US3147715A - Transport vehicle construction - Google Patents

Transport vehicle construction Download PDF

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US3147715A
US3147715A US112813A US11281361A US3147715A US 3147715 A US3147715 A US 3147715A US 112813 A US112813 A US 112813A US 11281361 A US11281361 A US 11281361A US 3147715 A US3147715 A US 3147715A
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support
load
bearing
units
pair
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US112813A
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Forest J Myers
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Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co
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Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B61RAILWAYS
    • B61DBODY DETAILS OR KINDS OF RAILWAY VEHICLES
    • B61D3/00Wagons or vans
    • B61D3/16Wagons or vans adapted for carrying special loads
    • B61D3/166Wagons or vans adapted for carrying special loads for carrying very heavy loads

Description

Sept. 8, 1964 F. J. MYERS 3,147,715

TRANSPORT VEHICLE CONSTRUCTION Filed May 26, 1961 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 WJ Wim ATTORNEYS Sept. 8, 1964 F. J. MYERS VTRANSPORT VEHICLE CONSTRUCTION 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed May 26, 1961 INVENTOR Fa/515 J Mya/25' BMZ/JMJ 571m ATTORNEYS Sept. 8, 1964 F. J. MYERS 3,147,715

TRANSPORT VEHICLE CONSTRUCTION Filed May 26, 1961 s sheets-sheet s [OOI 70 BY :72 w@ 7m ATTORNEY` United States Patent O 3,147,715 TRANSPRT VEHHCLE CONSTRUQTHN Forest li. Myers, Newport News, Va., assigner to Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Doek Company, Newport News, Va., a corporation ot Virginia Filed May 26, 1961, Ser. No. 112,813 6 Claims.. (Cl. 10S-367) The present invention relates to a new and novel transport vehicle construction, and more particularly to an arrangement which permits a load to be effectively transported over railway tracks or conventional highways.

The present invention was evolved as a result of problems encountered in transporting very large and heavy mechanical components such as large turbine runners, ships propellers, bull gears as used in ships, large castings, and similar structures.

Present day components of this nature-may be, for example in the case of a hydraulic turbine water wheel, as large as 19 feet in diameter with a width of l0 feet and Weighing on the order of 70 tons.

In the past, such large components have been commonly shipped on special railroad cars generally termed well hole or drop bed cars. These cars are especially designed to permit the load to extend downwardly as far as possible in order to provide sutiicient vertical clearance with overhead bridges and similar obstructions.

The arrangement of the present invention provides a maximum degree of versatility since the load support means of the arrangement is adapted to be mounted upon support means especially constructed for movement over either railway tracks or conventional highways.

A particular problem existing with prior art railroad cars designed for carrying this type of load is the fact that the cars are of fixed dimensions and are of large rigid heavy-duty construction, and there is no provision whatsoever for adjusting the size or dimensions of the car in accordance with the particular load being carried.

A particular problem arises in connection with conventional well hole and drop bed railroad cars when the large loads thereon are not balanced which is actually usually the case. Since the weight of the load component is of such a great magnitude, it is necessary to provide means for balancing the load on the car in order to ensure that the over-all arrangement will be sufficiently stable and that excessive wear and tear on the equipment will not occur. lt has been a common practice in the past to provide heavy counterweights on the railroad car in order to balance the load such that the overall center of gravity of the load including the counterweights will lie approximately along the center line of the railroad track. Since the size of such prior art railroad cars is generally not adjustable, the amount of dunnage and blocking required to support different loads in place thereon and to maintain them iirmly in position is often excessive. It is, of course, absolutely essential to firmly secure these heavy loads in place on the car since any shifting of the load can have disastrous consequences.

Another disadvantage occurring with the utilization of conventional well hole railroad cars is the fact that the load must be placed into operative position by lowering it into place. There is ordinarily no provision for loading the components from the side, and accordingly, it is sometimes very diiiicult, if not impossible, to load large turbine runners and the like into operative position relative to the car when there is limited overhead clearance as, for example, in a factory or the like.

Prior art railroad cars as discussed above are also "onf a very expensive and bulky construction, and where the car is of a width to accommodate very Wide loads, the shipper is required to pay a higher tariff for movement of ice such a wide car over certain railroad tracks. Furthermore, such wide cars when unloaded are accident prone. The arrangement of the present invention overcomes the disadvantages of such prior art structures, and at the same time a very simple and relatively inexpensive construction is provided which at the same time is very sturdy and reliable in operation.

The present invention employs a pair of spaced separate wheeled support means, these support means being susceptible of design for movement either over railroad tracks or conventional highways.

In the illustrated embodiment, the spaced support means are shown as being of the railway truck type which are adapted for movement over conventional railroad tracks. it is also evident that these support means could comprise a pair of units movable over highways, and that one of the units could comprise a modified highway tractor unit having the deck swivelled over the rear wheels of the tractor while the deck of the other support means could be nonswivellingly attached by the spring means to the wheels thereof.

The support means is provided with a pair of spaced transversely extending support members which are adapted to actually support the load-bearing means, and wear plates are provided on certain surfaces of the support members for contributing to the useful life of the apparatus. The upper portions of each of the support means are also provided with a series of threaded openings which are employed for attaching the load-bearing means to the support means.

The load-bearing means itself comprises a pair of spaced separate elongated girder-like components, each of which has the opposite ends thereof detachably connected to the support means.

Each of the loading-bearing means includes laterally propecting support brackets which dene downwardly facing channels, these channels being adapted to receive the transversely extending support members on the support means whereby the load-bearing means are supported on the support members. Certain surfaces of the downwardly facing channels defined by the support brackets are also provided with wear plate means for cooperating with the wear plate means on the support members.

A series of openings is also provided in a portion of the support brackets on the load-bearing means whereby bolts may be employed for detachably securing the loadbearing means to the support means.

In addition, a tapered wedge member is provided, this Wedge member being adapted to it between the wear plate means on the support brackets and the support members, this tapered wedge serving to positively prevent `any movement between the support brackets and the support members regardless of the amount of wear which may take place between the wear plate means thereon.

With the aforediscussed construction, maximum versatility is provided since the load support means can be readily adjusted laterally of the support units, and accordingly, the space between the load-support means can be varied to accommodate diiferent sizes and types of loads. The load-support means are also of such a construction that they readily permit the mounting of support brackets at any desired position thereon to thereby provide for the e'licient mounting of loads of many different coniigurations.

Since the load-support means of the present invention can be adjusted in a lateral direction, the over-all loading on the support units can accordingly be adjusted so as to ensure that the center of gravity of the over-all load is disposed substantially over the center line of the support units. In this manner, all the wheels of the support units will be equally loaded, and the counterweighting problem involved with the prior art can be totally eliminated.

An additional advantage obtained by the lateral adjustability of the load-support means lies in the reduction of the amount, and of course, the weight of dunnage and blocking required since the load-support means can be moved into a positon closely adjacent to the load due to the lateral adjustability thereof.

A still further advantage of the lateral adjustability of the support means is that a very wide load can be shipped over a certain railroad route and then after unloading the load, the dimension of the car can be reduced such that the car may be returned to its starting point as a narrow car. This results in a reduction in tariff required for the car, and further reduces the possibility of accidents or other damage to the car. It will also be understood that the load-supporting means can be provided of different lengths thereby permitting an even greater variation in the size of loads which can be readily accommodated with the apparatus.

1n a typical example, the construction according to the present invention may be designed to carry a pay load up to 100 tons and the railroad car can be of such a construction as to negotiate curves with a minimum radius of 125 feet to permit the car to be operated at and around industrial plants and darn sites where there is inadequate space for larger radius curves as in main line track. The loads carried by such a car may reach a height of 21 feet above the supporting rails.

An object of the present invention is to provide a new and novel transport vehicle construction which is adapted for use either on conventional railway tracks or over highways.

Another object of the invention is the provision of a transport vehicle construction which is readily adjustable to accommodate different sizes and types of loads.

A further object of the invention is to provide a transport vehicle construction particularly adapted for shipping very large heavy loads and wherein counterweights are unnecessary.

Still lanother object of the invention is to provide a transport vehicle construction wherein the amount of dunnage and blocking required for large heavy loads is substantially reduced.

A still further object of the invention is the provision of a transport vehicle construction which permits loading from the side as well as overhead, and further wherein a wide load can be shipped and the vehicle subsequently returned to its starting point with a reduced width.

Yet another object of the invention is to provide a transpoit vehicle construction which is quite simple and relatively inexpensive in construction, and yet which is sturdy and reliable in operation.

Other objects and many attendant advantages of the invention will become more apparent when considered in connection with the specification and accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view schematically illustrating a load operatively supported on the car;

FIG. 2 is a top view Vof the apparatus shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a sectional view taken substantially along line 3 3 of FIG. 2 looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIG. 4 is a bottom view of the platform body portion of one of the support units;

FIG. 5 is a sectional view taken substantially along line 55 of FIG. 3 looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIG 6 is a sectional view partially broken away taken along line 6-6 of FIG. 2 looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIG. 7 is a top view partially broken away illustrating the support bracket and tapered wedge arrangement;

FIG. 8 is a somewhat schematic plan view illustrating one position of the load-support means; and

FIG. 9 is a view similar to FIG. 8, illustrating another position of the load-support means.

Referring now to the drawings wherein like reference characters designate corresponding parts throughout the several views, there is shown in FIGS. 1-3 a pair of spaced separate support units indicated by reference numerals 1i) and 11, unit 10 including a body or platform portion 13 supported upon a railroad truck 16. The railroad trucks are of more or less conventional construction with a few rninor modifications therein to accommodate the trucks for the purpose of the present invention.

These trucks may be for example a 6-wheel Buckeye Articulating Truck as used on passenger locomotives of the Chesapeake and Ohio Railway Company. These trucks as seen in FIG. 1 are movable along conventional railroad tracks 17 and 18 supported upon a plurality of ties 19. It will, of course, be evident that many different type of conventional trucks may be employed for the purpose of the present invention.

Each truck is provided with a conventional swivel which is designed to permit the platform or body portion supported thereon vthe turn approximately 8 degrees.

The body or platform portions 13 and 15 are of generally similar construction, and a description of one of these bodies will suice for the purpose of disclosing both of the body portions. A bottom view of body portion 13 is illustrated in FIG. 4. Each of the body portions or platforms 13 and 15 is of low carbon steel cast integrally. As seen in FIG. l, these integral castings each include a pair of spaced transversely extending support members indicated by reference numerals 20 and 21 on body portion 13 and Z2 and 23 on body portion 15. These support members 20, 21, 22 and 23 are X-ray inspected prior to machining of the body portions to ensure that they are of suicient structural strength.

The transversely extending support members each include an upper surface and a pair of opposite side surfaces, the upper surface carrying the entire dead load from the load -support means, while the vertical side surfaces of the support members absorb all the pulling and buffing loads of the associated train.

As seen in FIG. 1, body portion 13 includes transversely extending flange portions 25 and 26 at opposite sides thereof. In a like manner, body portion 15 is provided with iiange portions 28 and 29 at the opposite sides thereof.

Referring now to FIG. 4, the casting of body portion 13 includes a bottom flange portion 30 having openings 31, 32, 33, 3d and 35 formed therein. Additionally, a pair of rectangular depressions 40 and 41 are formed in the central portion thereof, and a conical supporting portion 43 extends outwardly from ange portion 30.

A rec-ess 44 is provided in the central part of conical portion 43 and receives a suitable member extending upwardly from the railway truck, portions 43 and 44 serving to swivellingly support the entire body portion 13 on the associated railway truck. At this point, an inspection of the righthand portion of FIG. 3 will illustrate the corresponding structure of body portion 15 wherein the conical portion 43 thereof and the opening 44' thereof correspond to portions 43 and 44 of body portion 13 and the upstanding member received within the opening 44 is indicated by reference numeral 47.

Referring again to FIG. 4, the ilange portion 3i) of the integral casting extends parallel with the upper surface of the body structure 13, the ange portion 30 being connected with this upper surface by a plurality of vertically extending transverse portions 50, 51, 52, 53 and 54 and further by longitudinally extending portions 55, 55, 57 and 5S, the over-all arrangement being such that a very sturdy rigid platform is provided, and yet at t .e same time openings are provided through the bottom surface thereof so as to permit the installation of conven tional air brake equipment and the like.

The air brake equipment has been shown only schematically in FIG. 4, and includes a main train line 60 which is adapted to be connected through a fitting 61 to the corresponding line of the next adjacent car, while a conduit 62 is also connected with the main track line and through conduits 63 and 64 with the brake operating mechanism of the particular car. All of this structure is of a conventional nature and forms no portion of the present invention.

The coupler mechanism is indicated generally by reference numeral 65, and is of a conventional nature except that it has been slightly modified to permit swinging movement thereof through a somewhat greater angle than is customary in the prior art. While the body portions of the two support units have been shown as being formed as integral castings, it is apparent that these body portions could be constructed otherwise if desired.

Furthermore, it should be noted that the transversely extending portions 50 and 53 which extend completely across the width of the body portion from one lateral edge thereof to the opposite lateral edge thereof underlie the central portions of the integral support members 21 and 20 respectively formed on the upper surface of the body structure. In this manner, the platform or body means 13 provides a maximum degree of support at the particular portions thereof which are under heavy loading.

As noted in FIG. l, a conventional hand wheel 67 is installed at one side of each of the supporting units, this hand wheel being of a drop shaft type such that it can be lowered to a position flush with or below the body portion 13.

The hand wheel is connected with the hand brake assembly installed at each side of the car, this construction being conventional in the art.

As seen in FIG. 2, the upper surfaces of each of body or platform structures 13 and 15 are provided with a plurality of lines of tapped openings which as hereinafter described are provided for the purpose of securing the load carrying means in position thereon. A iirst line of tapped openings 70 is provided at one side of support member 20 and a second line of similar openings 71 is provided at the other side of support member 20. Similar lines of tapped openings 72 and 73 are provided on opposite sides of support member 21. In a like manner body portion 15 is provided with a first series of tapped openings 75 on one side of support member 22, a second line of openings 76 on the opposite side of support member 22, a first line of openings 77 on one side of support member 23, and finally a second series of openings 78 provided on the opposite side of support member 23.

As seen particularly in FIGS. l and 2, the load-bearing means of the presen-t invention comprises a pair of spaced separate elongate units indicated generally by reference numerals 80 `and 81, these units being of identical construction.

The description of member 80 will suffice for describing the structure of each of members 80 and 81, and referring to FIG. 3, it will be seen that unit 80 includes a top member 83 which may be formed of a plurality of sections welded to one another, the top member 83 being fabricated from a rolled, wide iiange I beam. The construction of member 83 may be seen more clearly in FIG. 5. With Ithis construction, the top portion of each of the load-supporting units is adapted to support concentrated loads at any point therealong. The entire units 80 and 81 are preferably fabricated of a low carbon weldable structural grade steel so as to provide the desired degree of strength and rigidity.

The bottom member 85 of the loadsupporting units is of -a channel-shaped-construction as seen in FIG. 5, and as noted in FIG. 3, this bottom member 35 slopes downwardly at portions 85 from the opposite ends thereof to provide a central portion of the unit which is of greater height than the remainder thereof to give additional strength to the central portion of the load-supporting A plurality of vertically extending reinforcing members 88 are provided between the upper and lower members 83 and 85, and as seen in FIG. 5, these members 83 may be provided with cut-out portions 89 to reduce the weight of the structure. Cut-out portions 90 may also be provided in the vertically extending flange portion of upper member 83 as seen in FIG. 3 to further reduce the weight.

As seen most clearly in FIG. 2, load-supporting means 80 is provided with four laterally extending support brackets 92, 93, 94 and 95, and load-support means 81 is provided with four similar supporting brackets 96, 97, 98 and 99. Each of these support brackets is provided with a central portion defining a downwardly facing open channel which is adapted to receive one of the support members on the associated supporting units. For example, as seen in FIG. 6, the construction of the central portion of support bracket 92 is illustrated.

As seen in FG. 6, the central body portion'92 thereof includes downwardly extending legs 160 and 101 which integrally merge with outwardly directed portions 102 and 103 respectively. The support member 20 formed integral with the upper portion of lthe body structure 13 extends upwardly within the downwardly facing channel portion of support bracket 92.

As seen in FIG. 6, the construction of each of the support members 20-23 is unique, and the description of support member 20 is equally applicable to the remaining supporting members. Member 20 includes an upper horizontal surface 105 and a pair of side vertical surfaces 106 and 107. A wear plate 110 is suitably secured to the upper surface 105 and a pair of wear plates 111 and 112 are secured to the sidesurfaces 106 and 107 of the support member.

The inner faces of the downwardly facing channel portion of each of the bracket members are provided with cooperating wear plates, and as seen in FIG. 6, a wear plate 115 provided on surface 116 is adapted to engage wear plate 110 on the associated support member.

A wear plate 117 provided on one inner surface of the support bracket is adapted to engage wear plate 112 on the supporting member, and another wear plate 118 provided on the opposite vertical surface of the downwardly facing channel portion of the support bracket cooperates with a tapered Wedge member 120 hereinafter more fully described. It will be apparent from the foregoing description that each of the support brackets 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98 and 99 includes a central laterally extending portion which defines a downwardly facing channel which receives one of the support members 20, 21, 22 or 23. Wear plate means is also provided between the support brackets and the support members.

As seen in FIG. 6, the under lsurfaces and 126 of laterally extending portions 102 and 103 of the support brackets are spaced `above the upper surface of the body structure 13, and accordingly, the entire weight will be transmitted from the support brackets to the support members through the wear plates 115 and 110.

A series of aligned openings is provided in laterally extending portion 102 and a similar series of aligned openings 131 is provided in laterally extending portion 103. Openings 130 and 131 provided in the support brackets are spaced apar-.t ,the same distance as the series of openings 70, 71, 72 and 73, 75, 76, 77 and 78, and a series of bolts 132 and 133 are adapted to extend through the openings in the support brackets and can be threaded into the tapped openings in the upper portions of the support units for detachably securing the support brackets of the load-supporting units to the supporting units.

The bolts hold the load-supporting means in operative position on the supporting units, but carry no loads except those imposed by the centrifugal forces acting on the load-supporting units which may place torsional loads on the load-supporting units. The bolts are prestressed and may be secured in place with safety wire.

Referring again to FIG. 5, it will be noted that the load-supporting means Sti includes an outer face plate 140 which extends the length thereof and an inner face plate 141 which also extends the length thereof. These face plates may, of course, be formed in sections if desired, but at any rate, they serve to rigidly interconnect the upper and lower members 83 and 35 as well as the various cross-bracing members. It will be noted that the inner face plate means 141 is of greater thickness than the outer face plate means to readily permit welding attachment thereto of the support brackets heretofore described, as well as various other mounting brackets which may be employed for supporting the load thereon.

Support brackets 92, 95, 96 and 99 include integral therewith vertically extending iiange portions 145, 146, 147 and 148 respectively, these vertically extending flange portions being secured to the inner face plate means of the load-supporting units to provide additional rigidity and strength to the associated support brackets.

' Support brackets 93, 94, 97 and 93 are also provided with integral flange portions 150, 151, 152 and 153 which extend upwardly therefrom at a slight angle toward the outer ends of the associated loadasupporting units to provide additional rigidity and strength to the arrangement.

To provide still further strength to the load-supporting units, each of the units is provided as seen in FIG. 3 with angularly disposed reinforcing members 155 disposed between the inner and outer face plates of the units and connected to Various portions of the upper member 83 as well as the vertical members Sii.

As seen in FIG. 3, a conduit 157 is supported through certain suitable openings provided in the vertical support members 88 and extends outwardly through openings provided in portions 85 of the lower member 85. This conduit 157 is adapted to be connected with the conduits of the brake system as incorporated in each of the adjacent supporting means.

As seen particularly in FIGS. l and 3, a load indicated generally by reference numeral 16u is shown in schematic outline, the outlines representing generally the outer dimensions of a large bull gear for use in ships.

As seen most clearly in FiG. 2, the bull gear 161B is shown as including a iirst relatively short shaft 161 extending from one side thereof and a considerably longer shaft 162 extending from the other side thereof.

As discussed previously, it is desirable to move the loadsupporting means quite close to the lateral portions of the loads so as to reduce the dunnage and blocking which is required. It will be seen in FIG. 2 that the load-supporting means 80 and S1 have been moved to a point closely adjacent to the lateral sides of the bull gear. For the purpose of illustration, it is assumed that the center of gravity of the bull gear plus the two adjacent loadsupporting means 30 and 81 lies at approximately the point indicated by letters C.G.

As discussed previously, a particular advantage of the present invention is the fact that load-support means 80 and 81 can be laterally adjusted so as to dispose the center of gravity substantially over the center line of the support means.

As seen in FIG. 2, the center of gravity is shown as being disposed directly on the longitudinal medial axis X--X of the car and this results in a complete elimination of the necessity of counterweights, and further ensures that the wheels of the support means will be substantially equally loaded. It will be noted as seen in FIG. 2 that the center of gravity of the arrangement can be so adjusted by disposing the two load-support means Si) and 81 in the relative position shown wherein support means 81 is disposed a considerable distance laterally inwardly from the adjacent outer edge of the support means.

lt is, of course, evident that either or both of the loadsupport means may be shifted back and forth in a lateral direction as required for accommodating the particular load and adjusting the position of the center of gravity. It will, of course, be understood that the bolts associated with each of the support brackets will be drawn tight after the load support means tat) and S1 have been placed in the predetermined desired position whereupon the bolts can be subsequently removed and members 8@ and 81 can be repositioned as desired.

Referring now to FIG. 7, support bracket 92 previously described in connection with load-support means 8@ is illustrated, and the top portion of the support bracket is broken away in order that the details of construction of the support bracket may be more clearly understood. 1t will be noted that the side wall portion 19t? of the support bracket 92 is tapered from a minimum thickness at the end 151) thereof to a maximum thickness at the end thereof. The wear plate 118 is disposed along the inner surface of wall 111i) and the tapered wedge member 124i is shown in its operative position. it will be seen that the side surface 12d of Wedge member 120 engages wear plate 111 while the support surface 126" of the wedge member engages the wear plate 118, the wedge member having a taper corresponding to the tapered space between wear plates 11S and 111 such that the wedge member is snugly received therebetween. lt is evident that when the wedge member is forced into the operative position shown in FiG. 7, it will prevent any relative movement between the associated support bracket and support member in cooperation with the bolts 132 and 133 which anchor the support bracket to the associated support unit. The wedge member is adapted to efficiently serve this function regardless of the amount of wear between the various wear plates on the support member and support bracket since the wedge member obviously can be moved in further than the position shown after some wear has occurred on the lateral wear plates 107, 111, 116 and 118.

A stop and extractor means for the wedge member is indicated generally by reference numeral and includes a plate portion 171 which is bolted in place by bolts 172 extending through suitable openings in the plate. An upstanding portion 173 is supported by the plate and has a bore 174 formed therethrough.

An elongated threaded bolt 175 extends through the bore 174 and is threaded within a correspondingly threaded opening 176 provided in the wedge member 120.

Three locking nuts 177, 178 and 179 are threaded on the bolt 175 and are adapted to be tightened up against the end of the wedge member and the opposite ends of the portion 173 for locking the components in the position shown.

It is evident that this arrangement will maintain the wedge securely in its operative position. When it is desired to withdraw the wedge member, member 173 for example may be backed off thereby permitting the bolt 175 to be rotated with respect to ynut 179 to pull the wedge member loose.

It is evident that once the wedge member has been sufficiently loosened, it may be simply withdrawn after unbolting plate 171 and removing the stop and extractor means.

Referring to FIG. 1, the stop and extractor means just described is indicated by reference numeral 70 and a second annular means is indicated by reference numeral 180. A wedge member along with an associated stop and extractor means may be provided for each of the brackets formed on the load-support means.

As indicated in FIGS. 1-3, the means for mounting the bolt means in position rstly comprises a pair of similar support members '185 mounted on the upper surfaces of each of the load-support means, the support members having semi-cylindrical cut-out portions 186 formed in the upper surface thereof for receiving one of the shaft portions of the bull gear.

These support members 185 are maintained in operative position by a pair of angle brackets 188 secured as by welding to the upper surface of each of the load-support means S0 and 81. The support members 185 are preferably formed of wood or other similar material to prevent scoring or other damage to the shaft portions yof the bull gear. A clamping member 190 is provided with a semi-cylindrical cut-out in the under surface thereof which receives the upper parts of the bull gear shaft, and clamping member 190 is secured as by bolts or the like to the lower support member 185.

To additionally support the bull gear in position, a pair of spaced I beams 192 and 193 are disposed in spanning relationship to the upper surfaces of each of the load-support units, these I beams 192 and 193 being secured in position as by welding or the like.

Blocks of wood 194 and 195 are disposed between beams 192 and 193 respectively and the adjacent surfaces of the bull gear for positively preventing any movement of the bull gear. It is evident that with this arrangement, the bull gear is firmly supported upon the load-bearing means. In addition, as seen in FIG. l, a pair of cables or annular strap means 196 may be passed over the upper portion of the bull gear and secured at their opposite ends to brackets 197 which may be welded to the upper deck of the platform structures of the associated support means.

It is obvious that the means for supporting the load will vary widely in accordance with the particular type of load being carried, and that the load-supporting means illustrated is merely one example of myriad arrangements which might be employed.

It should be understood that the various brackets and other support members which are welded to either the inner face plate means of the load-support means or to the deck of the support means can be chipped off and replaced as desired once the load has been removed.

Referring now to FIGS. 8 and 9, two possible positions of the load-support means are illustrated. In FIG. 8, the load-support means are indicated by reference numerals 200 and 201, and it will be noted that these load-support means are reversed from the position shown in FIG. l and FIG. 2, or in other words, the support brackets 203, 204, 205 and 206 of support means 201 and the support brackets V207, 208, 209 and 210 of support means 200 face outwardly rather than inwardly as previously discussed. It will, of course, be understood that the construction of the load-support means as well as the supporting units 212 and 213 is otherwise identical to that previously described.

The arrangement shown in FIG. 8 is one which is particularly adapted for use which a very narrow load, and it is evident from this figure that the two support means 200 and 201 can in fact be moved into abutting relationship with one another without in the least interfering with one another. This is due to the fact, of course, that the support brackets may be reversed as seen in FIG. 8 so as to extend away from one another on the two load-support means thereby permitting the units 200 and 201 to be disposed quite closely adjacent to one another while at the same time retaining all of the structural strength and rigidity of the over-all car.

Referring now to FIG. 9, a further modified position is shown wherein the two load-support means 220 and 221 are positioned such that the associated support brackets 222-229 are directed inwardly towards one another. In this instance, the load-support means 220 and 221 actually extend laterally outwardly of the sides of the associated supporting units 230 and 231, this arrangement providing a maximum width for receiving the load while at the same time maintaining the desired degree of strength and rigidity.

It is apparent from the foregoing that there is provided a new and novel transport vehicle construction which can be used either on land or on railroad tracks. While the disclosed embodiment is illustrated as mounted on relatively conventional railroad tracks, it is quite apparent that the two support means could as well be provided with conventional tired wheels for operation over Y v10 land, and further the body structure `at one end could be swivellingly secured as in a tractor-trailer combination.

This is a very desirable feature since many times railroad tracks are not available at the site to which the load is being delivered, and laccordingly it may be necessary to transfer the load at some intermediate point from the railway vehicle to a land vehicle of similar construction.

The arrangement of the present invention is also readily adapted for use with loads of different sizes and types since the load-supporting means can be adjusted laterally with respect to one another and with respect to the movable support means, and furthermore, load-support means of different lengths may be employed in certain applications.

The lateral adjustability of the load-support means completely eliminates the counter-weight problem prevalent in the prior art, since the center of gravity of the load can be adjusted with 4respect to the associated support means. Additionally, the load-support means may be moved quite close to the lo-ad thereby reducing the amount of dunnage and blocking required. The lateral adjustability of the load support means further enables a wide load to be shipped in a position for example as shown in FIG. 9, whereupon the load-support means may be adjusted laterally inwardly such that the car can be returned to its starting point at a reduced width thereby reducing the cost and possibility of injury thereto.

It should also be noted that the arrangement of the present invention permits ready loading in a lateral direction. This may be accomplished by removing one of the load-support means completely whereupon the load can be moved into operative position in a lateral direction whereupon the removed load support means can be replaced in its proper load-supporting relationship.

This is of particular advantage where the vertical clearance is limited as for example in warehouses and factories and the like where the loading is most likely to take place.

As this invention may be embodied in several forms without departing from the spirit or essential char-acteristics thereof, the present embodiment is therefore illustrative and not restrictive, and since the scope of the invention is defined by the appended claims, all changes that fall within the metes and bounds of the claims or that form their functional as well as conjointly cooperative equivalents are therefore intended to be embraced by those claims.

I claim:

l. A transport Vehicle construction comprising a pair of separate spaced wheeled support units, each of said support units having an upper portion including a pair of longitudinally spaced transversely extending support members extending substantially across the width of the associated support units and extending upwardly above the associated upper portions of the support units, a pair of separate spaced similar load-bearing means, each of said load-bearing means comprising an elongated rigid onepiece reinforced structure of heavy duty construction and each of said load-bearing means having a plurality of support brackets extending laterally therefrom and spaced longitudinally thereof and defining downwardly facing channel portions opening in a downward direction, each of said channel portions receiving one of said support members for supporting and interlocking the load-bearing means with the support units, and means for detachably securing said support brackets to the upper por-tion of each of said support units such that the load-bearing means can be laterally adjusted relative to each of the support means for accomodating different sizes and types of loads.

2. Apparatus as defined in claim l, wherein said lastmentioned means comprises a plurality of openings formed in said brackets and the upper portion of said support units, and bolt means extending through said openings for securely fixing the support brackets to said support units.

3. A transport vehicle construction comprising a pair of separate spaced wheeled support units including a reinforced upper substantially at portion having a pair of longitudinally spaced transversely extending support members thereon, said support members extending upwardly above said upper portions and substantially entirely across the width thereof, each of said support member including wear plate means on the upper and side outer surfaces thereof, a pair of separate spaced loadbearing means each of which includes an elongated rigid one-piece reinforced structure of heavy-duty construction, each of said load-bearing means having at opposite ends thereof a pair of longitudinally spaced laterally extending support brackets each of which defines a downwardly facing channel opening in 4a downward direction adapted to receive a portion of one of said support members, and wear plate means disposed along .the bottom and side walls of said downwardly facing channels for cooperation with the wear plate means on said support members, and means for detachably securing said support brackets to the upper portion of said support units such that the load-bearing means can be adjusted laterally relative tothe wheeled support units to vary the spacing of the load-bearing means for accommodating different sizes and types of loads.

4. Apparatus as defined in claim 3, including a tapered wedge member litting between the wear plate means of at least one of said support brackets and the associated support member for preventing relative movement between the support bracket and associated support member, and means for locking the wedge member in place.

5. A transport vehicle construction comprising a pair of separate spaced wheeled support units including a reinforced supporting platform having a substantially flat upper surface, a pair of longitudinally spaced transversely extending support members at the upper portion of said platform extending upwardly above said upper surface and substantially entirely across the width thereof, each of said support members having wear plates on the upper and side outer surfaces thereof, the upper portion of said platform having a series of openings formed on either side of each of the associated support members, a pair of separate spaced load-bearing means of similar construction, each of said load-bearing means comprising an elongated rigid one-piece reinforced structure of vheavy-,duty construction, each of said load-bearing means including four longitudinally spaced laterally extending support brackets all extending outwardly from one side of the associated load bearing means, a rst pair of said support brackets being disposed at one end thereof, and a second pair of said support brackets being disposed at .the other end thereof to dene an unobstructed intermediate load-bearing portion, each of said support brackets defining a downwardly facing channel portion opening in a downward direction and having wear plate means on the bottom and side inner surfaces thereof, each of the channel portions of said support brackets receiving one of said support members and being spaced from the adjacent platform whereby the load is supported from said loadbearing means directly on said support members, said support brackets having a series of openings formed on either side of the downwardly facing channel portions thereof, and bolt means extending through the openings formed in said platforms and said support br-ackets for detachably securing the load-bearing means to the support units such that the load bearing means can be adjusted laterally relative to the wheel support units to vary the spacing of the load-bearing means for accommodating different sizes and types of loads between the central unobstructed intermediate load-bearing portions of lthe load bearing means.

6. Apparatus `as defined in claim 5 including la tapered wedge member tting between the wear plate means on a side surface of each of ysaid support brackets and a side surface of the associated support members for preventing relative movement between said load-bearing means and said support units.

References Cited in the le of this patent

Claims (1)

1. A TRANSPORT VEHICLE CONSTRUCTION COMPRISING A PAIR OF SEPARATE SPACED WHEELED SUPPORT UNITS, EACH OF SAID SUPPORT UNITS HAVING AN UPPER PORTION INCLUDING A PAIR OF LONGITUDINALLY SPACED TRANSVERSELY EXTENDING SUPPORT MEMBERS EXTENDING SUBSTANTIALLY ACROSS THE WIDTH OF THE ASSOCIATED SUPPORT UNITS AND EXTENDING UPWARDLY ABOVE THE ASSOCIATED UPPER PORTIONS OF THE SUPPORT UNITS, A PAIR OF SEPARATE SPACED SIMILAR LOAD-BEARING MEANS, EACH OF SAID LOAD-BEARING MEANS COMPRISING AN ELONGATED RIGID ONEPIECE REINFORCED STRUCTURE OF HEAVY DUTY CONSTRUCTION AND EACH OF SAID LOAD-BEARING MEANS HAVING A PLURALITY OF SUPPORT BRACKETS EXTENDING LATERALLY THEREFROM AND SPACED LONGITUDINALLY THEREOF AND DEFINING DOWNWARDLY FACING CHANNEL PORTIONS OPENING IN A DOWNWARD DIRECTION, EACH OF SAID CHANNEL PORTIONS RECEIVING ONE OF SAID SUPPORT MEMBERS FOR SUPPORTING AND INTERLOCKING THE LOAD-BEARING MEANS WITH THE SUPPORT UNITS, AND MEANS FOR DETACHABLY SECURING SAID SUPPORT BRACKETS TO THE UPPER PORTION OF EACH OF SAID SUPPORT UNITS SUCH THAT THE LOAD-BEARING MEANS CAN BE LATERALLY ADJUSTED RELATIVE TO EACH OF THE SUPPORT MEANS FOR ACCOMMODATING DIFFERENT SIZES AND TYPES OF LOADS.
US112813A 1961-05-26 1961-05-26 Transport vehicle construction Expired - Lifetime US3147715A (en)

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US3242879A (en) * 1963-11-07 1966-03-29 Gen Electric Railroad transportation of large transformers
US3315800A (en) * 1964-12-14 1967-04-25 Hampton R Wagner Collapsible plywood shipping device
US3322457A (en) * 1965-10-21 1967-05-30 Price Bros Company Vehicle for transporting concrete pipe
US3658011A (en) * 1969-11-06 1972-04-25 Planet Corp Coil car
US3789774A (en) * 1972-05-08 1974-02-05 Gen Electric Transport vehicle for long loads having limited lateral roadway clearance
US3961709A (en) * 1974-07-15 1976-06-08 Ppg Industries, Inc. End restraint for shipping bins
US3963122A (en) * 1974-07-15 1976-06-15 Ppg Industries, Inc. Front restraint device for shipping bins
US4010848A (en) * 1974-07-15 1977-03-08 Ppg Industries, Inc. Front restraint device for shipping bins
US4671714A (en) * 1985-08-16 1987-06-09 Bennett Robert W System for transporting semi-trailers on two interconnected vehicles
US5362083A (en) * 1993-08-02 1994-11-08 Chrysler Corporation Apparatus for moving heavy equipment
US20090273159A1 (en) * 2007-05-05 2009-11-05 American Heavy Moving and Rigging, Inc. Dual lane multi-axle transport vehicle

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US2491044A (en) * 1946-08-31 1949-12-13 James C Holland Truck frame extension
US2636687A (en) * 1948-07-28 1953-04-28 Cleveland Frog & Crossing Co Rail brace
US2638852A (en) * 1950-01-24 1953-05-19 John A Bannen Rail trailer carrier
US2676815A (en) * 1951-12-07 1954-04-27 Utility Trailer Mfg Company Longitudinally adjustable running gear for vehicles
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US229072A (en) * 1880-06-22 Chester p
US1016381A (en) * 1911-09-11 1912-02-06 John Allen Watson Luggage-carrier.
US2058955A (en) * 1931-10-05 1936-10-27 Gothaer Waggonfabrik Ag Appliance for the transport of railway cars on streets
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US2491044A (en) * 1946-08-31 1949-12-13 James C Holland Truck frame extension
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US2638852A (en) * 1950-01-24 1953-05-19 John A Bannen Rail trailer carrier
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* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3242879A (en) * 1963-11-07 1966-03-29 Gen Electric Railroad transportation of large transformers
US3315800A (en) * 1964-12-14 1967-04-25 Hampton R Wagner Collapsible plywood shipping device
US3322457A (en) * 1965-10-21 1967-05-30 Price Bros Company Vehicle for transporting concrete pipe
US3658011A (en) * 1969-11-06 1972-04-25 Planet Corp Coil car
US3789774A (en) * 1972-05-08 1974-02-05 Gen Electric Transport vehicle for long loads having limited lateral roadway clearance
US3961709A (en) * 1974-07-15 1976-06-08 Ppg Industries, Inc. End restraint for shipping bins
US4010848A (en) * 1974-07-15 1977-03-08 Ppg Industries, Inc. Front restraint device for shipping bins
US3963122A (en) * 1974-07-15 1976-06-15 Ppg Industries, Inc. Front restraint device for shipping bins
US4671714A (en) * 1985-08-16 1987-06-09 Bennett Robert W System for transporting semi-trailers on two interconnected vehicles
US5362083A (en) * 1993-08-02 1994-11-08 Chrysler Corporation Apparatus for moving heavy equipment
US8424897B1 (en) 2002-05-24 2013-04-23 Alpha One Transporter Inc. Dual lane multi-axle transport vehicle
US9187123B2 (en) 2002-05-24 2015-11-17 Faymonville Distribution Ag Dual lane multi-axle transport vehicle
US20090273159A1 (en) * 2007-05-05 2009-11-05 American Heavy Moving and Rigging, Inc. Dual lane multi-axle transport vehicle

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