions which yield filaments of substantially constant cross-sectional shape. The present method of spinning through non-circular orifices provides distinct advantages over the conventional method, however, because the filament cross-sectional shape varies continually, and more importantly, the transitions from one polymer component to the other are predominantly axially asymmertical as illustrated at 48 in FIGURE 2. Therefore, the usual uniform helical crimp does not develop. Instead, the crimp is random both in kind and in extent: helical crimp may extend a few inches followed by saw-toothed convolutions that vary randomly in amplitude, period, and in axial plane. Bulk and interfilament cohesion of such self-crimping yarns will exceed that of conventional conjugate spun round filament yarns.

Another useful variation is to choose polymers which differ not only in the ratio of viscosity to the surface tension, but in dye receptivity as well. For example, the polymers extruded may be of a low viscosity stream of nylon 6 and a high viscosity stream of nylon 66. If these are extruded through a non-circular orifice, the nylon 6 will, in general, dye darker than the nylon 66 resulting in yarn with novel irregular streaks along the filaments; or nylon 66 polymer containing deep-dye additives may be combined with normal nylon 66 polymer. A similar variation would be to extrude streams of melt-colored polymers; e.g., one polymer stream colored with blue pigment may be combined with another which is colored white or is uncolored. The resultant yarn exhibits an attractive variegated blue and white coloration when it is converted into fabric.

As has been set forth above, the novel method makes possible the production of a filament having an appearance resembling a variable denier although the denier actually remains substantially constant along its length. The use of ploymer components which differ in their latent degree of shrinkage under the influence of heart or moisture provides a self-crimping filament wherein the crimping is random in kind and extent. The combination of polymer components which vary in dye receptivity provides novel filaments having a desirable random variegated coloration. The filaments produced according to the present invention possess a novel desirable hand, luster and porosity when incorporated into a fabric and possess a substantial amount of interfilament friction.

It will thus be seen that the objects set forth above, among those made apparent from the preceding description, are efficiently attained and, since certain changes may be made in carrying out the above method and in the article set forth without departing from the scope of the invention, it is intended that all matter contained in the above description or shown in the accompanying drawing shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

It is also be understood that the following claims are intended to cover all of the generic and specific features of the invention herein described, and all statements of the scope of the invention which, as a matter of language, might be said to fall therebetween.

Having described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. In a method of making a textured continuous filament, the steps comprising in combination:

(a) extruding through a non-circular orifice a continuous stream of a molten macroscopically nonhomogeneous mixture of first and second compatible polymer components, said first component having a relatively high ratio of viscosity to surface tension as compared to said second component, said mixture being sufficiently non-homogeneous that substantially the entire stream leaving said orifice at particular times consists of said first component and substantially the entire stream leaving said orifice at other particular times consists of said second component and (b) solidifying the polymer stream so extruded at a rate such that the portions composed of said second component assume a substantially circular crosssection while the portions composed substantially of said first component assume a substantially noncircular cross-section.

2. In a method of making a textured continuous filament, the steps comprising in combination:

(a) extruding through a non-circular orifice a continuous stream of a molten macroscopically nonhomogeneous mixture of first and second compatible polymer components, said polymer components having differing latent degrees of contraction, said mixture being sufficiently non-homogeneous that substantially the entire stream leaving said orifice at particular times consists of said first component and substantially the entire stream leaving said orifice at other particular times consists of said second component, and

(b) solidifying the polymer stream at a rate such that at least some portions thereof retain a substantially non-circular cross-section.

3. In a method of making a textured continuous filament, the steps comprising in combination:

5 6 (a) extruding through a non-circular orifice a conat other particular times consists of said second tinuous stream of a molten macroscopically noncomponent, and homogeneous mixture of first and second compatible (b) solidifying the polymer stream at a rate such that polymer components, said polymer components difat least some portions thereof retain a substantially fering in dye receptivity, said mixture being sufficient- 5 non-circular cross-section.

ly non-homogeneous that substantially the entire References Cited by the Examiner stream leaving said orifice at particular times consists of said first component and substantially the UNITED STATES PATENTS entire stream leaving said orifice at other articular 2,174,779 10/1939 Delorme 264-245 times consists of said second component, and 0 2,803,041 8/1957 Hill et a1. 264--75 (b) solidifying the polymer stream at a rate such that 2,315 033 12/1957 B nli h 264- -245 at least some portions thereof retain a substantially 2,822,574 2/1958 Lava h, non-circular cross-section. 3,017,686 1/1962 Breen et a1. 4. In a method of making a textured continuous fila- 3 038,235 6/1962 Zi rm 264-171 ment, the steps comprising in combination: 15 3 039 141 6/1962 Bau r,

(a) extruding through a non-circular orifice a continuous stream of a molten macroscopically non- FOREIGN PATENTS homogeneous mixture of first and second compatible 341,327 7/ 1960 Great Britainpolymer components having different colors, said 930,629 7/ 1963 Gwat Britainmixture being sufiiciently non-homogeneous that sub- 20 stantially the entire stream leaving said orifice at ALEXANDER BRODMERKEL Primary Examiner particular times consists of said first component and K. W. VERNON, A. L. LEAVITT, J. H. WOO, substantially the entire stream leaving said orifice Assistant Examiners.

Claims (1)

1. IN A METHOD OF MAKING A TEXTURED CONTINUOUS FILAMENT, THE STEPS COMPRISING IN COMBINATION: (A) EXTRUDING THROUGH A NON-CIRCULAR ORIFICE A CONTINUOUS STREAM OF A MOLTEN MACROSCOPICALLY NONHOMOGENEOUS MIXTURE OF FIRST AND SECOND COMPATIBLE POLYMER COMPONENTS, SAID FIRST COMPONENT HAVING A RELATIVELY HIGH RATIO OF VISCOSITY TO SURFACE TENSION AS COMPARED TO SAID SECOND COMPONENT, SAID MIXTURE BEING SUFFICIENTLY NON-HOMOGENEOUS THAT SUBSTANTIALLY THE ENTIRE STREAM LEAVING SAID ORIFICE AT PARTICULAR TIMES CONSISTS OF SAID FIRST COMPONENT AND SUBSTANTIALLY THE ENTIRE STREAM LEAVING SAID ORIFICE AT OTHER PARTICULAR TIMES CONSISTS OF SAID SECOND COMPONENT AND (B) SOLIDIFYING THE POLYMER STREAM SO EXTRUDED AT A RATE SUCH THAT THE PORTIONS COMPOSED OF SAID SECOND COMPONENT ASSUME A SUBSTANTIALLY CIRCULAR CROSSSECTION WHILE THE PORTIONS COMPOSED SUBSTANTIALLY OF SAID FIRST COMPONENT ASSUME A SUBSTANTIALLY NONCIRCULAR CROSS-SECTION.
US3272901A 1962-11-21 1963-10-02 Textile filament having apparent variable denier Expired - Lifetime US3272901A (en)

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US3138516A US3138516A (en) 1962-11-21 1962-11-21 Textile filament having apparent variable denier
US3272901A US3272901A (en) 1962-11-21 1963-10-02 Textile filament having apparent variable denier

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NL300696A NL300696A (en) 1962-11-21
BE640251A BE640251A (en) 1962-11-21
US3272901A US3272901A (en) 1962-11-21 1963-10-02 Textile filament having apparent variable denier
GB4466963A GB1033308A (en) 1962-11-21 1963-11-12 Artificial textile filament having apparent variable denier
DK543463A DK116463B (en) 1962-11-21 1963-11-20 The melt spinning method for producing a filament having systetisk apparently varying denier and apparatus for use in the method.
DE19631435568 DE1435568A1 (en) 1962-11-21 1963-11-20 Textile fiber and method and apparatus for their production

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BE (1) BE640251A (en)
DE (1) DE1435568A1 (en)
DK (1) DK116463B (en)
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NL (1) NL300696A (en)

Cited By (17)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3371139A (en) * 1964-12-22 1968-02-27 Monsanto Co Process and apparatus for producing self-texturing fibers
US3453688A (en) * 1967-02-28 1969-07-08 Monsanto Co Filament extrusion apparatus
US3461515A (en) * 1966-10-10 1969-08-19 Erie Foundry Co Continuous extrusion machine
US3655314A (en) * 1969-02-19 1972-04-11 Barmag Barmer Maschf Spinning apparatus composed of modular spinning units on common heating beam
US4186239A (en) * 1976-12-06 1980-01-29 Berkley & Company, Inc. Monofilament weed cutters
US4185951A (en) * 1976-05-19 1980-01-29 Dynamit Nobel Ag Apparatus for the extrusion of patterned sheets of thermoplastic synthetic resins
US4259277A (en) * 1978-05-18 1981-03-31 The General Engineering Company (Radcliffe) Limited Method and apparatus for the injection of additives into plastics material
US4276250A (en) * 1979-10-29 1981-06-30 Sherwood Medical Industries, Inc. Apparatus and method for producing tubular extrusions having axial sections of materials having different characteristics
US4414276A (en) * 1980-07-29 1983-11-08 Teijin Limited Novel assembly of composite fibers
US4869055A (en) * 1987-01-23 1989-09-26 Omark Industries, Inc. Star-shaped flexible cutting line
US5200248A (en) * 1990-02-20 1993-04-06 The Procter & Gamble Company Open capillary channel structures, improved process for making capillary channel structures, and extrusion die for use therein
US5242644A (en) * 1990-02-20 1993-09-07 The Procter & Gamble Company Process for making capillary channel structures and extrusion die for use therein
US5368926A (en) * 1992-09-10 1994-11-29 The Procter & Gamble Company Fluid accepting, transporting, and retaining structure
US5430943A (en) * 1992-12-10 1995-07-11 Lee; Anthony L. Unitary cutting attachment for vegetation cutting devices
US5628736A (en) * 1994-04-29 1997-05-13 The Procter & Gamble Company Resilient fluid transporting network for use in absorbent articles
US20090176054A1 (en) * 2008-01-03 2009-07-09 The Boeing Company Insulative Material And Associated Method Of Forming Same
US20150240385A1 (en) * 2012-10-22 2015-08-27 Korea Institute Of Industrial Technology Method and apparatus for fabricating conjugate fiber, and conjugate fiber fabricated thereby

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US2174779A (en) * 1937-12-16 1939-10-03 George Morrell Corp Apparatus for extruding varicolored plastics
US2803041A (en) * 1953-02-11 1957-08-20 Celanese Corp Extrusion of plastic materials
US2815033A (en) * 1954-02-08 1957-12-03 American Viscose Corp Alternate flow control for fluid streams
US2822574A (en) * 1956-04-17 1958-02-11 American Viscose Corp Method and means for spinning a banded filament
GB841327A (en) * 1955-12-21 1960-07-13 Snia Viscosa Improvements in and relating to the production of filaments of synthetic linear polymers
US3017686A (en) * 1957-08-01 1962-01-23 Du Pont Two component convoluted filaments
US3038235A (en) * 1956-12-06 1962-06-12 Du Pont Textile fibers and their manufacture
US3039141A (en) * 1958-05-12 1962-06-19 American Viscose Corp Apparatus for producing artificial filaments
GB930629A (en) * 1961-02-22 1963-07-03 Schweizerische Viscose Process for the manufacture of spontaneously crimping composite filaments

Patent Citations (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2174779A (en) * 1937-12-16 1939-10-03 George Morrell Corp Apparatus for extruding varicolored plastics
US2803041A (en) * 1953-02-11 1957-08-20 Celanese Corp Extrusion of plastic materials
US2815033A (en) * 1954-02-08 1957-12-03 American Viscose Corp Alternate flow control for fluid streams
GB841327A (en) * 1955-12-21 1960-07-13 Snia Viscosa Improvements in and relating to the production of filaments of synthetic linear polymers
US2822574A (en) * 1956-04-17 1958-02-11 American Viscose Corp Method and means for spinning a banded filament
US3038235A (en) * 1956-12-06 1962-06-12 Du Pont Textile fibers and their manufacture
US3017686A (en) * 1957-08-01 1962-01-23 Du Pont Two component convoluted filaments
US3039141A (en) * 1958-05-12 1962-06-19 American Viscose Corp Apparatus for producing artificial filaments
GB930629A (en) * 1961-02-22 1963-07-03 Schweizerische Viscose Process for the manufacture of spontaneously crimping composite filaments

Cited By (22)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3371139A (en) * 1964-12-22 1968-02-27 Monsanto Co Process and apparatus for producing self-texturing fibers
US3461515A (en) * 1966-10-10 1969-08-19 Erie Foundry Co Continuous extrusion machine
US3453688A (en) * 1967-02-28 1969-07-08 Monsanto Co Filament extrusion apparatus
US3655314A (en) * 1969-02-19 1972-04-11 Barmag Barmer Maschf Spinning apparatus composed of modular spinning units on common heating beam
US4185951A (en) * 1976-05-19 1980-01-29 Dynamit Nobel Ag Apparatus for the extrusion of patterned sheets of thermoplastic synthetic resins
US4186239A (en) * 1976-12-06 1980-01-29 Berkley & Company, Inc. Monofilament weed cutters
US4259277A (en) * 1978-05-18 1981-03-31 The General Engineering Company (Radcliffe) Limited Method and apparatus for the injection of additives into plastics material
US4276250A (en) * 1979-10-29 1981-06-30 Sherwood Medical Industries, Inc. Apparatus and method for producing tubular extrusions having axial sections of materials having different characteristics
US4414276A (en) * 1980-07-29 1983-11-08 Teijin Limited Novel assembly of composite fibers
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DE1435568A1 (en) 1969-03-13 application
NL300696A (en) application
GB1033308A (en) 1966-06-22 application
BE640251A (en) grant
DK116463B (en) 1970-01-12 grant

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