US3242521A - Street cleaning machine - Google Patents

Street cleaning machine Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US3242521A
US3242521A US340438A US34043864A US3242521A US 3242521 A US3242521 A US 3242521A US 340438 A US340438 A US 340438A US 34043864 A US34043864 A US 34043864A US 3242521 A US3242521 A US 3242521A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
bin
brush
frame
brushes
conduit
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US340438A
Inventor
Werner W Young
Original Assignee
Werner W Young
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Werner W Young filed Critical Werner W Young
Priority to US340438A priority Critical patent/US3242521A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US3242521A publication Critical patent/US3242521A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E01CONSTRUCTION OF ROADS, RAILWAYS, OR BRIDGES
    • E01HSTREET CLEANING; CLEANING OF PERMANENT WAYS; CLEANING BEACHES; DISPERSING OR PREVENTING FOG IN GENERAL CLEANING STREET OR RAILWAY FURNITURE OR TUNNEL WALLS
    • E01H1/00Removing undesirable matter from roads or like surfaces, with or without moistening of the surface
    • E01H1/08Pneumatically dislodging or taking-up undesirable matter or small objects; Drying by heat only or by streams of gas; Cleaning by projecting abrasive particles
    • E01H1/0827Dislodging by suction; Mechanical dislodging-cleaning apparatus with independent or dependent exhaust, e.g. dislodging-sweeping machines with independent suction nozzles ; Mechanical loosening devices working under vacuum
    • E01H1/0836Apparatus dislodging all of the dirt by suction ; Suction nozzles
    • E01H1/0845Apparatus dislodging all of the dirt by suction ; Suction nozzles with mechanical loosening or feeding instruments for the dirt to be sucked- up, e.g. brushes, scrapers

Description

March 29, 1966 w. W. YOUNG STREET CLEANING MACHINE 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Jan. 27, 1964 INVENTOR. WERNE-E W0 You/v4 BY Z March 29, 1966 w. w. YOUNG STREET CLEANING MACHINE 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Jan. 27, 1964 m LU A .M KW Q... m u mm mm WW Q9 2 e w E W March 29, 1965 w. w. YOUNG STREET CLEANING MACHINE 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Jan. 27, 1964 INVENTOR. WE -Q 14/, You/v United States Patent 3,242,521 STREET QLEANHNG MACHINE Werner W. Young, 301 N 13th, Oklahoma City, Okla. Filed Jan. 27, 1964, Ser. No. 340,438 9 Qlaims. (Cl. -340) This invention relates generally to machines useful in cleaning streets, highways, airport runways, etc. More particularly, but not by way of limitation, this invention relates to a self-propelled machine incorporating both brushes and a pneumatic system for cleaning streets.
Many problems have been encountered in the development of a machine which will successfully clean streets, highways, airport runways, etc. Two problems stand out above all others, and the solutions thereof are of great importance, particularly when the machine is to be used in highly congested areas.
The first of the problems, and probably the most important, is the dust created by the brushes of the cleaning machine as it operates. Most cleaning machines incorporate one or more rotating brushes which are provided to loosen the dirt and trash adhering to the pavement and, more often than not, to move it into some form of receptacle mounted on the machine. To alleviate the dust problem caused by the brushes, many machines have been provided with a water supply and some means of spraying the water either on the dirt directly ahead of the brushes or upon the brushes themselves.
While the foregoing procedure may, at least to some extent, alleviate the dust problems, several other problems result therefrom. Water sprayed as described will tend to turn the dust and dirt into mud. The mud produced is not only hard to remove from the street, but is extremely difficult to convey into any form of receptacle. Also, the mud tends to cling to the bristles of the brushes, impairing their operation.
In addition, some means must be provided in the street cleaning machine to contain the water. If a sufiicient water supply is provided to last for an extended period, the size and weight of the vehicle will become cumbersome, if not prohibitive.
The other major problem encountered in attempting to clean streets has occurred primarily when attempts have been made to use a vacuum or pneumatic system either alone or in conjunction with the rotating brushes. Anyone remotely acquainted with the use of pneumatic systems to move dust and dirt can readily appreciate the dust problem that is encountered. It is necessary to move large volumes of air at relatively high velocity to carry any quantity of dirt. It follows that the more dirt to be conveyed, the more air volume required and the higher air velocities required. Higher volumes and velocities of air are also required to convey the relatively large dirt particles which may be encountered in the cleaning of streets. It will be realized that the air which is carrying the dirt must be exhausted from the receptacle, and unless some means is provided to separate the dirt from the air, great quantities of dust will be discharged into the atmosphere. For the most part, attempts made in the past to reduce the dust discharged have incorporated either some form of water system or have used mechanical separators of the centrifugal type. The use of a permeable filter media for separation of the dust from the air has been judiciously avoided, except in relatively small machines. Such filters have been generally unsuccessful because of the propensity of the filters to become plugged or blocked by large particles of dirt and trash.
It is important in street cleaning machines that the trash receptacle be as large as possible so that the machine can remain in operation for extended periods of time. Due to the restrictions on the size and weight of 3,242,521 Patented Mar. 29, 1966 vehicles, the use of water and mechanical separators substantially reduce the volume and weight of dirt and trash that can be accommodated.
The afore-described problems are eliminated or alleviated in the street cleaning machine of this invention which generally includes a pair of rotatable brushes arranged for sweeping the street, a suction or vacuum nozzle located near the brushes for picking up dirt and trash, a bin located on the machine for receiving the dirt and trash, and a fan having its outlet connected with an inlet to the bin and its inlet connected with the nozzle. The fan provides high volumes of air for conveying the dirt from the nozzle to the bin. The bin includes a generally peripheral outlet and a permeable filter media disposed between the inlet and outlet of the bin for preventing the discharge of dust through the outlet while permitting discharge of air therethrough.
One object of the invention is to provide an improved street cleaning machine that utilizes a vacuum system for conveying dust and dirt, but substantially eliminates the dust problems of prior machines.
Another object of the invention is to provide an improved street cleaning machine that can be effectively operated for extended periods of time.
A further object of the invention is to provide an improved, self-propelled street cleaning machine that can be operated from either side of the vehicle.
Still another object of the invention is to provide an improved street cleaning machine that includes independently operable cleaning brushes.
One other object is the provision of an improved street cleaning machine that can be relatively easily and economically manufactured.
A still further object of the invention is to provide an improved street cleaning machine that requires a minimum of maintenance.
The fore oing and additional objects and advantages of the invention will become more apparent as the following description is read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein like reference characters denote like parts in all views and wherein:
FIG. 1 is an elevation view of a self-propelled street cleaning machine constructed in accordance with the invention;
FIG. 2 is an enlarged sectional View taken along the line 22 of FIG. 1;
FIG. 3 is an enlarged side elevation view of a brush assembly and a portion of the truck chassis with certain parts removed for clarity;
FIG. 4 is a front elevation view, the brush of FIG. 3;
FIG. 5 is an enlarged top elevation view, partly in section, of a suction nozzle utilized in the invention;
FIG. 6 is a view, partly in elevation and partly in section, taken along line 6-6 of FIG. 5;
FIG. 7 is an enlarged view taken along the line 77 of FIG. 1 and showing the dual cab controls; and,
FIG. 8 is a schematic diagram of a hydraulic circuit utilized in the preferred form of the invention.
Referring now to the drawings, and to FIG. 1 in particular, shown therein is a street cleaning machine, generally designated by the reference character 10. The street cleaning machine 10 includes a self-propelled truck 12 having a cab 14 mounted on a chassis or frame 16. The chassis 16 is provided in the conventional manner with generally parallel side rails, 21 front set of tires and Wheels 18, and a rear set of tires and wheels 20 which serve to propel the truck 12. Pivotally mounted on the rear of the chassis 1b is a bin or receptacle 22.
partly in ,section, of
Pivotal mounting of the bin 22 on the chassis 16 is accomplished by a pivotal mounting 24. One or more hydraulic cylinders 26 extend between the lower front end of the bin 22 and the chassis 16. The hydraulic cylinders 26 are provided to pivot the bin 22 about the pivotal mounting 24 to discharge trash and dirt from the bin 22, as will be explained more fully hereinafter. The bin 22 includes a pair of side walls 28 and 30, a bottom 32, and a top 34 (see FIG. 2). The bin 22 also includes a hinged rear door 36 as shown in the dash lines of FIG. 1. As may be more clearly seen in FIG. 2, the bin 22 is also provided with an opening or outlet 38 which extends peripherally around the bin 22 to permit the discharge of air therefrom. The opening 38 is separated from the main portion of the bin 22 by a removable permeable filter 40. Arranged on either side of the filter 41 is a pair of screens 42 which serve to retain the filter in position. Extending from the front of the bin 22 is an inlet conduit 44- (see FIG. 1) which terminates in a flange portion 45.
As shown in FIG. 1, a large fan or blower 46 is mounted on the chassis 16 between the cab 14- and the bin 22. An outlet 18 from the fan 46 has a flange portion 49 that mates with the flange portion of the inlet conduit 44 to form a continuous conduit extending from the fan 46 to the bin 22. An inlet 50 of the fan 46 is connected with a vacuum assembly indicated generally at 52 which is mounted on the chassis 16 just ahead of the rear wheels 20. The vacuum assembly extends forwardly relative to the truck 12 at an angle with the horizontal or ground not exceeding 20 (see FIGURE 1) and terminates just to the rear of a pair of vertically rotatable disc brush assemblies 54. The brush assemblies 54 are positioned on either side of the chassis 16 and immediately to the rear of the front wheels 18. The forward end of vacuum assembly 52 is carried by a hydraulic cylinder 56 which extends from the chassis 16 to the vacuum assembly and provides for the raising and lowering of the front end of the vacuum assembly.
One of the brush assemblies 54 is clearly illustrated in FIGS. 3 and 4. As shown therein, the brush assemblies 54 include a pivotal link 58 extending from a brush housing 60 to the chassis 16. An additional pivotal link 62, which may be more clearly seen in FIG. 3, extends from the brush housing 60 rearwardly and connects with the chassis 16. A pivotally mounted adjusting link 64 may also be seen in FIG. 3 extending from the brush housing 60 to the chassis 16. The adjusting link 64 is of the turn-buckle type and includes a nut 66- and a pair of threaded members 68 which are arranged so that rotation of the nut 66 will either extend or shorten the length of the adjusting link 64. The adjustment is provided so that the brush assembly 54 can be tilted either forwardly or backwardly with respect to the chassis 16. A similar pivotally mounted adjusting link 7 0 can been seen in FIG. 4.- The adjusting link 71? also extends from the brush housing 61) to the chassis 16 and includes a nut 72 and a pair of threaded members 74. The arrangement of the link is such that rotation of the nut 72 either shortens or increases the length of the adjusting link 70 so that the brush assembly 54 is tilted in a transverse direction relative to the chassis 16.
A hydraulic motor 76 is positioned on the brush housing 60 and is operably connected with a rotatable brush or broom 78. A pair of conduits 80 and 82 are connected with the hydraulic motor '76 and are provided to deliver fluid to the hydraulic motor 76, as will be explained more fully in connection with FIG. 8.
FIG. 4 also shows a hydraulic cylinder 84 which extends between the brush assembly 54 and the truck 12. The cylinder 64 provides vertical movement of the brush assembly 54 so that it can be moved between a raised transporting position or a lowered operating position. The hydraulic cylinder 84 derives its power through a 4 pair of hydraulic conduits 86 and 88. The method of providing hydraulic fluid to the cylinder 84 will be explained more fully in connection with the schematic diagram of the hydraulic circuit shown in FIG. 8. The hydraulic cylinder 84 is not shown in FIG. 3 so that the brush assembly 54 may be more clearly seen.
The details of construction of the vacuum assembly 52 are shown in FIGS. 5 and 6. As shown in FIG. 5, the inlet 50 which extends from assembly 52 to the fan 46 is connected with the chassis 16 by means of a pair of brackets 91) which are fixed to the inlet 50. The outer ends of the linet 50 are provided with a pair of swivel connections 92 which are in turn connected with a pair of conduits 94 leading to a nozzle 53 which includes a chamber 96 having a substantially horizontal opening 55 formed at the bottom thereof. The swivel connections 92 are provided so that the nozzle 53 and the conduits 94 of assembly 52 can be raised or lowered by the hydraulic cylinder 56. As shown, the chamber 96 extends transversely across the chassis 16 and is located immediately to the rear of the brush assemblies 54. The forward portion of the nozzle 53 is provided with a guard 98 which has a curved lower forward portion to deflect any rocks or large obstructions which the nozzle might encounter. The nozzle 53 is also provided with a rod or bar 100 which extends thereacross. The cylinder 56 which is used for raising and lowering the nozzle 53 is connected with the bar 100.
Dual controls 102 and 164 are provided in the cab 14 as illustrated in FIG. 7. It is highly desirable for the driver to be able to sit on the right hand side of the truck 12 during the time that the right hand brush assembly 54 is in use adjacent a curb or other obstruction. The need for such controls has increased because of the number of one-way streets in use and the desirability of having the truck operate with the traflic, rather than against the traific as is sometimes necessary with machines presently available. It should also be pointed out that the various controls for the hydraulic circuit of FIG. 8 will be mounted in the cab 14 and are generally illustrated by the control panel 106 shown therein.
FIG. 8 illustrates schematically the hydraulic circuit associated with the various components of the street cleaning machine. An engine 1118, which is preferably the truck engine, also drives hydraulic pumps 110 and 112 through appropriate transmissions, etc. Each of the pumps 110 and 112 have their inlet ports connected by a conduit 114- with a filter 116. The filter 116 is in turn connected by a conduit 118 with a fluid reservoir 120.
The pump 111) is connected with a hydraulic motor 122 by a conduit 124. A pressure relief valve 126 is interposed in the line 124 between the pump 110 and the hydraulic motor 122 to prevent overpressuring the motor 122, which is mechanically coupled with and rotates the fan 46. The outlet of the hydraulic motor 122 is connected with the reservoir 120 by means of a return con duit 128. A heat exchanger 130 is positioned in the return line 128 to dissipate some of the heat in the hydraulic fluid driving the motor 122. A conduit 132 extends from the relief valve 126 to the return line 128 to provide for fluids to pass from the pump 110 directly into the return line 128 in the event a predetermined pressure is exceeded in the relief valve 126.
The outlet port of the pump 112 is connected by a cond-uit 134 to a three-way valve 136 which is connected with the hydraulic cylinder 26 by a conduit 138. As previously described, the hydraulic cylinder 26 is connected with the chassis 16 and the bin 22 and is used to pivot the bin relative to the chassis 16. The remaining port of the three-way valve 136 is connected by a return conduit with the fluid reservoir 120. It can be seen from the foregoing that, when the three-Way valve 136 is in the position illustrated, fluid will be supplied from the pump 112 through the conduit 134 and conduit 138 to the hydraulic cylinder 26 which will raise the bin 22. When the valve 136 is rotated to a position connecting the conduits 138 and 140, fluid from the hydraulic cylinder 26 will flow tothe reservoir 120 and thereby permit the bin to return to the horizontal position, i.e., to the position shown in the solid lines in FIG. 1.
The conduit 134 is also connected with a four-way valve 142. A pair of conduits 144 and 146 connect the four-way valve 142 with the double-acting hydraulic cylinder 56 which, as previously described, extends between vacuum assembly 52 and the chassis 16. The fourway valve 142 is also connected with the return flow line 140 by means of a branch conduit 148. The alternate flow paths of fiuid through the four-way valve 142 are illustrated by the solid and dash arrows shown thereon. The nozzle 53 will be lowered when the valve is placed in the position wherein the fluid flow is in accordance with the solid arrows shown on the valve 142. When the valve is in this position, it can be seen that fluid flow is from the conduit 134 through the valve 142 into the conduit 144 to the hydraulic cylinder 56. The return flow of fluid from the lower portion of the hydraulic cylinder 56 is through the conduit 146 to the valve 142, thence through the branch conduit 14% into the return flow line 148 and then to the reservoir 12%. If vacuum assembly 52 is to be reaised, the valve 142 is positioned so that the flow is in a reverse direction therethrough, as shown by the dash arrows.
Raising and lowering of the brush assemblies 54 is accomplished in a manner very similar to the raising and lowering of vacuum assembly 52. The hydraulic circuits associated with the hydraulic cylinders 84 incorporate a pair of four-way valves 150 which are, in all respects, similar to the four-Way valve 142 previously described. To raise the brush assemblies 54, the four-way valves 150 are shifted t the position wherein fluid flow therethrough is in accordance with the dash arrows. For example, fluid will flow from the conduit 134- through the valves into the conduits 38 to the lower portions of the cylinders 84, driving the piston and the brush assemblies 54 upwardly. To lower the brush assemblies 54, the four-way valves 150 are shifted to the position wherein fluid flow therethrough is in accordance with the solid arrows. For example, fluid will move from the conduit 134 to the conduit 86 to the upper portions of the cylinders 84, driving the brush assemblies 54 downwardly. The return flow from the valves 150 is accomplished through a return flow line 154 which is connected with the flow line 140 which delivers the fluid to the reservoir 120.
The pump 112 is also connected with a three-way valve 156 by means of the conduit 135. The three-way valve 156 is connected with a conduit 158 which is connected with the inlet port of the fluid motors 76 by a conduit 82. The pair of conduits 80 connect the outlet ports of the hydraulic motors 76 with the return flow line 154 which, as previously described, is connected with the reservoir 120 by the return flow line 149. The conduit 82 which is connected with the inlet ports of the hydraulic motors 76 is also provided with a pair of branch conduits 160 and 162 which are connected with the return flow line 154, bypassing the hydraulic motors 76. The lines 160 and 162 are provided with solenoid actuated valves 164 and 166, respectively, so that either or both of the hydraulic motors 76 may be bypassed if desired.
It should be pointed out that each of the valves described herein is preferably of a type incorporating a remote operator which can be mounted in the cab 14 of the truck 12. It should also be pointed out that the hydraulic circuit has been simplified by not illustrating various pressure control mechanisms which are provided to balance the flow through the complex system of hydraulic conduits shown. The use of such mechanisms is Well known in the art and it is not believed that it forms a portion of the invention as set forth herein.
A street cleaning machine 10, constructed in accordance with the invention, provides a highly mobile unit that may be readily driven to and from remote locations Where the street cleaning is to be performed. Before driving to or from the cleaning area, the truck engine 108 will be started and the pump 112 engaged. The four way valves 142 and 150 are moved to a position wherein the fluid flow is in accordance with the dash arrows shown on the valves. In this position vacuum assembly 52 and the brush assemblies 54 will be raised to a transporting position wherein they are held out of contact with the surface of the street. If desired, vacuum assembly 52 and the brush assemblies 54 may be provided with some form of mechanical latch (not shown) which will positively hold the nozzle 53 and the brush assemblies 54 in the transporting position to eliminate any chance that they might drop down and come into contact with the surface of the street during the relatively high speed operation of the truck 12.
Upon reaching the location where the streeet cleaning is to be performed, the pumps 110 and 112 will be engaged with the driving mechanism or engine 108. Actu-' ation of the pump 11% will move fluid from the reservoir through the conduit 114 and the conduit 124 into the fluid motor 122. Fluid passing through the motor 122 will cause it to rotate and, through its mechanical linkage, rotate the fan 46. The fan 46 is arranged to create a suction in the vacuum assembly 52.
The valve 142 is then shifted to the position wherein fluid from the pump 112 will flow from the conduit 134 into the conduit 144 (solid arrows) and to the upper portion of the hydraulic cylinder 56, lowering assembly 52. The four-way valves will be actuated so that fluid in the conduit 134 will flow through the conduit 86 to the cylinders 84, thereby lowering the brush assemblies 54 into contact with the street. If desired, either the left hand brush assembly 54 or the right hand brush assembly 54 may be actuated independently. In some instances, such as when sweeping along a curb or in a gutter, it may be desired to lower only one of the brush assemblies 54.
To start the rotation of the brushes 78, the three-way valve 156 will be switched to such a position that fluid will flow from the conduit 134 into the conduit 158 and thence through the conduits 82 into the hydraulic motors 76. Fluid flowing through the hydraulic motors 76 will, through the mechanical coupling to the brushes 78, cause the rotation of the brushes 78. It may be desirable to rotate only one of the brushes 78. The rotation of either brush 78 can be accomplished by the opening or closing of the solenoid actuated valves 164 and 166. For example, if only the upper brush 78 shown in FIG. 8 is to be operated, the valve 164 will be closed and the valve 166 opened. With the valves 164 and 166 in this position, fluid will flow through the conduit 82 and the motor 76 of the upper brush assembly 54, but will flow through the conduit 162 bypassing the lower motor 76. If both brushes 78 are to be driven, the valves 164 and 166 are both closed. With the valves 164 and 166 in this position, hydraulic fluid is directed through the conduit 82 and through both hydraulic motors 76.
As the street cleaning machine 10 moves along the street, the brushes 78 will be rotating in a direction to sweep the dust and dirt from the outside of the truck toward the center position thereof where it is picked up by the nozzle 53 and carried into the fan inlet 50, through the fan 46 and from the outlet 48 of the fan 45 into the bin 22. The air and dust thus passing into the bin 22 must pass through the filter 40 to reach the outlet 38 of the bin 22. As the air passes through the permeable filter 40, the dirt and dust entrained therein is separated and falls to the bottom 32 of the receptacle or bin 22. After the bin 22 has become filled, the truck must then be moved to a dumping area.
In order to move the truck to the dumping area, vacuum assembly 52 and the brush assemblies 54 are raised and, if desired, locked in position. Upon reaching the dumping area, the pump 112 will be actuated and the three-way valve 136 rotated to a position wherein fluid may pass from the conduit 134- into the conduit 13%, thence into the hydraulic cylinder 26 which raises the bin 22 to the position shown in dash lines in FIG. 1. As previously mentioned, the rear end of the bin 22 is provided with a hinged door 36 which opens automatically as the bin 22 is pivoted about the pivotal mounting 24. The mechanism utilized to permit the rear door 36 to open as the bin is raised is conventional and well known to those connected with the use and construction of dump trucks of various types and will not be described in detail.
As the bin is raised, it is important to note that the inlet conduit 44 which is permanently fixed to the front wall of the bin 22 separates from the outlet 48 of the fan 46. The inlet conduit 44 and outlet 48 are not mechanically connected, but form a continuous conduit by the contact of two flange portions 45 and 49 thereon which are held together by the weight of the bin 22 when the bin 22 is in the down position.
It is important to note that the bin 22 does not include water or any form of watering mechanism to prevent the dust from entering the atmosphere, but depends entirely on the permeable filter media and the quiescent space in the bin 22. Since no water is utilized, the bin 22 can be constructed of light material and therefore provide the maximum volume for dust and dirt retention. Having a bin of suificient volume provides two distinct advantages. For example, the area beneath the inlet provides a quiescent zone in which the dust and dirt can fall and will not be picked up and circulated through the pneumatic or vacuum system used to remove the dirt from the street. It also provides the advantage of keeping the street cleaning machine in operation for longer periods of time.
It should also be pointed out that due to the provision of the dual controls in the cab 14, the street c'ieaning machine can be operated efi'iciently along either curb of a street. The machine can be operated in the same direction as traffic regardless of which curb is to be cleaned. The ability to operate with the tratiic is important in preventing congestion which naturally occurs when a truck, moving as slowly as street cleaning equipment does, is encountered moving in the opposite direction to the normal traffic flow.
Having described but a single embodiment of the invention, it should be noted that such embodiment is by way of example only and it is understood that many changes and modifications can be made therein without departing from the spirit of the invention or from the scope of the annexed claims.
What I claim is:
1. A street cleaning machine including:
a horizontally disposed frame having a left side, a right side, a front end and a back end;
a brush mounted on said left side and a brush mounted on said right side, said brushes being rotatable about a substantially vertical axis and movable vertically relative to said frame;
a vacuum assembly pivotally mounted below said frame behind and extending toward said brushes, said vacuum assembly having an opening sufficiently close to said brushes to receive debris directly therefrom;
a bin pivotally mounted on said frame, said bin including a top, a bottom, side walls, and a front wall, said bin having an inlet opening in the front wall and an outlet opening extending peripherally about said walls adjacent said top and having a permeable filter media positioned between said outlet opening and said inlet opening, said filter media extending completely across the top of the bin and generally parallel to the top thereof;
4% means for pivoting said bin relative to said frame;
and,
blower means mounted on said frame and having an inlet connected with said vacuum assembly and an outlet connected with the inlet opening in said bin.
2. The street cleaning machine of claim 1, and also including:
means connected with said frame and each of said brushes for independently moving each of said brushes vertically relative to said frame; and,
means connected with said frame and said vacuum assembly for pivoting said vacuum assembly relative to said frame.
3. A street cleaning machine, including:
a frame having a pair of horizontally extending opposed side rails and means holding said side rails in spaced relationship;
a rotatable brush mounted on each of said side rails and adapted for independent vertical movement relative to said side rails;
means connected with each of said brushes for rotating said brushes about a substantially vertical axis;
blower means mounted on said frame having an inlet and an outlet;
a vacuum assembly pivotally mounted below said frame behind and extending toward said rotatable brushes, said assembly having an outlet communicating with the inlet of said blower means and having an opening sufficiently close to said brushes to receive debris directly therefrom;
an enclosed bin pivotally mounted on said frame, said bin including a top, a bottom, side walls, and a front and rear wall, said bin having an inlet open ing extending through the front wall releasably connected with the outlet of said blower means and having an outlet opening extending peripherally about said side Walls adjacent said top;
a permeable filter media disposed in said bin between the inlet and outlet openings, said filter media extending completely across the top of said bin and generally parallel to the top thereof, whereby dust and other foreign materials will be removed from air passing therethrough; and,
means connected with said frame and bin for pivoting said bin relative to said frame.
4. The street cleaning machine of claim 3 wherein said bin also includes:
a releasable end closure adapted to open upon pivoting said bin away from said frame, whereby trash accumulated therein will be dumped; and
said bin having sufficient volume to provide a quiescent space in the lower portion thereof relatively below said inlet, wherein trash separated from the air by said permeable filter media can accumulate until dumped.
5. The street cleaning machine of claim 4 wherein said means for rotating said brushes includes a hydraulic motor operably connected with each of said brushes; and said street cleaning machine also includes:
hydraulic cylinders connected with said frame and with each of said brushes, whereby said brushes can be moved vertically relative to said frame;
a hydraulic cylinder for pivoting said suction nozzle relative to said frame;
a hydraulic motor operably connected with said blower means;
pump means in fluid communication with said hydraulic cylinders and motors for actuating said cylinders and motors; and,
means for driving said pump means.
6. A street cleaning machine including a chassis mounted, engine driven Vehicle having front and rear wheels comprising:
brush means mounted for vertical movement on the 9 chassis generally behind each front wheel, each said brush means including:
a brush rotatable about a substantially vertical axis, a hydraulic motor for rotating said brush; and, a hydraulic cylinder connected with each brush means and the chassis for independently moving said brush means relative to the chassis;
a vacuum assembly pivotally mounted below said chassis behind and extending toward said brush means, said vacuum assembly having an opening sufficicntly close to said brush means to receive debris directly therefrom;
a hydraulic cylinder connected with the chassis and said vacuum assembly for pivoting said vacuum assembly relative to the chassis;
a bin pivotally mounted on the chassis, said bin including a top, a bottom, side walls and a front and rear wall, said bin having an inlet opening in the front wall and an outlet opening extending peripherally about said walls adjacent said top;
a hydraulic cylinder connected with said bin and the chassis for pivoting said bin relative to the chassis;
a permeable filter media disposed in said bin between the inlet and outlet openings, said filter media exa horizontally disposed frame having a left side, a right side, a front end and a back end;
a brush mounted on said left side and a brush mounted on said right side, said brushes being rotatable about a substantially vertical axis;
a vacuum assembly including conduit means mounted on said frame and extending forwardly toward said brushes, said assembly having a nozzle on the forward end of said conduit means and said nozzle having formed therein a substantially horizontal opening sufficiently close to said brushes to receive debris directly therefrom, said conduit means, nozzle and opening forming a substantially straight flow passage and said conduit means extending at an angle of less than with respect to the ground;
a bin mounted on said frame, said bin having an inlet opening and an outlet opening therein;
a permeable filter positioned between said outlet opening and said inlet opening in said bin, whereby said debris is removed from air passing through said bin; and
blower means mounted on said frame for drawing air into said vacuum assembly and passing said air through said inlet and outlet in said bin.
9. The apparatus defined in claim 8 wherein said nozzle includes a forward portion which curves upwardly from said opening for deflecting relatively large solid objects away from said opening.
tending completely across the top of said bin between said front and rear walls and between said side walls and generally parallel to said top;
blower means having an inlet connected with the outlet of said vacuum assembly and an outlet releasably connected with the inlet opening in said bin;
a hydraulic motor mounted on the chassis for driving References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 802,682 10/1905 Collyer 15340 X W1 blower means: and, 985,945 3/1911 Shea 15-347 pump means mounted On the chassis adapted to be v g g et 1 X driven by the engine, said pump means including 1229127 6 /1917 Osborne means interconnecting said hydraulic cylinders and 1374933 4/1921 Lund 15 83 motors with said pump means, whereby said hydrau- 2458258 1/1949 Furr lic cylinders and motors are adapted to be driven 1/1950 Wells 15 340 y- 2,558,496 6/1951 Reeves 15-390 X 7. The street cleaning machine of claim 6 wherein said 40 2,303 47 1957 Hobbs 15 34 X brush means also includ 2,991,492 7/1961 Dear et al. 15-87 a pivotal linkage connecting said brush means and 3,054,130 9/1962 Ferrari 15-340 chassis; 3,165,775 1/1965 Lutz 15340 a first adjustable linkage extending between said brush 3,172,143 3/ 1965 Yucis et al 15340 means and chassis, whereby said brush means can 3,186,021 6/1965 Krier et al. 15-340 be tilted in a transverse plane extending through FOREIGN PATENTS said chassis; and, a second adjustable linkage extending between said g brush means and chassis, whereby said brush means 50 11/1959 ig i i can be tilted in a plane generally perpendicular to 970674 9/1964 Great i a-3' the transverse plane extending through said chassis.
8. A street cleaning machine including ROBERT w. MICHELL, Primary Examiner.

Claims (1)

1. A STREET CLEANING MACHINE INCLUDING: A HORIZONTALLY DISPOSED FRAME HAVING A LEFT SIDE, A RIGHT SIDE, A FRONT END AND A BACK END; A BRUSH MOUNTED ON SAID LEFT SIDE AND A BRUSH MOUNTED ON SAID RIGHT SIDE, SAID BRUSHES BEING ROTATABLE ABOUT A SUBSTANTIALLY VERTICAL AXIS AND MOVABLE VERTICALLY RELATIVE TO SAID FRAME; A VACUUM ASSEMBLY PIVOTALLY MOUNTED BELOW SAID FRAME BEHIND AND EXTENDING TOWARD SAID BRUSHES, SAID VACUUM ASSEMBLY HAVING AN OPENING SUFFICIENTLY CLOSE TO SAID BRUSHES TO RECEIVE DEBRIS DIRECTLY THEREFROM; A BIN PIVOTALLY MOUNTED ON SAID FRAME, SAID BIN INCLUDING A TOP, A BOTTOM, SIDE WALLS, AND A FRONT WAL, SAID BIN HAVING AN INLET OPENING IN THE FRONT WALL AND AN OUTLET OPENING EXTENDING PERIPHERALLY ABOUT SAID WALLS ADJACENT SAID TOP AND HAVING A PERMEABLE FILTER MEDIA POSITIONED BETWEEN SAID OUTLET OPENING AND SAID INLET OPENING, SAID FILTER MEDIA EXTENDING COMPLETELY ACROSS THE TOP OF THE BIN AND GENERALLY PARALLEL TO THE TOP THEREOF; MEANS FOR PIVOTING SAID BIN RELATIVE TO SAID FRAME; AND, BLOWER MEANS MOUNTED ON SAID FRAME AND HAVING AN INLET CONNECTED WITH SAID VACCUM ASSEMBLY AND AN OUTLET CONNECTED WITH THE INLET OPENING IN SAID BIN.
US340438A 1964-01-27 1964-01-27 Street cleaning machine Expired - Lifetime US3242521A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US340438A US3242521A (en) 1964-01-27 1964-01-27 Street cleaning machine

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US340438A US3242521A (en) 1964-01-27 1964-01-27 Street cleaning machine

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US3242521A true US3242521A (en) 1966-03-29

Family

ID=23333351

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US340438A Expired - Lifetime US3242521A (en) 1964-01-27 1964-01-27 Street cleaning machine

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US3242521A (en)

Cited By (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3406423A (en) * 1967-01-30 1968-10-22 Werner W. Young Street cleaning machine
US3886623A (en) * 1972-07-14 1975-06-03 Elgin Sweeper Co Vacuum type sweeper
JPS50127966U (en) * 1974-04-05 1975-10-21
US4084285A (en) * 1977-04-18 1978-04-18 Central Engineering Co., Inc. Street sweeper with multi-position gutter brush
US4218798A (en) * 1979-06-19 1980-08-26 Clarke-Gravely Corporation Floor treating machine
US4227893A (en) * 1978-09-01 1980-10-14 Peabody-Myers Corporation Mobile vacuum loader
DE2951479A1 (en) * 1979-12-20 1981-07-02 Wiedenmann Gmbh Lawn sweeping suction cleaner - has suction air passing over sound insulators in lid cavity, in flow to discharge port
WO1984001398A1 (en) * 1982-09-30 1984-04-12 Fmc Corp Sweeper with hydraulically driven components
US4554701A (en) * 1984-02-10 1985-11-26 Raaij Karel W M Van Vacuum street sweeper and filter apparatus therefor
US4569096A (en) * 1982-09-30 1986-02-11 Fmc Corporation Sweeper with hydraulically driven components
US4917648A (en) * 1988-08-09 1990-04-17 Hartje Robert A Toy sanitation truck
EP0795647A1 (en) * 1996-03-14 1997-09-17 DULEVO INTERNATIONAL S.p.A. Vehicle for dust and trash collecting
ES2332693A1 (en) * 2008-08-09 2010-02-10 Barredoras Antoli, S.L. Self-propelled hydraulic sweeper

Citations (17)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US802682A (en) * 1904-08-12 1905-10-24 Herbert M Briggs Street-sweeping machine.
US985945A (en) * 1909-12-23 1911-03-07 John Francis Shea Vacuum-cleaner.
US1048009A (en) * 1912-02-02 1912-12-24 John Vogelzangs Vacuum-cleaner.
US1229127A (en) * 1916-10-28 1917-06-05 Marshall L Osborne Street-cleaning machine.
US1374933A (en) * 1919-04-11 1921-04-19 Lund Charles Walter Motor-driven street-sweeper
US2458258A (en) * 1943-09-15 1949-01-04 William R Furr Suction-type street sweeper
US2496028A (en) * 1945-01-15 1950-01-31 Ira M Wells Vacuum street cleaner
US2558496A (en) * 1944-11-20 1951-06-26 Gen Motors Corp Agitator and fan drive mechanism for vacuum cleaners
US2803847A (en) * 1954-03-05 1957-08-27 Clement P Hobbs Vacuum tree leaf collection unit
GB824160A (en) * 1957-07-26 1959-11-25 Karl Heinz Schorling Automatic sweeping machine with low pressure feed for streets, roads and other driving surfaces
FR1217672A (en) * 1957-09-07 1960-05-05 Streicher M Street sweeper operated by vacuum
US2991492A (en) * 1957-03-05 1961-07-11 Lewin Road Sweepers Ltd Road sweeping machines
US3054130A (en) * 1958-07-16 1962-09-18 Belotti Ind Autogru Altre Mach Vacuum motor sweeper
FR1340146A (en) * 1962-02-22 1963-10-11 Lacre Ltd Machine for sweeping surfaces of streets and the like
US3165775A (en) * 1961-09-13 1965-01-19 Tennant Co G H Power sweeper drive, vacuum and propulsion
US3172143A (en) * 1962-10-29 1965-03-09 Yucis Machine for cleaning large surface areas
US3186021A (en) * 1959-02-20 1965-06-01 Tennant Co G H Power sweeper

Patent Citations (18)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US802682A (en) * 1904-08-12 1905-10-24 Herbert M Briggs Street-sweeping machine.
US985945A (en) * 1909-12-23 1911-03-07 John Francis Shea Vacuum-cleaner.
US1048009A (en) * 1912-02-02 1912-12-24 John Vogelzangs Vacuum-cleaner.
US1229127A (en) * 1916-10-28 1917-06-05 Marshall L Osborne Street-cleaning machine.
US1374933A (en) * 1919-04-11 1921-04-19 Lund Charles Walter Motor-driven street-sweeper
US2458258A (en) * 1943-09-15 1949-01-04 William R Furr Suction-type street sweeper
US2558496A (en) * 1944-11-20 1951-06-26 Gen Motors Corp Agitator and fan drive mechanism for vacuum cleaners
US2496028A (en) * 1945-01-15 1950-01-31 Ira M Wells Vacuum street cleaner
US2803847A (en) * 1954-03-05 1957-08-27 Clement P Hobbs Vacuum tree leaf collection unit
US2991492A (en) * 1957-03-05 1961-07-11 Lewin Road Sweepers Ltd Road sweeping machines
GB824160A (en) * 1957-07-26 1959-11-25 Karl Heinz Schorling Automatic sweeping machine with low pressure feed for streets, roads and other driving surfaces
FR1217672A (en) * 1957-09-07 1960-05-05 Streicher M Street sweeper operated by vacuum
US3054130A (en) * 1958-07-16 1962-09-18 Belotti Ind Autogru Altre Mach Vacuum motor sweeper
US3186021A (en) * 1959-02-20 1965-06-01 Tennant Co G H Power sweeper
US3165775A (en) * 1961-09-13 1965-01-19 Tennant Co G H Power sweeper drive, vacuum and propulsion
FR1340146A (en) * 1962-02-22 1963-10-11 Lacre Ltd Machine for sweeping surfaces of streets and the like
GB970674A (en) * 1962-02-22 1964-09-23 Lacre Ltd Machine for cleaning street and the like surfaces
US3172143A (en) * 1962-10-29 1965-03-09 Yucis Machine for cleaning large surface areas

Cited By (15)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3406423A (en) * 1967-01-30 1968-10-22 Werner W. Young Street cleaning machine
US3886623A (en) * 1972-07-14 1975-06-03 Elgin Sweeper Co Vacuum type sweeper
JPS50127966U (en) * 1974-04-05 1975-10-21
US4084285A (en) * 1977-04-18 1978-04-18 Central Engineering Co., Inc. Street sweeper with multi-position gutter brush
US4227893A (en) * 1978-09-01 1980-10-14 Peabody-Myers Corporation Mobile vacuum loader
US4218798A (en) * 1979-06-19 1980-08-26 Clarke-Gravely Corporation Floor treating machine
DE2951479A1 (en) * 1979-12-20 1981-07-02 Wiedenmann Gmbh Lawn sweeping suction cleaner - has suction air passing over sound insulators in lid cavity, in flow to discharge port
US4569096A (en) * 1982-09-30 1986-02-11 Fmc Corporation Sweeper with hydraulically driven components
WO1984001398A1 (en) * 1982-09-30 1984-04-12 Fmc Corp Sweeper with hydraulically driven components
US4554701A (en) * 1984-02-10 1985-11-26 Raaij Karel W M Van Vacuum street sweeper and filter apparatus therefor
US4917648A (en) * 1988-08-09 1990-04-17 Hartje Robert A Toy sanitation truck
EP0795647A1 (en) * 1996-03-14 1997-09-17 DULEVO INTERNATIONAL S.p.A. Vehicle for dust and trash collecting
US5715567A (en) * 1996-03-14 1998-02-10 Duvelo International S.P.A. Vehicle for dust and trash collecting
ES2332693A1 (en) * 2008-08-09 2010-02-10 Barredoras Antoli, S.L. Self-propelled hydraulic sweeper
WO2010018271A1 (en) * 2008-08-09 2010-02-18 Barredoras Antolí, S.L. Self-propelled hydraulic sweeper

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
AU2005313181B2 (en) Dust control system
US4062085A (en) Suction cleaning apparatus
CA1102970A (en) Apparatus for sewer cleaning and the like
US3955236A (en) Collector system in a vacuum sweeper circuit
US5797203A (en) Vehicular apparatus for removing snow and aircraft de-icing or anti-icing liquids from runway surfaces
US6013138A (en) Method for cleaning a pipe with a vehicle
CA1186110A (en) Scrubbing machine with selective recycle
US3639940A (en) Filter chamber
US3973935A (en) Dust filtration system
US7293723B2 (en) Material handling device for vehicle
US5163786A (en) Cyclone separator with filter assembly for pneumatic conveyor
US4907357A (en) Snow plow assembly adapted for mounting on a vehicle and method of using the same
US3447188A (en) Road-cleaning vehicle
CA1116102A (en) Method of collecting dust during rock drilling and a dust collecting suction system for a rock drilling apparatus
US6195837B1 (en) Debris suctioning and separating apparatus for use in a surface sweeping vehicle having a mechanical debris elevator
US20060053582A1 (en) Street sweeper with dust control
US3886623A (en) Vacuum type sweeper
US5224236A (en) Machine for cleaning paved surfaces
RU2365711C2 (en) Device for movement and handling and ejection of material and method of its operation (versions)
US6615849B1 (en) Tank cleaning system
EP1601837B1 (en) A cyclone unit with a hopper
US8393049B2 (en) Surface cleaning and recycling apparatus and method
US4874283A (en) Front dispensing truck with vertically and horizontally swingable screw conveyor
EP1714830B1 (en) Apparatus for removal of material by suction, particularly of soil
US6742219B2 (en) Air sweeping apparatus