US3241537A - Volumetric controlled crankcase ventilation systems - Google Patents

Volumetric controlled crankcase ventilation systems Download PDF

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US3241537A
US3241537A US44372965A US3241537A US 3241537 A US3241537 A US 3241537A US 44372965 A US44372965 A US 44372965A US 3241537 A US3241537 A US 3241537A
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filter
crankcase
receptacle
manifold
vapors
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Oscar F Jones
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Oscar F Jones
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01MLUBRICATING OF MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; LUBRICATING INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES; CRANKCASE VENTILATING
    • F01M13/00Crankcase ventilating or breathing
    • F01M13/04Crankcase ventilating or breathing having means for purifying air before leaving crankcase, e.g. removing oil
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01MLUBRICATING OF MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; LUBRICATING INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES; CRANKCASE VENTILATING
    • F01M13/00Crankcase ventilating or breathing
    • F01M13/04Crankcase ventilating or breathing having means for purifying air before leaving crankcase, e.g. removing oil
    • F01M2013/0438Crankcase ventilating or breathing having means for purifying air before leaving crankcase, e.g. removing oil with a filter
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S55/00Gas separation
    • Y10S55/19Crankcase ventilation

Description

March 22, 1966 o. F. JONES 3,241,537

VOLUMETRIC CONTROLLED CRANKCASE VENTILATION SYSTEMS Original Filed Nov. 6. 1961 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 A 32 34 i 4 22 \ll 22 41 I 42 a H .4 3e 36 I T A 30 W 44 44 1% /fi fio 25 26\ -26 w H6 2 2i 53 VENTOR.

OSCA F JONES ATTORNEYS March 22, 1966 o. F. JONES 3,241,537

VOLUMETRIC CONTROLLED CRANKCASE VENTILATION SYSTEMS Original Filed Nov. 6. 1961 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 TO lNTAKE MANIFOLD CRANKCASE VAPORS 58 INVENTOR.

OSCAR F JONES FIG.6

ATTORNEYS March 22, 1966 o. F. JONES 3,241,537

VOLUMETRIC CONTROLLED CRANKCASE VENTILATION SYSTEMS Original Filed Nov. 6, 1961 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTOR. OSCAR E JONES BYuaaPJaM ATTORNEYS March 22, 1966 o. F. JONES 3 241 537 VOLUMETRIC CONTROLLED CRANKGASE VENTILATION SYSTEMS Original Filed Nov. 6, 1961 5 Sheets--Sheet 4 INVENTOR. OSCAR F JONES ATTORNEYS United States Patent 3,241,537 VOLUMETREC CONTROLLED CRANKCASE VENTILATION SYSTEMS Oscar F. Jones, 1716 Andover Court, Oklahoma City, Okla.

Original application Nov. 6, 1961, Ser. No. 152,709, now Patent No. 3,164,141, dated Jan. 5, 1965. Divided and this application Jan. 4, 1965, Ser. No. 443,729

8 Claims. (Cl. 123--119) This is a divisional application of SN. 152,709 now US. Patent 3,164,141, issued January 5, 1965, and copending here-with.

This invention relates to ventilation systems for the crankcase and related chambers for internal combustion engines. More particularly, it relates to a volumetric control for such systems.

It is a well established fact that blow-by gases and vapors, such as water and unburned fuel, enter the crankcase lubricating oil chamber and other associated chambers during the operation of an internal combustion engine. These blow-by gases and vapors occur by leakages past the cylinder during the cycle of operation and, if not removed, contaminate the lubricating oil. Modern lubricants in use today contain many additives for suspending and emulsifying extraneous particles picked up from the atmosphere and blow-by vapors, plus gums, tars and acids generated by the combustion process. Ventilating or scavenging systems have been provided for removing these undesirable particles into the atmosphere. It has been found, however, that the release of such vapors and gases into the atmosphere is directly related to the creation of a smog atmosphere. Some systems have been provided to prevent such atmospheric conditions by establishing communication between the crankcase interior and the vacuum pressure source existing in the engine intake manifold. These latter systems, however, have been plagued with the problem of adequate volumetric control of the undesirable vapors, solids, and so on, under all conditions of the engine operation. When an engine is running at idling speed and minimum load conditions, the throttle valve of the carburetor is substantially closed and hence develops a maximum vacuum downstream of the throttle valve. During such a phase of engine operation, there is a minimum of leakage of gases, vapors and solids into the crankcase chambers. However, as the throttle is moved to a loaded or more fully opened position, the manifold vacuum pressure approaches atmospheric pressure conditions. At the same time, the amount of blowby gases, vapors and solids emitted into the crankcase and related chambers is increased. Accordingly, it is highly desirable that an efiicient crankcase ventilation system be provided that is capable of volumetrically controlling the connection between the crankcase chambers and the intake manifold.

Accordingly, it is an object of this invention to provide a volumetric control for ventilation systems of internal combustion engine crankcases and its related chambers which overcomes the objections existing with present and prior devices and results in a desirable condition for all engine operation conditions.

It is another object of this invention to provide a volumetric control for crankcase ventilation systems which will reduce the smog producing characteristics of internal combustion engines.

Another object of this invention is to provide a volumetric control for internal combustion engine crankcase ventilation which increases the overall engine efiiciency, horsepower, cleanliness and minimizes wear.

A yet further object of this invention is to provide a unique valve for controlling flow volume between the vapor space of a crankcase of an internal combustion 3,241,537 Patented Mar. 22, 1966 ice engine which adequately controls the flow volume to the intake manifold of said engine.

A yet additional object is to provide a valve which has a minimum of fractional contact and hence is not effected by the accumulation of gums, tars, corrosive vapors, which might cause other valves to stick under the changing manifold vacuum conditions.

It is a yet further object of this invention to provide a volumetric control for use with filtered and unfiltered crankcase ventilation systems.

These and other objects of this invention will become more apparent upon further reading of the specification and claims when taken in conjunction with the following illustrations of which:

FIGURE 1 is a sectional view of the volumetric control valve for use with this invention in the operative condition of the highest manifold vacuum.

FIGURE 2 is a sectional view of the volumetric control valve of this invention in the position of reduced manifold vacuum or load conditions of an internal combustion engine.

FIGURE 3 is an elevational view of the valve piston used in the volumetric control valve.

FIGURES 4 and 5 are top and bottom plan views respectively of the valve piston used in the volumetric control valve of this invention.

FIGURE 6 is a perspective View, partially in cross-section, of a crankcase filter system as used in combination with the volumetric control valve of this invention.

FIGURES 7 and 8 are sectional views: taken along the lines 77 and 8-8 respectively of FIGURE 6.

FIGURE 9 is an elevational view, partly in cross-section, of an additional embodiment of use of this invention.

FIGURE 10 is a sectional view taken along the line 10-10 of FlGURE 9.

FIGURE 11 is a still further embodiment of use of the volumetric ventilation control system of this invention, as used with diesel type internal combustion engines.

FIGURE 12 shows the relationship of flow and vacuum.

FIGURE 13 is a table showing valve dimensions for engines of varying displacement.

General description In general, this invention provides a volumetric control valve and piston for internal combustion engine crankcase ventilation from the crankcase vapor chamber to the intake manifold chamber for all load conditions. The valve body has a piston of design to provide a minimum of surface contact between the valve body and the piston. The valve is adaptable to be used with specially designed filtered and non-filtered ventilation systems and is also effective in eliminating smog.

Specific description Referring now to FIGURES 1 and 2, the numeral 20 is used to generally designate the volumetric control valve of this invention. The (valve comprises a body portion 22 with an inlet connector 24 threadably attached at 26 to the valve body. This closure includes threaded inlet opening 28 into the interior chamber 30 of the valve body. An outlet opening 32 is provided at the opposite end and includes threads 34 for connection to various conduits, tu bing etc. Bet-ween the interior chamber 30 and the outlet 32 are a series of step-down orifices. An upper beveled surface 36 terminates with a first circular orifice 38. A beveled surface 40 extends upwardly and inwardly to the next adjacent smaller orifice 42, which terminates with outlet 32. Although the step-down orifices are shown the volumetric control is largely dependent on the size of orifice 42 with respect to the orifice restrictions or" the valve piston 44 which is operable within chamber 30 and the associated orifices above de- 3 scribed, and which is best described by reference to FIG- URES 3, 4 and 5.

The main body of the piston is triangular in crosssection as shown and terminates at its upper portion for operation with the orificing restrictions between the chamber 36 and the outlet 32. Typically, these restrictions include a first cylindrical portion 46 and a second cylindrical portion 48 whose diameter is slightly less than the diameter of cylindrical portion 46. In some instances, a constant diameter orifice restriction is used. For the most part, portion 48 is caused to be operative within orifice 42 during periods of load, i.e., when vacuum is approaching atmospheric pressure. Conversely, portion 46 is operative to restrict orifice 42 during idle or high vacuum conditions. That portion of piston 44 adjacent the inlet end is designated by the numeral 50 which is substantially horizontal and of diameter substantially less than the diameter of the bevelled edge situated in the threaded closure member 24. Each corner of the triangle forms edges 51, 52 and 53, and in this embodiment a curved chamfer 54, 55 and 56 extends upwardly from the relatively horizontal portion 50. The partial dotted line shown in FIGURE 5 represents the contact surface when piston 44 rests upon the bevelled edge 25.

The configuration of the valve piston body forms an important feature of this invention. The triangular shape provides a minmum of surface-to-surface frictional contact between the valve piston and the internal chamber in addition to the centralizing vertical movement control. When the piston is in the position of FIGURE 1, the traingular points are the only contact with the bevelled surface 36. In the position of FIGURE 2 the contact is between surface 25 and that portion of the chamfered surfaces shown in FIGURE 5. The importance of a low surface contact prevents the possible sticking and hesitation of the valve during its vertical movement, since v-apors containing gums, tars, waxes, etc. pass through. The piston 44 is composed of a hardened stainless steel while the body 22 is of brass, a relatively soft-er material.

Reference is now made to FIGURE 6, wherein a crankcase vapor filtering apparatus 58 is described for use with or without the volumetric control rvalve of this invention. The outside structure of the apparatus includes a top cover portion 60 and a lower translucent jar or trap 62 which are held assembled by a spring biased bale 64 which includes an off-center lower locking latch 66. A filtering cartridge, generally designated by the numeral 68, includes an inner relatively rigid perforated cylindrioal portion 70'and an outer filter cloth or fiber material 72. The filter material 72 is sandwiched at the top of the cartridge between the inner perforated cylinder 70 and an outer flange portion 74 to retain the cartridge in sealing engagement between the open upper end of jar 62 and the cover 66. Release of the bale 64 permits separation of the cover 60 and jar 62 and hence replacement of the cartridge 68. The lower end of the filter includes a bottom closure and support plate 76 which is crimped around the lower edge to retain the filter in the shape substantially shown.

An L-shaped crankcase vapor inlet 78 extends from the top cover 60 inwardly and downwardly through the cylindrical filter 68 and bottom plate 76. At the lower end thereof, and below the cylindrical filter 68, is acid reactive plate or baffie 80 which is detachably secured thereto, such as by threads 82. Preferably, the bafiie plate is of a diameter slightly less than the internal diameter of the bottom trap 62 and includes a multiplicity of circumcferentially spaced perforations 84 to permit passage of the vapors. The trap 62 is adapted to retain separated liquids or solids 86 therein. Because of the translucent trap 62, an indication is provided to empty the trap and/ or change the filter 68 or bafiie mechanism 80.

The inlet 78 is adapted to be connected, in one of numerous ways, to the crankcase vapor space of an internal combustion engine. Such attachment may be made by closing off a vent pipe normally found in most engines, and making connection with the inlet by suitable conduit. Of course, other chambers which are directly or indirectly connected to the crankcase vapor space are adaptable to be connected directly to the inlet conduit 78. A suitable bracketing system, not shown, is adapted to permit the apparatus of FIGURE 6 to be attached to the firewall or other appropriate places contiguous to the internal combustion engine. Connection is usually made by flexible conduits or the like.

An adapter 88 in the top cover 60 is provided with internal threads to permit attachment of the valve housing 22. The attachment 88 is so located so as to be in communication with the interior of the cylindrical filter element 68. Connection is made from the external threaded attachment 88 to the intake manifold system of the internal combustion engine.

In the operation of the device of FIGURE 6, the flow characteristics are controlled by the volumetric control valve 20 as a function of manifold vacuum. A circulatory induced draft is established in the crankcase vapor chambers by the atmosphere drawn through an oil fill vent into the vapor space, into the filter, through the volumetric control thence into the intake manifold. The crankcase vapors typically include blow-by gases, tars, acids, water, and the like. These are drawn into the inlet conduit 78 and pass downwardly near the bottom of the trap 62 where the heavier matter is separated by the reversal of flow, substantially shown by the arrows. The separated or formed vapors pass upwardly around the bafiie with the primary amount passing through the multiple perforations 84. Due to the nature of baffie 80, being an acid reactive material (e.g. Zinc) causes neutralization of these acid vapors and conversion into hydrogen gas which continues passing upwardly with the other crankcase vapors. The vapors are then forced through the cylindrical filter 68 from the outside inward and thence upwardly through the valve 20, and attachment 88 into the intake manifold system.

Referring now to FIGURES 9 and 10, an additional embodiment of this invention is described using the volumetric valve 20. In this embodiment an internal combustion engine 90 includes a crankcase vapor space 92 and an intake manifold 94. In one embodiment a filter trap 96 includes internal baffiing 98. The baffling includes a multiplicity of perforations 100 which are adapted to be placed opposite an outlet 102 such that the vapors from the crankcase space generally follow the direction of the arrows through the volumetric control valve 20 into outlet 104 into the intake manifold 94.

In the operation of this embodiment, the filter 96 causes the crankcase vapors to be separated from dense material therein which passes back into the crankcase or is retained permitting the lighter hydrocarbon vapors, and/or water vapor, to be passed directly into the intake manifold system for improved combustion efficiency of the internal combustion engine 90. An alternate embodiment of this invention, using the volumetric control valve 20, is diagrammatically shown in FIGURE 9. In this embodiment, ordinarily direct attachment is made. However, to show the embodiment in FIGURE 9 various shut-off and by-pass valves are used for descriptive purposes only. Valve 106 would shut ofi flow through the filter 96 and valve 108 permits passage of crankcase vapors into conduit 110 and thence into the volumetric control valve and the intake manifold. The latter embodiment of FIGURE 9 wherein crankcase vapors are fed directly by volumetric control valve 20 into the intake manifold, an economical system of smog control is effected. In those systems where it is desired to provide greater filtering of the dense material from the vapor material, filters such as that shown at 96 and/or the filter system of FIGURE 6 may be utilized and thus provide greater engine performance and efliciency.

Another modification of this invention is diagrammatically shown in FIGURE 11. In this instance, a diesel engine 120 includes the typical fuel injection system 122, and air intake valve 124 cyclically operated by cam and follower 126 and 128 respectively. crankcase 130 includes an air breather means 132 for normally equalizing the pressure Within the crankcase. The breather 132 may be located with respect to the crankcase as shown, or may be located with respect to the valve housing and cover 134 which permits atmospheric draft-like ventilation of the crankcase. Suitably connected to the air intake manifold 136 is filtered air inlet line 138 which is downstream from filtering unit 140.. The filter unit itself includes an inlet conduit 142 causing the air to be forced downwardly across an optional oil bath section 144 and thence upwardly through restrictive filter element 146. It has been found that the restrictive passage of air across filter element 146 causes a slight vacuum to exist in the downstream inlet 138 to the air intake manifold. Accordingly, it has been found possible to use the crankcase vapor filtering unit 58 with such a system without the volumetric control valve 20 therein. That is, crankcase vapors and air are drawn, by the slight vacuum of intake 138, from the crankcase space through conduit 48 into the inlet conduit 78 with the filtrate hydrocarbon and/or water flowing outwardly through a conduit 150 into the air intake system. Accordingly, blow-by vapors from the piston of the internal combustion engine which enter the crankcase and other impurities are therefore filtered and utilized in the combustion process to increase the efiiciency of the diesel engine. In one test it was apparent that the cylinder deposits are softened and removed by the vapors with a 6% increase in horsepower.

FIGURE 12 is a graphic indication of the performance curves for various types of volumetric control valves whose basic dimensions are shown in the chart of FIG- URE 13. The letters A, B and C refer to dimensions indicated in FIGURES 1 and 3. The valves are designed for various maximum cubic inches displacement (C.I.D.) from below 100 to around 900 cubic inches.

Although this invention has been described with reference to specific and preferred embodiments, this is not to be held as limiting. Accordingly, this invention should be limited only by the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. An internal combustion engine crankcase ventilation filter system comprising the combination of,

a cylindrical receptacle open at one end,

a top cover for said receptacle end,

a replaceable filter element extendable within said receptable and clampable between said receptacle and said cover,

a crankcase vapor inlet into said receptacle exteriorly of said filter,

a bafile plate exteriorly of said filter to cause separation of solid and liquid particles in said vapor,

an outlet to manifold vacuum of said engine in said cover connectable with the interior of said filter element,

and a variable flow restrict-ion valve in said outlet to permit relatively high rate of flow under low manifold vacuum and a low rate of flow under high manifold vacuum;

2. A filter system according to claim 1, wherein said baffle plate is reactive to neutralize acidic vapors in said crankcase.

3. A filter system according to claim 2, wherein said plate is zinc.

4. An internal combustion engine crankcase ventilation filter system comprising the combination of,

a cylindrical receptacle open at one end,

a top cover for said receptacle end,

a replaceable filter element extendable within said receptacle and clampable between said receptacle and said cover,

a crankcase vapor inlet conduit extending through said cover, and downwardly through said filter opening slightly below said filter and substantially above the bottom of said receptacle,

an acid reactive baffle plate exteriorly of said filter and detachably secured to said inlet conduit adjacent said opening and to cause separation of solid and liquid particles in said vapor,

an outlet to manifold vacuum of said engine in said cover connectable with the interior of said filter element,

and a variable flow restriction valve in said outlet to permit relatively high rate of flow under low manifold vacuum and a low rate of flow under high manifold vacuum.

5. An internal combustion engine crankcase ventilation filter system comprising the combination of,

a cylindrical receptacle open at one end,

a top cover for said receptacle end,

a replaceable filter element extendab le within said receptacle and clampable between said receptacle and said cover,

a crankcase vapor inlet into said receptacle exteriorly of said filter,

a baffle plate exteriorly of said filter to cause separa tion of solid and liquid particles in said vapor,

an outlet to manifold vacuum of said engine in said cover connectable with the interior of said filter element,

a volumetric control valve in said outlet for metering internal combustion engine crankcase vapors into the intake manifold as a function of the no-load and load vacuum therein,

a valve body having a cylindrical chamber between a lower vapor inlet and an upper outlet control orifice,

a valve piston operable between said inlet and outlet,

said piston having a triangular cross-section body portion operable substantially within said chamber and terminating its upper end with first and second cylindrical restricting portions,

said first portion of diameter slightly less than the diameter of said control orifice and substantially oper able therein under said no-load conditions,

and said second portion above said first and of diameter slightly less than said first portion and substantially operable within said control orifice under load conditicins and when said body portion is at rest on said in et.

6. Apparatus for preventing atmospheric discharge of crankcase vapors from an internal combustion engine, comprising in combination,

conduit means from said crankcase vapor space to the intake manifold of said engine,

a volumetric control valve in said conduit for metering said vapors into said manifold. as a function of the no-load and load vacuum therein, comprising,

a valve body having a cylindrical chamber between a lower vapor inlet and an upper outlet control orifice,

a valve piston operable between said inlet and outlet,

said piston having a triangular cross-section body portion operable substantially within said chamber and terminating its upper end with first and second cylindrical restricting portions,

said first portion of diameter slightly less than the diameter of said control orifice and substantially operable therein under said no-load conditions,

and said second portion above said first and of diameter slightly less than said first portion and substantially operable within said control orifice under load conditions and when said body portion is at rest on said inlet.

7. Apparatus according to claim 6 wherein the combination includes a bafile-filter means to separate dense materials from said vapors.

8. Apparatus for filtering cranckcase vapors in internal combustion engines of the diesel type having an air inlet manifold and a restrictive air filter attached to said mani fold causing a slight vacuum in said manifold, comprising in combination,

a cylindrical receptacle open at one end,

a top cover for said receptacle end,

a replaceable filter element extendable within said receptacle and clarnpable between said receptacle and said cover,

a crankcase vapor inlet into said receptacle exteriorly of said filter,

an acid reactive baffle plate exteriorly of said filter to cause separation of solid and liquid particles in said vapor,

an outlet in said cover connectable with the interior of said filter element,

means to connect said inlet with said crankcase vapor space, and means to connect said outlet with said manifold.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,990,657 2/1935 Krieck 123-119 2,113,447 4/1938 Hardingev 2,604,186 7/ 1952 Beckett.

2,731,958 1/1956 Robley 123-119 2,742,057 4/1956 Krieck.

KARL J. ALBRECHT, Primary Examiner.

Claims (1)

  1. 8. APPARATUS FOR FILTERING CRANKCASE VAPORS IN INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES OF THE DIESEL TYPE HAVING AN AIR INLET MANIFOLD AND A RESTRICTIVE AIR FILTER ATTACHED TO SAID MANIFOLD CAUSING A SLIGHT VACUUM IN SAID MANIFOLD, COMPRISING IN COMBINATION, A CYLINDRICAL RECEPTACLE OPEN AT ONE END, A TOP COVER FOR SAID RECEPTACLE END, A REPLACEABLE FILTER ELEMENT EXTENDABLE WITHIN SAID RECEPTACLE AND CLAMPABLE BETWEEN SAID RECEPTACLE AND SAID COVER, A CRANKCASE VAPOR INLET INTO SAID RECEPTACLE EXTERIORLY OF SAID FILTER, AN ACID REACTIVE BAFFLE PLATE EXTERIORLY OF SAID FILTER TO CAUSE SEPARATION OF SOLID AND LIQUID PARTICLES IN SAID VAPOR, AN OUTLET IN SAID COVER CONNECTABLE WITH THE INTERIOR OF SAID FILTER ELEMENT, MEANS TO CONNECT SAID INLET WITH SAID CRANKCASE VAPOR SPACE, AND MEANS TO CONNECT SAID OUTLET WITH SAID MANIFOLD.
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Cited By (17)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3308798A (en) * 1965-05-05 1967-03-14 Kenneth M Snider Metering valve for crankcase ventilation systems
US3359961A (en) * 1965-06-01 1967-12-26 Paolo John De Fume eliminator
US3469565A (en) * 1967-08-17 1969-09-30 Caterpillar Tractor Co Crankcase ventilating means for internal combustion engines
US3653191A (en) * 1969-10-16 1972-04-04 Gardner Denver Co Receiver-separator unit for liquid injected gas compressor
US4082071A (en) * 1976-02-20 1978-04-04 Jones Oscar F Engine vent vapor filter and method of constructing same
US4453525A (en) * 1982-05-07 1984-06-12 Energy Innovations, Ltd. Apparatus for treating the crankcase vapor emissions of internal combustion engines
US5472463A (en) * 1994-06-14 1995-12-05 Cummins Engine Company, Inc. Pressure side integrated air filter and filtering networks for engines
US5558688A (en) * 1994-07-14 1996-09-24 Semi-Gas Systems, Inc. Block filter-purifier
US5586996A (en) * 1994-05-12 1996-12-24 Manookian, Jr.; Arman K. Vapor separating device
US6149718A (en) * 1998-10-16 2000-11-21 Mott Mettallurgical Corporation Contamination control system
EP1471218A1 (en) * 2003-04-25 2004-10-27 Perkins Engines Company Limited Internal combustion engine having an internal barrier device to reduce oil carry-over
US20090266346A1 (en) * 2008-04-29 2009-10-29 Cummins Filtration Ip, Inc. Crankcase filtration assembly with additive for treating condensate material
US20100077972A1 (en) * 2008-09-30 2010-04-01 Deltahawk Engines, Inc. Crankcase pressure regulator for an internal combustion engine
US20110056455A1 (en) * 2008-05-16 2011-03-10 Naoto Koyamaishi Oil mist separator for internal combustion engine
US20120031228A1 (en) * 2010-08-05 2012-02-09 Toyo Electric Mfg. Co. Ltd. Gear device for electric motor
US20130087222A1 (en) * 2011-10-07 2013-04-11 Aisan Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Flow control valves
NO20161697A1 (en) * 2016-10-26 2018-04-27 Viking Heat Engines As Fluid separator for a displacement machine and a method for separating lubricant and working fluid in a displacement machine

Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1990657A (en) * 1933-02-21 1935-02-12 James H Krieck Apparatus for increasing the efficiency of internal combustion engines
US2113447A (en) * 1934-03-20 1938-04-05 Hardinge Franklin Water separator for fluid lines
US2604186A (en) * 1950-01-07 1952-07-22 Ronald C Beckett Crankcase ventilator
US2731958A (en) * 1956-01-24 Motor moisture
US2742057A (en) * 1952-10-22 1956-04-17 James H Krieck Device for ventilating engine crankcase

Patent Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2731958A (en) * 1956-01-24 Motor moisture
US1990657A (en) * 1933-02-21 1935-02-12 James H Krieck Apparatus for increasing the efficiency of internal combustion engines
US2113447A (en) * 1934-03-20 1938-04-05 Hardinge Franklin Water separator for fluid lines
US2604186A (en) * 1950-01-07 1952-07-22 Ronald C Beckett Crankcase ventilator
US2742057A (en) * 1952-10-22 1956-04-17 James H Krieck Device for ventilating engine crankcase

Cited By (25)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3308798A (en) * 1965-05-05 1967-03-14 Kenneth M Snider Metering valve for crankcase ventilation systems
US3359961A (en) * 1965-06-01 1967-12-26 Paolo John De Fume eliminator
US3469565A (en) * 1967-08-17 1969-09-30 Caterpillar Tractor Co Crankcase ventilating means for internal combustion engines
US3653191A (en) * 1969-10-16 1972-04-04 Gardner Denver Co Receiver-separator unit for liquid injected gas compressor
US4082071A (en) * 1976-02-20 1978-04-04 Jones Oscar F Engine vent vapor filter and method of constructing same
US4453525A (en) * 1982-05-07 1984-06-12 Energy Innovations, Ltd. Apparatus for treating the crankcase vapor emissions of internal combustion engines
US5586996A (en) * 1994-05-12 1996-12-24 Manookian, Jr.; Arman K. Vapor separating device
US5472463A (en) * 1994-06-14 1995-12-05 Cummins Engine Company, Inc. Pressure side integrated air filter and filtering networks for engines
US5558688A (en) * 1994-07-14 1996-09-24 Semi-Gas Systems, Inc. Block filter-purifier
US6149718A (en) * 1998-10-16 2000-11-21 Mott Mettallurgical Corporation Contamination control system
EP1471218A1 (en) * 2003-04-25 2004-10-27 Perkins Engines Company Limited Internal combustion engine having an internal barrier device to reduce oil carry-over
US20050011503A1 (en) * 2003-04-25 2005-01-20 Daniel Deane Internal combustion engine having an internal barrier device to reduce oil carry-over
US7055510B2 (en) * 2003-04-25 2006-06-06 Perkins Engines Company Limited Internal combustion engine having an internal barrier device to reduce oil carry-over
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