US3163073A - Electric guitar - Google Patents

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US3163073A
US3163073A US143929A US14392961A US3163073A US 3163073 A US3163073 A US 3163073A US 143929 A US143929 A US 143929A US 14392961 A US14392961 A US 14392961A US 3163073 A US3163073 A US 3163073A
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arm
pedal
tone
means
string
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US143929A
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John F Elmore
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John F Elmore
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10DSTRINGED MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; WIND MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACCORDIONS OR CONCERTINAS; PERCUSSION MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; AEOLIAN HARPS; SINGING-FLAME MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G10D1/00General design of stringed musical instruments
    • G10D1/04Plucked or strummed string instruments, e.g. harps or lyres
    • G10D1/05Plucked or strummed string instruments, e.g. harps or lyres with fret boards or fingerboards
    • G10D1/08Guitars
    • G10D1/085Mechanical design of electric guitars

Description

Dec. 29, 1964 Y J. F. ELMORE 3,153,073

' ELECTRIC GUITAR Filed Oct. 9. 1961 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Fig.1

IN l/E A/ TOR.

JOHN F. E LMORE Fig. 2

BY BUCKHORN, CHEATHAM 8 BLORE ATTORNEYS Dec. 29, 1964 J. F. ELMORE 3,163,073

ELECTRIC GUITAR Filed Oct. 9. 1961 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 mvewro/a G 3 JOHN F. ELMORE BY BUCKHORN, CHEATHAM 8 BLORE ATTORNEYS United States Patent 3,153,073 ELECTRIC GUETAR John F. Ehnore, 400 E. 1st St, Newherg, Ureg. Filed Oct. 9, 1961, Ser. No. 143,929 3 Claims. (til. 843i2) The present invention relates to stringed instruments and more particularly to a new and improved arrangement for means for effecting changes in the tone of certain strings of such an instrument while the same is played.

A principal object of the present invention is to provide an instrument, of the type described, wherein the tone of certain strings may be changed by either a halt tone or a full tone during the playing of the instrument as desired.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a new and improved means for efiecting temporary changes in the tone of certain strings of a stringed instrument.

A further object of the invention is to provide an instrument of the class described in which tone changes in certain strings can be obtained by simple manipulations of a foot pedal.

Still other objects and advantages of the invention will become more apparent hereinafter.

In accordance with the illustrated embodiment, the present invention comprises a horizontally disposed sounding board before which the player may sit while playing the instrument. Means are provided to tune each of the strings of the instrument to a normal playing tone and further means are provided to permit two of the strin s to be changed each by a half tone or a full tone during playing of the instrument by manipulation of one set of foot pedals arranged for operation by one foot of the operator.

Further details of the invention will become more apparent from the following description taken thereof in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of an instrument embodying the invention;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged, fragmentary top plan view of a portion of the instrument and;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged, sectional view taken substantially along line 3-3 of FIG. 2.

The invention is illustrated in connection with a socalled electric steel guitar which comprises an .elongate horizontally disposed sounding board 10. having a plurality of strings indicated generally at 12 tensioned over frets 14. The strings 12 are fixedly secured to the board id at one end thereof by conventional means indicated at 16 and suitable means are provided at the opposite end of the board to permit tuning of the strings. The board is supported at a convenient table height by stands 2d, 21 so that the player may be comfortably seated upon a chair and manipulate the strings. It will be understood that sound amplifying equipment (not shown) may be utilized in the conventional manner.

Referring now, more particularly, to FIGURES 2 and 3, the illustrated instrument is an eight stringed instrument, the outer three strings 22 on each side being connected to a conventional type tuning key arrangement indicated at 24. Particular attention will now be directed to the center strings 30, 32 with which the novel arrangement of the present invention is concerned.

Pivotally mounted upon a transverse shaft 36 is a pair of levers or arms 38, 4'1." to which the strings 3t), 32, respectively, are connected by means of conventional Eddiiflili Patented Dec. 29, 1964 ice tensioning key arrangements indicated at 42. Each arm is provided with a tubular extension 44 at its base in which the shaft 36 is rotatably received and over which the corresponding string is tensioned as best indicated in FIG. 3. As will be evident in FIG. 3, the tension on the string attached to a particular arm will tend to cause that arm to rotate in a clockwise direction.

Means are provided to define a first normal position of the arms 38, iii to which each is urged by the tension of the strings 3d, 32, respectively, to produce the normal tone of the strings. In the illustrated embodiment such stop means comprises a fiat bar or plate 50 extending across the instrument and against the underside of which the arms 38, 40 are adapted to engage. A projection 52 may be provided on the arms to define an abutment for this purpose.

In accordance with the invention means are provided for selectively moving each of the arms 38, 4t) counter clockwise to two alternate positions, in the first of which the tone of the corresponding string will be increased by a half tone and to which the second of which such string will be increased by another half tone or by a full tone from its original tone. Referring first to the arrangement for string 3t), connected to the arm 38 is a pair of cables 54, as which are in turn connected to a foot pedal means comprising a first portion 58 connected by a hinge 6i) to the adjacent stand 20 for rotation about a horizontal axis, and a second portion 62 connected by a hinge 64 to the free end of the portion 58. The cables 54, 55 may be secured by any suitable means to the por tion 58. As shown in FIG. 3, the upper end of the cable 5'6 extends upwardly through the arm 38, the upper end of the cable constituting a threaded rod 66 which is en gaged in a threaded adjusting screw 6% having an enlarged head portion 7%). The shank of the adjusting screw extends through an opening 72 in the plate 56 which is of larger diameter than the shank so that the screw may move freely vertically through such opening but which opening is of smaller diameter than the head so that downward movement of the arm caused by downward movement of the cable 56 is arrested when the head 70 engages the stop 59.

The cable 54 is also provided with a threaded upper end portion 2'4 which is engaged in the threaded shank of an adjusting screw '76 having an enlarged head portion 7d. The cable portion '74 extends through an enlarged opening Stl provided in the arm 38 so that the arm can be moved freely with respect to the cable portion 74 within limits to become apparent. The shank portion of the screw 7% is of a larger diameter than the opening so that the arm 38 can be moved downwardly by downward movement of the cable 54. The shank of the screw 76 extends through an enlarged opening 84 in the stop 5%) so that the shank may be moved freely vertically therein, but the head '78 is of larger diameter than the opening 3 so that the head constitutes a stop to limit the downward movement of the adjusting screw and consequently the cable 54. As will be apparent from FIG. 3, the shank of the adjusting screw 68 is of greater length than the shank of the screw '76, the reasons for which will be made apparent hereinafter.

The cable 56 is addition to being connected to the foot edal portion 53 is also connected to the foot pedal portion 62 by means of a further cable length 86.

The arm 40 is connected by a similar arrangement through cables 88, 94 to a foot pedal including a base portion 92 hingedly connected to the base 20 and a supplemental foot pedal portion 94.

As will be evident, depression of the foot pedal portion 58 will cause the arm 38 to rotate in a counterclockwise direction until the head 78 of the adjusting screw 86 engages the plate 50. The screw 76 is adjusted so that at this point the tone of the string is increased by a half tone from its normal tone. If at this point the supplemental foot portion 62 is rotated in a clockwise direction, the additional tension will be applied to the cable 56 causing additional counter clockwise rotation of the arm 38, the limit of such rotation being attained when the screw head 70 engages the stop bar 50. The adjusting screw 68 is adjusted so that this limit position is reached when the string 30 is tensioned to a full tone above its normal tone.

Similar changes in the tone of the string 32 may be made by depressing the foot pedal portion 92 and actuation of the pedal portion 94.

In playing the instrument the player places one foot upon the upper ends of the pedal portions 94, 62 as indicated by dotted lines in FIGURE 1. With no pressure applied upon the foot pedals the strings 3t), 32 are tenvariations in tone combinations on the two strings 39, 32

enabling an extremely wide range of selection of tonal changes.

Obviously, tone adjustment of additional strings could be made from pedals 58, 62, 92 and 94 and a similar control arrangement could be provided utilizing the other foot of the player.

Having illustrated and described a preferred embodiment of the invention it should be apparent that it permits of modification in arrangement and detail. I claim such modifications as come within the purview and scope of the appended claims:

1. In a guitar or like stringed instrument,

a horizontally extending sounding board,

a plurality of parallel tensioned strings extending along said board,

means anchoring said strings at one end of said board,

and means for varying the tone of one of said strings connected to such string at the opposite end of said board, said last mentioned means comprising,

an arm mounted for rotation about a horizontal axis,

means connecting said one string to said arm,

a stop member engaging said arm to hold the same against rotation under the tension of the attached string,

means to adjust the tension of said string when said arm is in engagement with said stop so as to tune said string to its normal tone,

a foot pedal mounted beneath said board for engagement by the foot of the player of said instrument, said pedal being mounted at one end thereof for rotation about a horizontal axis,

means connecting said pedal to said arm to cause said arm to rotate from said stop member When said pedal is depressed,

means associated with said arm to arrest rotation thereof by movement of said foot pedal when the tone of the string connected to said arm has been raised by one half tone,

a supplemental pedal mounted on the free end of said foot pedal for rotation about a horizontal axis, said supplemental pedal adapted to be actuated by hori zontal movement of the players foot operating said foot pedal,

means connecting said supplemental pedal to said arm to cause said arm to rotate in the direction away from said stop member when said supplemental pedal is actuated,

and means associated with said arm to arrest rotation thereof by movement of the corresponding supple mental pedal when the tone of the string connected to said arm has been raised by one full tone from its normal tone.

2. In a guitar or like stringed instrument,

a sounding board,

a plurality of parallel tensioned strings extending along said board,

means anchoring said strings at one end of said board,

and means for varying the tone of one of said strings connected to such strings at the opposite end of said board, said last mentioned means comprising,

a pivotally mounted arm connected to said one string,

a stop member to hold said arm against rotation under the tension of said string,

a bi-part foot pedal including a first part actuated by movement of a foot in one direction and a second part actuated by movement of a foot in a direction at right angles to the first mentioned direction,

means connecting said pedal first part to said arm to cause said arm to rotate from said stop upon actuation of said first part,

means to arrest rotation of said arm by movement of the pedal first part when the tone of string connected to said arm has been raised by one half tone,

means connecting said second pedal part to said arm to cause said arm to rotate in the direction away from said stop means when said second pedal part is actuated,

and means associated with said arm to arrest rotation of said arm by movement of the said second pedal part when the tone of said string connected to said arm has been raised by one full tone from its normal tone.

3. In a guitar or like stringed instrument,

a horizontally extending sounding board,

a plurality of parallel tensioned strings extending along said board,

means anchoring said strings at one end of said board,

and means for varying the tone of a pair of said strings connected to such strings at the opposite end of said board, said last mentioned means comprising,

a pair of arms mounted for rotation about a horizontal axis,

means connecting said pair of strings one to each of said arms,

a stop member engaging said arms to hold the same against rotation under the tension of the attached string,

means to adjust the tension of said pair of strings when said arms are in engagement with said stop so as to tune said strings to their normal tone,

a pair of foot pedals mounted beneath said board for engagement by the heel and toe of one foot of the player of said instrument, said pedals being mounted on one end thereof for rotation about a horizontal axis,

means connecting said pedals one to each of said arms to cause said arms to rotate in the direction away from said stop member when said pedals are depressed,

means associated with each of said arms to arrest rotation thereof by movement of the corresponding foot pedal when the tone of the string connected to said arm has been raised by one half tone,

a pair of supplemental pedals mounted on the free ends of said foot pedals, one on each, for rotation about a horizontal axis, said supplemental pedals adapted to be actuated by side movement of the heel and toe 5 5 portions of the players foot operating said foot References Cited in the file of this patent Pfldals, UNlTED STATES PATENTS means connecting said supplemental pedals one to each of said arms to cause said levers to rotate in the 2,068,962 Sanford Jan'261937 direction away from said stop member when said 5 2,122,396 Freeman July 1938 supplemental pedals are actuated, 21231718 Mafiel et a1 1941 and means associated with each of said arms to arrest 21257995 Abrams et a1 19 rotation thereof by movement of the corresponding 2,458,263 Harhn supplemental pedal when the tone of the string connected to said arm has been raised by one full tone 10 from its normal tone.

Claims (1)

1. IN A GUITAR OR LIKE STRINGED INSTRUMENT, A HORIZONTALLY EXTENDING SOUNDING BOARD, A PLURALITY OF PARALLEL TENSIONED STRINGS EXTENDING ALONG SAID BOARD, MEANS ANCHORING SAID STRINGS AT ONE END OF SAID BOARD, AND MEANS FOR VARYING THE TONE OF ONE OF SAID STRINGS CONNECTED TO SUCH STRING AT THE OPPOSITE END OF SAID BOARD, SAID LAST MENTIONED MEANS COMPRISING, AN ARM MOUNTED FOR ROTATION ABOUT A HORIZONTAL AXIS, MEANS CONNECTING SAID ONE STRING TO SAID ARM, A STOP MEMBER ENGAGING SAID ARM TO HOLD THE SAME AGAINST ROTATION UNDER THE TENSION OF THE ATTACHED STRING, MEANS TO ADJUST THE TENSION OF SAID STRING WHEN SAID ARM IS IN ENGAGEMENT WITH SAID STOP SO AS TO TUNE SAID STRING TO ITS NORMAL TONE, A FOOT PEDAL MOUNTED BENEATH SAID BOARD FOR ENGAGEMENT BY THE FOOT OF THE PLAYER OF SAID INSTRUMENT, SAID PEDAL BEING MOUNTED AT ONE END THEREOF FOR ROTATION ABOUT A HORIZONTAL AXIS, MEANS CONNECTING SAID PEDAL TO SAID ARM TO CAUSE SAID ARM TO ROTATE FROM SAID STOP MEMBER WHEN SAID PEDAL IS DEPRESSED, MEANS ASSOCIATED WITH SAID ARM TO ARREST ROTATION THEREOF BY MOVEMENT OF SAID FOOT PEDAL WHEN THE TONE OF THE STRING CONNECTED TO SAID ARM HAS BEEN RAISED BY ONE HALF TONE, A SUPPLEMENTAL PEDAL MOUNTED ON THE FREE END OF SAID FOOT PEDAL FOR ROTATION ABOUT A HORIZONTAL AXIS, SAID SUPPLEMENTAL PEDAL ADAPTED TO BE ACTUATED BY HORIZONTAL MOVEMENT OF THE PLAYER''S FOOT OPERATING SAID FOOT PEDAL, MEANS CONNECTING SAID SUPPLEMENTAL PEDAL TO SAID ARM TO CAUSE SAID ARM TO ROTATE IN THE DIRECTION AWAY FROM SAID STOP MEMBER WHEN SAID SUPPLEMENTAL PEDAL IS ACTUATED, AND MEANS ASSOCIATED WITH SAID ARM TO ARREST ROTATION THEREOF BY MOVEMENT OF THE CORRESPONDING SUPPLEMENTAL PEDAL WHEN THE TONE OF THE STRING CONNECTED TO SAID ARM HAS BEEN RAISED BY ONE FULL TONE FROM ITS NORMAL TONE.
US143929A 1961-10-09 1961-10-09 Electric guitar Expired - Lifetime US3163073A (en)

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Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3447413A (en) * 1965-03-18 1969-06-03 Emmons Guitar Co Inc Guitar tone changing device
US4408515A (en) * 1981-07-13 1983-10-11 Sciuto Michael N Stringed instrument conversion kit employing combined bridge/tuning mechanism
DE3423374A1 (en) * 1984-06-25 1986-01-02 Helmut Juengling Electronic string instrument
US20040261599A1 (en) * 2003-06-25 2004-12-30 Templeton Christopher N Tone control apparatus for guitars

Citations (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2068962A (en) * 1935-04-29 1937-01-26 Bragg Kliesrath Corp Control mechanism
US2122396A (en) * 1936-12-14 1938-07-05 Martin P Grauenhorst Musical instrument
US2235718A (en) * 1939-09-22 1941-03-18 Epiphone Inc Stringed musical instrument
US2257995A (en) * 1940-10-21 1941-10-07 Gibson Inc Musical instrument
US2458263A (en) * 1947-08-21 1949-01-04 Harlin Brothers String musical instrument with chord tuning mechanism
US2949806A (en) * 1958-09-08 1960-08-23 Thomas B Turman Individual string tone changer for guitars
US2973682A (en) * 1957-07-22 1961-03-07 Clarence L Fender String tension controlling means for lute-type instrument

Patent Citations (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2068962A (en) * 1935-04-29 1937-01-26 Bragg Kliesrath Corp Control mechanism
US2122396A (en) * 1936-12-14 1938-07-05 Martin P Grauenhorst Musical instrument
US2235718A (en) * 1939-09-22 1941-03-18 Epiphone Inc Stringed musical instrument
US2257995A (en) * 1940-10-21 1941-10-07 Gibson Inc Musical instrument
US2458263A (en) * 1947-08-21 1949-01-04 Harlin Brothers String musical instrument with chord tuning mechanism
US2973682A (en) * 1957-07-22 1961-03-07 Clarence L Fender String tension controlling means for lute-type instrument
US2949806A (en) * 1958-09-08 1960-08-23 Thomas B Turman Individual string tone changer for guitars

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3447413A (en) * 1965-03-18 1969-06-03 Emmons Guitar Co Inc Guitar tone changing device
US4408515A (en) * 1981-07-13 1983-10-11 Sciuto Michael N Stringed instrument conversion kit employing combined bridge/tuning mechanism
DE3423374A1 (en) * 1984-06-25 1986-01-02 Helmut Juengling Electronic string instrument
US20040261599A1 (en) * 2003-06-25 2004-12-30 Templeton Christopher N Tone control apparatus for guitars

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