US3151829A - Flat-iron rest - Google Patents

Flat-iron rest Download PDF

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Publication number
US3151829A
US3151829A US181692A US18169262A US3151829A US 3151829 A US3151829 A US 3151829A US 181692 A US181692 A US 181692A US 18169262 A US18169262 A US 18169262A US 3151829 A US3151829 A US 3151829A
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Prior art keywords
iron
supporting member
rest
flat
ironing
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Expired - Lifetime
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US181692A
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Rab Gabor
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Rab Gabor
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D06TREATMENT OF TEXTILES OR THE LIKE; LAUNDERING; FLEXIBLE MATERIALS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • D06FLAUNDERING, DRYING, IRONING, PRESSING OR FOLDING TEXTILE ARTICLES
    • D06F79/00Accessories for hand irons
    • D06F79/02Stands or supports neither attached to, nor forming part of, the iron or ironing board

Description

Oct. 6, 1964 Filed March 22, 1962 INVENTOK GABOKM ATTOR United States Patent 3,151,829 FLAT-ERGN REST Gahor Rah, 273 Dovercourt Road, Toronto, (lntario, Canada Filed Mar. 22, 1962, Ser. No. 131,692 4 Claims. (til. 248117.l)

This invention relates to a detachable fiat-iron rest to be used in connection with ironing boards of all types and configurations and with all kinds of tables.

Various kinds of fiat-iron rests have been marketed, some being separate supports made of iron, steel or other metal, some having fiat surfaces provided with asbestos or other heat insulating material. Other types are built as integral units on ironing boards. All of these types were created with the idea that the person ironing should have within reach of his or her hand a place to rest the hot flat iron without having to disconnect same and to obviate the danger of fire, or damage to the laundry. in all these types, the flat-iron is supposed to be placed face down in the place provided for it. The platform on which the hot iron is placed after or before ironing, or during the time the ironer has both hands busy with some other activity, is commonly made either of a metal grid or other heat conducting material which evenly distributes the heat or, as the form of asbestos plates, to work on the principle that the inflammable parts of the work area in proximity to the iron rest should be separated therefrom by heat-insulating material.

The grill type metal supports of prior art structures all have the same disadvantage, namel that the iron will slip from them at the slightest push since the iron itself is essentially smooth and will slide easily in any direction on the surface of the grill. it is not feasible to provide the grill with a rough surface in order to preclude slipping as contact with such a surface would prove harmful to the pressing surface of the iron. Especially in the modern folding ironing boards which are essentially light in weight, the ironing board is almost constantly moved to some degree by the ironers motion and it has been found in prac ice that the average housewife, while ironing, may drop the iron several times within an hour, unless considerable care is exercised with all the ensuing trouble such as breakage of electrical contacts, breakage of the power cord and soiling of the ironing surface.

In the heat-insulating types of prior art rests, there is a natural tendency to prevent the iron from sliding too much, as asbestos by itself has a reasonably high coeflici ent of friction. However, the asbestos surface is quite brittle, wears quickly and further cannot essentially be much larger than the surface of the iron itself, with the result that frequently the ironer misplaces the iron and creates a fire hazard or at least scorches the iron pad or clothes. Furthermore, the heat-insulating pad, when deteriorated by use gives a false sense of security. it has been found that about 50% of all fires caused by an overheated iron left on the ironing board were caused by just this mistake, namely, that the housewife had confidence in an asbestos pad which had actually deteriorated to the point of uselessness. In addition, even an asbestos surface is smooth enough to allow the iron to slide off the board whenever the ironer pushes against it as often happens. In order to overcome some of the aforementioned problems flat-iron rests have been elaborated to include a ledge or small fence to prevent the iron from moving off the rest. The greatest drawback in this proposal is that the rest must be solidly built on the ironing board and raises the overall height of the ironing board by a few inches just at the right side where the irons hand must travel in each ironing motion. Consequently, it forces the ironer to keep his or her 3,151,829 f e-tented Get. 6, 1964 elbow in an uplifted position, which is unnatural and tiring.

l have found that the proper and practical place for a fiat-iron rest is not above but below and outside the ironing board in such a position that the iron at rest does not extend above the surface of the ironing board. I also found that in order to secure full maneuverability and safety in this device, it must be so designed that the iron is placed in a mainly upright position but with its tip still tilting slightly backwards. If the rest is in this position the ironer can put the iron to rest with a normal natural motion, just as if she or he had finished the ironing stroke. The iron itself cannot fall down from its rest or cage even if the board is suddenly and roughly moved and further, there are no obstacles to the hand or elbow. I also found that in order to have a truly versatile flatiron rest one must be able to attach and detach the whole rest to and from any kind of i oning board or table so that the rest itself can be put aside without taking up much space, and mounted or assembled safely and quickly.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a novel iron res-t which will hold a flat iron securely in a readily available position.

It is a further object of this invention to provide an iron rest adapted to be mounted on an ironing board or table in such a manner as to present no obstacle to a person when ironing.

A still further object of the present invention is to provide an iron rest which will dissipate heat rapidly.

Another object is to provide an iron rest which has no parts susceptible to deterioration in normal use and requires no periodic replacement of parts.

Still another object is to provide an iron rest, which, while securely holding an iron, will not structurally damage or otherwise impair the ironing surface of a fiat iron.

The fiat-iron rest of the present invention herein dis closed fulfills the foregoing requirements. The rest, broadly speaking, comprises a cage made of a suitable number of upright, horizontal and transversal steel rods, welded or otherwise secured together in a suitable manner and into which the flat iron securely rests with ample room to spare. The lowest part of this cage is provided with a supporting plate on which the rear end of the fiat iron rests with the handle directed towards the operator and the front tip of the iron pointing upwardly. The flat or ironing surface of the fiat iron rests on the rear grill of the cage in a slightly slanting position. The lower supporting plate and the rear grill are connected to each other at an angle somewhat less than 90, approximately so that the fiat iron, when placed in the cage, is prevented from falling out by the inclination of the lower plate to the horizontal, even when the ironing board is shaken.

The cage or iron rest itself is desiged in the form of a laterally suspended basket and is supported by strong supporting rods on one side of an ironing board. On the same side the cage may be provided with two suitably arranged clamping means provided with plates and a counter-plate for fastening to the ironing board. The fastening plates and the counter-plates are interconnected by a fastening screw provided with a suitable handle or wing in such a way that when the handle or wing is turned the fastening plates and the counter-plate move relatively to each other. The upright ledge of the ironing board, which is sometimes below sometimes above the horizontal surface of the ironing board, is clamped between the fastening plates and counter-plate and the whole cage is then fastened on this ledge by turning the handle or wing aforementioned. The clamping device, which per se forms no part of this invention, is similar to those clamping screws which are generally used for the fastening of lamps, meat grinders or similar objects on the ledge of a table. I

I have found that all the modern ironing boards are provided with some kind of vertical ledge so that there will be a convenient place to screw on the cage or rest of my invention. In most common tables provided with a ledge overlapping the side of the table there will be also a vertical surface below the ledge to winch the clamping plates and the counter-plate can be applied. However, in the case of those tables which only have a small horizontal ledge to which the iron rest may be attached it is noted that there are many well known expedients which could be used in conjunction with the novel iron rest herein disclosed to overcome any mounting problem, and as aforementioned, as the clamping per se forms no part of the present invention further detail of such means is not deemed necessary herein.

The invention will be more readily understood from the following detailed description taken in conjunction with the drawings appended hereto wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a side elevation of the iron rest;

FIGURE 2 is a plan view of the iron rest.

From the drawings it will be seen that the novel ironrest comprises, in a broad sense, a cage connected to a supporting structure which in turn has attached thereto suitable clamping means for fastening the iron-rest as a whole to an ironing board or table in a preferred location thereon. The device is intended to be fastened on the right hand side of the board or table as seen from an operators position in order to facilitate placement and removal of an iron in and from said rest.

In the illustrative embodiment shown in the drawings, the aforementioned cage comprises a plurality of laterally spaced, substantially L-shaped wire holding ribs 1, 1a, 1b, 1c and 1d retained in spaced relationship by a nurrr ber of transverse wire rib members designated 2 and 2t The ribs 2 in addition to interconnecting the upper legs of holding ribs 1, 1a, 1b, 1c, 1d, provide rigidity t what may be termed the rear portion of the cage structure while ribs 2a perform a similar dual function with respect to what may be termed the base portion of the cage structure.

As best seen in FIGURE 1 side ribs or stays 3 extend from holding ribs 1 and 1d for connection to the free upper end of the rear portion of the cage structure. The term free upper end refers to that end of the rear portion not connected to, or free and remote from the cage base portion. Side ribs 3a and 3b extend from spaced locations on the base portion for connection to side rib 3 adjacent the upper end thereof or the free upper end of the rear cage portion. The side ribs may, if desired, be formed as integral extensions of the transverse ribs 2a. With reference to FIGURE 2 it will be noted that side ribs 3, 3a and 3b are curved outwardly to facilitate positioning of an iron in the rest.

Connected to the base portion as by welding or other suitable expedient is a main supporting plate 4 of thin gauge sheet metal or the like upon which the heel or rear end of the iron is supported.

At the upper end of the rear cage portion, holding ribs 1 to 1d inclusive and side ribs 3 are connected to a protective plate member 5. Plate 5 is formed with a rolled top portion for a purpose to be later described.

To support the cage in preferred location on an ironing board or table a supporting structure is provided comprising a long supporting rod member 6 and a short supporting rod member 7 welded at opposite ends of a crossbar 8.

Supporting rod member 6 extends downwardly to a point subjacent the lower ends of side ribs 3 and is provided with a laterally extending portion which extends laterally underneath the cage structure and is welded thereto.

Supporting rod member 7 extends downwardly as seen in FIGURE 1 and is also provided with a laterally extending portion to which is welded the rolled top portion of plate member 5. The supporting rod members 6 and 7 are so proportioned relative to one another that the rear and base portions are suitably inclined to the horizontal and this feature precludes to a great extent, the possibility of the iron being jolted out of the rest accidentally. The further function of protective plate member 5 is to provide an abutting surface for the tip or nose of a flat-iron and thus serves to protect the flatiron work surrace from damaging abrasive contact with the rib members of the rear cage section.

As best seen in FIGURE 2 of the drawings, clamping means are provided for detachably clamping the iron-rest to a work-table although as previously stated herein the clamping means shown in the drawings is illustrative only and to those skilled in the art, the possibility of substitution of other types of clamping means in order to adapt the iron-rest for connection to various types and configurations of tables or ironing boards will be obvious.

Adjustably mounted relative to cross-bar 8 is a main clamping or pressure plate It This pressure plate is pivotally mounted upon a screw member 9 which threadably engages with cross-bar 8 and is operable by means of handle or wing element 9a.

The pressure plate It is further slidably mounted on two generally J-shaped members 11 and 11a fixedly connected to cross-bar 8. Members 11 and 11a extend through clearance holes in the pressure plate 19. Thus, on rotation of screw 9, plate 16 may be moved relative to two holding or clamping plates 12 and 12a afiixed to the free ends of J-shaped members 11 and 11a.

Plates 10, 12 and 12a co-operate in releasably clamping the iron-rest to the ledge 13 of a table indicated by dotted lines.

To persons skilled in this field, many changes and modifications may become readily apparent and the applicant wishes to be limited only by the scope of the claims appended hereto.

I claim:

1. A flat-iron rest for detachable connection to an ironing-board or the like, said flat-iron res-t comprising, a first vertical supporting member provided at the lower end thereof with a horizontal extension; a second vertical supporting member of greater length than said first supporting member and maintained in spaced parallel relationship therewith by a cross-bar member connected at respective ends thereof to the respective upper ends of said supporting members, said second supporting member also being provided at the lower end thereof with a horizontal extension substantially equal in length and parallel to but below the extension on said first supporting member; a cage structure including a plurality of laterally spaced, substantially L-shaped holding ribs interconnected by a plurality of laterally extending rib members, said L-shaped holding ribs defining a rear portion having a free upper end, and a base portion; the free upper end of said rear portion being connected along the length of the horizontal extension of said first vertical supporting member and the base portion resting on and secured to the horizontal extension of said second vertical supporting member; said vertical supporting members being so proportioned in length relative to one another that the rear and base portions of the cage structure are inclined to the horizontal when connected to said horizontal extensions; a plurality of side members curved outwardly with respect to the cage structure and extending from spaced locations on each side of the base portion for interconnection with said free upper end of said rear portion, and clamping means connected to said cross-bar for detachably clamping the flat-iron rest to an ironhig-board or table.

2. A flat-iron rest as claimed in claim 1 wherein the free upper end of said rear portion is secured to a plate member, said plate member having a rolled top portion 3,151,829 5 6 for connection to the horizontally extending portion References Cited in the file of this patent of said first vertical supporting member and operative UNITED STATES PATENTS to preclude contact of a major portion of a fiat-irons Work surface with the rear portion of said cage structure. 2,472,676 Nunnany June 1949 3. A fiat-iron rest as claimed in claim 2 wherein a sup- 5 FOREIGN PATENTS portin plate covers the entire area of said base portion. 1 4. Z flat-iron rest as claimed in claim 1 wherein the 3:523: rear and base portions define therebetween an included 24910O Switzerland 51 1948 angle, said included angle being approximately 75.

Claims (1)

1. A FLAT-IRON REST FOR DETACHABLE CONNECTION TO AN IRONING-BOARD OR THE LIKE, SAID FLAT-IRON REST COMPRISING, A FIRST VERTICAL SUPPORTING MEMBER PROVIDED AT THE LOWER END THEREOF WITH A HORIZONTAL EXTENSION; A SECOND VERTICAL SUPPORTING MEMBER OF GREATER LENGTH THAN SAID FIRST SUPPORTING MEMBER AND MAINTAINED IN SPACED PARALLEL RELATIONSHIP THEREWITH BY A CROSS-BAR MEMBER CONNECTED AT RESPECTIVE ENDS THEREOF TO THE RESPECTIVE UPPER ENDS OF SAID SUPPORTING MEMBERS, SAID SECOND SUPPORTING MEMBER ALSO BEING PROVIDED AT THE LOWER END THEREOF WITH A HORIZONTAL EXTENSION SUBSTANTIALLY EQUAL IN LENGTH AND PARALLEL TO BUT BELOW THE EXTENSION ON SAID FIRST SUPPORTING MEMBER; A CAGE STRUCTURE INCLUDING A PLURALITY OF LATERALLY SPACED, SUBSTANTIALLY L-SHAPED HOLDING RIBS INTERCONNECTED BY A PLURALITY OF LATERALLY EXTENDING RIB MEMBERS, SAID L-SHAPED HOLDING RIBS DEFINING A REAR PORTION HAVING A FREE UPPER END, AND A BASE PORTION; THE FREE UPPER END OF SAID REAR PORTION BEING CONNECTED ALONG THE LENGTH OF THE HORIZONTAL EXTENSION OF SAID FIRST VERTICAL SUPPORTING MEMBER AND THE BASE PORTION RESTING ON AND SECURED TO THE HORIZONTAL EXTENSION OF SAID SECOND VERTICAL SUPPORTING MEMBER; SAID VERTICAL SUPPORTING MEMBERS BEING SO PROPORTIONED IN LENGTH RELATIVE TO ONE ANOTHER THAT THE REAR AND BASE PORTIONS OF THE CAGE STRUCTURE ARE INCLINED TO THE HORIZONTAL WHEN CONNECTED TO SAID HORIZONTAL EXTENSIONS; A PLURALITY OF SIDE MEMBERS CURVED OUTWARDLY WITH RESPECT TO THE CAGE STRUCTURE AND EXTENDING FROM SPACED LOCATIONS ON EACH SIDE OF THE BASE PORTION FOR INTERCONNECTION WITH SAID FREE UPPER END OF SAID REAR PORTION, AND CLAMPING MEANS CONNECTED TO SAID CROSS-BAR FOR DETACHABLY CLAMPING THE FLAT-IRON REST TO AN IRONING-BOARD OR TABLE.
US181692A 1962-03-22 1962-03-22 Flat-iron rest Expired - Lifetime US3151829A (en)

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Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20030025793A1 (en) * 2001-07-31 2003-02-06 Mcmahon Martha A. Video processor module for use in a vehicular video system
US20040032321A1 (en) * 2002-04-19 2004-02-19 Mcmahon Martha A. Vehicle imaging system

Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
CH184858A (en) * 1935-11-22 1936-06-30 Ilg Anton Table tops A suspension iron holder.
CH249100A (en) * 1945-09-12 1947-06-15 Mueller Forster Paula Trays for iron.
US2472676A (en) * 1946-02-27 1949-06-07 Sr William Branch Nunnally Smoothing iron holder

Patent Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
CH184858A (en) * 1935-11-22 1936-06-30 Ilg Anton Table tops A suspension iron holder.
CH249100A (en) * 1945-09-12 1947-06-15 Mueller Forster Paula Trays for iron.
US2472676A (en) * 1946-02-27 1949-06-07 Sr William Branch Nunnally Smoothing iron holder

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20030025793A1 (en) * 2001-07-31 2003-02-06 Mcmahon Martha A. Video processor module for use in a vehicular video system
US20040032321A1 (en) * 2002-04-19 2004-02-19 Mcmahon Martha A. Vehicle imaging system

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