US3154996A - Musical instrument - Google Patents

Musical instrument Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US3154996A
US3154996A US21838A US2183860A US3154996A US 3154996 A US3154996 A US 3154996A US 21838 A US21838 A US 21838A US 2183860 A US2183860 A US 2183860A US 3154996 A US3154996 A US 3154996A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
instrument
instruments
vibrato
air column
varying
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US21838A
Inventor
Joseph J Krilanovich
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Individual
Original Assignee
Individual
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Individual filed Critical Individual
Priority to US21838A priority Critical patent/US3154996A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US3154996A publication Critical patent/US3154996A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10DSTRINGED MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; WIND MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACCORDIONS OR CONCERTINAS; PERCUSSION MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; AEOLIAN HARPS; SINGING-FLAME MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G10D7/00General design of wind musical instruments
    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10DSTRINGED MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; WIND MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACCORDIONS OR CONCERTINAS; PERCUSSION MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; AEOLIAN HARPS; SINGING-FLAME MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G10D9/00Details of, or accessories for, wind musical instruments

Definitions

  • This invention relates to musical instruments and more particularly to a novel musical instrument construction incorporating powered means for imparting vibrato to the produced notes of the instrument thereby automatically adding warmth and beauty of tone without efiort on the part of the musician.
  • musical wind instruments of the type depending on the vibration of a volume of air to produce musical notes have characteristic timbre due to the harmonics caused by their construction, the material of which they are made, and the manner in which the air column is set into vibration.
  • the characteristic timbre of an instrument is constant though differing slightly in many instruments of the same kind, and in some according to the pitch of the note being played. In some instruments the timbre is not pleasing to the car at certain frequencies played, and various means have been suggested, such as auxiliary slides manipulatable by the player to improve such imperfect notes.
  • each instrument includes a vibrato accessory having an air passage forming part of the instrument air passage but differing there from is being variable in length over a range eilective to produce the desired variation in tone pitch.
  • the produced variation in tone pitch fluctuates uniformly over a frequency less than that required to play the next adjacent note and found eifective to enliven the music and to produce the most pleasing vibrato.
  • the vibrato accessory for each instrument is connected through suitable, flexible operating means to a common driving motor, it being pointed out that the vibrato devices of the several instruments may be operated in synchronized phase, opposed phase relation or in ever-changing phase 3,1543% Patented Nov. 3, 1964 relation, as desired.
  • a foot-operated control effective to change the speed of the power source may also be operated to vary the frequency with which the air columns of each instrument are varied to produce the vibrato.
  • the driving connection between the power source and the vibrato devices of each instrument includes means for varying the phase relationship of the several vibrato devices to the end that a highly pleasing and realistic phase relationship may exist between the vibratos of the several instruments.
  • unusually pleasing vibrato effects are obtained by arranging the vibrato devices of a pair of similar instruments to operate in a predetermined timed relationship with one another and preferably in phase opposition, that is, with one instrument playing the sharp phase of the note while the second instrument is playing the flat phase of this same note.
  • the phase coordinated vibrato devices for a pair of instruments form part of the supporting structure for the instruments proper, the latter being arranged to support the mouthpiece and the keys in a comfortable and convenient position for the musician.
  • Another object of the invention is the provision of a wind musical instrument incorporating therein simple and effective power-actuated means effective to shorten and lengthen at a predetermined frequency the air column of the instrument to impart a pleasing variation in the frequency of the note being played and commonly known as vibrato.
  • Another object of the invention is the provision of a plurality of power-operated vibrato devices arranged to be driven from a common power source, each device being associated with a different wind instrument and operable to impart a vibrato effect on the notes produced without effort on the part of the musician and featuring means for continuously changing the phase relationship of the vibrato of the several wind instruments relative to one another.
  • Another object of the invention is the provision of a plurality of wind instruments arranged in pairs with each pair incorporating a vibrato device eifective to superimpose vibratos on each of a given pair of instruments which vibratos are in predetermined out-of-phase rela tion to one another and including means for continuously varying the operating phase relationships of two or more pairs of said instruments.
  • Another object of the invention is the provision of a power-operated vibrato device for incorporation in the air column of a wind instrument and operable to change the length of the air column to vary pleasingly the frequency of a note being played, the device including means for varying the frequency with which the length of the air column is changed.
  • Another object of the invention is the provision of vibrato devices of the kind described and including control means by which sections of wind instruments fitted to the vibrato devices in a band or orchestra may be separatel controlled to the end that certain instruments may be played with vibrato while the instruments of other sections are played without vibrato through certain passages of the music at the will of the conductor or person in control.
  • FIGURE 1 is a general perspective view of one preferred embodiment of the invention showing several typical wind instruments each provided with the vibrato device of this invention and with each being coupled through flexible power transmitting means to a common power source;
  • FIGURE 2 is a longitudinal sectional view on an enlarged scale through one of the vibrato devices shown in FIGURE 1;
  • FIGURE 3 is a cross-sectional view taken on line 3-3 .011 FIGURE 2;
  • FIGURE 4 is an elevational view of a modified embodiment of the vibrato device with portions broken away and showing the driving motor mounted directly on the device itself;
  • FIGURE 5 is a longitudinal sectional view on an enlarged scale taken along line 55 of FIGURE 4;
  • FIGURE 6 is a schematic diagram of an electrical circuit controlling the operation of another preferred embodiment of the vibrato device utilizing solenoids to operate the same;
  • FIGURE 7 is a longitudinal sectional through a vibrato device employed with the control circuit shown in FIGURE 6;
  • FIGURE 8 is a schematic diagram showing the control circuit for use with the vibrato deviceof FIGURE 7 and by which the vibrato devices of individual sections of the wind instruments of an orchestra may be selectively operated;
  • FIGURE 9 is a perspective view of another preferred embodiment wherein the wind instruments are arranged to be supported in pairs with the vibrato devices of each pair driven by a flexible cable drive by the same motor driving other similar pairs of instruments;
  • FIGURE 10 is a longitudinal sectional view on an enlarged scale taken along line 1tl-1tl on FIGURE 9;
  • FIGURE 11 is a view taken on line l111 on FIG- URE 10;
  • FIGURE 12 is a fragmentary cross sectional view taken along line I2a-l2a on FIGURE 12.
  • FIGURE 13 is a graphical representation of the phase relationship of a single cycle of the means for varying the length or" the air column of a pair of coordinated wind instruments shown in FIGURE 9;
  • FIGURE 14 is a fragmentary sectional view on an enlarged scale taken along line 14-14 on FIGURE 9.
  • the numeral lltl indicates a control box containing mechanical power means such as an electric motor Ill with plug-in cord 12 and on-off switch 13.
  • the motor is fitted with reduction gearing 14 through which it drives a shaft 15 the end of which is supported in a bearing 16.
  • a plurality of shafts 17 extend parallel to shaft 15 and are mounted in suitable bearings in opposite sides of 7 box It It will be understood that the number of shafts will be equal to the number of wind instruments but only three are shown operatively connected, by way of example, to a saxophone, clarinet, and trombone.
  • a belt-driving pulley 18 is mounted on shaft 15 and driven belt pulleys 19, which may all be of one diameter or of different diameters having a definite relation to one another, are mounted on shafts 17.
  • An endless drive belt 20 is mounted on the pulleys 18 and 19 and will rotate all shafts 17 in unison.
  • pulleys 1.9 have diameters which differ by as little as one mil from one another in order that the phase relationshipof the vibrato imparted to the different instruments will change continuously and pleasingly adding to the beauty and realism of the mechanically produced vibrato.
  • Bowden wire flexible drive shafts 21 are secured to one end of each shaft 17 and transmit the rotation of the shafts 17 to the driving element of vibrato devices 22 designed as an accessory attachment adapted to be substituted for a portion of air passage in a wind instrument which devices are shown as identical in construction, although not necessarily so.
  • Vibrato devices 22, as shown in FIGURES 2 and 3, comprise a small lightweight rectangular case 23 formed with laterally projecting tubular sockets adapted to replace a cut-out length of the air tube 25 of an instrument such a the trombone 26 and to seat this air tube upon the opposite sides of the cut-out, or to be positioned between the mouthpiece of a saxophone 2'? or clarinet 2S and the instrument proper.
  • the case 23 may be secured in assembled relation to the instrument in any suitable manner.
  • One side of the case 23 is closed by a plate 29, the case and cover being secured together by registering lugs 3h drilled and tapped to receive small unshown machine screws.
  • a boss 32 is provided which is drilled to serve a a bearing for a shaft 33, the opposite end of the shaft being supported by a bearing 34 formed in a projection on the plate 23.
  • the top of the case 23 may be closed by a top cover 35 held by screws 37.
  • An upper and stationary body member 36 fits closely within the upper part of the case 23 and is secured to the top plate 35 by screw 37, and to the sides of the case by screws 38. It will be noted th t the case 2 3, while only slightly wider than the diameter of the tubular part of the instrument on which it is mounted, is relatively wide transversely of the instrument air column. This is in order that a U-shaped passage 39 may be provided within the case between the sockets or ports 24. The upper half of this passage 39 is formed by the stationary body 35 and its lower half by a cooperating body also fitting closely in the case 23 but slidable therein toward and away from body as.
  • Upper body 35 is provided with a transverse slot 41 opening into passage 39 and open at it end to the e"- terior through a breather hole 35a and a baffle 42 secured to the lower body ill by screws 43 and is arranged to slide in slot 41 and extends transversely of the passage.
  • Baffle l2 cooperates with body it? to form an opening of the same cross-sectional area as passage 3& which connects the portions of that passage upon its opposite sides.
  • Passage 39 is to be understood as being of variable length and may be viewed as having two sections, one upon either side of the baffle i2 and the opening 44' tl'ierethrough. As the body 46 reciprocates relative to the stationary body 36, it will be recognized that the length of the sections of passage 39 as described will alternately increase and decrease thereby varying the length of the instrument air column.
  • Bodydt is reciprocated in case 23 toward and away from body 36 by the rotation of shaft
  • the latter is driven by the suitable flexible shafting as Bowden wire drive shaft Ztl, the non-circular driving head 45 of which fits within a complementally-shaped socizet as formed in the end face of shaft 33, and being retained there by con nector 4'7 detachably screwed onto the threaded boss 32.
  • An eccentric disc St formed integral with the shaft 33 is effective to drive a pitman 51 coupled to body 4i by a wrist pin 5% extending crosswise of notch 55.
  • Pitman 51 has a strap Sla encircling disc 5% which strap includes a groove 52 movable past a hole 53 in the narrower side of case 23 when the eccentric 5 3 is in its mean position thereby enabling the player of the instrument to tune it.
  • peep hole 53 is so located that when groove 52 extends diametrically thereacross, the instrument air column is the mean of its,
  • the rate of reciprocation of body 40 determines the frequency of the vibrato and is dependent on the operating speed of driving motor 11 and the ratio of the speed reduction gear fitted to the motor. Being driven by a cam, its acceleration and deceleration upon approaching and leaving its end positions is in accordance with a sine wave.
  • the musicians tune their instruments in the usual manner after having checked to make certain that the mark or groove 52 on pitman 51 is aligned with the aperture 53 thereby placing passage 3% at its normal or middle length.
  • the devices effective to produce the tone fringe or vibrato do not affect the normal characteristics of the instruments when the parts are positioned as indicated by the alignment of the mark 52 and the aperture 53.
  • Cord 12 of motor 11 is then plugged into an electric outlet and the described equipment i ready to function, motor 11 rotating shafts 17 and flexible shafts 21 to communicate rotary movement to eccentrics t) in devices 22 and cause continuous reciprocation of movable parts it? and 42.
  • a frequency variation of 4 to times per second thereby to produce a variation in sound fre quency, which determines pitch or tone, being over a narrow range selected at will and preferably extending for the same number of cycles above and below the frequency of the note being played.
  • a vibrato frequency of 6 cycles per second is found in practice to provide particularly pleasing effects.
  • the frequency range selected may be within the range of from five hundredths to one and one-half (1 /2) times a step at middle A.
  • the air column as a whole of the instrument is, of course, set into vibration by the player lowing into the instrument through a vibrating reed mouthpiece and the frequency of vibration is controlled by altering the length of the air column by opening and closing with his fingers keys controlling properly located holes in the length of the tubular portion of the instrument.
  • a case 5801 is provided having oppositely extending tubular sockets 59 by which the case may be incorporated into a musical wind instrument as in the first embodiment.
  • the case 53:: is closed by a cover plate tl secured by screws 61 seating in tapped holes drilled in lugs 62 cast on the wall of the case.
  • a pair of downwardly curved lengths of tube 63 and 6d are secured to the inner wall of the case in alignment with the tubular sockets Si by screws @311 and 64a.
  • a body 65 is positioned for smooth sliding movement toward and from tubes 63, 6d and supports a U-shaped tube 66. The upturned ends of the latter telescopically enclose the downturned ends of tubes 63, 64.
  • a first eccentric 68 secured to shaft 69 operates within the eccentrically located circular seat of a second eccentric 7d.
  • the relative angular positions of the eccentrics are adjustable, a selected relationship being retained by a threaded stud 71 screwed into a tapped hole one half of which is formed in the periphery of one eccentric, while the other half is provided by one of a plurality of half bores 72 formed in the periphery of the other circular eccentric.
  • the strap 72a is provided with a threaded boss which connects by a threaded collar 72!; to the threaded end of pitman 72c.
  • Collar 72b is oppositely threaded at its opposite ends and its rotation in one direction effects a lengthening of the pitman while its rotation in the opposite direction decreases that length.
  • individual power drives as, for example, small variable speed electric motors 73 for each device, the motors being mounted in housings 74 secured to the cases 58a.
  • the motors 73 may be connected directly to the current source and then will drive their units individually.
  • the various motors may rotate at the same speeds, if desired, or may be controlled to rotate at different speeds.
  • variable speed motor 75 is supplied with current through an adjustable rheostat 76 which may be connected to a convenient electrical outlet. The speed of the motor may thus be controlled from Zero at the OFF position of the rheostat to a predetermined maximum.
  • the motor 75 rotates a currentconducting shaft 78 through a reduction gear box 77 and a coupling 79 of insulating material.
  • Electric current is supplied to the shaft 7% by a wiper contact 82, and contact blades 83a, 83b, 83c, 83a, 83a and 38;, arranged to rest on the periphery of discs at similar points, conduct the current, as their associated strips 31a, 81b, 81c, 81d, 81:: and Slf reach the blades, through leads 84a, 84b, 84c, 84a, 8412 and 84 to the front series of contacts 35!), 85c, 85d, 85e and 85 of a multiple double throw switch S6.
  • the movable contacts of switch 86 connect to the individual attachment of five different musical instruments, the instrument whose attachment is supplied through contact 851) being shown as a clarinet 87.
  • the actuating current impulses to the instruments will be similarly spaced and the fringing devices will be actuated serially or in predetermined phase relation; rather than simultaneously.
  • FIGURE 7 The modified vibrato construction of FIGURE 7 is adapted to be controlled by the electric circuit shown in FIGURE 6, its case 8% being generally similar to that of the device shown in FIGURE 5.
  • its two downwardly curved tubes @t) and 91 are arranged with one end of each in communication with the laterally extending sockets 92 and 93.
  • U-shaped tube as which fits telescopically over the downturned ends of tubes 92 and 93 is arranged to be reciprocated vertically by a solenoid 95 to which it connects by a stem 96 secured by a screw 98 at its opposite end in a bore in the upper end of the movable core 97 of the solenoid armature.
  • Solenoid $95 is secured to the wall of the case 89a by a small bracket 99 itself attached to the case by screws 100.
  • a coil spring 101 is mounted between the lower end of the solenoid core and the end of the case and acts to hold the core in raised position when the solenoid is de-energized. Under the action of the spring 191 the tubes are telescoped and the air column is shortened. It
  • a second spring 1-52 which is of less strength than spring N71, is arranged to bear downwardly thereon.
  • Spring 10?. is positioned between the upper end of the case 8901 and a seat 193 fixed near the upper end of a rod 164 which rod is aligned with the armature axis of solenoid and secured to the tube M in any suitable manner.
  • the actions of springs Mill and 1&2 are opposed to one another but when the solenoid 5 is tie-energized by switching off the electric current the U-shaped tube will assume a position in which a mark ltlfl on stem as is aligned with an observation opening ms in the wall of the case 89a.
  • the hole 1% provided for observing the midposition of the moving pans also serves as a breather opening.
  • FIGURES 4, 5 and 7 The general manner of operation of the devices shown in FIGURES 4, 5 and 7 is similar to that of the devices shown in FIGURES 2 and 3. in the constructions of FIGURES 4, 5 and 7, however, each instrument is equipped with its own prime mover or electrical actuating means.
  • the units constructed in accordance with the embodiment of FIGURES 4 and 5 are independent of all other units, no means being provided to control the relative positions of the armatures driving motors '74.
  • the vibrato units on the instruments may be operated at will as a group either in synchronism or out of phase with one another by manipulation of the multiple double throw switch
  • the frequency of the tone fringe may be adjusted by adjusting rheostat 76 which controls the speed of driving motor '75.
  • Rheostat '76 also provides for switching off the current to the motor and to the devices so that the instruments may be played without vibrato effect when desired.
  • FIGURE 8 A control unit for this purpose is shown in FIGURE 8 which utilizes the electric motor and switching arrangement described with reference to FIGURE 6, the unit being housed in a control box iii? and having the multiple double pole switch divided into three separate switches ltlti, lttl? and llltl, each controlling a section of instruments.
  • Indicator lights llll, 112 and 113 are connected in a known manner in the circuits operated by the respective switches so'that the conductor can see What form of The lights are preferably arranged to show one color for synchronous vibrato, and another color for out-of-phase vibrato.
  • the wires for the separate instruments are'preferably contained in-cables lid, 15, lid connected to distributor boxes 11?, lid, 119 located in the sections, leads 120, 312i, 122 being connected from the distributor box for a section, to the individual instruments.
  • FIGURES 9 to 14 Still another preferred embodiment of the invention is illustrated in FIGURES 9 to 14 and differs in minor but important respects from the above described embodiments.
  • the common power driving unit ltl is identical with that described in connection with the first preferred embodiment and has a plurality of flexible output shafts Ell only two of which are here shown, these each being connected respectively to independent groups of wind instruments in a manner to be described more fully presently.
  • Powcr'unit lb is provided with the usual service cord 13 connectible to any power outlet as well as a flexible cable 13:"
  • Rheostat 13a is' arranged to maintain the circuit to the driving motor closed at a minimum or normal operating speed unless the operating pedal is depressed thereby gradually adjusting the rheostat to speed up the motor and the output speed of each of the flexible drive shafts Zll'.
  • FIGURE 9 Shown in FIGURE 9 by Way of illustration only are typical wind instruments as a pair of clarinets 28", 28 and a pair of saxophones 27, 2'7.
  • Each pair of wind instruments is illustrated as having their axes extending parallel to one another and rigidly mounted at the opposite ends of the elongated horizontally disposed vibrato devices 2%, 2% supported at a convenient operating height as by suitable legs Bill.
  • the main bodies of the several wind instruments are suitably detachably coupled to outlet fittings carried at the opposite ends of devices 2%. These outlet fittings communicate through air passages of adjustable length within the respective housings with inlet fittings aligned with the outlet openings and detachably seating therein the mouthpieces 22% of the several wind instruments.
  • vibrato device comprises a generally rectangular hollow housing having a removable side plate held in assembled position by screws 2% which are seated in threaded openings in the thiclened central portion of the housing.
  • Portion 2% is provided with a narrow but deep slot open through the side of the housing closed by plate 2 Slidably seated within slot 2% for movement lengthwise of the housing is a smoot ly finished'slide member 2ft) formed with a deep notch Zlll having parallel side walls siidably seating a journal member 212.
  • lournaled in member 212 is a shouldered crank pin threadedly seated in a driving disc Zild oflcenter from the axis or" this disc which is fixed to the end of a shaft Th' shaft is journaled in pair of bearings seated at opposite ends of a hollow vertical boss 2Y7 projectin downwardly from the underside of the housing of vibrat device 2% in the manner best shown in FIGURE 11.
  • flywheel 224 Fixed to the lower end of shaft 215, by key is a flywheel 224.
  • This flywheel is normally enclosed by a cup-shaped cap 225 held in assembled position by screws
  • Flexible shaft 2?. includes a fl xible tubular out housing 23d surrounding an inner iiovden wire or other suitable flexible power shaft havi g a non-circula terminal 232 seated in a complementally-shaped soc t a the end of shaft 215.
  • Shaft 21 is held detachably assem bled to shaft 215 as by a threaded sleeve mating with threads on the threaded hollow boss 235 at the lower end of cap 225.
  • body members 36' are fixedly supported at the opposite ends of the vibrato hollow housing and cooperate with movable members 4h, to provide variable length.
  • tapering air passages lid of the instrument air column and in erconnecting mouthpiece 2% with the main body oi'instru- C f particular significance is the fact that the merit A: generally U-shaped air passages 3% are specially contoured to provide a generally tapering air passage small diameter end of which communicates with a mouthpiece and the larger diameter end of which con teristics of passages 3?, though readily variable in length, will remain consonant and harmonious with those of other portions of the tapering air column of the particular instrument for which the vibrato device has been designed.
  • the operating connection for reciprocating body members dd, 4d to and fro lengthwise of the seating passages therefor formed within the main housing comprises connecting rods 24% ⁇ projecting from the opposite ends of slide members 219.
  • connecting rods 249 have threaded ends mating with threaded openings in the adjacent ends of members 40'.
  • crank pin 213 is in alignment with the axes of connecting rods 240.
  • the left-hand member 40 as viewed in FIGURE 10 is at the left-hand end of its stroke and its associated air passage 39 is of minimum length.
  • the other air passage 39 at the right-hand end of the vibrato device is in its position of maximum length. Accordingly, the note then being played by the instrument at the right-hand end of device 2% will be flat in contrast to the sharp version of the same note then being played by the instrument at the left-hand end of the vibrato device.
  • variable length air passages 39 is generally tubular in shape and of substantially uniform cross-section throughout its length.
  • FIGURE 13 is a graphical representation of the relationship of corresponding single cycles of the movement or" members sit), 4d of one of the vibrato devices for a pair of associated wind instruments, as the pair of saxophones 27' or the pair of clarinets 2s.
  • the horizontal line passing midway between the crests of the two sine waves A and B represents a frequency of 440 cycles, or note A. It is pointed out that the single cycle of one of the members 4%) is 180 degrees out of phase with the corresponding cycle or" member 4 5 at the opposite end of the vibrato device. This 180 degree out-of-phase relationship of the members ill is assured by the constructional details of the vibrato devices and of the common driving connection for varying the respective length of the two air columns.
  • variable length passages 39 for one instrument will be at its minimum length simultaneously with the maximum extension of passage 39' for the other instrument of that pair of instruments. All other relative adjustments of the length of the two passages are similarly coordinated and positively maintained in this relationship by reason of the constant speed rotation of the power connection to. slide 210. It ,will therefore be recognized from FIGURE 13 that when a given pair of instruments play a specific note, the sweep of the vibrato of one instrument will be flat while the sweep of the vibrato on the other instrument will be sharp.
  • housing 225 is provided with an elongated slot 2% opposite the periphery of flywheel 2Z4. Slot 256 is sufficiently long as to permit the musician to contact the flywheel with his finger and rotate it until the vertical indicator mark 251 is in vertical alignment with an arrow 252 placed on the outer face of housing 225. Mark 251 and arrow 252, when aligned, provide assurance that members ill of the id vibrato device are in their neutral positions midway between their opposite extreme positions.
  • pulleys 19 (FIGURE 1) at the power input ends of the shafts are of slightly difierent diameters, as is preferred, it will be recognized that the respective shafts will rotate at very slightly different speeds thereby automatically varying the phase relationship of the vibratos produced by one pair of instruments with respect to other pairs of instruments. This feature adds greatly to the realism and naturalness of the enlivened music and avoids creating any impression or suggestion that the vibrato has a mechanical origin.
  • connecting rods 24% interconnecting slide Zltl and the movable element 49' of each vibrato are here shown as rigid rods, it will be appreciated that these rods may be replaced by Bowden wires suitably encased in flexiole cables to the end that the vibrato devices at the outer ends of each Bowden wire may be coupled directly to the instrument in the manner shown in FlGURE 1 without risk of the two instruments so connected to a common slide 210 operating in other than a desired predetermined phase relationship.
  • a pair of associated wind instruments may be supported by the musician in the normal manner without need for or reliance on a tripod or other rigid support.
  • Wind instruments include a plurality of sets of instruments each incorporating said means for varying the length of the instrument air column independently of the musician playing each particular instrument and each connected for actuation from continuously driven power means, said power driven means including means for operating the air column varying means of the instruments in each or" at least two sets of instruments in predetermined phase relationship to one another.
  • a plurality of duplicate vibrato devices for use on similar Wind-type musical instruments and operable when inserted between the opposite ends of the air columns of such instruments to impart a vibrato frequency to the note played by the instrument, said devices each comprising a housing having an air passage extending therethrough and opening through opposed sides of said housing, means movably mounted within said housing for varying the axial length of said air passage without obstructing the flow of air therethrough, and power driven means connected to said last named means operable to drive the same continuously at a predetermined constant speed and effective to increase and decrease the length of said air passage at the same rate over both halves of an operating cycle starting from a mid-length position of the air passage thereby to vary the frequency of the note producible by the midlength position of the air passage slightly above and slightly below said midlength frequency as the length of said column is alternately increased and decreased with respect to said midlength position, said duplicate vibrato devices being characterized in the provision of duplicate housings having duplicate variable length air passages therethrough each adapted for insertion in the air column
  • a device for imparting a continuous tone variation to wind musical instruments comprising: a case secured to a tubular part of the instrument enclosing the air column thereof; a first part immovably secured in the case; a second part mounted in the case for movement toward and from the first part, the first and second parts being formed to provide Within the case a portion of the tubular enclosure of the air column of the instrument; a shaft rotatably mounted in said case; an eccentric mounted on said shaft and operatively connected to the second part; and an electric motor effective to rotate ai shaft to continuously and alternately move the sec- 0nd part toward the first part to shorten the portion of the air column within the case, and to move the second part away from the first part to lengthen the portion of the air column Within the case so as to cause the notes played by the instrument to have frequency alternately greater than and less than the standard frequency of the notes.
  • a device for imparting a continuous tone variation to wind musical instruments comprising: a case secured to a tubular part of the instrument enclosing the air column thereof; a first part immovably secured in the case; a second part mounted in the case for movement toward and from the first part, the first and second parts being formed to provide within the case a portion of the tubular enclosure of the air column of the instrument; a shaft rotatably mounted in said case; an eccentric mounted on said shaft and opera-tively connected to the second part;
  • an electric motor positioned at a location spaced from said instrument; and a flexible drive shaft connected to the shaft of the electric motor and to the shaft mounted in the case, whereby the second part is continuously and alternately moved toward and from the first part to vary the length of the air column and cause the notes played by the instrument to have a frequency alternately greater than and less than the standard frequency of the notes played by the instrument.
  • a device for imparting a continuous tone variation to wind musical instruments comprising: a case secured to a tubular part of the instrumcntenclosing the air column thereof; a first part immovably secured in the case; a second part mounted in the case for movement toward and trom the first part, the first'and second parts being formed to provide within the case a portion or the tubular enclosure of the air column of the instrument; a slot formed in the first part and a battle secured in the second part and extending into said slot,'said baffie being provided adjacent the second part with an orifice, the construction being such that movement of the second part toward the first is effective to shorten the air column and movement of the second part away from the first part is effective to lengthen the air column, the cross-section of the air column remaining 7 substantially unchanged; a shaft rotatably mounted in said case; an eccentric mounted onsaid shaft;' an' eccentric strap surrounding said eccentric and provided with a mark thereon, the case being provided with an aperture through which the mark is visible; a rod secured
  • a device for imparting a continuous tone variation to a plurality of wind musical instruments comprising: a case secured to a tubular part of each instrument enclosing the air column thereof; a first part immovably secured in the case; a second part mounted in the case for movement toward and from the first part, the first and second parts being formed to provide within the case a portion of the tubular enclosure of the air column of the instrument; a shaft rotatably mounted in said case; an eccentric mounted on said shaft and operatively connected to the second part; an electric motor positioned at a location spaced from a plurality of said musical instruments; a plurality of shafts rotated in unison by said motor; and flexible drive shafts connected between each of said shafts and the drive shaft rotatably mounted in the case secured to each instrument, whereby the second part is continuously and alternately moved toward and from the first part to vary the length of the air column in the instrument, independently of the variation of the length thereof efiTected by the players, to cause the notes played by the instruments to

Landscapes

  • Physics & Mathematics (AREA)
  • Engineering & Computer Science (AREA)
  • Acoustics & Sound (AREA)
  • Multimedia (AREA)
  • Electrophonic Musical Instruments (AREA)

Description

Nov. 3, 1964 J; J. KRILANOVICH MUSICAL INSTRUMENT 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed April 12, 1960 I09 us as LIVE/N :21
am y 7 m 5J- 3, 1964 J. J. KRILANOVICH 3,154,996
MUSICAL INSTRUMENT Filed April 12, 1960 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 UOS'EO/I u. me/znA/owcw,
INVENTOR.
1964 J. J. KRILANOVICH 3,154,996
MUSICAL INSTRUMENT Filed April 12, 1960 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 S M um a i. i Z d wez y w 2 0 j 0 J 2 m pa 5 .4 a I a w I F m 2 i 5 g m w a w m 4*.
Her-- 1964 J. J. KRILANOVICH MUSICAL INSTRUMENT 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed April 12 1960 IN VEN TOR.
.4 17%,"?! u v I In United States Patent 3,1543% MUICAL INSTRUMENT Joseph J. Krilanovich, 6324 Lanirershirn Blvd, North Hoiiywood, Qalif. Fiied Apr. 12, 1969, Ser. No. 21,838 Claims. (Cl. 84-4191) This invention relates to musical instruments and more particularly to a novel musical instrument construction incorporating powered means for imparting vibrato to the produced notes of the instrument thereby automatically adding warmth and beauty of tone without efiort on the part of the musician.
This application is a continuation-in-part of my copending application for United States Letters Patent Serial No. 173,098, filed July 11, 1950, now abandoned, for Musical Instrument.
As is well understood, musical wind instruments of the type depending on the vibration of a volume of air to produce musical notes have characteristic timbre due to the harmonics caused by their construction, the material of which they are made, and the manner in which the air column is set into vibration. The characteristic timbre of an instrument is constant though differing slightly in many instruments of the same kind, and in some according to the pitch of the note being played. In some instruments the timbre is not pleasing to the car at certain frequencies played, and various means have been suggested, such as auxiliary slides manipulatable by the player to improve such imperfect notes.
It has long been known that the Warmth and beauty of tone of a musical instrument is obtainable by imparting a low frequency change in the pitch of a note slightly above and slightly below the true frequency of the note thereby rendering the played note alternately slightly sharp and slightly flat. This pleasing change of note pitch from the true pitch or frequency is accomplished in a wind instrument by varying the length of the wind column with out substantial change in the cross-sectional area of the air column. This change of note pitch to produce vibrato is accomplished in a string instrument by an expert musician by rolling the string depressing finger back and forth lengthwise of the string. In a wind instrument of the type having a variable length air column, as a trombone, an expert musician imparts vibrato to the notes simply by moving the slide back and forth across the true note position of the slide. In other wind instruments, vibrato is produced by rapidly opening and closing the keys being played.
By the present invention there is provided a simple, highly efiective method and apparatus specially designed for use with wind instruments and by which self-powered means operates to vary the length of the instrument air column in a manner to superimpose vibrato on all notes played by the musician without effort on his part or need for any action by the musician other than that required to produce true renditions of the notes comprising the score being played. For this purpose, each instrument includes a vibrato accessory having an air passage forming part of the instrument air passage but differing there from is being variable in length over a range eilective to produce the desired variation in tone pitch. Desirably, the produced variation in tone pitch fluctuates uniformly over a frequency less than that required to play the next adjacent note and found eifective to enliven the music and to produce the most pleasing vibrato.
According to one preferred version of the invention, the vibrato accessory for each instrument is connected through suitable, flexible operating means to a common driving motor, it being pointed out that the vibrato devices of the several instruments may be operated in synchronized phase, opposed phase relation or in ever-changing phase 3,1543% Patented Nov. 3, 1964 relation, as desired. A foot-operated control effective to change the speed of the power source may also be operated to vary the frequency with which the air columns of each instrument are varied to produce the vibrato. Additionally and desirably, the driving connection between the power source and the vibrato devices of each instrument includes means for varying the phase relationship of the several vibrato devices to the end that a highly pleasing and realistic phase relationship may exist between the vibratos of the several instruments.
According to another preferred embodiment of the invention, unusually pleasing vibrato effects are obtained by arranging the vibrato devices of a pair of similar instruments to operate in a predetermined timed relationship with one another and preferably in phase opposition, that is, with one instrument playing the sharp phase of the note while the second instrument is playing the flat phase of this same note. In this manner, richness, beauty and quality is imparted to the notes of the two instruments unobtainable in any other manner. According to one mode of practicing this embodiment of the invention, the phase coordinated vibrato devices for a pair of instruments form part of the supporting structure for the instruments proper, the latter being arranged to support the mouthpiece and the keys in a comfortable and convenient position for the musician.
Accordingly, it is a primary object of the present invention to provide an improved musical instrument embodying therein power operated means for imparting to the notes played a slightly tremulous or pulsating effect for adding warmth and beauty of tone by varying the pitch of the tone being produced.
Another object of the invention is the provision of a wind musical instrument incorporating therein simple and effective power-actuated means effective to shorten and lengthen at a predetermined frequency the air column of the instrument to impart a pleasing variation in the frequency of the note being played and commonly known as vibrato.
Another object of the invention is the provision of a plurality of power-operated vibrato devices arranged to be driven from a common power source, each device being associated with a different wind instrument and operable to impart a vibrato effect on the notes produced without effort on the part of the musician and featuring means for continuously changing the phase relationship of the vibrato of the several wind instruments relative to one another.
Another object of the invention is the provision of a plurality of wind instruments arranged in pairs with each pair incorporating a vibrato device eifective to superimpose vibratos on each of a given pair of instruments which vibratos are in predetermined out-of-phase rela tion to one another and including means for continuously varying the operating phase relationships of two or more pairs of said instruments.
Another object of the invention is the provision of a power-operated vibrato device for incorporation in the air column of a wind instrument and operable to change the length of the air column to vary pleasingly the frequency of a note being played, the device including means for varying the frequency with which the length of the air column is changed.
Another object of the invention is the provision of vibrato devices of the kind described and including control means by which sections of wind instruments fitted to the vibrato devices in a band or orchestra may be separatel controlled to the end that certain instruments may be played with vibrato while the instruments of other sections are played without vibrato through certain passages of the music at the will of the conductor or person in control.
These and other more specific objects will appear upon reading the following specification and claims and upon considering in connection therewith the attached drawings to which they relate,
Referring now to the drawings in which preferred embodiments of the invention are illustrated.
FIGURE 1 is a general perspective view of one preferred embodiment of the invention showing several typical wind instruments each provided with the vibrato device of this invention and with each being coupled through flexible power transmitting means to a common power source;
FIGURE 2 is a longitudinal sectional view on an enlarged scale through one of the vibrato devices shown in FIGURE 1;
FIGURE 3 is a cross-sectional view taken on line 3-3 .011 FIGURE 2;
FIGURE 4 is an elevational view of a modified embodiment of the vibrato device with portions broken away and showing the driving motor mounted directly on the device itself;
FIGURE 5 is a longitudinal sectional view on an enlarged scale taken along line 55 of FIGURE 4;
FIGURE 6 is a schematic diagram of an electrical circuit controlling the operation of another preferred embodiment of the vibrato device utilizing solenoids to operate the same;
FIGURE 7 is a longitudinal sectional through a vibrato device employed with the control circuit shown in FIGURE 6;
FIGURE 8 is a schematic diagram showing the control circuit for use with the vibrato deviceof FIGURE 7 and by which the vibrato devices of individual sections of the wind instruments of an orchestra may be selectively operated;
FIGURE 9 is a perspective view of another preferred embodiment wherein the wind instruments are arranged to be supported in pairs with the vibrato devices of each pair driven by a flexible cable drive by the same motor driving other similar pairs of instruments;
FIGURE 10 is a longitudinal sectional view on an enlarged scale taken along line 1tl-1tl on FIGURE 9;
FIGURE 11 is a view taken on line l111 on FIG- URE 10;
FIGURE 12 is a cross-sectional view on an enlarged scale taken along line 12-12 on FIGURE 11;
FIGURE 12:: is a fragmentary cross sectional view taken along line I2a-l2a on FIGURE 12. t
FIGURE 13 is a graphical representation of the phase relationship of a single cycle of the means for varying the length or" the air column of a pair of coordinated wind instruments shown in FIGURE 9; and
FIGURE 14 is a fragmentary sectional view on an enlarged scale taken along line 14-14 on FIGURE 9.
Referring first to FIGURES 1 through 3 in particular, the numeral lltl indicates a control box containing mechanical power means such as an electric motor Ill with plug-in cord 12 and on-off switch 13. The motor is fitted with reduction gearing 14 through which it drives a shaft 15 the end of which is supported in a bearing 16.
A plurality of shafts 17 extend parallel to shaft 15 and are mounted in suitable bearings in opposite sides of 7 box It It will be understood that the number of shafts will be equal to the number of wind instruments but only three are shown operatively connected, by way of example, to a saxophone, clarinet, and trombone.
A belt-driving pulley 18 is mounted on shaft 15 and driven belt pulleys 19, which may all be of one diameter or of different diameters having a definite relation to one another, are mounted on shafts 17. An endless drive belt 20 is mounted on the pulleys 18 and 19 and will rotate all shafts 17 in unison. Desirably, pulleys 1.9 have diameters which differ by as little as one mil from one another in order that the phase relationshipof the vibrato imparted to the different instruments will change continuously and pleasingly adding to the beauty and realism of the mechanically produced vibrato.
Bowden wire flexible drive shafts 21 are secured to one end of each shaft 17 and transmit the rotation of the shafts 17 to the driving element of vibrato devices 22 designed as an accessory attachment adapted to be substituted for a portion of air passage in a wind instrument which devices are shown as identical in construction, although not necessarily so.
Vibrato devices 22, as shown in FIGURES 2 and 3, comprise a small lightweight rectangular case 23 formed with laterally projecting tubular sockets adapted to replace a cut-out length of the air tube 25 of an instrument such a the trombone 26 and to seat this air tube upon the opposite sides of the cut-out, or to be positioned between the mouthpiece of a saxophone 2'? or clarinet 2S and the instrument proper. The case 23 may be secured in assembled relation to the instrument in any suitable manner.
One side of the case 23 is closed by a plate 29, the case and cover being secured together by registering lugs 3h drilled and tapped to receive small unshown machine screws. Toward the lower end of the case a boss 32 is provided which is drilled to serve a a bearing for a shaft 33, the opposite end of the shaft being supported by a bearing 34 formed in a projection on the plate 23. The top of the case 23 may be closed by a top cover 35 held by screws 37.
An upper and stationary body member 36 fits closely within the upper part of the case 23 and is secured to the top plate 35 by screw 37, and to the sides of the case by screws 38. It will be noted th t the case 2 3, while only slightly wider than the diameter of the tubular part of the instrument on which it is mounted, is relatively wide transversely of the instrument air column. This is in order that a U-shaped passage 39 may be provided within the case between the sockets or ports 24. The upper half of this passage 39 is formed by the stationary body 35 and its lower half by a cooperating body also fitting closely in the case 23 but slidable therein toward and away from body as.
Upper body 35 is provided with a transverse slot 41 opening into passage 39 and open at it end to the e"- terior through a breather hole 35a and a baffle 42 secured to the lower body ill by screws 43 and is arranged to slide in slot 41 and extends transversely of the passage. Baffle l2 cooperates with body it? to form an opening of the same cross-sectional area as passage 3& which connects the portions of that passage upon its opposite sides. Passage 39 is to be understood as being of variable length and may be viewed as having two sections, one upon either side of the baffle i2 and the opening 44' tl'ierethrough. As the body 46 reciprocates relative to the stationary body 36, it will be recognized that the length of the sections of passage 39 as described will alternately increase and decrease thereby varying the length of the instrument air column.
Bodydt is reciprocated in case 23 toward and away from body 36 by the rotation of shaft The latter is driven by the suitable flexible shafting as Bowden wire drive shaft Ztl, the non-circular driving head 45 of which fits within a complementally-shaped socizet as formed in the end face of shaft 33, and being retained there by con nector 4'7 detachably screwed onto the threaded boss 32.
An eccentric disc St formed integral with the shaft 33 is effective to drive a pitman 51 coupled to body 4i by a wrist pin 5% extending crosswise of notch 55. Pitman 51 has a strap Sla encircling disc 5% which strap includes a groove 52 movable past a hole 53 in the narrower side of case 23 when the eccentric 5 3 is in its mean position thereby enabling the player of the instrument to tune it. In this connection, it is pointed out that peep hole 53 is so located that when groove 52 extends diametrically thereacross, the instrument air column is the mean of its,
The rate of reciprocation of body 40 determines the frequency of the vibrato and is dependent on the operating speed of driving motor 11 and the ratio of the speed reduction gear fitted to the motor. Being driven by a cam, its acceleration and deceleration upon approaching and leaving its end positions is in accordance with a sine wave.
In using the form of the invention shown in FIGURES 1, 2 and 3 the musicians tune their instruments in the usual manner after having checked to make certain that the mark or groove 52 on pitman 51 is aligned with the aperture 53 thereby placing passage 3% at its normal or middle length. As previously stated, the devices effective to produce the tone fringe or vibrato do not affect the normal characteristics of the instruments when the parts are positioned as indicated by the alignment of the mark 52 and the aperture 53.
Cord 12 of motor 11 is then plugged into an electric outlet and the described equipment i ready to function, motor 11 rotating shafts 17 and flexible shafts 21 to communicate rotary movement to eccentrics t) in devices 22 and cause continuous reciprocation of movable parts it? and 42. This reciprocation effects, as described, the alternately shortening and lengthening of portion 3 9 of the instrument air column.
To accomplish my pitch fringe or vibrato eifect, I prefer to utilize a frequency variation of 4 to times per second thereby to produce a variation in sound fre quency, which determines pitch or tone, being over a narrow range selected at will and preferably extending for the same number of cycles above and below the frequency of the note being played. A vibrato frequency of 6 cycles per second is found in practice to provide particularly pleasing effects. In a preferred arrangement the frequency range selected may be within the range of from five hundredths to one and one-half (1 /2) times a step at middle A. The air column as a whole of the instrument is, of course, set into vibration by the player lowing into the instrument through a vibrating reed mouthpiece and the frequency of vibration is controlled by altering the length of the air column by opening and closing with his fingers keys controlling properly located holes in the length of the tubular portion of the instrument.
In the modified form of my invention shown in FIG- URES 4 and 5, a case 5801 is provided having oppositely extending tubular sockets 59 by which the case may be incorporated into a musical wind instrument as in the first embodiment. The case 53:: is closed by a cover plate tl secured by screws 61 seating in tapped holes drilled in lugs 62 cast on the wall of the case.
Within the upper part of the case a pair of downwardly curved lengths of tube 63 and 6d are secured to the inner wall of the case in alignment with the tubular sockets Si by screws @311 and 64a. In the lower portion of the case 58a a body 65 is positioned for smooth sliding movement toward and from tubes 63, 6d and supports a U-shaped tube 66. The upturned ends of the latter telescopically enclose the downturned ends of tubes 63, 64.
Preferably, there is provided means for individually adjusting the length of travel of body 65, which adg'ustment can also be applied to the embodiment of FTGURES 2 and 3. For this purpose a first eccentric 68 secured to shaft 69 operates within the eccentrically located circular seat of a second eccentric 7d. The relative angular positions of the eccentrics are adjustable, a selected relationship being retained by a threaded stud 71 screwed into a tapped hole one half of which is formed in the periphery of one eccentric, while the other half is provided by one of a plurality of half bores 72 formed in the periphery of the other circular eccentric. To compensate for the chan e in throw which otherwise would take place upon changes in the angular relationship existing between the eccentrics 68 and 7d the strap 72a is provided with a threaded boss which connects by a threaded collar 72!; to the threaded end of pitman 72c. Collar 72b is oppositely threaded at its opposite ends and its rotation in one direction effects a lengthening of the pitman while its rotation in the opposite direction decreases that length.
In order to enable the tone of the instrument to be varied in unison or in sequence at predetermined intervals, there is provided individual power drives as, for example, small variable speed electric motors 73 for each device, the motors being mounted in housings 74 secured to the cases 58a.
The motors 73 may be connected directly to the current source and then will drive their units individually. The various motors may rotate at the same speeds, if desired, or may be controlled to rotate at different speeds.
Referring to FIGURES 6 and 7 in particular, a solenoidactuated unit and its controlling circuit are disclosed. In the control circuit of FIGURE 6, variable speed motor 75 is supplied with current through an adjustable rheostat 76 which may be connected to a convenient electrical outlet. The speed of the motor may thus be controlled from Zero at the OFF position of the rheostat to a predetermined maximum. The motor 75 rotates a currentconducting shaft 78 through a reduction gear box 77 and a coupling 79 of insulating material. A plurality of discs 8t equal in number to the instruments to be controlled, and of insulating material, are mounted on the shaft 78 and are provided with radially extending strips 81a, 81b, 81c, 8112', 81c and 81f, forming conductive paths from the shaft to a limited are on the circumference of each disc. It is to be noted that each strip is arcuately displaced, as for example, by 72 degrees, from the angular position of the preceding strip for supplying current to a group of five instruments.
Electric current is supplied to the shaft 7% by a wiper contact 82, and contact blades 83a, 83b, 83c, 83a, 83a and 38;, arranged to rest on the periphery of discs at similar points, conduct the current, as their associated strips 31a, 81b, 81c, 81d, 81:: and Slf reach the blades, through leads 84a, 84b, 84c, 84a, 8412 and 84 to the front series of contacts 35!), 85c, 85d, 85e and 85 of a multiple double throw switch S6. The movable contacts of switch 86 connect to the individual attachment of five different musical instruments, the instrument whose attachment is supplied through contact 851) being shown as a clarinet 87. As the same current is supplied to all the discs, and as their radial strips, being arcuately spaced from one another, will make contact with their wiping contacts in spaced time phase relationship, it follows that the actuating current impulses to the instruments will be similarly spaced and the fringing devices will be actuated serially or in predetermined phase relation; rather than simultaneously. The back series of contacts of switch 86 shown at 88b, 38c, 880, 88c and 83 are connected in parallel to line 34a and contact 3a, and when switch S6 closes these back contacts the electric current impulse is supplied to all the devices 58 simultaneousiy.
The modified vibrato construction of FIGURE 7 is adapted to be controlled by the electric circuit shown in FIGURE 6, its case 8% being generally similar to that of the device shown in FIGURE 5. Thus, its two downwardly curved tubes @t) and 91 are arranged with one end of each in communication with the laterally extending sockets 92 and 93. U-shaped tube as which fits telescopically over the downturned ends of tubes 92 and 93 is arranged to be reciprocated vertically by a solenoid 95 to which it connects by a stem 96 secured by a screw 98 at its opposite end in a bore in the upper end of the movable core 97 of the solenoid armature.
Solenoid $95 is secured to the wall of the case 89a by a small bracket 99 itself attached to the case by screws 100. A coil spring 101 is mounted between the lower end of the solenoid core and the end of the case and acts to hold the core in raised position when the solenoid is de-energized. Under the action of the spring 191 the tubes are telescoped and the air column is shortened. It
vibrato, if any, is imposed on the instrument section.
7 performs this function immediately upon de-energization of the solenoid and after the core has been retracted into the body of the solenoid during energization.
In order to smooth the reciprocating action of the U- shaped tube 94, a second spring 1-52,, which is of less strength than spring N71, is arranged to bear downwardly thereon. Spring 10?. is positioned between the upper end of the case 8901 and a seat 193 fixed near the upper end of a rod 164 which rod is aligned with the armature axis of solenoid and secured to the tube M in any suitable manner. The actions of springs Mill and 1&2 are opposed to one another but when the solenoid 5 is tie-energized by switching off the electric current the U-shaped tube will assume a position in which a mark ltlfl on stem as is aligned with an observation opening ms in the wall of the case 89a. The hole 1% provided for observing the midposition of the moving pans also serves as a breather opening.
The general manner of operation of the devices shown in FIGURES 4, 5 and 7 is similar to that of the devices shown in FIGURES 2 and 3. in the constructions of FIGURES 4, 5 and 7, however, each instrument is equipped with its own prime mover or electrical actuating means. The units constructed in accordance with the embodiment of FIGURES 4 and 5 are independent of all other units, no means being provided to control the relative positions of the armatures driving motors '74. in the embodiment of FIGURE 6, the vibrato units on the instruments may be operated at will as a group either in synchronism or out of phase with one another by manipulation of the multiple double throw switch The frequency of the tone fringe may be adjusted by adjusting rheostat 76 which controls the speed of driving motor '75. Rheostat '76 also provides for switching off the current to the motor and to the devices so that the instruments may be played without vibrato effect when desired.
It may be desired to control the devices attached to the instruments of an orchestra, by sections, as for instance the saxophones, clarinets, and trombones, so that one section would be playing with the vibrato devices of each instrument in the section in phase with one another but out of phase with the instruments of another section, and a third section would be playing without vibrato at all.
A control unit for this purpose is shown in FIGURE 8 which utilizes the electric motor and switching arrangement described with reference to FIGURE 6, the unit being housed in a control box iii? and having the multiple double pole switch divided into three separate switches ltlti, lttl? and llltl, each controlling a section of instruments. Indicator lights llll, 112 and 113 are connected in a known manner in the circuits operated by the respective switches so'that the conductor can see What form of The lights are preferably arranged to show one color for synchronous vibrato, and another color for out-of-phase vibrato. The wires for the separate instruments are'preferably contained in-cables lid, 15, lid connected to distributor boxes 11?, lid, 119 located in the sections, leads 120, 312i, 122 being connected from the distributor box for a section, to the individual instruments. V
' By using a control arranged as shown in FEGURE 8, a conductor can obtain sound effects from an orchestra not heretofore obtainable.
Still another preferred embodiment of the invention is illustrated in FIGURES 9 to 14 and differs in minor but important respects from the above described embodiments. it is pointed out that the common power driving unit ltl is identical with that described in connection with the first preferred embodiment and has a plurality of flexible output shafts Ell only two of which are here shown, these each being connected respectively to independent groups of wind instruments in a manner to be described more fully presently. Powcr'unit lb is provided with the usual service cord 13 connectible to any power outlet as well as a flexible cable 13:"
terminating in afoot pedal operated Disc 2M and shaft 215 are assembled into bearings 2i"- forming a part rheostat 13a. Rheostat 13a is' arranged to maintain the circuit to the driving motor closed at a minimum or normal operating speed unless the operating pedal is depressed thereby gradually adjusting the rheostat to speed up the motor and the output speed of each of the flexible drive shafts Zll'.
Shown in FIGURE 9 by Way of illustration only are typical wind instruments as a pair of clarinets 28", 28 and a pair of saxophones 27, 2'7. Each pair of wind instruments is illustrated as having their axes extending parallel to one another and rigidly mounted at the opposite ends of the elongated horizontally disposed vibrato devices 2%, 2% supported at a convenient operating height as by suitable legs Bill. The main bodies of the several wind instruments are suitably detachably coupled to outlet fittings carried at the opposite ends of devices 2%. These outlet fittings communicate through air passages of adjustable length within the respective housings with inlet fittings aligned with the outlet openings and detachably seating therein the mouthpieces 22% of the several wind instruments.
Referring now more particularly to l0 and 11, it will be seen that vibrato device comprises a generally rectangular hollow housing having a removable side plate held in assembled position by screws 2% which are seated in threaded openings in the thiclened central portion of the housing. Portion 2% is provided with a narrow but deep slot open through the side of the housing closed by plate 2 Slidably seated within slot 2% for movement lengthwise of the housing is a smoot ly finished'slide member 2ft) formed with a deep notch Zlll having parallel side walls siidably seating a journal member 212. lournaled in member 212 is a shouldered crank pin threadedly seated in a driving disc Zild oflcenter from the axis or" this disc which is fixed to the end of a shaft Th' shaft is journaled in pair of bearings seated at opposite ends of a hollow vertical boss 2Y7 proiectin downwardly from the underside of the housing of vibrat device 2% in the manner best shown in FIGURE 11.
through a well 218 opening centrall through the top 0" device 2%, the top of this Well being normally close. by a cover plate 2% held in assembled position by cap screws 221i.
Fixed to the lower end of shaft 215, by key is a flywheel 224. This flywheel is normally enclosed by a cup-shaped cap 225 held in assembled position by screws Flexible shaft 2?. includes a fl xible tubular out housing 23d surrounding an inner iiovden wire or other suitable flexible power shaft havi g a non-circula terminal 232 seated in a complementally-shaped soc t a the end of shaft 215. Shaft 21 is held detachably assem bled to shaft 215 as by a threaded sleeve mating with threads on the threaded hollow boss 235 at the lower end of cap 225.
The means for alternately increasing and decreasing the length or the air columns of saxophones 27' will now be described and will be understood as generally similar to the construction of FIGURE 2 described above. Thus, it will be understood that body members 36' are fixedly supported at the opposite ends of the vibrato hollow housing and cooperate with movable members 4h, to provide variable length. tapering air passages lid of the instrument air column and in erconnecting mouthpiece 2% with the main body oi'instru- C f particular significance is the fact that the merit A: generally U-shaped air passages 3% are specially contoured to provide a generally tapering air passage small diameter end of which communicates with a mouthpiece and the larger diameter end of which con teristics of passages 3?, though readily variable in length, will remain consonant and harmonious with those of other portions of the tapering air column of the particular instrument for which the vibrato device has been designed.
It is pointed out that the operating connection for reciprocating body members dd, 4d to and fro lengthwise of the seating passages therefor formed within the main housing comprises connecting rods 24%} projecting from the opposite ends of slide members 219. As here shown, connecting rods 249 have threaded ends mating with threaded openings in the adjacent ends of members 40'. In the position of the parts shown in FIGURES 10 and 11, crank pin 213 is in alignment with the axes of connecting rods 240. Accordingly, the left-hand member 40 as viewed in FIGURE 10 is at the left-hand end of its stroke and its associated air passage 39 is of minimum length. On the other hand, the other air passage 39 at the right-hand end of the vibrato device is in its position of maximum length. Accordingly, the note then being played by the instrument at the right-hand end of device 2% will be flat in contrast to the sharp version of the same note then being played by the instrument at the left-hand end of the vibrato device.
Referring now to FIGURE 14 taken through one end of the vibrato housing 2% designed for wind instruments with tubular substantially non-tapering air columns, it will be understood that the construction of this vibrato device may be identical with that described for device 200' with the exception that the variable length air passages 39" is generally tubular in shape and of substantially uniform cross-section throughout its length.
FIGURE 13 is a graphical representation of the relationship of corresponding single cycles of the movement or" members sit), 4d of one of the vibrato devices for a pair of associated wind instruments, as the pair of saxophones 27' or the pair of clarinets 2s. The horizontal line passing midway between the crests of the two sine waves A and B represents a frequency of 440 cycles, or note A. It is pointed out that the single cycle of one of the members 4%) is 180 degrees out of phase with the corresponding cycle or" member 4 5 at the opposite end of the vibrato device. This 180 degree out-of-phase relationship of the members ill is assured by the constructional details of the vibrato devices and of the common driving connection for varying the respective length of the two air columns. In this manner, assurance is provided that the variable length passages 39 for one instrument will be at its minimum length simultaneously with the maximum extension of passage 39' for the other instrument of that pair of instruments. All other relative adjustments of the length of the two passages are similarly coordinated and positively maintained in this relationship by reason of the constant speed rotation of the power connection to. slide 210. It ,will therefore be recognized from FIGURE 13 that when a given pair of instruments play a specific note, the sweep of the vibrato of one instrument will be flat while the sweep of the vibrato on the other instrument will be sharp.
Referring now to FIGURES l2 and 12a, it is pointed out that tuning of the instruments in the usual manner by the musician is not interfered with in any way by the fact that the instruments are fitted with vibrato devices 7 having air passages of variable length. All that is necessary to tune the instrument is to first check the position of flywheel 224 concealed within housing 225 to ascertain that the variable passages 39' of each instrument are in their neutral or mid-positions. To this end, housing 225 is provided with an elongated slot 2% opposite the periphery of flywheel 2Z4. Slot 256 is sufficiently long as to permit the musician to contact the flywheel with his finger and rotate it until the vertical indicator mark 251 is in vertical alignment with an arrow 252 placed on the outer face of housing 225. Mark 251 and arrow 252, when aligned, provide assurance that members ill of the id vibrato device are in their neutral positions midway between their opposite extreme positions.
In the use of the vibrato devices described in connection with FIGURES 9 to 14, it will be understood that the musicians play the instruments in the usual and conventional manner with the power unit 10 energized and effective to rotate the shafts of flexible cables 21 at suitable speed as, for example, six revolutions per second. By reason of the mechanical connection between the terminal end of each shaft and the rigidly interconnected movable element ill, 4% rec iprocated thereby, it will be clear that the two associated wind instruments will produce music in predetermined out-of-phase vibrato with one instrument playing flat when the other is playing sharp. The same relationship holds true for each pair of instruments connected to the common power unit 10. However, if pulleys 19 (FIGURE 1) at the power input ends of the shafts are of slightly difierent diameters, as is preferred, it will be recognized that the respective shafts will rotate at very slightly different speeds thereby automatically varying the phase relationship of the vibratos produced by one pair of instruments with respect to other pairs of instruments. This feature adds greatly to the realism and naturalness of the enlivened music and avoids creating any impression or suggestion that the vibrato has a mechanical origin.
Although connecting rods 24% interconnecting slide Zltl and the movable element 49' of each vibrato are here shown as rigid rods, it will be appreciated that these rods may be replaced by Bowden wires suitably encased in flexiole cables to the end that the vibrato devices at the outer ends of each Bowden wire may be coupled directly to the instrument in the manner shown in FlGURE 1 without risk of the two instruments so connected to a common slide 210 operating in other than a desired predetermined phase relationship. When so constructed, a pair of associated wind instruments may be supported by the musician in the normal manner without need for or reliance on a tripod or other rigid support.
While the particular musical instrument herein shown and disclosed in detail is fully capable of attaining the objects and providing the advantages hereinbefore stated, it is to be understood that it is merely illustrative of the presently preferred embodiments of the invention and that no limitations are intended to the details of construction or design herein shown other than as defined in the appended claims.
I claim:
1. In wind-type musical instruments wherein the different notes produced are dependent on the effective length of the instrument air column as determined by the conventional manually operated playing control means for said instrument, that improvement comprising adjustable means forming an unobstructed part of the instrument air column for varying the elfective length of the air column, power driven means for operating said lastnamed means to vary the length of said instrument air column rapidly and thereby the frequency of the produced note to either side of the note actually played by the musician, said power driven means including housing means enclosing the movable components thereof to assure that the moving components operate independently of and without possibility of interference from the musician or by contact with nearby objects, and there being a plurality of similarly constructed instruments interconnected to common power driven means for varying the lengths of their respective air columns independently of the manipulation of the manually operated playing control means by the musician playing each instrument, and means for operating the drives to the means for varying the lengths of the air column of the different instruments including means for gradually varying the phase operating relationship thereof thereby to vary the phase relation of the produced vibrato of the different instruments.
2. That improvement defined in claim 1 characterized l l. in that said means for varying the length of the instrument air column is eilective to traverse both halves of one complete operating cycle in the same time period whereby the sharp portion of the produced note is balanced by a flat portion of equal magnitude.
3. That improvement defined in claim 1 characterized in that said power driven means operates at a predetermined uniform speed and is effective to shorten and to lengthen the instrument air column alternately by identical increments during corresponding portions of each cycle thereby to vary the frequency of the produced note in identical respects both above and below the frequency of the note sought to be played on the instrument by the musician.
4. In combination with a plurality of wind instruments of the type having manually controlled means for varying the effective length of the air column in each to play different musical notes, that improvement which cornprises means located in the air column of each for varying the length thereof independently of the musician, said last mentioned means including a common power actuator driven continuously at a predetermined speed for varying the lengths of the instrument air columns in a constant predetermined phase relationship.
5. The combination defined in claim 4 characterized in that said Wind instruments include a plurality of sets of instruments each incorporating said means for varying the length of the instrument air column independently of the musician playing each particular instrument and each connected for actuation from continuously driven power means, said power driven means including means for operating the air column varying means of the instruments in each or" at least two sets of instruments in predetermined phase relationship to one another.
6. The combination defined in claim 5 characterized in that said power driven means also includes means for gradually varying the operating phase relationship of the drives to different sets of said instruments.
7. The combination defined in claim 5 characterized in that the mean for varying the lengths of the air columns in each of said two sets of instruments are adjusted and arranged to operate 180 degrees out of phase with one another whereby one instrument of the set operates sharp while the other is operating fiat.
8. in combination, a pair of similar Wind instruments supported for use in close proximity to one another, means in each instrument functioning entirely separately from the usual playing control means for varying the length of the instrument air column without obstructing the same, said air column varying means of each of said pair or" instruments having common power driven operating means therefor including means for shortening the air column length in one instrument While simultaneously increasing the air column length of the other instrument in the same amount and at the same rate.
9. The combination defined in claim 8 characterized intne provision of flywheel means in the power drive to said air column varying means.
10. The combination defined in claim 9 characterized in the provision of housing means enclosing said flywheel means and including provision for manually rotating said flywheel at slow speed to adjust said air column varying means to neutral central position to facilitate tuning of said instruments. 7
ll. A plurality of duplicate vibrato devices for use on similar Wind-type musical instruments and operable when inserted between the opposite ends of the air columns of such instruments to impart a vibrato frequency to the note played by the instrument, said devices each comprising a housing having an air passage extending therethrough and opening through opposed sides of said housing, means movably mounted within said housing for varying the axial length of said air passage without obstructing the flow of air therethrough, and power driven means connected to said last named means operable to drive the same continuously at a predetermined constant speed and effective to increase and decrease the length of said air passage at the same rate over both halves of an operating cycle starting from a mid-length position of the air passage thereby to vary the frequency of the note producible by the midlength position of the air passage slightly above and slightly below said midlength frequency as the length of said column is alternately increased and decreased with respect to said midlength position, said duplicate vibrato devices being characterized in the provision of duplicate housings having duplicate variable length air passages therethrough each adapted for insertion in the air column of similar musical instruments and further characterized in the provisions of separate power transmission means extending from said power driven means to the variable length air passage in each of said housings and arranged to vary the length of too one air passage in out of phase relation to the other whereby one passage will be decreasing in length while the other is increasing in length.
12. A device for imparting a continuous tone variation to wind musical instruments, comprising: a case secured to a tubular part of the instrument enclosing the air column thereof; a first part immovably secured in the case; a second part mounted in the case for movement toward and from the first part, the first and second parts being formed to provide Within the case a portion of the tubular enclosure of the air column of the instrument; a shaft rotatably mounted in said case; an eccentric mounted on said shaft and operatively connected to the second part; and an electric motor effective to rotate ai shaft to continuously and alternately move the sec- 0nd part toward the first part to shorten the portion of the air column within the case, and to move the second part away from the first part to lengthen the portion of the air column Within the case so as to cause the notes played by the instrument to have frequency alternately greater than and less than the standard frequency of the notes.
13. A device for imparting a continuous tone variation to wind musical instruments, comprising: a case secured to a tubular part of the instrument enclosing the air column thereof; a first part immovably secured in the case; a second part mounted in the case for movement toward and from the first part, the first and second parts being formed to provide within the case a portion of the tubular enclosure of the air column of the instrument; a shaft rotatably mounted in said case; an eccentric mounted on said shaft and opera-tively connected to the second part;
' an electric motor positioned at a location spaced from said instrument; and a flexible drive shaft connected to the shaft of the electric motor and to the shaft mounted in the case, whereby the second part is continuously and alternately moved toward and from the first part to vary the length of the air column and cause the notes played by the instrument to have a frequency alternately greater than and less than the standard frequency of the notes played by the instrument.
14. A device for imparting a continuous tone variation to wind musical instruments comprising: a case secured to a tubular part of the instrumcntenclosing the air column thereof; a first part immovably secured in the case; a second part mounted in the case for movement toward and trom the first part, the first'and second parts being formed to provide within the case a portion or the tubular enclosure of the air column of the instrument; a slot formed in the first part and a battle secured in the second part and extending into said slot,'said baffie being provided adjacent the second part with an orifice, the construction being such that movement of the second part toward the first is effective to shorten the air column and movement of the second part away from the first part is effective to lengthen the air column, the cross-section of the air column remaining 7 substantially unchanged; a shaft rotatably mounted in said case; an eccentric mounted onsaid shaft;' an' eccentric strap surrounding said eccentric and provided with a mark thereon, the case being provided with an aperture through which the mark is visible; a rod secured to said eccentric and pivotally connected to said second part, the mark on the eccentric strap being aligned with said aperture when the eccentric is at the mid-point of its travel in which position the air column of the instrument is of proper length to play a musical note of standard frequency; and means effective to rotate said shaft.
15. A device for imparting a continuous tone variation to a plurality of wind musical instruments, comprising: a case secured to a tubular part of each instrument enclosing the air column thereof; a first part immovably secured in the case; a second part mounted in the case for movement toward and from the first part, the first and second parts being formed to provide within the case a portion of the tubular enclosure of the air column of the instrument; a shaft rotatably mounted in said case; an eccentric mounted on said shaft and operatively connected to the second part; an electric motor positioned at a location spaced from a plurality of said musical instruments; a plurality of shafts rotated in unison by said motor; and flexible drive shafts connected between each of said shafts and the drive shaft rotatably mounted in the case secured to each instrument, whereby the second part is continuously and alternately moved toward and from the first part to vary the length of the air column in the instrument, independently of the variation of the length thereof efiTected by the players, to cause the notes played by the instruments to have a frequency alternately greater than and less than the standard frequency of the notes emitted by the instruments.
References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 369,804 Menzenhauer Sept. 13, 1887 935,626 Lockhart Sept. 28, 1909 1,043,500 Bachrich Nov. 5, 1912 1,262,640 Cloetens Apr. 16, 1918 1,554,782 Brasor Sept. 22, 1925 1,374,154 Barbieri Aug. 30, 1932 1,880,961 Kingsley Oct. 4, 1932 2,136,628 Lohrnan Nov. 15, 1938 2,560,568 Hammond et a1 July 17, 1951 FOREIGN PATENTS 562,095 Germany Oct. 21, 1932

Claims (1)

1. IN WIND-TYPE MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS WHEREIN THE DIFFERENT NOTES PRODUCED ARE DEPENDENT ON THE EFFECTIVE LENGTH OF THE INSTRUMENT AIR COLUMN AS DETERMINED BY THE CONVENTIONAL MANUALLY OPERATED PLAYING CONTROL MEANS FOR SAID INSTRUMENT, THAT IMPROVEMENT COMPRISING ADJUSTABLE MEANS FORMING AN UNOBSTRUCTED PART OF THE INSTRUMENT AIR COLUMN FOR VARYING THE EFFECTIVE LENGTH OF THE AIR COLUMN, POWER DRIVEN MEANS FOR OPERATING SAID LASTNAMED MEANS TO VARY THE LENGTH OF SAID INSTRUMENT AIR COLUMN RAPIDLY AND THEREBY THE FREQUENCY OF THE PRODUCED NOTE TO EITHER SIDE OF THE NOTE ACTUALLY PLAYED BY THE MUSICIAN, SAID POWER DRIVEN MEANS INCLUDING HOUSING MEANS ENCLOSING THE MOVABLE COMPONENTS THEREOF TO ASSURE THAT THE MOVING COMPONENTS OPERATE INDEPENDENTLY OF AND WITHOUT POSSIBILITY OF INTERFERENCE FROM THE MUSICIAN OR BY CONTACT WITH NEARBY OBJECTS, AND THERE BEING A PLURALITY OF SIMILARLY CONSTRUCTED INSTRUMENTS INTERCONNECTED TO COMMON POWER DRIVEN MEANS FOR VARYING THE LENGTHS OF THEIR RESPECTIVE AIR COLUMNS INDEPENDENTLY OF THE MANIPULATION OF THE MANUALLY OPERATED PLAYING CONTROL MEANS BY THE MUSICIAN PLAYING EACH INSTRUMENT, AND MEANS FOR OPERATING THE DRIVES TO THE MEANS FOR VARYING THE LENGTHS OF THE AIR COLUMN OF THE DIFFERENT INSTRUMENTS INCLUDING MEANS FOR GRADUALLY VARYING THE PHASE OPERATING RELATIONSHIP THEREOF THEREBY TO VARY THE PHASE RELATION OF THE PRODUCED VIBRATO OF THE DIFFERENT INSTRUMENTS.
US21838A 1960-04-12 1960-04-12 Musical instrument Expired - Lifetime US3154996A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US21838A US3154996A (en) 1960-04-12 1960-04-12 Musical instrument

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US21838A US3154996A (en) 1960-04-12 1960-04-12 Musical instrument

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US3154996A true US3154996A (en) 1964-11-03

Family

ID=21806433

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US21838A Expired - Lifetime US3154996A (en) 1960-04-12 1960-04-12 Musical instrument

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US3154996A (en)

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3429976A (en) * 1966-05-11 1969-02-25 Electro Voice Electrical woodwind musical instrument having electronically produced sounds for accompaniment
US3602189A (en) * 1969-07-28 1971-08-31 Tokyo Pigeon Kk Device for automatically sounding wind instruments

Citations (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US369804A (en) * 1887-09-13 Hatier
US935626A (en) * 1908-03-24 1909-09-28 John Lockhart Tone-correcting means for brass wind instrument.
US1043500A (en) * 1908-10-13 1912-11-05 Ludwig Bachrich Control of valves, detents, switches, and the like.
US1262640A (en) * 1914-04-16 1918-04-16 Georges Cloetens Tremolo device for organs.
US1554782A (en) * 1922-11-03 1925-09-22 Otto Kastrup Jr Tremolo device for musical instruments
US1874154A (en) * 1926-06-13 1932-08-30 Barbieri Angelo Electrically driven system of instruments through keyboard and pedals
US1880961A (en) * 1931-01-16 1932-10-04 Harold T Kingsley Musical instrument
DE562095C (en) * 1932-10-21 Franz Wikarski Vibrator for wind instruments
US2136628A (en) * 1937-08-02 1938-11-15 Alvin C Lundell Propeller and rudder guard for outboard motors
US2560568A (en) * 1946-10-10 1951-07-17 Hammond Instr Co Vibrato apparatus

Patent Citations (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US369804A (en) * 1887-09-13 Hatier
DE562095C (en) * 1932-10-21 Franz Wikarski Vibrator for wind instruments
US935626A (en) * 1908-03-24 1909-09-28 John Lockhart Tone-correcting means for brass wind instrument.
US1043500A (en) * 1908-10-13 1912-11-05 Ludwig Bachrich Control of valves, detents, switches, and the like.
US1262640A (en) * 1914-04-16 1918-04-16 Georges Cloetens Tremolo device for organs.
US1554782A (en) * 1922-11-03 1925-09-22 Otto Kastrup Jr Tremolo device for musical instruments
US1874154A (en) * 1926-06-13 1932-08-30 Barbieri Angelo Electrically driven system of instruments through keyboard and pedals
US1880961A (en) * 1931-01-16 1932-10-04 Harold T Kingsley Musical instrument
US2136628A (en) * 1937-08-02 1938-11-15 Alvin C Lundell Propeller and rudder guard for outboard motors
US2560568A (en) * 1946-10-10 1951-07-17 Hammond Instr Co Vibrato apparatus

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3429976A (en) * 1966-05-11 1969-02-25 Electro Voice Electrical woodwind musical instrument having electronically produced sounds for accompaniment
US3602189A (en) * 1969-07-28 1971-08-31 Tokyo Pigeon Kk Device for automatically sounding wind instruments

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3196729A (en) Musical instruments
US3154996A (en) Musical instrument
US9589549B1 (en) Electro-mechanical audio signal control system
US2221814A (en) Musical instrument
US2136627A (en) Tremulant for stringed musical instruments
EP0992033A1 (en) Keyed free-reed instruments scope
US2352438A (en) Musical instrument
US2241911A (en) Stringed musical instrument
US1853630A (en) Electric musical instrument
US3252368A (en) Vibrato devices
US2812680A (en) Music box
US2153725A (en) Musical instrument
US3207835A (en) Rhythm device
US5140883A (en) Harp action
US2130251A (en) Musical instrument
US1747650A (en) Stringed musical instrument
US1969147A (en) Musical instrument
Mirka To cut the Gordian knot: The timbre system of Krzysztof Penderecki
US1941870A (en) Electrical musical instrument
US2009337A (en) Synchronized sound and action reproduction
US3270119A (en) Electric musical instrument for producing percussion type sound effects
US1750325A (en) Adjustable tremolo device
US1914831A (en) Electric keyboard musical instrument
US2045877A (en) Musical instrument
US2229206A (en) Audiometer