US2257995A - Musical instrument - Google Patents

Musical instrument Download PDF

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US2257995A
US2257995A US36198840A US2257995A US 2257995 A US2257995 A US 2257995A US 36198840 A US36198840 A US 36198840A US 2257995 A US2257995 A US 2257995A
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Prior art keywords
string
strings
lever
tension
bridge
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Neil B Abrams
William J Mills
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GIBSON Inc
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GIBSON Inc
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10DSTRINGED MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; WIND MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACCORDIONS OR CONCERTINAS; PERCUSSION MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G10D3/00Details of, or accessories for, stringed musical instruments, e.g. slide-bars
    • G10D3/14Tuning devices, e.g. pegs, pins, friction discs
    • G10D3/143Devices for altering the string tension during playing

Description

Oct. 7, 1941. N B ABRAMS ETAL 2,257,995

MUSICAL INSTRUMENT Filed Oct. 21, 1940 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTORS. Med F/ama Patented Oct. 7, 1941 MUSICAL INSTRUMENT Neil B. Abrams and William J. Mills, Kalamazoo, Mich, asslgnors to Gibson, Inc., Kalamazoo,

Mich.

Application October 21, 1940, Serial No. 361,988

13 Claims.

This invention relates to improvements in musical instruments.

The main objects of this invention are:

First, to provide a stringed musical instrument having provision for altering the tension of one or more of the strings during playing thereof in a novel and improved manner to enable the pitch or tone of certain of the strings to be altered at will and thereby permit the playing of numerous types of chords making chord progressions complete without objectionably increasing the number of strings.

Second, to provide an instrument of the type described for altering the tone of certain of the strings a predetermined degree by increasing or decreasing the tension thereof so as to raise or lower the tones and wherein the altered tuning of the strings thus affected is instantaneously and accurately effected and accurately maintained as long as desired.

Third, to provide a musical instrument having associated therewith an automatic tone changing device for certain of the strings operable while the instrument is being played and wherein the altered tunings of the notes produced are maintained effectively so long as the device is operative.

Fourth, to provide a stringed musical instrument adapted to be played manually having an improved pedal controlled automatic tuning device associated therewith for altering the tune of certain of the strings a predetermined precise amount. i

Fifth, to provide an instrument of the type described having the foregoing pitch changing device associated therewith, the said instrument and device being built into a console or cabinet to provide a highly attractive and readily played instrument.

Further objects relating to details and economies of our invention will appear from the de-' scription to follow. The invention is defined in the claims.

A preferred embodiment of the features of our invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawings, wherein:

Fig. l is a rear perspective view illustrating a console type stringed instrument embodying our invention adapted to be manually played and having pedal provision for controlling the pitch or tone changing device associated therewith.

Fig. 2 is an enlarged fragmentary top plan view of the instrument of Fig. l with the automatic tuning housing associated therewith removed in order to illustrate the construction and arrangement of the automatic tuning device of the instrument.

Figs. 3, 4, and 5 are enlarged fragmentary views partially broken away and in section on lines 33, H, and 5-5, respectively, of Fig. 2, illustrating the several elements of the pitch changing or tuning device coacting with certain of the strings of the instrument to alter the pitch thereof during playing.

The present invention relates to improvements in stringed musical instruments, particularly of the guitar type, and more particularly to an automatic tuning instrumentality therefor which is pedal operated by the performer during playing of the instrument to enable the tone or pitch of certain of the strings of the instrument to be altered by altering the tension of those strings. This enables the playing of a wide range of chords without the necessity of manually altering the tuning of the instrument by the usual tuning posts or keys. Furthermore,- the invention concerns the provision of such an automatically tunable instrument mounted in console style with readily operable pedal means for effecting the desired tuning during playing which console conceals the lower part of the operator's body, the strings of the instrument being disposed across the top of the console for ready manipulation by the performer in playing.

Referring to the drawings, in Fig. 1 we indicate the console or cabinet for the musical instrument of our invention by the reference numeral I, this console being enclosed on its front and sides and having a top 2 upon which the vibrating strings of the instrument are mounted. The rear of the console is open to receive the feet of the performer in operating the pedal control 3, the function of which will be hereinafter referred to, and it will be perceived that I have provided an instrument mounting which is highly attractive in appearance and which enables the playing of the'instrument with the utmost ease.

The strings for the instrument, generally designated l, are disposed longitudinally acrossa suitable fretted surface 5 on the console top and are tunably secured at one end to the post or keys 6. These posts or keys and the coacting parts therefor are mounted in a suitable recess 1 in the top surface of the console and are manipulated in the usual manner to initially tune the instrument.

The reference numeral 8 designates a suitable electromagnet pickup having pole pieces 9 disposed beneath the strings for electromagnetic re-' production of the tones produced thereby in vibrating, the pickup being controlled by the volume and tone control members II. The construction and operation of the aforesaid electromagnetic means do not constitute part of the present invention, hence are not illustrated in further detail.

Immediately adjacent the pickup I and on the side thereof opposite the fret surface I, table 2 has set into the upper surface thereof and secured thereto as by screws a base plate Ii for the automatic tuning device, which is indicated in general by the reference numeral l2. Details of this device are illustrated with particularity in Figs. 2, 3, 4, and 5.

Referring to Fig. 2. it will be noted that a group of four of the strings of the instrument, designated it, have the ends thereof anchored in forks or slots it in a suitable tailpiece bar ll secured to or integral with base plate Ii, these strings ll passing over an upstanding bridge I I integral with said base. The tuning device I! of our invention is not operative on these four strings, which are tuned solely by manipulation of the tuning posts I in a conventional manner. The other three strings II, II, and It. in addition to being initially tuned by the tuning posts 0, are connected to the automatic device I! in order to enable the tone or pitch of any one thereof to be altered in playing in the manner to be described. Thus, in the embodiment illustrated, string il may be manipulated during playing to increase or decrease its tension and thereby pitch the same a half tone above or below its initially tuned tone; string Il may be manipulated by the performer to increase its pitch a full tone above initial tuning; and string is may be manipulated to decrease its pitch a full tone lower than the initial tuning. This enables the playing of a wide variety of chords without unduly or obiectionably increasing the number of strings and resultant complexity of playing. Suitable operating connections to pedal control I are provided to eii'ect the foregoing string tension alterations so that the range of the instrument is rendered indeed wide and the playing thereof facilitated.

Referring to Fig. 3, wherein the tuning elements for string I! are illustrated, the reference numeral 2| denotes a fixed transverse pin preferably secured to the anchoring bar II, on which pin the respective tuning levers 2|, 2!, 21 for strings II, II, II are pivoted. Each of these levers has an upwardly extending bridge nose ll over which the string is disposed and is provided with a laterally opening arcuate recess 28 on the side thereof having an enlargement 28 at its end adjacent the forward extremity of the lever to receive the string and an anchoring element II at its end. Thus, it will be preceived that each of the noses '24 serves as a bridge over which its respective string is snubbed, and that when the lever 2|, 2!, II are rocked in one direction or another the tension of the respective strings is instantaneously altered. It should be noted in particular that this tension altering action is transmitted directly to the strings l'l, ll, II, which do not rest on any further fixed bridge member of any sort likely to interfere with or otherwise affect the accuracy and speed of the string tensioning action.

As illustrated in Figs. 4 and 5. each of the levers 22, 23 has a downwardly extending abutment 2! engageable with base H to limit the counterclockwise movement of the lever under he tension of the string associated therewith. This may be omitted in the case of the lever II shown in Fig. 8, or alternatively. an rbutment of lens thickness employed, for the reason that. as pointed out above, string I1 is intended to have the tension thereof either increased or diminished, hence lever II must be free to rockfrom the initial position thereof corresponding to the normally tuned tension of string II in either clockwise or counterclockwise direction under the influence of the tension controlling instrumentalities to be described. In any event. however, lever II will engage the base to limit its counterclockwise movement to the amount requisite to alter the tension of string I! by loosening the same.

Referring to Fig. 3, the lever II has a rearwardly extending elongated arm 2| having a laterally extending horizontal slot 80 at its rear extremity. This slot is slidably engageable with apinll whichisfixedtoandextendstransversely of the forked head of a vertically extending lever actuating plunger 32. Plunger 8! is mounted for vertical sliding movement in a hollow guide tube or sleeve It secured to and extending beneath base plate I I, the plunger having secured thereto the actuating element 34 of a flexible cable it which is connected to one of the pedals ii of the pedal control I. A cell compression spring I! disposed in the sleeve in surrounding relation to the plunger abuts at one end an enlarged shoulder II on the latter and at the other end the annular end wall in the sleeve. thereby serving to urge the plunger upwardly and rock lever II in counterclockwise direction.

The lever rocking tendency of plunger 82 is counteracted and balanced in the normal tuned condition of string II by means of a further similar plunger ll mounted directly to the rear of plunger I! in a sleeve ll which is similar to sleeve II and similarly mounted on the base plate Ii. Plunger II has a forked head provided with apinll engageableinaslot If at therearend of a rocker arm ll, which arm is pivoted on a fixedpinllcarriedbyapairofrearwardlydisposed vertical posts ll on the base plate. see Figs. 2 and 3. At its forward end rocker arm it carries a roller it having rolling engagement with the rearwardly extending arm 2| of lever Ii. Sleeve ll, like sleeve 33. has a coil spring 41 therein normally urging the plunger 8| upwardly andthelatterislikewise connectedtoapedalcontrolled flexible cable II in the same manner as described above.

By the foregoing provisions, it will be appreciated that spring 41 serves to urge plunger 3! upwardly and rock arm 43 counterclockwise. whereby the roller 40 thereon biases lever II in a clockwise direction and thereby counteracts and balances the effect of plunger 32 to urge the same in counterclockwise direction. These two instrumentalities acting on lever ll serve to balance and maintain the latter in the normal neutral position thereof when string i1 is in initially tuned condition as described above.

A stop screw it threadedly engaged with a rear post I! on the base plate is engageable with a rear extension II on pivoted arm 43 to adiustably limit the counterclockwise rocking thereof and the extent to which the rocker shifts lever II in clockwise direction, while a further screw ll threadedly engaged with lever arm 2' and provided with concealing stop sleeve II is utilized to limit the clockwise rotation of lever ll by engaging the base plate Ii.

In the above we have provided a balanced adjustable bridge at 24 for the string II, the

cameos string being snubbed around the bridge and anchored at 28 and the spring urged plungers 32, 88 normally acting oppositely on the bridge carrying lever 21 to maintain the proper tuned tension on the aforesaid string. Either of the plungers 32, 89 is retractable downwardly by the manipulation of an appropriate pedal 88 to either increase or diminish the tension of spring I! and thereby, raise or lower the pitch thereof one-half tone and enable the playing of numerous chords as desired.

In Fig. 4 we illustrate the string tensioning elements for the second automatically tunable string l8 which is trained over the bridge nose 24 of lever 22 and anchored as described. Lever 22 has a rearwardly extending arm 53 pivoted by a slot therein on a pin 54 carried by the forked head of plunger 85, this plunger being spring urged upwardly in identical fashion to that described above in connection with the plungers 32, 28, and being likewise pedal controlled in a similar manner. -In this case the maximum counterclockwise string loosening movement of lever 22 is determined by the engagement of the foot or abutment 28 with base plate II, it being understood that the lever 22 and nose 24 thereon are in this last named position (illustrated in solid lines in Fig. 4) when the string I8 is in its normally tuned position. Actuation of plunger 85 serves to rock the lever to dotted line position and increase the tension and pitch of string l8 a full tone above its normally tuned pitch for the selective increase in the range of the instrument described. A suitable adjustment stop 58 is carried by lever 22 to determine the extent of clockwise rotation.

In Fig. 5 we illustrate provisions for automatically changing the pitch of the third controllable string I9, consisting of a rocker arm I! pivoted on the above described pivot pin 48 carried by posts 45 and provided at its forward end with a roller 58 engageable with the rear end 89 of lever 23. At its own rear end the arm 51 is pivoted on a pin 80 carried by the forked head of a pedal-controlled plunger 8i similar to plungers 32, 39 and 55, this plunger being mounted similarly for spring biasing upwardly by a spring 62 in the sleeve 83. In this case the sleeve has an extension 84 projecting above the base plate to limit the downward movement of the plunger head. Obviously, a

spring 82 serves under normal conditions to maintain pivoted arm 51 and lever 23 in the position illustrated in dotted lines in Fig. 5 and thereby maintain string I9 in its normal tuned tension, while in the pedal-controlled downwardly actuated position of the plunger 8| the parts are shifted to the position illustrated in dotted lines to decrease the string tension and lower the pitch of the string IS a full tone. The stop 88 on lever 23 limits the clockwise rotation thereof and the counterclockwise rotation is limited by foot or abutment 28 in the manner described above.

From the foregoing it is believed that the manner of manipulation of the foregoing string tension controlling instrumentalities by the performer in playing the instrument will be obvious. By suitably controlling the pedals 38, it is possible to raise or lower the pitch of string II a half tone, to raise the pitch of string l8 a full tone, or to lower the pitch of string IS a full tone. These manipulations vastly increase the range of the instrument and enable the playing of a great number of chords without, however, increasing the number of strings.

We desire in particular to point out that by snubbing the strings I1, l8, I! about the nose 28 of the respective levers 2|, 22, 22 and employing the said nose as a bridge, dispensing with the conventional bridges heretofore provided and relied on in all comparable tuning devices of which we are aware, we enable any one of the said strings to be immediately and accurately altered in pitch as described. The presence of the usual stationary bridge lnassoclation with a string tensioning mechanism greatly detracts from its effectiveness by rendering non-uniform the tension of the string between the said bridge and the conventional tuning keys and automatic instrumentality, respectively. With such instruments it is simply impossible to effect the instantaneous automatic alteration of the pitch of the string with accuracy. The pitch shifts unavoidably and unprethroughout the full length and without sliding on a bridge to the exact and proper degree for the desired. altered tone, being otherwise maintained in the precise initially tuned pitch determined by the setting of the tuning keys 5.

The provisions which we have described above are admirably adapted for incorporation in the console type instrument illustrated in Fig. 1, wherein the manipulations of the performer's feet in controlling pedals 88 are concealed from the audience and a highly attractive effect is obtained.

We have illustrated and described our improvements in an embodiment which we have found highly satisfactory and practical. we have not attempted to illustrate or describe other embodiments which we contemplate as we believe this disclosure will enable the embodiment of our invention by those skilled in the art as may be desired.

Having thus described the invention what is claimed as new and desired to secure by Letters Patent is:

l. A pitch changing device for a musical instrument having a plurality of strings adjustably tensioned for tuning by keysat one end thereof. said device comprising-\a support having a fixed bridge thereon for anchoring the other end of certain of the strings, a plurality of levers, one for each remaining string, pivotally mounted on said support at one side," of said bridge, each of said levers having an upwardly extending bridge nose, a rearwardly extending string snubbing surface adjoining the nose about which the string associated therewithgis disposed, and

means for receiving and anchoring the adjacent end of the string whereby pivotal movement of any of said levers rocks the nose and alters the tension of the corresponding string, said noses alone supporting and tensioning the respective strings throughout the entire effective length thereof up to said keys, a plurality of plungers mounted on said support for vertical sliding movement and operatively connected with said levers, and pedal operated means associated with the plungers for actuating the same.

2. A pitch changing device for a musical instrument having a plurality of strings fixedly secured at one end thereof, said device comprising a support, a plurality of levers, one for each string, pivotally mounted on said support, each of said levers having an upwardly extending bridge nose, a rearwardly extending string snubbing surface adJoining the nose about which the string associated therewith is disposed, and means for receiving and anchoring the adjacent end of the string whereby pivotal movement of any of said levers rocks the nose and alters the tension of the corresponding string, said noses alone supporting and tensioning the respective strings throughout the entire effective length thereof up to said keys, a plurality of plungers mounted on said support for vertical sliding movement and operatively connected with said levers, and pedal operated means associated with the plungers for actuating the same.

3. A pitch changing device for a musical instrument having a plurality of strings fixedly secured at one end thereof, said device comprising a support, a plurality of levers, one for each string, pivotally mounted on said support, each of said levers having an upwardly extending bridge nose, at rearwardly extending string snubbing surface adjoining the nose about which the string associated therewith is disposed, and means for receiving and anchoring the adjacent end of the string whereby pivotal movement of any of said levers rocks the nose and alters the tension of the corresponding string, said noses alone supporting and tensioning the respective strings throughout the entire eifective length thereof up to said securing means and having stop elements on the bottom thereof engageable with the support to limit movement of the levers under the tension of the string secured thereto, and means for pivotally actuating said levers during playing of the instrument.

4. A pitch changing device for a stringed musical instrument comprising a plurality of strings provided with tuning keys at one end thereof. said device comprising a fixed bridge element for certain of said strings, a bridge element for each of a plurality of other strings pivotally mounted on said support, said pivoted bridge elements being provided with eccentrically disposed noselike string rests over which the strings are disposed, the strings being anchored to their respective pivotally mounted bridge elements so that tension of such strings is varied with pivotal movement of the bridge elements, said bridge elements being provided with laterally projecting arms, adjustable strops for said arms, manually operable means including foot levers for actuating said arms in one direction, and stop elements on the forward edge of certain of said string rests engageable with said support to limit movement of the bridge element under the tension of the string.

5. A tune changing device for a musical instrument having a plurality of strings connected to anchoring means at one end thereof, said device comprising a support having a fixed bridge thereon for supporting and anchoring the other end of the strings, a plurality of levers, one for each remaining string, pivotally mounted on said support, each of said levers having an upwardly extending bridge member over which the corresponding string is disposed, means on the levers for receiving and anchoring the adjacent end of said string whereby pivotal movement of any of said levers rocks the bridge member and alters the tension of the corresponding string, said members alone supporting the respective strings throughout the entire eifective length thereof up to said first named anchoring means, certain of said members having stop elements on the bottom aasmos movementthereofimderthetension oftherespective strings, spring means associated with the levers for normally urging the same in one direction, and pedal operated means operatively connected with the levers for actuating the same in the opposite direction during p n of the instrument.

6. A time changing device for a musical instrument having a plurality of strings connected to anchoring means at one end thereof, said device comprising a support having a fixed bridge thereon for supporting and anchoring the other end of the strings. a plurality of levers, one for each remaining string, pivotally mounted on said support, each of said levers having an upwardly extending bridge member over which the corresponding string is disposed, means on the levers for receiving and anchoring the adjacent end of said string whereby pivotal movement of any of said levers rocks the bridge member and alters the tension of the corresponding string. said members alone supporting the respective strings throughout the entire effective length thereof up to said first named anchoring means. certain of said members having stop elements on the bottom thereof engageable with said support to limit movement thereof under the tension of the respective strings, and pedal operated means operatively connected with the levers for actuating the same during playing of the instrument.

7. A tune changing device for a musical instrument having a plurality of strings connected to anchoring means at one end thereof, said device comprising a support, means for supporting and anchoring the other end of thestrings including a lever pivotally mounted on said support having an upwardly extending bridge member over which one of the strings is dispom, means on the lever for receiving and anchoring the adjacent end of said string whereby pivotal movement of said lever rocks the bridge member and alters the tension of the corresponding string, said member alone supporting the string throughout the entire effective length thereof up 5 to said first named anchoring means, said member having a stop element thereon engageable with said support to limit movement of the member under the tension of the string, and means operatively connected with the lever for actuating the same during playing of the instrument.

8. In a tuning device for a stringed musical instrument having a plurality of strings fixedly anchored at one end, a support having a lever pivotally mounted thereon, said lever having an upwardly extending bridge member over which one of said strings is snubbingly disposed and having means for receiving and anchoring the adjacent end of said string, said string being tensioned in its effective length solely by its fixed anchor and said adjustable bridge member, said lever having a rearwardly extending arm actuable to alter the tension of the string and a downwardly projecting stop adjacent the forward side of the bridge member engageable with the support to limit movement of the lever under the tension of the string.

9. In a tuning device for a stringed musical instrument having a plurality of strings fixedly anchored at one end, a support having a lever pivotally mounted thereon, said lever having an upwardly extending bridge member over which one of said strings is disposed and having means for receiving and anchoring the adjacent end of said string, said string being tensioned in its efiective thereof engageable with said support to limit length solely by its fixed anchor and said adjust- -member for a string pivotally mounted on said able bridge member, said lever having a rearwardly extending arm actuable to alter the tension of the string and a downwardly projecting stop adjacent the forward side of the bridge member engageable with the supportito limit movement of the lever under the tension of the string.

10. In a tuning device for a stringed musical instrument having a plurality of strings fixedly anchored at one end, a support having alever pivotally mounted thereon, said lever having an ll. pitch changing device for stringed musi-n cal instruments comprising a plurality of strings provided with tuning keys at one end thereof, said device comprising individual bridge members for said strings rockably mounted on said support, said strings being anchored to their respective bridge member whereby on the rocking of the bridge member of a particular string the tension of the string is varied without sliding action of the string on its bridge member, means for normally maintaining the rockabie bridge members in initially tuned pomtion, and manually operated means for selectively rocking said bridge members, said bridge members having stops thereon engageable with said support to limit movement thereof under the tension 0! the strings.

12. A pitch changing device for stringed musical instruments comprising a support, a bridge support, said string being anchored to said bridge so that on the rocking of the bridge member the tension of the string is varied without sliding movement of the string on its bridge member,

and manually operated means for rocking said bridge member on its pivot for varying the pitch of the string, said bridge member having a stop element on the lower forward edge thereof engageable with said support to limit movement of the bridge member under the tension of the string.

1 3. In a tuning device for a musical instrument having a string fixedly anchored at one end and adapted to be adjustably anchored at the other end for altering of the tension and pitch thereof, a support at the last named end of the string, a lever pivoted on said support, having means for anchoring the string end adjacent the same and an bflset string engaging and tensioning portion, a pedal-actuated control member mounted on said support and connected to said lever for rocking said portion to alter the tension of the string, a second pedal-actuated control member mounted on said support, said members having spring means coacting therewith to urge the same in a direction opposite to the direction of pedal actuation thereof, and an arm pivoted on said support-and operatively connected to said second member, said arm being operatively engageable with said lever. said first spring urged member and said arm acting oppositely on said lever to resiliently urge the same to and main- WIILIAMLMILIB.

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Cited By (19)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2459102A (en) * 1947-01-25 1949-01-11 Newton J Adair Musical instrument
US2467086A (en) * 1949-04-12 Stringed musical instrument
US2487192A (en) * 1946-05-24 1949-11-08 Walter E Smith Attachment for stringed musical instruments
US2519044A (en) * 1948-08-14 1950-08-15 Herbert M Hise Stringed musical instrument
US2573963A (en) * 1949-07-07 1951-11-06 Gibson Inc Pitch changing mechanism for stringed musical instruments
US2613283A (en) * 1948-12-09 1952-10-07 Alertronic Protective Corp Of Vibration transducer assembly
US2662439A (en) * 1950-11-14 1953-12-15 Floyd B Snodgrass Guitar tuning device
US2893282A (en) * 1955-06-20 1959-07-07 Thomas F Searles Tone varying attachment for a string musical instrument
US2949806A (en) * 1958-09-08 1960-08-23 Thomas B Turman Individual string tone changer for guitars
US3136198A (en) * 1961-10-13 1964-06-09 Smith Robert Irvin Tone changer for electric steel pedal guitars
US3163073A (en) * 1961-10-09 1964-12-29 John F Elmore Electric guitar
US3352188A (en) * 1963-07-17 1967-11-14 Columbia Broadcasting Syst Inc String mounting for steel pedal guitars
US3435722A (en) * 1964-08-05 1969-04-01 Kenneth V Paul Stringed musical instrument
US3440920A (en) * 1966-11-01 1969-04-29 Paul J Norwood String tension adjustment device for stringed instrument
US3447413A (en) * 1965-03-18 1969-06-03 Emmons Guitar Co Inc Guitar tone changing device
US4080865A (en) * 1976-11-26 1978-03-28 Gfell Edward B Pitch varying apparatus
US4147086A (en) * 1977-09-01 1979-04-03 Cough Jr Roy L Guitar
US4549461A (en) * 1982-03-15 1985-10-29 Rose Floyd D Apparatus for restraining and fine tuning the strings of a musical instrument, particularly guitars
US4677891A (en) * 1985-01-31 1987-07-07 Fender Musical Instruments Corporation Tremolo bridge for guitars

Cited By (19)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2467086A (en) * 1949-04-12 Stringed musical instrument
US2487192A (en) * 1946-05-24 1949-11-08 Walter E Smith Attachment for stringed musical instruments
US2459102A (en) * 1947-01-25 1949-01-11 Newton J Adair Musical instrument
US2519044A (en) * 1948-08-14 1950-08-15 Herbert M Hise Stringed musical instrument
US2613283A (en) * 1948-12-09 1952-10-07 Alertronic Protective Corp Of Vibration transducer assembly
US2573963A (en) * 1949-07-07 1951-11-06 Gibson Inc Pitch changing mechanism for stringed musical instruments
US2662439A (en) * 1950-11-14 1953-12-15 Floyd B Snodgrass Guitar tuning device
US2893282A (en) * 1955-06-20 1959-07-07 Thomas F Searles Tone varying attachment for a string musical instrument
US2949806A (en) * 1958-09-08 1960-08-23 Thomas B Turman Individual string tone changer for guitars
US3163073A (en) * 1961-10-09 1964-12-29 John F Elmore Electric guitar
US3136198A (en) * 1961-10-13 1964-06-09 Smith Robert Irvin Tone changer for electric steel pedal guitars
US3352188A (en) * 1963-07-17 1967-11-14 Columbia Broadcasting Syst Inc String mounting for steel pedal guitars
US3435722A (en) * 1964-08-05 1969-04-01 Kenneth V Paul Stringed musical instrument
US3447413A (en) * 1965-03-18 1969-06-03 Emmons Guitar Co Inc Guitar tone changing device
US3440920A (en) * 1966-11-01 1969-04-29 Paul J Norwood String tension adjustment device for stringed instrument
US4080865A (en) * 1976-11-26 1978-03-28 Gfell Edward B Pitch varying apparatus
US4147086A (en) * 1977-09-01 1979-04-03 Cough Jr Roy L Guitar
US4549461A (en) * 1982-03-15 1985-10-29 Rose Floyd D Apparatus for restraining and fine tuning the strings of a musical instrument, particularly guitars
US4677891A (en) * 1985-01-31 1987-07-07 Fender Musical Instruments Corporation Tremolo bridge for guitars

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