US3221873A - Non-slip surgical package - Google Patents

Non-slip surgical package Download PDF

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US3221873A
US3221873A US29133963A US3221873A US 3221873 A US3221873 A US 3221873A US 29133963 A US29133963 A US 29133963A US 3221873 A US3221873 A US 3221873A
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Prior art keywords
package
layer
foil
film
panels
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Expired - Lifetime
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Donald R Bowes
Oliver T Smith
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Donald R Bowes
Oliver T Smith
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/04Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets for suturing wounds; Holders or packages for needles or suture materials
    • A61B17/06Needles ; Sutures; Needle-suture combinations; Holders or packages for needles or suture materials
    • A61B17/06114Packages or dispensers for needles or sutures
    • A61B17/06133Packages or dispensers for needles or sutures of parallelepipedal shape, e.g. made of rectangular or slightly oval panels
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F15/00Auxiliary appliances for wound dressings; Dispensing containers for dressings or bandages
    • A61F15/001Packages or dispensers for bandages, cotton balls, drapes, dressings, gauze, gowns, sheets, sponges, swabsticks or towels

Description

Dec. 7, 1965 D. R. BovvEs ETAL 3,221,873

NoN-SLIP SURGICAL PACKAGE Filed June 28, 1965 1.4. ajc? Z/// INVENTOR S.'

ATTO R N EY United States Patent O 3,221,873 NGN-SLIP SURGICAL PACKAGE Donald R. Bowes, 214 Vinton Circle, Fanwood, NJ., and Oliver T. Smith, 17010 Melgrave Ave., Cleveland,

Ohio Filed .lune 28, 1963, Ser. No. 291,339

6 Claims. (Cl. ZIM-63.3)

The present invention relates to surgical packages of the type which are used to contain sterile absorbable catgut sutures and other sutures and surgical products.

Surgical packages intended for use in the sterile zone in hospital operating rooms must meet the exacting requirement of being sterile both inside and out. Under some circumstances, the exterior of the package is maintained sterile prior to use by immersing the package in a formaldehyde sterilizing 'solution enclosed in a secondary container. Often this type of package is packed by the manufacturer in a formaldehyde containing secondary unit of this type. When surgical gut is involved, a suture softening solution, which normally is alcohol-based, is included inside the package. Thus, the individual package must be capable of preventing permeation of the formaldehyde sterilizing solution into the package and leakage of the suture softening solution out of the package. If the sterilizing solution reaches the suture inside the package, the suture is hardened and may become nonabsorbable. On the other hand, if the softening solution leaks out, the gut becomes brittle and nonuseable. It is necessary, then that surgical packages of this type be capable of resisting the permeation of such uids for an indefinite period of time since one cannot determine how long it will be before one of the packages is used.

For a number of years, sealed glass tubes were used for this purpose. While they were capable of resisting the permeation of these uids, they were fragile and often broke in transit. Perhaps more importantly, they were opened by breaking the glass. This was, not only difficult, but dangerous and a source of possible contamination.

It has been proposed to use envelopes of various materials for this purpose. The only single plastic sheet material which is capable of resisting the permeation of these fluids for the length of time required is polychloro-trifluoroethylene. However, the cost of this material for this purpose is prohibitive and it also becomes brittle during sterilization by irradiation. Recognizing that a lm of a single material is not satisfactory for this purpose, laminates of various materials have been employed. None of these have been completely satisfactory.

The most commonly used laminate is one comprising an outside layer of aluminum foil and an inside layer of a heat sealable film of a thermoplastic material such as polyvinyl chloride. Packages formed from this type of laminate are satisfactory up to a point. For instance, aluminum foil of the proper thickness makes a perfect barrier to the permeation of formaldehyde containing sterilizing solutions and alcohol-based suture softening fluids. However, aluminum foil is very susceptible to moisture induced electrolytic corrosion and to heavy metals attack. Quite often foil packages of this type are washed in water to remove blood stains, or the like. This can and does cause holes to be corroded through the foil. Obviously, once the holes appear, permeation of the fluids begins and then becomes increasingly worse. Another disadvantage of the aluminum foil on the exterior of the package is that the foil, itself, has very little capacity for elongation and therefore is susceptible to being broken or punctured during removal of the packages from the secondary container with the various forceps in use for this purpose. It also has been common in foil-plastic packages of this type to use a laminating film on the inside of 3,221,873 Patented Dec. 7, 1965 ICC the package for the additional reason that the film provides a secondary barrier to permeation through the package in case a pin hole is formed in the foil. Such films normally are plasticized to give them the necessary exibility. Thus another problem occurs because the alcohol in the suture softening solution leaches out the plasticizer in the film and the plasticizer contaminates the suture.

In accordance with the present invention, a surgical package is provided which solves all of these problems. This package comprises opposed panels of an impervious laminate secured to one another around their edges to completely enclose and hermetically seal off a central space in which the panels are unattached to one another, and a surgical product such as a sterile suture enclosed in said space. Normally the laminate is impervious to formaldehyde and other sterilizing components. Each of the panels comprises an inner layer of aluminum foil and an outer layer of a tough, moisture impermeable transparent plastic film. The aluminum foil layer normally provides an effective barrier to all gases and fluids with which the package might come in contact, and the plastic film protects the foil from external moisture induced electrolytic corrosion and heavy metals attack and from mechanical damage during handling. At the same time, the foil-film laminate is capable of being torn easily for opening the package along a tear line adjacent one end thereof. In addition, the plastic film acts as a secondary barrier to penetration or permeation of the package by gases and fluids. Furthermore, the package according to this invention is sterilizable by irradiation, using an electron beam or similar means, without degradation of any of the materials making up the package.

Preferably, the plastic film is a polyester such as polyethylene terephthalate sold as Mylar film by E. I. Du Pont de Nemours & Co. Inc. and the film possesses a tensile strength of at least about 15,000 p.s.i. and a puncture resistance of at least about 25 kilometers per centimeter to give it the desired toughness to protect the foil from mechanical damage and chemical attack.

The plastic film of the package of this invention is transparent and the inner surface of the transparent film of at least one of the panels is printed in reverse to describe the contents of the package in such a way that the printing can be read from the outside of the package through the printed film. This protects the printing from being scuffed off the package or reacting with the sterilizing solution and thereby assures accurate description of the contents of the package at all times.

According to this invention, a package of the above type is provided wherein a transparent non-slip layer having a high wet coefficient of friction is provided on the outside surface of each of the plastic film outer layers of the package to assure that the package can be handled accurately and torn properly to open the package and expose its contents when desired. When the plastic film is a polyester, it is preferred that the non-slip layer comprise a dispersion of silica particles in a transparent polyester base. This non-slip layer including the silica particles is transparent so that the printing on the inside surface of the plastic film can be read easily through the non-slip layer.

Copending application Serial No. 291,482 filed June 28, 1963, in the name of Donald R. Bowes claims the specific aluminum foil-polyester laminated package described herein. This application is directed in particular to the aforesaid non-slip feature.

Other and further advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following description and claims taken together with the drawings wherein:

FIG. l is a partially broken away plan view of a sterile suture package according to one embodiment of this invention;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged sectional view taken along the line 2 2 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a greatly enlarged sectional view of the encircled portion of FIG. 2 showing the adjacent top and bottom panels of the package before they are heat sealed to one another;

FIG. 4 is a greatly enlarged sectional view of the panels of FIG. 3 after they are heat sealed to one another.

Referring to the drawings, there is shown a sterile suture package comprising a top panel 11 and a bottom panel 12 of a formaldehyde impervious laminate. Said panels 11 and 12 are superimposed and sealed to one another along their edges to completely enclose and hermetically seal olf a central space 13 in which the panels are unattached to one another. A coiled sterile surgical suture 14 inside a paper sleeve 15 is enclosed within the central space 13. A tab 16 at one end of the sleeve 15 lits between the panels 11 and 12 at one end of the package and is thereby sealed to the panels. If the suture 14 is of absorbable surgical gut, a small amount of a suture softening, or pliabilizing, solution, not shown, is included within the central space 13. A typical softening fluid for this purpose is a 90% solution of isopropyl alcohol in water. The suture package, itself, may be enclosed within an outer container, not shown, and immersed in a formaldehyde containing sterilizing solution for maintaining the exterior of the package sterile. A tearing notch 17 is located adjacent one end 18 of the package along its top edge and a tear line 19 is marked on one side of the package extending from the notch 17 to the opposite side thereof. The package is intended to be opened by gripping it on opposite sides of the notch 17 and tearing downwardly along the tear line 19 to remove the end 18 of the package.

As shown most clearly in FIGS. 3 and 4, both the top and bottom panels of the package are made up of an inner aluminum foil barrier layer 21 and an outer moistureimpermeable transparent plastic protective layer 22 of a tough material such as a polyester film. The inside of the foil layer is coated with an alcohol resistant heat sealable layer 23y and the outer surface of the foil layer is coated with an adhesive layer 24. When the plastic protective layer 22 is a polyester film, the adhesive 24 is a polyester adhesive. The outermost layer of the panel laminate is a waterproof and chemical-resistant transparent non-slip layer 25 having a Wet coefficient of friction. Again, when the plastic protective layer 22 is a polyester film, the non-slip layer 25 comprises a dispersion of silica particles in a transparent polyester base.

As shown in FIG. 4, the top and bottom panels 11 and 12 are placed together and heat sealed by the application of heat and pressure in such a way that the two heat sealable layers 23 adhere and more or less blend into one another in the sealed areas. The edge 26 of the blended heat sealable layers is so thin and presents such a small area to the outside of the package and the width of the seal, i.e., the distance between the edge 26 and the cavity 13 is comparatively so great, that there is virtually no opportunity for permeation of fluids through the seal itself. Elsewhere, the foil plastic laminate described makes a perfect barrier to the permeation of iiuids inwardly or outwardly of the package, and the plastic protective layer 22 protects the foil layer 21 from external moisture induced electrolytic corrosion and heavy metals attack, and from mechanical damage. As mentioned hereinbefore, the plastic film 22, itself, preferably possesses a low permeability to gases and fluids and acts as a secondary barrier to penetration of the package in case any holes should be formed in one of the foil layers. In this connection, it should be noted that preferably the foil layer in the panel which is distorted the most to form the central space or cavity 13 in the package is somewhat thicker than the foil layer in the other panel in order to provide additional strength in the panel and minimize thelikelihood of cracking the foil. In the embodiment shown, Vthe foil layer 21 of the bottom panel 12 is somewhat thicker than the foil layer 21 of the top panel 11 for this reason.

The inside surface of the transparent plastic protective layer 22 of the top panel 11 preferably is printed in reverse with material intended to describe the contents of the package and the printing, shown in part in FIG. 1, can be read through lthe protective layer 22 and through the transparent non-slip layer 25. Thus, the printing, itself, and the ink used therefore, is .completely shielded against reaction with chemicals and fully protected from scuing.

In a typical package according to this embodiment of the invention, the bottom panel 12 is formed from a layer 21 of dead-soft, high purity aluminum foil approximately two mils thick and a protective layer 22 of Mylar polyethylene terephthalate lilm approximately 0.25 mil thick; whereas the top panel 11 is formed from a similar aluminum foil layer 21 approximately 1.5 mils thick and a protective layer 22 of the same Mylar polyester approximately 0.35 mil thick. The alcohol resistant heat sealing layer 23 in each case is applied in a lirst coat of about 3 pounds per ream of a primer comprising copolymers of Vinyl chloride and vinyl acetate and a second coat of about 3 pounds per ream of an unplasticized heat sealing material which consists predominately of a copolymer of vinyl chloride and vinyl acetate. The adhesive 24 between the foil layer 21 and the Mylar polyester protective layer 22 is a polyethylene terephthalate adhesive. In the bottom panel 12 only about 3 pounds per ream of the polyester is applied, but in the top panel 11 the polyester adhesive 24 is pigmented white and applied in the amount of about 6 pounds per ream. The non-slip layer 25 is a similar transparent polyester adhesive with very small silica particles dispersed therein to achieve a high Wet coefficient of friction. When the inside surface of the transparent protective layer of the top panel is reverse printed as described hereinbefore, the White pigment in the polyester adhesive provides a background for the printing so that it may be read more easily.

Various important qualities of this polyester protective film 22 have been described hereinbefore. For instance, the film should possess a tensile strength of at least about 15,000 p.s.i. and a puncture resistance of at least about 25 kilograms per centimeter to provide the desired toughness and impermeability. On the other hand, to provide good tearability which is necessary to facilitate removal of the end of the package by tearing as described above, moderate to low tear strength and elongation are required. For instance, a film possessing an elongation of about -100% combined with a tear strength of about l5 grams per mil should have ideal tearing qualities. One additional important feature when the package is to be heat sealed from the outside, i.e., the top and bottom, is that the polyester protective film 22 and the non-slip layer 25 be capable of resisting the temperature of the heat sealing shoes or dies employed. Polyethylene terephthalate lilms of the type described possess a melting point above about 350-3 80 F., which is satisfactory for this purpose. Furthermore, these films possess very low water vapor transmission rates and, perhaps more importantly, a low rate of moisture absorption. It is the combination of these qualities which protects the exterior surface of the foil from electrolytic corrosion. These lms also possess excellent resistance to acids, bases, grease and oil, and for these reasons are ideal for protecting the foil barrier.

Having now described the invention in specific detail and exemplified the manner in which it may be carried into practice, it will be readily apparent to those skilled in the art that innumerable variations, applications, modifications, and extensions of the basic principles involved may be made without departing from its spirit or scope.

The invention claimed is:

1. A sterile surgical package which comprises `opposed panels of a gas yand liquid impervious laminate secured to one another around their edges to completely enclose and hermetically seal off a central space in which the panels are unattached to one another, a sterile surgical product in said space, said panels each comprising `an inner layer of aluminum foil and an outer layer of a tough, moisture impermeable transparent plastic iilm, and a transparent non-slip 'layer having :a h-igh wet coeicient of friction on the outside surface of each `of said panels.

2. A ysterile surgical package -a-ccording to claim l1, Iwherein said sterile product is a surgical suture.

3. A sterile surgical package according to claim 1, wherein the inner surface of said transparent plastic liilm -is printed to describe the contents of the package in such a Way that the printing can be read through the lm and through the non-slip layer.

4. A surgical package which comprises opposed panels of a -gas and lliquid impervious laminate secured to one another around their edges to completely enclose and hermetically seal off a central space in which the panels are unattached to one another, a surgical product in said space, said panels each comprising an inner [layer of laluminum foil and an `outer layer lof a tough, moisture impermeable polyester lm, and a waterproof and chemicalresistant non-slip -layer comprising a dispersion `of silica particles in a polyester base `on the outside surface of each of said panels.

5. A surgical package according to claim 4, wherein said polyester -lm comprises polyethylene terephthalate and 4said film is adhered t-o the foil by a polyester adhesive.

6. A surgical package according to 4claim 5, wherein the polyester `fil-m of at least one 'of said panels and its corresponding non-'slip outside ylayer are t-ranspa-rent and the inner surface of said polyester til-m Iis printed to describe the contents lof the package in Such a way that the printing can be read from the outside of the package through the y)film and through the non-slip layer.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,872,094 2/ 1959 Leptien 229-53 2,993,589 7/1961 Zoller 206-63.3

FRANKLIN T. GARRETTI, Primary Examiner.

GEORGE O. RALSTON, Examiner.

Claims (1)

1. A STERILE SURGICAL PACKAGE WHICH COMPRISES OPPOSED PANELS OF A GAS AND LIQUID IMPERVIOUS LAMINATE SECURED TO ONE ANOTHER AROUND THEIR EDGES TO COMPLETELY ENCLOSE AND HERMETICALLY SEAL OFF A CENTRAL SPACE IN WHICH THE PANELS ARE UNATTACHED TO ONE ANOTHER , A STERILE SURGICAL PRODUCT IN SAID SPACE, SAID PANELS EACH COMPRISING AN INNER LAYER OF ALUMINUM FOIL AND AN OUTER LAYER OF A TOUGH, MOISTURE IMPERMEABLE TRANSPARENT PLASTIC FILM, AND A TRANSPARENT NON-SLIP LAYER HAVING A HIGH WET COEFFICIENT OF FRICTION ON THE OUTSIDE SURFACE OF EACH OF SAID PANELS.
US3221873A 1963-06-28 1963-06-28 Non-slip surgical package Expired - Lifetime US3221873A (en)

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US3221873A US3221873A (en) 1963-06-28 1963-06-28 Non-slip surgical package
DE1964B0077406 DE1298236B (en) 1963-06-28 1964-06-25 Sterile surgical pack
GB2652064A GB1062696A (en) 1963-06-28 1964-06-26 Non-slip surgical package

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Cited By (21)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3343663A (en) * 1965-10-24 1967-09-26 Dow Chemical Co Package and laminate thereof
US3613879A (en) * 1969-08-19 1971-10-19 Philip Morris Inc Suture packaging
US4014433A (en) * 1975-05-27 1977-03-29 Ethican, Inc. Package for moisture sensitive sutures and method for making same
US4048205A (en) * 1976-08-02 1977-09-13 Uop Inc. Process for separating an ester of a monoethanoid fatty acid
US4168000A (en) * 1976-10-22 1979-09-18 American Cyanamid Company Suture package
US4557381A (en) * 1983-09-09 1985-12-10 Alba-Waldensian, Inc. Wrap for impregnated dressing
US5129511A (en) * 1989-08-01 1992-07-14 United States Surgical Corporation Package for a combined surgical suture-needle device
EP0498093A1 (en) * 1991-01-25 1992-08-12 United States Surgical Corporation Package for a combined surgical suture-needle device
US5178277A (en) * 1991-01-04 1993-01-12 United States Surgical Corporation Breather pouch for surgical suture packages
US5217772A (en) * 1991-01-04 1993-06-08 United States Surgical Corporation Breather pouch for surgical suture packages
US5220769A (en) * 1991-01-04 1993-06-22 United States Surgical Corporation Method for packaging surgical elements
US5222978A (en) * 1987-08-26 1993-06-29 United States Surgical Corporation Packaged synthetic absorbable surgical elements
EP0578101A1 (en) * 1992-07-09 1994-01-12 United States Surgical Corporation A package for surgical devices
US5341922A (en) * 1993-02-24 1994-08-30 Ethicon, Inc. Peelable foil suture packaging
US5359831A (en) * 1989-08-01 1994-11-01 United States Surgical Corporation Molded suture retainer
US5366081A (en) * 1987-08-26 1994-11-22 United States Surgical Corporation Packaged synthetic absorbable surgical elements
US20110233097A1 (en) * 2008-10-06 2011-09-29 Kraft Foods Global Brands Llc Packaging assembly including a blister card having a vapor barrier
EP2493755A1 (en) * 2009-10-26 2012-09-05 Waxless Surfboard Systems, Inc. Traction surface and methods therefor
US20150144649A1 (en) * 2013-11-25 2015-05-28 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Wet Wipe Refill Container Indicator
US9125532B2 (en) 2012-12-20 2015-09-08 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Storing and dispensing container for wipes
US9889963B2 (en) 2012-12-20 2018-02-13 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Refillable dispensing container for stacked moist wipes

Families Citing this family (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE2321608C2 (en) * 1973-04-28 1982-11-04 Aluminium-Walzwerke Singen Gmbh, 7700 Singen, De
FR2621475B1 (en) * 1987-10-09 1997-02-28

Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2872094A (en) * 1956-11-09 1959-02-03 St Regis Paper Co Anti-skid compositions and container material coated therewith
US2993589A (en) * 1958-08-15 1961-07-25 Ethicon Inc Surgical package

Family Cites Families (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
FR1244570A (en) * 1958-11-13 1960-10-28 American Cyanamid Co advanced packaging for surgical articles
FR1232033A (en) * 1959-08-04 1960-10-05 Suture package of products under aluminum foil
DE1863980U (en) * 1962-10-06 1962-12-13 Aluminium Walzwerke Singen Sterilizable soft packaging.

Patent Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2872094A (en) * 1956-11-09 1959-02-03 St Regis Paper Co Anti-skid compositions and container material coated therewith
US2993589A (en) * 1958-08-15 1961-07-25 Ethicon Inc Surgical package

Cited By (26)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3343663A (en) * 1965-10-24 1967-09-26 Dow Chemical Co Package and laminate thereof
US3613879A (en) * 1969-08-19 1971-10-19 Philip Morris Inc Suture packaging
US4014433A (en) * 1975-05-27 1977-03-29 Ethican, Inc. Package for moisture sensitive sutures and method for making same
US4048205A (en) * 1976-08-02 1977-09-13 Uop Inc. Process for separating an ester of a monoethanoid fatty acid
US4168000A (en) * 1976-10-22 1979-09-18 American Cyanamid Company Suture package
US4557381A (en) * 1983-09-09 1985-12-10 Alba-Waldensian, Inc. Wrap for impregnated dressing
US5222978A (en) * 1987-08-26 1993-06-29 United States Surgical Corporation Packaged synthetic absorbable surgical elements
US5366081A (en) * 1987-08-26 1994-11-22 United States Surgical Corporation Packaged synthetic absorbable surgical elements
US5468252A (en) * 1987-08-26 1995-11-21 United States Surgical Corporation Packaged synthetic absorbable surgical elements
US5129511A (en) * 1989-08-01 1992-07-14 United States Surgical Corporation Package for a combined surgical suture-needle device
US5359831A (en) * 1989-08-01 1994-11-01 United States Surgical Corporation Molded suture retainer
US5178277A (en) * 1991-01-04 1993-01-12 United States Surgical Corporation Breather pouch for surgical suture packages
US5220769A (en) * 1991-01-04 1993-06-22 United States Surgical Corporation Method for packaging surgical elements
US5217772A (en) * 1991-01-04 1993-06-08 United States Surgical Corporation Breather pouch for surgical suture packages
EP0498093A1 (en) * 1991-01-25 1992-08-12 United States Surgical Corporation Package for a combined surgical suture-needle device
EP0578101A1 (en) * 1992-07-09 1994-01-12 United States Surgical Corporation A package for surgical devices
US5439102A (en) * 1992-07-09 1995-08-08 United States Surgical Corporation Package for surgical sutures
US5341922A (en) * 1993-02-24 1994-08-30 Ethicon, Inc. Peelable foil suture packaging
US20110233097A1 (en) * 2008-10-06 2011-09-29 Kraft Foods Global Brands Llc Packaging assembly including a blister card having a vapor barrier
EP2493755A1 (en) * 2009-10-26 2012-09-05 Waxless Surfboard Systems, Inc. Traction surface and methods therefor
EP2493755A4 (en) * 2009-10-26 2014-06-18 Waxless Surfboard Systems Inc Traction surface and methods therefor
US9126388B2 (en) 2009-10-26 2015-09-08 Waxless Surfboard Systems, Inc. Traction surface and methods therefor
US9296152B2 (en) 2009-10-26 2016-03-29 Versatraction, Inc. Traction surface and methods therefor
US9125532B2 (en) 2012-12-20 2015-09-08 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Storing and dispensing container for wipes
US9889963B2 (en) 2012-12-20 2018-02-13 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Refillable dispensing container for stacked moist wipes
US20150144649A1 (en) * 2013-11-25 2015-05-28 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Wet Wipe Refill Container Indicator

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
GB1062696A (en) 1967-03-22 application
DE1298236B (en) 1969-06-26 application

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