US3177612A - Toy airplane with automatic pilot ejector - Google Patents

Toy airplane with automatic pilot ejector Download PDF

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Publication number
US3177612A
US3177612A US32910963A US3177612A US 3177612 A US3177612 A US 3177612A US 32910963 A US32910963 A US 32910963A US 3177612 A US3177612 A US 3177612A
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Prior art keywords
parachute
cockpit
means
member
toy
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Louis J Giossi
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Louis J Giossi
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63HTOYS, e.g. TOPS, DOLLS, HOOPS, BUILDING BLOCKS
    • A63H27/00Toy aircraft; Other flying toys ; Starting or launching devices therefor
    • A63H27/004Means for launching objects from aircraft, e.g. pilot, missiles

Description

April 13, 1965 1.. J. GIOSSI 3, 77,6

I TOY AIRPLANE WITH AUTOMATIC PILOT EJECTOR Filed Dec. 9, 1963 2 Sheets-Sheet. l

INVENTOR. LOU/5 J 6/055/ ,4 7' TORNE X BY find 2% L. J. GlOSSl April 13, 1965 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Dec. 9, 1965 INVENTOR. LOU/5 .fG/OSS/ A 7 TOR/V5 Y United States Patent 3,177,612 TQY LANE WITH AUTOMATIC PILOT EJECTOR Louis J. Giossi, 1007 Frances Drive, North Valley Stream, N.Y. Filed Dec. 9, 1963, Ser. No. 329,109 Claims. (Cl. 46-81) This invention relates to toy projectiles and more particularly to toy airplanes having automatic valve means to eject the pilot so that the plane and the pilot descend separately, the pilot being supported by a parachute which is concurrently, and automatically deployed therewith.

There are many examples in the prior art of toy airplanes having means to eject a parachute at some time during its flight. However, each such effort in the past has resulted in the inclusion of one or more of the following undesirable characteristics:

(a) The means to release the parachute was a relatively complicated mechanism depending upon gravity actuated springs to operate a latch;

(b) The release or latch mechanism was expensive to manufacture because of its complexity, thus pricing the toy at a high level;

(c) The latch mechanism was not absolutely reliable due to its complexity;

(d) Because of the non-conventional latch mechanism the airplanes were frequently aerodynamically inaccurate so that the toy was unreliable in flight;v

(2) Instead of being attached to and aiding the pilot in his descent after ejection, the parachute was secured to the plane or projectile in an unrealistic manner; and

(1) Means Were generally not included to prevent damage to the plane when it landed.

By way of contrast the present invention permits of an aerodynamically proportioned device so that the overall appearance approximates that of an actual airplane or glider and thus has appeal to a wide age group, but particularly to children. The wings and stabilizers of the present invention are readily movable and yieldingly secured to the fuselage. This type of construction is of convenience to the manufacturer since it makes for much simpler and smaller packaging than for one-piece designs. Furthermore, since the wings and stabilizers are not rigidly secured to the body they will yield their position if they should contact some obstruction either in flight or on landing, and thus avoid damage.

Still another desirable feature of the present invention is the method of inserting the pilot and parachute. The pilot is placed in position by insertion through a suitably sized and placed opening in the forward end of the canopy. There are no doors that require complicated and expensive hinges or latching mechanisms. The parachute does not require any special folding. All that is needed is to lay the parachute in the trough behind the pilot.

The parachute is automatically deployed just past the high point of the trajectory of the aircraft by the simplest possible valve means. While ascending, that is with the nose of the airplane pointed in an upward attitude, a light weight ball rolls rearwardly from the air intake scoop into a ball seat to close off the cockpit containing the pilot and parachute. When the airplane reaches the top of its trajectory and turns its nose downwardly, changing its attitude due to the forces of gravity, the ball valve rolls forward permitting air to rush in through the intake scoop to the canopy area. As will be explained more fully hereinafter the parachute is deployed by the air stream through a rearward opening in the canopy taking with it the figure of the pilot to which it is connected by a means of a plurality of shroud lines.

of automatically deploying the parachute supported figure of a pilot.

It is another object to provide simple valve means that permit a parachute to be automatically deployed after the airplane passes the top of its trajectory, changes its attitude and starts downward.

Still another object is to provide readily removable wing and stabilizer portions that are yieldingly secured to the fuselage.

A further object is to provide inexpensive valve means for a toy airplane that is of simple construction yet operates effectively and reliably.

An additional object is to provide a toy airplane wherein the plane and the pilot descend independently of each other.

Another object is to provide a toy airplane wherein a parachute is deployed to support the descent of the pilot while the plane glides to a landing.

These and other objects and advantages of the invention will, in part, be pointed out with particularity and will, in part, become obvious from the following more detailed description of the invention, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawing, which forms an integral part thereof.

In the various figures of the drawing like reference characters designate like parts.

In the drawing:

FIG. 1 is a pictorial view of a toy airplane embodying the features of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is an exploded plan view of the present invention illustrating the detachability of the wings and stabilizers;

FIG. 3 is a transverse elevational view in section taken along line 33 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a partial longitudinal view in section taken through the fuselage of an ascending toy airplane; and

FIG. 5 is a longitudinal sectional view, similar to FIG. 4, of a descending airplane.

Referring now to the drawings, and in particular to FIGS. 1, 2 and 3, there is shown a toy airplane 10 of conventional design. Since no propeller is required for flight the airplane may, for marketing purposes, take the configuration of a glider or a jet fighter plane.

The basic components of the airplane are the fuselage 12, a pair of removable wings 14a and 14b, a pair of removable stabilizers 16a and 16b, a rudder 18 and a cockpit partially enclosed by canopy 20. Each of the aforementioned components may be fabricated separately using any one of a number of conventional molding techniques such as blow molding, injection molding etc. Well known and commercially available plastics such as polyethylene, polypropylene, polyvinyl acetate, polyvinyl chloride are well suited to a product of this nature. The two components that are to be permanently attached to fuselage 12, namely rudder 18 and canopy 20, may be secured thereto by heat sealing, solvent sealing or by means of adhesive. In the preferred embodiment, canopy 20 would be clear plastic so that the pilot and his parachute would be visible. The remainder of the parts could be suitably colored in a manner designed to appeal to the age group most interested in a toy of this nature.

As a safety feature, and in order to minimize the possibility of damage upon landing, the wings and stabilizers are made removable. On either side of fuselage 12 there are provided sockets 22a and 22b adapted to receive inboard ends 24a and 24b of wings 14a and 14b, respectively. The wing sockets are elongated, being disposed proximate to and on either side of canopy 20. Sockets 22a and 22b extend parallel to the longitudinal axis of.

the fuselage and are sized such that ends 24a and 24b fit loosely therein. Wing ends 24a and 24b are further provided with notches 26a and 26b, a portion of which-are" a and leading edge of the wing proximate end 24a.

contained within sockets 22a and 225 as may best be seen, 7

in the exploded view of FIG. 2.

' An elongated, resilient member such as rubber band 28 is used to yieldingly retain the wing sections Considering, for purposes of illustration, that'the 'rubberband consists of two spaced end loops 28a and 28b connected by two elongated lengths 280, it will be seen most clearly in exploded view FIG. 2 that loop 28a spans the top surface of wing 14a and engages notches 26a in the trailing Elon gated lengths 280, which are a continuation of the ends of loop 28a, continue under fuselage 12 to terminate at the ends of loop 28b. FIGURE 2 shows loop 28b somewhat schematically, it being understood that, in the fully assembled condition, loop 28b spans the .top of wing 14b to similarly engage notches 26b.

Stabilizers 16a and 16b are also-provided with notches 30a and 30b proximate their inboard ends 32a and 32b. The notches which are on the, trailing and leading edge of each stabilizer. are adapted to receive endloops' 3'4a and 34b of still another elongated resilient member 34. As in the case of the wing retainer, member 34 is conveniently a rubber band having intermediate, elongated j lengths 34c connecting end loops 34a and 34b.

It will be seen in FIGS. 1, 2 and. 3 that the means for attaching the wings and the stabilizers permits these components to yield and pop out of their respective sockets,

without damage should they meet any obstruction during landing. Consequently, the airplane is much lesslikely V with rather large and awkward extensions such as the wings and stabilizers.

The plane is launched either by, throwing it outwardly and upwardly or by utilizing hook member 36 formed integrally or attached to the underside of fuselage 12. FIG. 1 shows a slingshot S in, phantom which may'read ily serve this purpose. The elastic sling fits into the hook so thatupon release of the body, after the slingfhas been stretched, the airplane will be projected past the slingshot. a

Referring now to FIG. 4 and FIG. 5 there is shown a pilot 40 seated ,in cockpit 42.. The pilot figure may be formed of metal or, plastic and should be heavier than the parachute and hang therebelow when it is ejected from. the airplane. V Shroud lines 44' areused to attachpara her and suitably securing the two halves together.

The second design feature is that the forward end50 of the cockpit is gently curved and is preferably spherical with a well 52 for the pilots feet so that upon ejection, no part of the pilot will bind or become snagged 'to prevent deployment of the parachute. Air intake s'coop'60, of relatively small diameter, is located in the nose of the plane and is comprised of an enlarged, central chamber 62 which terminates at its rearward end'in relatively small opening or ball seat 64, which is in direct communication with the cockpit. By way of example, openings 60 and 64 may be from onequarter to one-half inch in diameter. It will be seen that openings 62 and 64 are approximately the same size, both of them being somewhat smaller than ball 66, captured in the enlarged, central chamber 62. The ball may easily be captured by fabricating the fuselage in two longitudinalhalves, placing the ball in the cham- Of course, other means may be employed such as separately fabricating the front portion of the chamber, that is from the largest diameter thereof forward to the air intake scoop 60, inserting thejballjand then cementing the front portion in place. T

, In operation, the airplane is propelled upwardly by means such as a slingshot engaged by hook member 36.

' In the upward flight of the airplane, ball 66, which is relatively lightweight and which may also be formed of 7 plastic, is deflected rearwardly by reaction forces andby air entering the intake scoop to impinge on the ball. Eifectively,ball 66 covers and closes off rearward opening 64 so that air is not forced into the cockpit. It is to be remembered'that windshield 48 deflects the air. away from. the cockpit so that the pilot and parachute are not disturbed. This situation is illustrated in FIG. 4.

FIG. 5 illustrates a toy airplane embodying the present invention ,just after it hasreached the peak "of its tra-' ward' thus uncovering rearward opening 64. Therefore,

an entering through scoop 60 passes freely through chamyber 62 and exits through opening 64 into the cockpit area. Since the parachute was inserted with its open end of thesimplest possible nature.

facing forward, the inrushing air will fill the pocket of theparachute and force it outrearwardly. The parachute is-thus deployed through aft canopy opening 47. The plane is free to continue along its downward glide path as the pilot floats gently towards earth assisted by the parachute. 1 I

The mechanism and construction of the apparatus is The very effective and practical ,ballvalve consists of only one moving part chute'46 to the pilot. The parachutemayf be fabricated,

from light weight rayon or other inexpensive cloth that is' not particularly porous.

It will be seen in FIGS. 3, 4 andjS that the cockpit is d e-i which is very unlikely ,to cause a malfunction. The method of attaching thewings and the stabilizers is beneficial to both the manufacturer and'the user in that it lowers production and selling costs as well as provides a more damage proof article. 1 In contrast-to much ofthe prior rearwardmost point. 'The shroud lines jextend'forward .of the parachute,,terminating atthe pilot who is seatedon the forwardmost ledgefportion of the trough.

Of particular importance is they fact that canopy'20,

while permanently secured tofuselage 12, does not completely cover the cockpit. Towards the front of the cock:

pit, the combination of the fuselage andthe'canopy define opening 45, through which the pilot and parachute are inserted. Towards the rear of the cockpit, the comwo additional design features. Projection 48 is in- 'In manner, rushing air is deflected away y formed just forward of the cockpit to form a i v art, the apparatus of the present invention is quite realistic in appearanceas well'as function.

Having thus disclosed heretofore the best embodiment of the invention presently contemplated it isto be under stood that various changes and modifications may be made by those skilled'in the'art without departing from the i "spirit of the invention. 7 a 7 What is claimed is:

1. A my model aircraft comprising:

(a) a fuse'lage 'having a cockpit and an air intake scoop in communication with said cockpit;

(b) valve means comprising an elongated chamber having a valve seat proximate saidcockpit and a ball member freelymoyable'inlsaid'chamber, said chamher being disposed intermediate and in communication with said air intake scoop and said cockpit,

' said ball member being movable between a valve open position intermediate said air intake scoop and said cockpit and a valve closed position proximate said valve seat;

(0) a Weighted member removably positioned in said cockpit; and

(d) a parachute having a plurality of shroud lines secured to said weighted member, and means disposing said parachute in said cockpit whereby said parachute is in communication with said air intake scoop when said ball member is in the valve open position whereby said weighted member and said parachute can be ejected through exit means in said cockpit.

2. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said ball member is larger than said valve seat and said air intake scoop and smaller than said chamber portion intermediate said valve seat and said air intake scoop.

3. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said valve seat is circular and said valve member is a sphere.

4. The apparatus of claim 1 including a canopy at least partially covering said cockpit whereby said exit means for said weighted member and parachute is defined rearward of said weighted member by said canopy and said cockpit.

5. In a toy adapted for flight through the air and having a partially enclosed cockpit having exit means whereby a weighted, removable member having a parachute secured thereto can be ejected therefrom, improved ejection means for said weighted, removable member and said parachute, said ejection means comprising:

(a) an air intake scoop positioned in said toy forward of said weighted member and said parachute; and

(b) valve means comprising an elongated chamber having a valve seat proximate said cockpit and a ball member freely movable in said chamber, said chamber being disposed intermediate and in communicntion with said air intake scoop and said cockpit, said ball member being movable between a valve open position intermediate said air intake scoop and said cockpit and a valve closed position proximate said valve seat.

6. The apparatus of claim 5 wherein said ball member is larger than said valve seat and said air intake scoop and smaller than said chamber portion intermediate said valve seat and said air intake scoop.

7. The apparatus of claim 5 including a canopy at least partially covering said cockpit whereby said exit means for said Weighted member and parachute is defined rearward of said weighted member by said canopy and said cockpit.

8. A toy model aircraft comprising:

(a) a fuselage having a cockpit having exit means whereby a weighted member having a parachute secured thereto can be ejected and an air intake scoop in communication with said cockpit;

(b) a pair of wing members and a pair of stabilizer members detachably secured to said fuselage;

(c) retaining means securing said wing members and said stabilizer members to said fuselage;

(d) valve means comprising an elongated chamber having a valve seat proximate said cockpit and a ball member freely movable in said chamber, said chamber being disposed intermediate and in communication with said air intake scoop and said cockpit, said ball member being movable between a valve open position intermediate said air intake scoop and said cockpit and a valve closed position proximate said valve seat;

(6) said weighted member removably positioned in said cockpit; and

(f) said parachute having a plurality of shroud lines securing it to said weighted member, said parachute being disposed in said cockpit whereby said parachute is in communication with said air intake scoop when said ball member is in the valve open position.

9. The apparatus of claim 8 wherein said fuselage is provided with two pairs of elongated, horizontal sockets adapted to removabiy receive the inboard ends of said wing members and said stabilizers.

10. The apparatus of claim 9 wherein said Wing members and said stabilizers are each provided with a pair of notches proximate their inboard ends, one of said notches being disposed in each of the leading and trailing edges of said wing members and said stabiiizers and said retaining means comprises an elongated elastic band, the curved end portions of which are adapted to span the top surface of each wing and be engaged in each notch, the central portion of said elastic band being disposed below the fuselage transverse the longitudinal axis thereof.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,649,374 11/27 Von Zundel et al. 46-86 1,920,746 8/33 Guillow 4680 1,974,656 9/34 Nelson 46-80 2,739,414 3/56 Cleveland 46-79 X 2,923,090 2/60 Jones 46-86 3,022,966 2/62 Briggs 4679 X FOREIGN PATENTS 591,936 2/60 Canada.

1,071,879 3/54 France.

RICHARD C. PINKHAM, Primary Examiner.

Claims (1)

  1. 5. IN A TOY ADAPTED FOR FLIGHT THROUGH THE AIR AND HAVING A PARTIALLY ENCLOSED COCKPIT HAVING EXIT MEANS WHEREBY A WEIGHTED, REMOVABLE MEMBER HAVING A PARACHUTE SECURED THERETO CAN BE EJECTED THEREFROM, IMPROVED EJECTION MEANS FOR SAID WEIGHTED, REMOVABLE MEMBER AND SAID PARACHUTE, SAID EJECTION MEANS COMPRISING: (A) AN AIR INTAKE SCOOP POSITIONED IN SAID TOY FORWARD OF SAID WEIGHTED MEMBER AND SAID PARACHUTE; AND (B) VALVE MEANS COMPRISING AN ELONGATED CHAMBER HAVING A VALVE SEAT PROXIMATE SAID COCKPIT AND A BALL MEMBER FREELY MOVABLE IN SAID CHAMBER, SAID CHAMBER BEING DISPOSED INTERMEDIATE AND IN COMMUNICA-
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Cited By (16)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3496671A (en) * 1968-02-09 1970-02-24 Theodore A Korona Toy airplane
US3935664A (en) * 1974-05-03 1976-02-03 Hermann Neuhierl Connector arrangement for detachable fastening of airplane wings to the fuselage of model airplane
US4064647A (en) * 1976-06-07 1977-12-27 Lemelson Jerome H Catapult launched model glider
US4332103A (en) * 1980-06-27 1982-06-01 Life-Like Products, Inc. Model aircraft glider
US4655720A (en) * 1985-07-05 1987-04-07 Mattel, Inc. Toy glider
US4840598A (en) * 1987-11-16 1989-06-20 Schuetz Robert W Amusement projectile device
US5951354A (en) * 1993-12-08 1999-09-14 Johnson Research & Development Co., Inc. Toy rocket
US20060091258A1 (en) * 2004-10-29 2006-05-04 Chiu Tien S Autonomous, back-packable computer-controlled breakaway unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV)
US20060270315A1 (en) * 2005-05-24 2006-11-30 Mattel, Inc. Transformation toy and related products
US20060270307A1 (en) * 2005-05-27 2006-11-30 Michael Montalvo Flying toy with extending wings
US20060270313A1 (en) * 2005-05-24 2006-11-30 Mattel, Inc. Reconfigurable toy extreme sport hang glider
US20090104839A1 (en) * 2007-10-19 2009-04-23 Ping-Sung Chang Launching device for toy rocket
US20110076915A1 (en) * 2005-05-24 2011-03-31 Fraser Campbell Reconfigurable Toy
US8500067B2 (en) * 2009-09-09 2013-08-06 Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation Modular miniature unmanned aircraft with vectored-thrust control
US8991750B2 (en) 2009-09-09 2015-03-31 Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation Modular miniature unmanned aircraft with vectored thrust control
US20150119174A1 (en) * 2010-09-09 2015-04-30 Kma Concepts Limited Toy Arrow for Use with Toy Bow

Citations (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1649374A (en) * 1926-10-21 1927-11-15 Zundel La Von Toy parachute
US1920746A (en) * 1932-01-23 1933-08-01 Roscoe M Guillow Airplane toy
US1974656A (en) * 1933-06-06 1934-09-25 Henry E Nelson Toy airplane
FR1071879A (en) * 1952-11-26 1954-09-06 Clockwork toy
US2739414A (en) * 1954-04-26 1956-03-27 Charles H Cleveland Knockdown toy glider
US2923090A (en) * 1957-11-04 1960-02-02 Le Roy T Jones Toy projectile
CA591936A (en) * 1960-02-02 Nils F. Testor Toy airplane construction
US3022966A (en) * 1960-02-17 1962-02-27 Cramer Mahan H Kite

Patent Citations (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
CA591936A (en) * 1960-02-02 Nils F. Testor Toy airplane construction
US1649374A (en) * 1926-10-21 1927-11-15 Zundel La Von Toy parachute
US1920746A (en) * 1932-01-23 1933-08-01 Roscoe M Guillow Airplane toy
US1974656A (en) * 1933-06-06 1934-09-25 Henry E Nelson Toy airplane
FR1071879A (en) * 1952-11-26 1954-09-06 Clockwork toy
US2739414A (en) * 1954-04-26 1956-03-27 Charles H Cleveland Knockdown toy glider
US2923090A (en) * 1957-11-04 1960-02-02 Le Roy T Jones Toy projectile
US3022966A (en) * 1960-02-17 1962-02-27 Cramer Mahan H Kite

Cited By (27)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3496671A (en) * 1968-02-09 1970-02-24 Theodore A Korona Toy airplane
US3935664A (en) * 1974-05-03 1976-02-03 Hermann Neuhierl Connector arrangement for detachable fastening of airplane wings to the fuselage of model airplane
US4064647A (en) * 1976-06-07 1977-12-27 Lemelson Jerome H Catapult launched model glider
US4332103A (en) * 1980-06-27 1982-06-01 Life-Like Products, Inc. Model aircraft glider
US4655720A (en) * 1985-07-05 1987-04-07 Mattel, Inc. Toy glider
US4840598A (en) * 1987-11-16 1989-06-20 Schuetz Robert W Amusement projectile device
US5951354A (en) * 1993-12-08 1999-09-14 Johnson Research & Development Co., Inc. Toy rocket
US7237750B2 (en) * 2004-10-29 2007-07-03 L3 Communications Autonomous, back-packable computer-controlled breakaway unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV)
US20060091258A1 (en) * 2004-10-29 2006-05-04 Chiu Tien S Autonomous, back-packable computer-controlled breakaway unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV)
US8337271B2 (en) 2005-05-24 2012-12-25 Mattel, Inc. Reconfigurable toy
US20060270313A1 (en) * 2005-05-24 2006-11-30 Mattel, Inc. Reconfigurable toy extreme sport hang glider
US7722426B2 (en) * 2005-05-24 2010-05-25 Mattel, Inc. Reconfigurable toy extreme sport hang glider
US7722429B2 (en) 2005-05-24 2010-05-25 Mattel, Inc. Transformation toy and related products
US20060270315A1 (en) * 2005-05-24 2006-11-30 Mattel, Inc. Transformation toy and related products
US20110076915A1 (en) * 2005-05-24 2011-03-31 Fraser Campbell Reconfigurable Toy
US20060270307A1 (en) * 2005-05-27 2006-11-30 Michael Montalvo Flying toy with extending wings
US20090104839A1 (en) * 2007-10-19 2009-04-23 Ping-Sung Chang Launching device for toy rocket
US7601046B2 (en) * 2007-10-19 2009-10-13 Ping-Sung Chang Launching device for toy rocket
US8500067B2 (en) * 2009-09-09 2013-08-06 Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation Modular miniature unmanned aircraft with vectored-thrust control
US8951086B2 (en) 2009-09-09 2015-02-10 Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation Modular miniature unmanned aircraft with vectored-thrust control
US8967527B2 (en) 2009-09-09 2015-03-03 Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation Modular miniature unmanned aircraft with vectored-thrust control
US8991750B2 (en) 2009-09-09 2015-03-31 Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation Modular miniature unmanned aircraft with vectored thrust control
US9114871B2 (en) 2009-09-09 2015-08-25 Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation Modular miniature unmanned aircraft with vectored-thrust control
US20150119174A1 (en) * 2010-09-09 2015-04-30 Kma Concepts Limited Toy Arrow for Use with Toy Bow
US9310171B2 (en) * 2010-09-09 2016-04-12 Kma Concepts Limited Toy arrow for use with toy bow
US20170045326A1 (en) * 2010-09-09 2017-02-16 Kma Concepts Limited Toy Arrow for Use with Toy Bow
US9903681B2 (en) * 2010-09-09 2018-02-27 Kma Concepts Limited Toy arrow for use with toy bow

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