US3163929A - Chip cleaning method - Google Patents

Chip cleaning method Download PDF

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US3163929A
US3163929A US18321062A US3163929A US 3163929 A US3163929 A US 3163929A US 18321062 A US18321062 A US 18321062A US 3163929 A US3163929 A US 3163929A
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chips
drum
detergent
spray
steam
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Sanders A Goodstein
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Sanders A Goodstein
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B08CLEANING
    • B08BCLEANING IN GENERAL; PREVENTION OF FOULING IN GENERAL
    • B08B3/00Cleaning by methods involving the use or presence of liquid or steam
    • B08B3/04Cleaning involving contact with liquid
    • B08B3/041Cleaning travelling work
    • B08B3/042Cleaning travelling work the loose articles or bulk material travelling gradually through a drum or other container, e.g. by helix or gravity
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C22METALLURGY; FERROUS OR NON-FERROUS ALLOYS; TREATMENT OF ALLOYS OR NON-FERROUS METALS
    • C22BPRODUCTION AND REFINING OF METALS; PRETREATMENT OF RAW MATERIALS
    • C22B1/00Preliminary treatment of ores or scrap
    • C22B1/005Preliminary treatment of scrap
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02PCLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES IN THE PRODUCTION OR PROCESSING OF GOODS
    • Y02P10/00Technologies related to metal processing
    • Y02P10/20Process efficiency
    • Y02P10/21Process efficiency by recovering materials
    • Y02P10/212Recovering metals from waste

Description

Jan. 5, 1965 INVENTOR.

S. A: GOODSTEIN CHIP CLEANING METHOD Filed March 28, 1962 I BY I United States Patent 3,163,929 CHEF CLEANING METHQD Sanders A. Goodstein, 6391 N. Dort Highway, Flint, Mich. Filed Mar. 28, 1962, Ser. No. 183,210 14 Claims. (Cl. 29-403) This invention relates to a process and apparatus for cleaning chips and turnings.

Thousands of tons of metal chips, turnings, borings, etc. (hereinafter referred to as chips), are created annually in the production of various commodities. These chips are created by cutting tools which in many instances are cooled, along with the workpiece, by cutting oil or by a solution of water soluble cutting oil and water. Thus a film of oil remains on the surfaces of the chips. It can be appreciated that since the size of the individual metal chips is small there is a very large surface area per ton of chips, and hence a large percentage by weight of oil retained on the chips, i.e. some estimates indicate that the oil on the surface could account for as much as 8 to 10 percent of the total weight of chips received at scrap collection yards.

With this large quantity of chips produced, many uses for this scrap material have developed, especially in iron foundries or blast furnaces. In either of the latter applications, the chips carry into the furnace a substantial percentage of the oil originally coating their surfaces. However, the oil is not completely dissipated by combustion and hence leaves the furnace as a black cloud, thereby creating both a nuisance and a potential health hazard. If relatively clean chips, i.e. oil free, can be provided, these chips can be used in processes in which the carbon and sulphur content of the charge must be carefully limited. On some occasions chips are transported in the holds of ships; with chips free from oil the possibility of fire due to combustion of the oil is eliminated. To alleviate the above problems, several methods have been attempted. One method is to remove the oil from the chips by centrifugal separation; this method, however, is a batch-type operation which does not lend itself to the economical treatment of the high volume of chips. Another method is to bake the oils away. It can be appreciated, however, that this must be done in a controlled atmosphere in order to avoid excessive oxidation of the chips; this process, while effective, is quite costly. Another method is by simple immersion of the chips in a water bath; however, since the oils on the chips are water soluble, the effectiveness of such baths is impaired. With such baths to be effective, a considerable amount of water and detergent must be used.

It is an object of this invention, then, to provide a novel and eifective method for cleaning oil from chips.

It is another object of this invention to provide novel apparatus for effectively removing oil from chips.

It is still another object of this invention to provide a continuous process for efiiciently and relatively inexpensively removing the oil from chips.

It is a further object of this invention to provide novel apparatus for the efficient and relatively inexpensive removal of oil from chips.

Other objects, features, and advantages of the present invention will become apparent from the subsequent description and the appended claims, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIGURE 1 depicts one embodiment of apparatus usable in the novel process for cleaning chips to be described; and

FIGURE 2 is a sectional view of the apparatus of FIG- URE 1 taken substantially along the line 22.

In general, apparatus for a continuous process is provided whereby the oil-coated chips are injected into an initial wash at a preselected rate, which wash is co..- prised of detergent-laden hot water. Quantities of the chips are continuously removed from this initial wash and into a spray of detergent-laden steam; as the chips are moved through the steam spray they are being continuously tumbled in order to better expose all of the surface areas to thereby provide for a more effective cleansing action. By subjecting the chips, which have been heated in the initial wash, to the steam spray, the chips emanating from the steam spray are substantially dry, thereby preventing excessive oxidation. The cleansed chips are continuously removed and can then alternatively be fed into a hopper which feeds conventional briquetting apparatus whereby the chips are compressed under high pressures to form a briquette, thereby facilitating shipping and use. The briquetting operation is not required in all cases since in some instances it is desirable that the chips be transported loosely.

More specifically now and looking to the drawing, chip feeding means generally indicated by the numeral it) comprises a hopper 12 having a downwardly extending throat portion 14 in which is rotatably mounted a paddle wheel type of feeding mechanism 16. The throat portion 14 is integral with and in communication with a transversely extending, downwardly inclined pipe or tube portion 18. A window or opening 14a can be provided in the throat portion 14 such that the operator can observe the flow of chips. In operation, chips to be cleaned are inserted in the open top 24 of the hopper 12 and are fed at a predetermined rate into the throat .14 and into the connecting pipe 18, depending upon the rate of rotation of the paddle wheel mechanism 1%. Other types of feed means could be utilized.

The end of the transversely extending tube portion 18 is in communication with the interior of conveying and tumbling means, generally indicated by the numeral 22. The conveying and tumbling means includes a hollow drum 24 for rotation mounted about an axis inclined with respect to the horizontal axis and having an end plate 26 at its upper end having a centrally located aperture 28 and a lower end plate 31' having a centrally located aperture 32 at the lower end. The angle of inclination can be varied to be more or substantially less than that shown in the drawing, depending upon individual requirements. The transverse tube portion 18 extends into the interior of the drum 2 through the lower aperture 32 and hence is capable of depositing or injecting chips from the hopper 12 into the lower end of the drum 24.

Disposed intermediate the ends of the drum 24 is an annular gear member 34 which is engageable with a drive gear member 37 which can be driven by motor means well known in the art and hence not shown in the drawing. Proximate to either end of the hollow drum 24 are disposed closely spaced pairs or" flanges 36. Located within the flange portions 36 are wheels 38 rotatably secured to an inclined platform on opposite sides of the drum 24. Pairs of wheels 38 are spaced on opposite dies of the hollow drum 24 and within the pairs of flanges 36 (FIGURE 2). Thus it can be seen (FIGURE 1) that by so disposing the rollers 38 within the flanges 36 the hollow drum 24 is rotatably mounted and is prevented from moving axially rearwardly down the incline by means of the engagement of the flanges 36 with the rollers 38. While only two sets of flanges 36 and two sets of wheels 38 are shown in the figures, more could be used, depending upon the requirements as dictated by size, capacity, etc.

Secured internally to the hollow drum 24 are partially radially inwardly extending pluralities of internal screw threads 45. Each of the screw threads 4% extends only partially of the length of the hollow drum 24 with adjacent ones axially olfset or staggered from each other 3 and partially radially overlapping each other to provide a gap 42 for a purpose to be described. Secured to the screw flights or threads 40 are lifting members or scoops 44 (see FIGURE 2) which extend axially and radially of the flights or screw threads 49 and serve a purpose to be presently seen. 7

Chips are inserted into the hopper l2 and are fed at a preselected rate by feed mechanism 16 into the throat portion 14 and into the transverse pipe portion 18; these chips are then fed into the lower extremity of the rotating drum 24. The chips inserted at the lower end of drum 24 are conveyed up the inclined axis by means of the internal screw threads 49 toward the upper end of the drum 24. As the drum 24 is rotated and the chips are moved axially and upwardly along the drum 24, portions of the chips are occasionally picked up by means of the scoops 44, raised, and then dropped to thereby cause a tumbling action whereby the various surfaces of the chips are exposed. It is to be noted that there IS a tendency for the chips to accumulate in conglomerate masses hence impairing a thorough cleaning action. By means of the tumbling action provided by the scoops 4- these groups. of material are eventually broken apart thus allowing exposure of all of the surfaces of the u1- dividual metal chips. Likewise, in the transition from one screw portionltl to the adjacent portion 4%, the aperture 42 therebetween is such that these conglomerate masses are further broken up in passing through the aperture 42. Secured at the upper end of the drum 24 and disposed radially about the upper aperture 28 are a plurality of axially and partially radially inwardly extending lift fin members 45. The chips at the upper end of the rotating drum 24 are then raised upwardly by the lift fins 4d and thence dropped onto a belt conveyor 48 which extends into the drum 24 via the upper aperture 28. Thus it can be seen that with the apparatus as shown, the chips to be. cleaned are continuously carried upwardly toward the exit at the upper end of the rotating drum 24 and are being continuously tumbled and otherwise agitated to insureboth that large conglomerate masses are broken and also to insure exposure of the various surfaces of the chips for a purpose to be seen.

Extending axially inwardly into the hollow drum 24 from the .upper end through the aperture 28 is a pipe 50 having a plurality of inclined, variously directed nozzles 52 along its length. In the preferred embodiment, some of the nozzles 52 are directed downwardly towards the chips. A mixture of steam and detergent is inserted into the pipe 59 and thence into the rotating drum 24 via the nozzles 52. The mixture of steam and detergent under pressure impinges against the chips upon their travel upwardly along the length of the hollow drum 24. Note that with the constant agitation and tumbling of the chips, the various surfaces of each of the chips are thereby exposed to the spray of detergent-laden steam. The mixture of steam and-detergent, upon condensing, is free to flow rearwardly through the series of apertures 42 to- Wards thebottom of the drum 24 and to collect to form thereby a pool of hot detergent-laden water. As the condensatefiows rearwardly it provides an additional wash of the chips, progressing upwardly in the drum 24.

' Thus the chips from the chip feeding means it) are initially immersed. into the pool of detergent-laden hot water at the bottom of the drum 24 and are initially washed; the temperature of the individual chips is raised the chips reach the exit at the upper'end of the rotating drum 24 the hot chips are contacted only by the clean fresh spray of detergent-laden steam and are at a temi perature such that upon deposit of the chips onto the conveyor 4% rapid drying occurs, thus minimizing th oxidation of the now cleansed chips.

The steam is generated in a closed tank 49. A mixture of water and detergent is disposed in the tank 49 and converted to steam by means (not shown) well known in the art. The steam is then fed to the pipe 50 via a valve 51. In order to further facilitate the rapid drying of the cleansed chips, the steam could be superheated. The amount of superheat, of course, would vary with the particular application. Note that by using steam a large surface area can be covered with a small amount of water and detergent; thus, an eiiicient and inexpensive means for cleaning the chips is provided.

In order to allow for the escape of liquid from the drum 24, a plurality of apertures 54 are provided in the plate 30 such that the'liquid at the bottom portion of the drum 24 isfree to drain therefrom, thus allowing only a selected portion of that end of the drum 24 to be filled with the detergent-laden water. The mixture of oil and water flowing from the apertures-54 is collected in a receiving tank 56 and thence carried away.

Depending upon the proposed use of the cleansed chips, the chips could be carried from the conveyor 48 and shipped directly to the ultimate consumers. applications, however, as previously mentioned, it is desirable that the chips be briquetted in order to facilitate shipping and handling. In this instance then, the conveyor 48 is connected directly to a hopper 58 of a briquetting machine being of a construction Well known to the art and generally indicated by the numeral 60.

A feed mechanism generally indicated by a paddle wheel type mechanism 62 is utilized to control the feed into the briquetting machine oil. Other types of feeding mechanisms could be utilized, i.e.'vibrating feed mechanism, etc. The cleansed chips are then fed into the briquetting machine 60 wherein they are compressed under a high pressure to form briquettes which can then be shipped to the ultimate consumers.

While it will be apparent that the preferred embodiment of the invention disclosed is well calculated to fulfill the objects above stated, it will be appreciated that the invention is susceptible to modification, variation and change without departing from the proper scope or fair meaning of the subjoined claims.

What is claimed is:

1. Apparatus for cleaning chips of material such as metal chips or turnings having an oily film thereon comprising spray means for providing a distributed spray of detergent-laden steam, conveying means for carrying the chips through the spray from said spray means, said conveying means including means for agitating and tumbling the chips as they are carried through the spray from said spray means.

2. Apparatus for cleaning chips such as metal chips or turnings having an oily film thereon comprising spray means for providing a distributed spray of detergentladen steam, conveying means for carrying the chips through the spray from said spray means, feed means for depositing the chips to be cleaned upon said conveying means at a variably selectable rate, said conveying means including means for agitating and tumbling the chips as they are carried through the spray of detergent-laden steam.

3. Apparatus for processing metal chips comprising spray means for providing a distributed spray of detergentladen steam, first conveying means for carrying the chips through the spray from said spray means, first feed means for depositing the chips to be cleaned upon said first convey ng means at a variably selectable rate, said first conveying means including means for agitating and tumbling the chips as they are carried through the spray of detergent laden steam from said spray means, briquetting means for compressing the cleaned chips into briquettes, second feed means for storing the clean chips and selectively deposit- In some ing the clean chips into said briquetting means, and second conveying means for carrying the clean chips from said first conveying means to said second feed means.

4. Apparatus for cleaning metal chips such as metal chips or turnings having an oily film thereon comprising a hollow drum rotatably disposed along an inclined axis and having a lower end for receiving chips to be cleaned and an upper end for emitting the cleaned chips, a thread member secured internally to said drum and extending partially radially inwardly thereof, spray means disposed within said hollow drum for providing a distributed spray of detergent-laden steam directed at the chips carried by said thread member up said inclined axis, and means secured to said thread member for agitating and tumbling the chips as the chips are carried through the spray from said spray means.

5. Apparatus for cleaning metal chips such as metal chips or turnings having an oily film thereon comprising a hollow drum rotatably disposed along an inclined axis and having a lower end for receiving chips to be cleaned and an upper end for emitting the cleaned chips, a thread member secured internally to said drum and extending partially radially inwardly thereof, generating means for generating a supply of detergent-laden steam, spray means connected to said generating means and having a plurality of nozzles disposed within said hollow drum for providing a distributed spray of detergent-laden steam directed at the chips carried by said thread member up said inclined axis, and a plurality of lifting scoops secured to said thread member at spaced intervals for raising and dropping a portion of the chips as the chips are carried through the spray from said nozzles.

6. Apparatus for cleaning metal chips such as metal chips or turnings having an oily film thereon comprising a hollow drum rotatably disposed along an inclined axis and having a lower end for receiving chips to be cleaned and an upper end for emitting the cleaned chips, a plurality of thread members secured internally of said drum and extending partially radially inwardly thereof with each of said plurality of thread members being staggered axially relative to and partially radially overlapping adjacent ones of said plurality of thread members, a plurality of axially and radially extending lifting scoops secured to said plurality of thread members at spaced intervals and being adapted to pick up portions of the chips in said drum, and spray means disposed within said drum for providing a distributed spray of detergent-laden steam directed downwardly towards the chips in said drum.

7. Apparatus for cleaning metal chips such as metal chips or turnings having an oily film thereon comprising a hollow drum rotatably disposed along an inclined axis and having a lower end for receiving chips to be cleaned and an upper end for emitting the cleaned chips, a plurality of thread members secured internally of said drum and extending partially radially inwardly thereof with each of said plurality of thread members being staggered axially relative to and partially overlapping adjacent ones of said plurality of thread members, a plurality of axially and radially extending lifting scoops secured to said plurality of thread members at spaced intervals and being adapted to pick up portions of the chips in said drum, spray means disposed within said drum for providing a distributed spray of detergent-laden steam directed downwardly towards the chips in said drum, an annular gear member radially secured externally to said drum, and a drive gear engageable with said gear member for rotatably driving said drum.

8. Apparatus for cleaning metal chips such as metal chips or turnings having an oily film thereon comprising a hollow drum rotatably disposed along an inclined axis and having a lower end for receiving chips to be cleaned and an upper end for emitting the cleaned chips, a plurality of thread members secured internally of said drum and extending partially radially inwardly thereof with each of said plurality of thread members being staggered axially relative to and partially overlapping said adjacent ones of said plurality of thread members, a plurality of am'ally and radially extending lifting scoops secured to said plurality of thread members at spaced intervals and being adapted to pick up portions of the chips in said drum, spray means disposed within said drum for providing a distributed spray of detergent-laden steam directed downwardly towards the chips in said drum, and an end plate disposed in blocking relationship with said lower end of said drum and having a substantially centrally located aperture therethrough and having a plurality of radially inwardly disposed drain holes whereby the accumulated liquid at said lower end of said drum can be drained therefrom upon reaching a predetermined level.

9. Apparatus for cleaning metal chips such as metal chips or turnings having an oily film thereon comprising a hollow drum rotatably disposed along an inclined axis and having a lower end for receiving chips to be cleaned and an upper end for emitting the cleaned chips, a plurality of thread members secured internally of said drum and extending partially radially inwardly thereof with each of said plurality of thread members being staggered axially relative to and partially overlapping said adjacent ones of said plurality of thread members, a plurality of axially and radially extending lifting scoops secured to said plurality of thread members at spaced intervals and being adapted to pick up portions of the chips in said drum, spray means disposed within said drum for providing a distributed spray of detergent-laden steam directed downwardly towards the chips in said drum, and a plurality of axially extending, radially disposed lift fins extending partially radially inwardly and disposed at said upper end of said drum for lifting upwardly the cleaned chips at said upper end.

10. The method of continuously cleaning chips such as metal chips or turnings having an oily film thereon comprising the steps of depositing chips to be cleaned in a wash, conveying the chips out of the wash, spraying the chips conveyed out of the wash with detergent-laden steam, and tumbling and agitating the chips while carrying the chips through the spray of detergent-laden steam to expose thereby the various surfaces of the chips.

11. The method of continuously cleaning chips such as metal chips or turnings having an oily film thereon comprising the steps of conveying the chips to be cleaned, spraying the chips while being conveyed with detergentladen steam, and tumbling and agitating the chips while conveying the chips through the spray of detergent-laden steam to expose thereby the various surfaces of the chips.

12. The method of continuously cleaning chips such as metal chips or turnings having an oily film thereon comprising the steps of conveying the chips to be cleaned, spraying the chips while being conveyed with a mixture of super-heated steam and detergent, and tumbling and agitating the chips While conveying the chips through the spray of the mixture of super-heated steam and detergent to expose thereby the various surfaces of the chips.

13. The method of cleaning metal chips such as metal chips or turnings having an oily film thereon comprising the steps of depositing chips to be cleaned in a wash of hot detergent-laden water, conveying the chips out of the wash, spraying the chips out of the wash with detergentladen steam, washing the chips being conveyed by flowing the condensate of the detergent-laden steam over a portion of'the chips, tumbling and agitating the chips while carrying the chips through the spray of detergent-laden steam to expose thereby the various surfaces of the chips.

14. The method of cleaning metal chips comprising the steps of depositing chips to be cleaned in a wash of hot detergent-laden water, conveying the chips out of the wash, spraying the chips out of the wash with detergent-laden steam,'washing portions of the chips being conveyed by flowing the condensate of the detergent-laden steam over a a portion of the chips, tumbling and agitating the chips while carrying the chips through the spray of detergentladen steam to expose thereby the various surfaces 'of the chips, compressing batches of the cleaned chips under a high pressure to form thereby briquettes of substantially oil-free chips.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS Ransohofl 134-157 X Fox et a1. 134-36 'Boessenkool 29-403 MacDonald 134-30 Hyams 134-36 Dzalo 29-403 Brown 29-403 WHIT MORE A. WlLTZ, Primary Examiner.-

THOMAS H. EAGER, Examiner.

Claims (1)

14. THE METHOD OF CLEANING METAL CHIPS COMPRISING THE STEPS OF DEPOSITING CHIPS TO BE CLEANED IN A WASH OF HOT DETERGENT-LADEN WATER, CONVEYING THE CHIPS OUT OF THE WASH, SPRAYING THE CHIPS OUT OF THE WASH WIDTH DETERGENT-LADEN STEAM, WASHING PORTIONS OF THE CHIPS BEING CONVEYED BY FLOWING THE CONDENSATE OF THE DETERGENT-LADEN STEAM OVER A PORTION OF THE CHIPS, TUMBLING AND AGITATING THE CHIPS WHILE CARRYING THE CHIPS THROUGH THE SPRAY OF DETERGENTLADEN STEAM TO EXPOSE THEREBY THE VARIOUS SURFACES OF THE CHIPS, COMPRESSING BATCHES OF THE CLEANED CHIPS UNDER A HIGH PRESDSURE TO FORM THEREBY BRIQUETTES OF SUBSTANTIALLY OIL-FREE CHIPS.
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Cited By (17)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3225428A (en) * 1964-09-11 1965-12-28 Jr Louis S Deitz Method of reclaiming copper from insulated copper wire
US3484289A (en) * 1965-11-03 1969-12-16 Alvin Wasserman Method of processing metals for use in alloying furnaces
US3544369A (en) * 1967-12-26 1970-12-01 Fmc Corp Method for the cleaning of metal waste and the recovery of oil therefrom
US3639172A (en) * 1970-07-08 1972-02-01 Fmc Corp Cleaning oil-laden metal waste to recover the metal and reclaim the oil
US3734776A (en) * 1967-12-26 1973-05-22 Fmc Corp Cleaning oil laden metal waste to recover the metal and reclaim the oil
USRE28787E (en) * 1969-12-18 1976-04-27 K-G Industries, Inc. Method and system for hot de-oiling and hot briquetting
US4015780A (en) * 1975-05-05 1977-04-05 Boc Limited Powder forming
US4073225A (en) * 1976-12-17 1978-02-14 N.P.I. Corporation Rocking meatball cooker
USRE29606E (en) * 1969-03-03 1978-04-11 Thermetics, Inc. Scrap reclamation
US4103605A (en) * 1977-01-17 1978-08-01 N.P.I. Corporation Meatball cooker
WO1985001069A1 (en) * 1983-09-08 1985-03-14 Georg Von Bormann Process, plant and/or device for preparing oil-coated scales or similar materials
US4547227A (en) * 1984-04-09 1985-10-15 Herter Carl J Method for preparing a steel charge from terneplate scrap metal
US4565583A (en) * 1984-04-24 1986-01-21 Inductotherm Corporation Process for removing oil from metal chips
DE3544240A1 (en) * 1985-12-14 1987-06-19 Metallgesellschaft Ag Method for processing fragmented wastes contaminated with fats or oils
US5133808A (en) * 1991-03-06 1992-07-28 Avco Corporation Cleaning process for radioactive machine shop turnings
US5344255A (en) * 1992-01-03 1994-09-06 Itex Enterprises, Inc. Oil, water and sand separator
FR2991888A1 (en) * 2012-06-14 2013-12-20 Plast Recycling Washer for washing soiled polymeric material i.e. PVC, has positioning unit arranged for positioning of tank, mixing unit arranged internal to tank, and motorized drive unit i.e. motor, arranged for driving of mixing unit

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US1529168A (en) * 1920-09-13 1925-03-10 David P Cleveland Process of removing finish coating
US1779046A (en) * 1928-05-24 1930-10-21 Edward T Mcnaney Oyster-cleaning machine
US2288742A (en) * 1940-04-10 1942-07-07 Ransohoff Nathan Washing apparatus
US2592885A (en) * 1946-05-29 1952-04-15 Hobart Mfg Co Method of and apparatus for washing dishes
US2747265A (en) * 1951-06-29 1956-05-29 Metals & Controls Corp Reclaiming scrap metal
US2852418A (en) * 1956-02-20 1958-09-16 Michigan Foundry Supply Compan Method for treating metal borings
US3015588A (en) * 1951-12-31 1962-01-02 Amchem Prod Spray pickling processes for the surface treatment of metal
US3031745A (en) * 1959-06-01 1962-05-01 Dzialo Frank Machine and method for reclaiming tin cans and the like to be made into alloyed billets of tin and metal
US3116545A (en) * 1962-07-03 1964-01-07 Herman L Brown Recovering pure metal from insulated scrap wire

Patent Citations (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1529168A (en) * 1920-09-13 1925-03-10 David P Cleveland Process of removing finish coating
US1779046A (en) * 1928-05-24 1930-10-21 Edward T Mcnaney Oyster-cleaning machine
US2288742A (en) * 1940-04-10 1942-07-07 Ransohoff Nathan Washing apparatus
US2592885A (en) * 1946-05-29 1952-04-15 Hobart Mfg Co Method of and apparatus for washing dishes
US2747265A (en) * 1951-06-29 1956-05-29 Metals & Controls Corp Reclaiming scrap metal
US3015588A (en) * 1951-12-31 1962-01-02 Amchem Prod Spray pickling processes for the surface treatment of metal
US2852418A (en) * 1956-02-20 1958-09-16 Michigan Foundry Supply Compan Method for treating metal borings
US3031745A (en) * 1959-06-01 1962-05-01 Dzialo Frank Machine and method for reclaiming tin cans and the like to be made into alloyed billets of tin and metal
US3116545A (en) * 1962-07-03 1964-01-07 Herman L Brown Recovering pure metal from insulated scrap wire

Cited By (18)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3225428A (en) * 1964-09-11 1965-12-28 Jr Louis S Deitz Method of reclaiming copper from insulated copper wire
US3484289A (en) * 1965-11-03 1969-12-16 Alvin Wasserman Method of processing metals for use in alloying furnaces
US3544369A (en) * 1967-12-26 1970-12-01 Fmc Corp Method for the cleaning of metal waste and the recovery of oil therefrom
US3734776A (en) * 1967-12-26 1973-05-22 Fmc Corp Cleaning oil laden metal waste to recover the metal and reclaim the oil
USRE29606E (en) * 1969-03-03 1978-04-11 Thermetics, Inc. Scrap reclamation
USRE28787E (en) * 1969-12-18 1976-04-27 K-G Industries, Inc. Method and system for hot de-oiling and hot briquetting
US3639172A (en) * 1970-07-08 1972-02-01 Fmc Corp Cleaning oil-laden metal waste to recover the metal and reclaim the oil
US4015780A (en) * 1975-05-05 1977-04-05 Boc Limited Powder forming
US4073225A (en) * 1976-12-17 1978-02-14 N.P.I. Corporation Rocking meatball cooker
US4103605A (en) * 1977-01-17 1978-08-01 N.P.I. Corporation Meatball cooker
WO1985001069A1 (en) * 1983-09-08 1985-03-14 Georg Von Bormann Process, plant and/or device for preparing oil-coated scales or similar materials
US4988391A (en) * 1983-09-08 1991-01-29 Bormann Georg Von Process, plant and/or apparatus for treating oil-contaminated debris or like materials
US4547227A (en) * 1984-04-09 1985-10-15 Herter Carl J Method for preparing a steel charge from terneplate scrap metal
US4565583A (en) * 1984-04-24 1986-01-21 Inductotherm Corporation Process for removing oil from metal chips
DE3544240A1 (en) * 1985-12-14 1987-06-19 Metallgesellschaft Ag Method for processing fragmented wastes contaminated with fats or oils
US5133808A (en) * 1991-03-06 1992-07-28 Avco Corporation Cleaning process for radioactive machine shop turnings
US5344255A (en) * 1992-01-03 1994-09-06 Itex Enterprises, Inc. Oil, water and sand separator
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