US3174494A - Arm contoured crutch - Google Patents

Arm contoured crutch Download PDF

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Publication number
US3174494A
US3174494A US12011761A US3174494A US 3174494 A US3174494 A US 3174494A US 12011761 A US12011761 A US 12011761A US 3174494 A US3174494 A US 3174494A
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Prior art keywords
crutch
support
arm
hand
hand grip
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Expired - Lifetime
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Jr Roderick H Maguire
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Jr Roderick H Maguire
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61HPHYSICAL THERAPY APPARATUS, e.g. DEVICES FOR LOCATING OR STIMULATING REFLEX POINTS IN THE BODY; ARTIFICIAL RESPIRATION; MASSAGE; BATHING DEVICES FOR SPECIAL THERAPEUTIC OR HYGIENIC PURPOSES OR SPECIFIC PARTS OF THE BODY
    • A61H3/00Appliances for aiding patients or disabled persons to walk about
    • A61H3/02Crutches
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61HPHYSICAL THERAPY APPARATUS, e.g. DEVICES FOR LOCATING OR STIMULATING REFLEX POINTS IN THE BODY; ARTIFICIAL RESPIRATION; MASSAGE; BATHING DEVICES FOR SPECIAL THERAPEUTIC OR HYGIENIC PURPOSES OR SPECIFIC PARTS OF THE BODY
    • A61H2201/00Characteristics of apparatus not provided for in the preceding codes
    • A61H2201/16Physical interface with patient
    • A61H2201/1602Physical interface with patient kind of interface, e.g. head rest, knee support or lumbar support
    • A61H2201/1645Physical interface with patient kind of interface, e.g. head rest, knee support or lumbar support contoured to fit the user

Description

March 23, 1965 R. H. MAGUIRE, JR

ARM coNTouREo cRu'rcH 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed June 5'. 1961 March 23, 1965 R. H. MAGUIRE, JR 3,174,494

ARM CONTOURED CRUTCH Filed June 5, 1961 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Roose/CK H. MnGu/RE,JQ.

United States Patent O 3,174,494 ARM CONTOURED CRUTCH Roderick H. Maguire, Jr., 223 W. Chestnut St., Canton, lll. Filed June 5, 1961, Ser. No. 120,117 4 Claims. (Cl. 135-7-49) This invention relates to improvements in crutches and in particular is concerned with a crutch having means for receiving the heel of the hand and the arm in a supported position to relieve strain upon the elbow and the hand of the user. This application is a continuation-impart of my prior application Serial No. 93,222, tiled March 3, 1961, now abandoned.

In the past, various types of crutches have been employed. However, such crutches, including hand-types of crutches which support the forearm, have been somewhat uncomfortable and also fatiguing to the user. In particular, such crutches require weight bearing through a rigid looked joint and require the strain to be borne by the muscles about the elbow and the shoulder. This is a `fatiquing position to the user and over prolonged periods of time is quite uncomfortable and difficult to bear.

By means lof this invention there has been provided a contoured crutch which has a hand grip Acontoured to relceive the heel of the hand. Positioned upwardly `from the rear of the hand grip is a concave or hollowed-out arm rereceiving section which continues up to a little bit above the elbow of the user, or may be of just suflicient length to receive part of the forearm. A body support, shaped somewhat like the conventional underarm or armpit grip, but curved to fit more comfortably agains the side of the body as well as in the armpit, forms the top portion of the crutch and is situated just slightly above the top portion of the arm support.

It is a particular feature of this invention that the combination of the flat base of the hand grip, positioned adjacent the lower part of the contoured arm support, and this arm support very comfortably receives the heel of the hand and the arm of the user so that the Weight of the body will be supported in a least fatiguing condition. This makes it particularly possible to extend the arm and maintain it in extended position with a minimum of muscular effort.

It is a further feature of this invention that the body support may be slightly inclined at -l0 from the axis of the shaft. This makes it possible for the crutch to be supported at the ground engaging position slightly away from the user in order that the body may 'rest slightly against the crutch, providing laterial stability in addition to Whatever weight bearing the user may wish to place on this portion of the crutch.

It is a further feature of this invention that a ground engaging support shaft may be made adjustable to t the height of various users and the upper` body support may likewise be made adjustable to tit various body shapes and sizes.

Additionally, it is a feature of this invention that the hand grip and contoured arm section may be made. separately in a snap-ion fashion whereby the unit can ybe snapped on to conventional crutches where desired. In this manner a crutch may be used in conventional fashion Vor it can be used with the hand grip and contoured arm ice Further features and objects of this invention will appear in the detailed description Vwhich follows and will be otherwise apparent to those skilled in the art.

For the purpose of illustration of this invention there is shown in the accompanying drawings an embodiment thereof. In addition, there are shown modifications Whereby the hand grip and arm supporting section can be made in a separate unit to be snapped on conventional crutch structures, and whereby the crutch may be provided with an adjustable inclined body support. It is to be understood that these drawings and illustrations are for the purpose `of example only, however, and that the invention is not limited thereto.

In the drawings:

FIGURE l is a view in front elevation of one embodiment of this invention;

FIGURE 2 is a view in side elevation taken from the right side of FIGURE 1; t

FIGURE 3 is a view in rear elevation of the crutch;

FIGURE 4 is a view in section taken on the line 4 4 showing part of the structure of the arm support;

FIGURE 5 is a further view in section taken on the line 5 5 of FIGURE l;

FIGURE 6 is a still further view in section taken on the line 6 6 of FIGURE l showing the construction of the arm support;

FIGURE 7 is a modification of the invention showing a snap-on attachment for use with conventional crutches to provide for the hand and arm support;

FIGURE 8 is a view in section taken on the line 8 8 of FIGURE 7 showing the structure of the modification;

FIGURE 9 is another modification showing an adjustable inclined upper arm support;

FIGURE 10 is a pictorial view showing a man using the crutch of this invention; i

FIGURE 1l is a fragmentary view in front elevation of a modified form of crutch using a removable and adjustable hand grip and forearm support;

FIGURE 12 is an enlarged fragmentary side view taken from the left side of FIGURE 11 showing the structure of the removable and adjustable forearm support;

FIGURE 13 is a view taken similarly to FIGURE 12, but showing an axial section of the crutch strut upon which the forearm support is positioned .and shows the removable and adjustable features;

FIGURE 14 is a view in section taken on the line 14 14 of FIGURE 13; and

FIGURE l5 is a pictorial view showing a man using the modified crutch of this invention.

The crutch of FIGURES 1 through 6 is a right handed crutch and is generally identified by the reference numeral 20. As there shown, it includes a ground engaging support shaft 22, a bifurcated main frame 24 comprised of vertically extending struts 26 and 28, and an adjustably supported upper body support 30.

The ground engaging support shaft 22 has a bore 32 receiving an extensible shaft 34,` which may be adjusted by means of a setscrew 36 to vary the eective length of the crutch.

The body engaging support 30 is dished in or concave at the top sothat if desired the crutch may be extended to tit underneath the armpit, although, in the preferred position, the body engaging support ts against the upper body, which is commonly termed the thorax. It is also concave on its medial aspect, as shown at 31,`to tit against the side of the thorax. The body engaging support 30 includes two adjustable shafts 38 and 40, which are received Within drilled openings in the struts 26 and 28. Adjustment and locking is provided by means of setscrews 42 and 44, respectively. A

A hand engaging support 46 is provided at the bottom and part of the upper arm of a user.

3 portion of the frame and extends between the vertical struts 26 and 28. It will be noted that this hand grip has a rear portion 48 which is somewhat flattened and of an enlarged area, and which is contoured to receive the heel of the users hand, and has a slightly convex contoured i hand portion of the hand grip. This arm support is of a concave cross section or can be described as somewhat dished out so that it receives the forearm, elbow, and a portion of the upper arm of the user.

A modification of the hand grip and arm support of this invention is shown in FIGURES 7 and 8. This moditication is in the form of an attachment generally identified by the reference numeral 60. The attachment, like the crutch 20, may be made of any substantially rigid material of construction, such as metal, molded plastic, or the like, but is designed so that a snap-on ange can be slightly iiexed to snap-on supporting features of a conventional crutch with which the attachment is employed.

The crutch attachment 60 has a hand grip 62. which is generally conformed on the exterior to the hand grip 48 of previously described crutch 20. It has, however, an opening of an arcuate cross section `so that it may fit over the rod-like hand brace used in conventional crutches.

An arm support section 64 extends upwardly from the rear of the hand grip and is of similar construction to that described for the arm support 50 of crutch 20. Thus, it has a concave cross section to receive the forearm, elbow, In addition, an arcuate cross section iiange 66 is provided at one side of the arm support. This flange may be slightly spread apart so that it may be snapped upon a vertical strut of the crutch main frame, such as the main frame described for crutch 20.

A bottom portion 68 is provided for the attachment which also is of a generally arcuate cross section. This section is somewhat offset from the arm support and is adapted to engage the ground engaging shaft, `such as shaft 22 previously described for the crutch 20.

By the structure of the attachment 60, it will be seen that it may be very simply snapped on a conventional crutch. When so snapped on, the fiange 66 engages the main frame while the hand grip 62 engages the hand brace and the lower portion 68 rests against the ground engaging shaft of a conventional crutch.

A further embodiment is shown in FIGURE. 9. In this embodiment the body support, which is identified by the reference numeral 70, is of a similar construction to that of the body support 30 of crutch 20 shown in FIGURE l. However, in this modification, there are shafts 72 which seat within thetop of the frame and are relatively adjustable therein by means of setscrews 74. The shafts are bent at an angle of about -10 with respect to the main axis of the crutch. In this fashion the body support 70 may be rested against the upper body or thorax of the user, and, when so employed, the bottom of the crutch will rest against the ground a slight distance away, such as a couple of feet or so from the feet of the user to provide additional Support and a firmer base.

FIGURE 10 is a simple pictorial view showing the crutch of this invention in use. In this picture the figure of the man isindicated by the reference numeral 80, while the upper body or thorax portion is indicated by the reference numeral 82, with the arm of the man being indicated by the reference numeral 84 and the hand being indicated by the reference numeral 86. As shown in this figure, the crutch is very simply adapted to be used in the manner shown to provide a support from the right side of the man. It will be obvious that if the left side of the man is to be supported a crutch similar to those described can be employed by a mere reversal of the position of the arm support to the opposite side of the crutch.

A further embodiment and modification of the crutch of this invention is shown in FIGURES l1 through 15. In this modification an adjustable forearm support, generally indicated by the reference 90, is employed. In addition, a removable hand grip 92 is utilized. By means of this modification the forearm support and hand grip may be provided for existing crutches by bolting the same upon bolt holes that may be readily drilled into the crutch.

The forearm support comprises a concave plate 94, which is generally contoured to receive the forearm of an individual. The plate is adapted to be secured to the strut 26 of the crutch by bolts 96. These bolts may be received in any one of a series of holes 98 so that proper adjustment atvarying height levels on the strut may be effected.

The hand grip 92 likewise may be removably secured to the crutch between the struts 26 and 28. Thus, in the same fashion as the attachment of the forearm support bolts 100 are used to fit through holes 98 drilled into the struts at a lower portion to secure the hand grip therebetween. It will be understood that holes at varying levels may be provided in the struts 26 and 28 to receive the bolts at varying levels so as to alter the effective lengths between the hand grip and the body engaging support 30 so that individuals can obtain the proper adjustment for their personal arm lengths.

USE

In the use of the crutch of this invention, it is noted that the hand grip is designed so that the weight can be borne on the palm of the hand at 481 and the heel of the hand at 48 with the thumb in the recess 49 designed to accommodate it and the thenar eminence, all with the hand extended or bent back at the Wrist in the position which is the most comfortable for weight bearing. The rear portion of the hand grip merges with the lower portion of the arm support at the base of the hand grip, which as noted is recessed at 49 so as to allow the heel of the hand to rest comfortably in this position, and at the same time allow the forearm to be completely ex tended. Thus, the arm and forearm may be held rigidly in a straight line. This fairly rigid ystraight line position of the 'arm and forearnrsupported by the arm support -is that which is most comfortable and least fatiguing for the bearing of weight on the hand. Otherwise, with the elbow partially bent, the line of weight bearing does not extend straight through the rigid locked elbow joint and the strain must be borne by the muscles about the elbow and the shoulder. This latter is a very fatiguing position and cannot be maintained for any prolonged period of time.

The curved arm support extending up from the heel of the hand receives the forearm and the elbow and the lower portion of the upper arm to be supported and maintained thereby. At the same time this arm support, behind the forearm and elbow, does not completely capture these parts, i.e., does not lock them in place, so that the individual using the crutch is not deprived of complete freedom of movement of the arm into other positions if necessary or desired.

The body supportA of the crutch, such as that shown in FIGURES 9 and 10, is intended to rest against the lateral side of the upper body or thorax just below the armpit and may be concaved somewhat to tit the shape of the side of `the body inV this area. The addition of the upper support against the side of the body gives lateral support -to the individual using the crutch and allows him to rest the crutch against his body Vwith sufficient pressure to vgive support with a minimal amount of discomfort. This-type of structure is shown in FIGURE 9 and is also shown in use by the user in FIGURE 10. The upper border of the body support is also enlarged, widened, and slightly curved so that the individual who requires it or desires it can transmit some weight to the crutch from the armpit. The inclination of the upper body support at the top of the crutch of about 5-10 from the axis of ythe crutch further allows the position shown in FIGURE to be maintained comfortably and with great stability By means of the extension of the ground engaging support and the upper body support, the crutch may be adjusted for the heights of varying individuals and also for varying body shapes. Thus, varying distances between the hand and armpit may be allowed for. This arrangement allows one crutch to fit varying classification of individuals with a minimal amount of adjustment. It will be noted that the -exibility in adjustment of the body support, as shown in FIGURE 9, makes it possible to make an extension without any change in the angle of inclination. Thus, the angle may be maintained while varying the adjustment in the crutch to rit different sized and shaped individuals.

The snap-on attachment of FIGURES 7 and 8 can be very simply employed with conventional crutches as previously described. A molded material of conventional relatively rigid plastic can be employed, but, Where desired, metal may be used, for instance, to prevent wearing in the areas of greatest Wear. Thus, metal sleeves may be employed so that a good fit may be maintained. A combination of plastic and metal, or molded plastic in its entirety, or molded lightweight metal, can be used singly or in combination to build a useable and satisfactory crutch attachment.

The removable and adjustable forearm support 90 and hand grip 92 in the embodiment of FIGURES 11 to 15 is also very simply employed. This embodiment is shown in use in FIGURE where it will be seen that the forearm 102 of the individual rests in supporting engagement within the forearm support 90. The hand 86 of the individual is securely supported upon the hand support 92 in the same `fashion as previously described.

Where desired, the forearm support 90 may be adjusted to a higher or lower level by loosening the bolts 96 and moving them to an upper or lower hole position and then tightening them very simply in place. Likewise the elevation of the hand grip 92 for lowering may be very simply elected by removing the bolts 100 and inserting them in upper or lower hole positions.

The forearm support 90 and 92 can be used in existing conventional crutches very simply. This is done by making the proper drilled openings 93, previously referred to, whereby the forearm support can be simply attached to an existing crutch. Likewise the openings 98 are drilled into the lower region of the struts 26 and 28 to receive the bolts 100, Which secure the hand support to the lower portions of the crutch in desired hole positions. Thus, by this provision, the simple arm support and hand grip attachments can be used on existing crutches to provide the improved arm and hand grip crutch of this invention.

Various changes and modifications may be made Within this invention as will be readily apparent to those skilled in the art. Such changes and modiiications are within the scope and teaching of this invention as defined by the claims appended hereto.

What is claimed is:

1. A crutch comprising: vertical support means to extend from the arm pit to the ground; a body support extending transversely of the support means in a generally fore-and-aft direction, a hand grip intermediate the ends of the vertical support means and alsoI extending generally fore-and-aft, and vertically elongated concave arm d support means on the vertical support means above the hand grip shaped to engage the back of the forearm adjacent the elbow to brace the ar-m against undesired bending.

2. A crutch comprising: vertical support means to extend from the arm pit to the ground; a body support extending transversely of the support means in a generally fore-and-aft direction, and having its inner surface concave to tit cooperatively against the thorax of the user; a hand grip intermediate the ends of the vertical support means and also extending generally fore-and-aft, and vertically elongated concave arm support means on the vertical support means above the hand Igrip shaped to engage the back of the forearm adjacent the elbow to brace the arm against undesired bending.

3. A crutch comprising: vertical support means to extend from the arm pit to` the ground; a body support extending transversely of the support means in a generally fore-and-aft direction, and a hand grip intermediate the ends of the vertical support means and also extending generally fore-and-aft, and vertically elongated concave arm support means on the Vertical support means above the hand grip shaped to engage the back of the forearm adjacent the elbow to brace the arm against undesired bending, said concave arm support having means for removably securing it to said vertical support means in positions of varying height adjustments.

4. A crutch comprising: vertical support means to extend from the arm pit to the ground; a body support eX- tending transversely of the support means in a generally fore-and-aft direction, and having its inner surface concave to fit cooperatively against the thorax of the user; a hand grip intermediate the ends of the vertical support means and alsol extending generally fore-and-aft, its upper surfaces being contoured into a flattened concavity to receive and support the heel of the hand, and into a portion to receive and support the palm of the hand, and having a concavity to receive .the thumb and adjacent eminence of the hand, the opposite edges being shaped to be grasped by the lingers, such contouring enabling the user to support himself by the palm and heel of the hand rather than the lingers or thumb; and with his forearm extending generally vertically in front of the vertical support means; and vertically elongated concave arm support means on the vertical support means above the hand grip shaped to engage the back of the forearm adjacent the elbow to brace the arm against undesired bending.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 596,203 12/97 Drake 135-50 1,256,350 2/18 Mielcarek 135-50 1,270,102 6/18 Bell 13S-50 2,362,642 11/44 Lamb 135-52 2,408,604 10/46` Brickson 13S-47 2,409,365 10/46 Lamb 135-51 X 2,417,171 3/47 McGowan 135--52 2,516,852 8/50 Burry et al. 135-51 X 2,575,681 11/51 Peters 135-49 2,793,647 5/57 Urie et al 135-50 2,811,978 11/57 Russell 13S-50 X 2,989,114 6/61 Ecroyd 13S-49 3,016,060 1/62 Beattie 135-50 FOREIGN PATENTS 506,235 5/20 France.

1,101,212 4/55 France.

345,114 4/ 60 Sweden.

HARRISON R. MOSELEY, Primary Examiner.

BENJAMN BENDETT, JOSEPH D. SEERS,

Examiners.

Claims (1)

1. A CRUTCH COMPRISING: VERTICAL SUPPORT MEANS TO EXTEND FROM THE ARM PIT TO THE GROUND; A BODY SUPPORT EXTENDING TRANSVERSELY OF THE SUPPORT MEANS IN A GENERALLY FORE-AND-AFT DIRECTION, A HAND GRIP INTERMEDIATE THE ENDS OF THE VERTICAL SUPPORT MEANS AND ALSO EXTENDING GENERALLY FORE-AND-AFT, AND VERTICALLY ELONGATED CONCAVE ARM SUPPORT MEANS ON THE VERTICAL SUPPORT MEANS ABOVE THE HAND GRIP SHAPED TO ENGAGE THE BACK OF THE FOREARM ADJACENT THE ELBOW TO BRACE THE ARM AGAINST UNDESIRED BENDING.
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Cited By (22)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3269399A (en) * 1964-08-03 1966-08-30 Alfred A Smith Combined handle and hand grip for crutches
US3517678A (en) * 1968-12-31 1970-06-30 Robert B Gilsdorf Hand grip for crutch
US3995650A (en) * 1975-09-10 1976-12-07 Lumex, Inc. Adjustable positioned handgrip for canes, crutches, walkers and other ambulatory aids
US5331989A (en) * 1992-07-30 1994-07-26 Stephens Thomas P Walking aid
US5571065A (en) * 1995-07-21 1996-11-05 Buitoni; Gian L. L. Arm extension exercise device
FR2830749A1 (en) * 2001-10-11 2003-04-18 Noel Cogne Walking aid with elbow support is convertible into crutch by extending tube with handle
US20040011392A1 (en) * 2002-07-22 2004-01-22 Maulden John H. Crutch with hands-free attachment
EP1793791A1 (en) * 2004-09-11 2007-06-13 Orthocrutch Limited A handle and a walking aid incorporating the same
US20070256718A1 (en) * 2005-09-02 2007-11-08 Diaz R G Mobility device
US20080035191A1 (en) * 2006-08-11 2008-02-14 Baker William H Handle assembly for an adjustable multi-purpose crutch
US20080053503A1 (en) * 2003-10-10 2008-03-06 Millennial Medical Equipment, Llc Ergonomic forearm crutch
US20090114257A1 (en) * 2004-09-11 2009-05-07 Orthocrutch Limited Handle and a Walking Aid Incorporating the Same
US7621288B2 (en) 2002-09-23 2009-11-24 Evans Jeffrey D Hand based weight distribution system
US20100024857A1 (en) * 2003-10-10 2010-02-04 Millennial Medical Equipment, Llc Crutch
US20100154849A1 (en) * 2008-12-22 2010-06-24 Lee Schulz Handles for mobility devices
US20110061699A1 (en) * 2009-09-14 2011-03-17 Liverpool John Moores University Standing aid
US20130098412A1 (en) * 2011-10-21 2013-04-25 Mobi, Llc Self-walking cane
US8707975B2 (en) 2003-10-10 2014-04-29 Millennial Medical Equipment, Llc Crutch
US20150202112A1 (en) * 2014-01-21 2015-07-23 Motivo, Inc. Single-point supportive monocoque ambulation aid
US20160151229A1 (en) * 2013-06-27 2016-06-02 Better Walk, Inc. Mobility aids and related methods
US9750973B1 (en) 2015-08-17 2017-09-05 Weipeng Yang Human hand-crawling and foot-bounding apparatus
US10034812B2 (en) 2016-12-12 2018-07-31 Mobi, Llc Biomechanically derived crutch

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US596203A (en) * 1897-12-28 Crutch
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US2793647A (en) * 1954-07-27 1957-05-28 Harold T Urie Adjustable crutch
US2811978A (en) * 1955-03-04 1957-11-05 Martin I Russell Walking aid
US2989114A (en) * 1958-04-25 1961-06-20 John W Ecroyd Walking aids for injured or crippled persons
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US596203A (en) * 1897-12-28 Crutch
US1256350A (en) * 1917-11-05 1918-02-12 Wladyslaw S Mielcarek Adjustable crutch.
US1270102A (en) * 1918-02-14 1918-06-18 Arthur Bell Adjustable crutch.
US1409365A (en) * 1919-04-21 1922-03-14 Dorfman Leo Maximum-demand meter
FR506235A (en) * 1919-11-18 1920-08-17 Gabriel Auguste Marie Victor B Crutch allowing movement of the legs with the arms
US2362642A (en) * 1943-07-10 1944-11-14 Lamb Thomas Armrest for crutches
US2408604A (en) * 1944-11-22 1946-10-01 Al R Brooks Crutch
US2417171A (en) * 1945-03-12 1947-03-11 Henri C Mcgowan Crutch armrest
US2516852A (en) * 1947-09-08 1950-08-01 William C Burry Crutch
US2575681A (en) * 1948-03-23 1951-11-20 Jerry M Peters Crutch
FR1101212A (en) * 1954-03-16 1955-10-04 Cane infirm
US2793647A (en) * 1954-07-27 1957-05-28 Harold T Urie Adjustable crutch
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Cited By (34)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3269399A (en) * 1964-08-03 1966-08-30 Alfred A Smith Combined handle and hand grip for crutches
US3517678A (en) * 1968-12-31 1970-06-30 Robert B Gilsdorf Hand grip for crutch
US3995650A (en) * 1975-09-10 1976-12-07 Lumex, Inc. Adjustable positioned handgrip for canes, crutches, walkers and other ambulatory aids
US5331989A (en) * 1992-07-30 1994-07-26 Stephens Thomas P Walking aid
US5571065A (en) * 1995-07-21 1996-11-05 Buitoni; Gian L. L. Arm extension exercise device
WO1997003724A1 (en) * 1995-07-21 1997-02-06 Gian Luigi Longinotti Buitoni Arm extension exercise device
US5713818A (en) * 1995-07-21 1998-02-03 Buitoni; Gian Luigi Longinotti Arm extension exercise device
FR2830749A1 (en) * 2001-10-11 2003-04-18 Noel Cogne Walking aid with elbow support is convertible into crutch by extending tube with handle
US20040011392A1 (en) * 2002-07-22 2004-01-22 Maulden John H. Crutch with hands-free attachment
US20100071738A1 (en) * 2002-09-23 2010-03-25 Evans Jeffrey D Hand Based Weight Distribution System
US7621288B2 (en) 2002-09-23 2009-11-24 Evans Jeffrey D Hand based weight distribution system
US20100024857A1 (en) * 2003-10-10 2010-02-04 Millennial Medical Equipment, Llc Crutch
US9801776B2 (en) * 2003-10-10 2017-10-31 Millennial Medical Equipment, Llc Crutch
US20080053503A1 (en) * 2003-10-10 2008-03-06 Millennial Medical Equipment, Llc Ergonomic forearm crutch
US20140166061A1 (en) * 2003-10-10 2014-06-19 Millennial Medical Equipment, Llc Crutch
US8707975B2 (en) 2003-10-10 2014-04-29 Millennial Medical Equipment, Llc Crutch
US20090114257A1 (en) * 2004-09-11 2009-05-07 Orthocrutch Limited Handle and a Walking Aid Incorporating the Same
EP1793791A1 (en) * 2004-09-11 2007-06-13 Orthocrutch Limited A handle and a walking aid incorporating the same
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