US3142289A - High output engines - Google Patents

High output engines Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US3142289A
US3142289A US31930A US3193060A US3142289A US 3142289 A US3142289 A US 3142289A US 31930 A US31930 A US 31930A US 3193060 A US3193060 A US 3193060A US 3142289 A US3142289 A US 3142289A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
bank
cylinder
cylinders
chamber
engine
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US31930A
Inventor
John B Platner
Charles D Moore
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Old Carco LLC
Original Assignee
Chrysler Corp
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Chrysler Corp filed Critical Chrysler Corp
Priority to US31930A priority Critical patent/US3142289A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US3142289A publication Critical patent/US3142289A/en
Assigned to FIDELITY UNION TRUST COMPANY, TRUSTEE reassignment FIDELITY UNION TRUST COMPANY, TRUSTEE MORTGAGE (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: CHRYSLER CORPORATION
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02BINTERNAL-COMBUSTION PISTON ENGINES; COMBUSTION ENGINES IN GENERAL
    • F02B27/00Use of kinetic or wave energy of charge in induction systems, or of combustion residues in exhaust systems, for improving quantity of charge or for increasing removal of combustion residues
    • F02B27/005Oscillating pipes with charging achieved by arrangement, dimensions or shapes of intakes pipes or chambers; Ram air pipes
    • F02B27/006Oscillating pipes with charging achieved by arrangement, dimensions or shapes of intakes pipes or chambers; Ram air pipes of intake runners
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02BINTERNAL-COMBUSTION PISTON ENGINES; COMBUSTION ENGINES IN GENERAL
    • F02B27/00Use of kinetic or wave energy of charge in induction systems, or of combustion residues in exhaust systems, for improving quantity of charge or for increasing removal of combustion residues
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02MSUPPLYING COMBUSTION ENGINES IN GENERAL WITH COMBUSTIBLE MIXTURES OR CONSTITUENTS THEREOF
    • F02M31/00Apparatus for thermally treating combustion-air, fuel, or fuel-air mixture
    • F02M31/02Apparatus for thermally treating combustion-air, fuel, or fuel-air mixture for heating
    • F02M31/04Apparatus for thermally treating combustion-air, fuel, or fuel-air mixture for heating combustion-air or fuel-air mixture
    • F02M31/06Apparatus for thermally treating combustion-air, fuel, or fuel-air mixture for heating combustion-air or fuel-air mixture by hot gases, e.g. by mixing cold and hot air
    • F02M31/08Apparatus for thermally treating combustion-air, fuel, or fuel-air mixture for heating combustion-air or fuel-air mixture by hot gases, e.g. by mixing cold and hot air the gases being exhaust gases
    • F02M31/083Temperature-responsive control of the amount of exhaust gas or combustion air directed to the heat exchange surface
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02MSUPPLYING COMBUSTION ENGINES IN GENERAL WITH COMBUSTIBLE MIXTURES OR CONSTITUENTS THEREOF
    • F02M35/00Combustion-air cleaners, air intakes, intake silencers, or induction systems specially adapted for, or arranged on, internal-combustion engines
    • F02M35/10Air intakes; Induction systems
    • F02M35/10006Air intakes; Induction systems characterised by the position of elements of the air intake system in direction of the air intake flow, i.e. between ambient air inlet and supply to the combustion chamber
    • F02M35/10026Plenum chambers
    • F02M35/10045Multiple plenum chambers; Plenum chambers having inner separation walls
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02MSUPPLYING COMBUSTION ENGINES IN GENERAL WITH COMBUSTIBLE MIXTURES OR CONSTITUENTS THEREOF
    • F02M35/00Combustion-air cleaners, air intakes, intake silencers, or induction systems specially adapted for, or arranged on, internal-combustion engines
    • F02M35/10Air intakes; Induction systems
    • F02M35/104Intake manifolds
    • F02M35/116Intake manifolds for engines with cylinders in V-arrangement or arranged oppositely relative to the main shaft
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02BINTERNAL-COMBUSTION PISTON ENGINES; COMBUSTION ENGINES IN GENERAL
    • F02B75/00Other engines
    • F02B75/16Engines characterised by number of cylinders, e.g. single-cylinder engines
    • F02B75/18Multi-cylinder engines
    • F02B75/22Multi-cylinder engines with cylinders in V, fan, or star arrangement
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02TCLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES RELATED TO TRANSPORTATION
    • Y02T10/00Road transport of goods or passengers
    • Y02T10/10Internal combustion engine [ICE] based vehicles
    • Y02T10/12Improving ICE efficiencies

Description

July 2s, 1964 Filed May 26, 1960 `uly 28, 1964 J. B. PLATNER ETAL HIGH OUTPUT ENGINES 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed May 26, 1960 INVENTOR.;A 771727@ 7'. ,.F. )Ya a re July 28, A1964 J. B. PLATNER ETAL 3,142,289

HIGH OUTPUT ENGINES Filed May 26, 1960 5 SheetsSheet 3 INVENTOR'. )27271 .3. ffdzzfef 5647/65 P, More E MMM/w #fray/115K:

July 28, 1964 .1. B. PLATNER ETAL HIGH OUTPUT ENGINES 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed May 26, 1960 array/winds".

July 28, 1964 J. B. PLATNER ETAL 3,142,289

HIGH OUTPUT ENGINES Filed May 26, 1960 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 array/VSM?.

United States Patent O 3,142,239 HIGH OUTPUT ENG-EJES John B. Piatner, Detroit, and Charles D. Moore, Birmingham, Mich., assignors to Chrysler Corporation, Highland Park, Mich., a corporation of Delaware Filed May 26, 1960, Ser. No. 31,930 16 Claims. (Ci. 12S- 55) This invention relates to high output engines for motor driven vehicles. It especially relates to ram induction systems for engines of automotive vehicles designed to provide the cylinders thereof with dynamic charging and adapted to provide such vehicles with unusual performance characteristics.

The present application is a continuation-in-part of our copending application Serial No. 657,153 tiled May 6, 1957.

In said copending application Serial No. 657,153 we have described a number of forms of induction manifolding systems for use in connection with engines, for example of the V-type, which systems are provided with long induction passages or ducts and wherein these systems and the lengths of their induction passages are such as to produce dynamic charging by harmonic resonant tuning and by mass movement of air (inertia effects) in the cylinders of .the engine over substantially the full operating range (usually 1200 to 4000 rpm.) of speeds of the engine.

It was also there disclosed that the passage lengths in inches for optimum results subject to variations in length required by specific damping effects produced in particular designs, would generally fall within the empirical formula where N is the engine speed in revolutions per minute at which performance is to peak and C is the velocity of sound in feet per second in air in the intake passages under the atmospheric temperature and pressure conditions at which the engine is to be operated. Moreover, it was there stated that where a plenum chamber feed was used, the passage length obtained above was in most cases to be considered to be the distance from the valve inlet and the connection of the passage with the plenum chamber.

We also have disclosed in said copending application a particularly novel construction utilizing the foregoing effects wherein each cylinder is provided with its own long intake passage between the inlet valve of such cylinder and the source of air-fuel mixture and wherein all the intake passages for the cylinders of each bank of the engine emanate from a common air-fuel charge receiving plenum chamber in juxtaposition to the bank of cylinders of the engine opposite to that containing the cylinders it is to be feed. It was also there made apparent that by varying the design details, the speed range of the engine in which dynamic charging was to occur could be predetermined and an arrangement be obtained having for example exceptional torque output in the low and mid speed range or maximum performance in the upper speed range.

The present invention is especially directed to an application of these features to particular arrangements providing unusual performance characteristics, especially high torque, in the medium speed range of the engine enabling enough extra boost in power in such range for quick passing on present-day highways without need of kickdown or passing gears. The intake manifolding of the present invention facilitates the obtaining of this result by packing into the cylinders of the engine an extraordinary amount of fuel-air mixture to secure a sizeable power increase as compared to conventional systems.

ice

The effect obtained is one superior to normal aspiration and without the complication of costly mechanisms essential to supercharging. The increase in torque is particularly noticeable in the speed range of 2000 and 3800 r.p.m. with a peak boost at 2800 r.p.m. It enables an increase in torque or hosepower of 10% and more.

The induction system of the present invention moreover provides this impressive acceleration at highway speeds while also providing smooth low speed operation and by a construction precluding the mechanical diiiiculties normally associated with supercharger fuel induction and other high performance equipment. Furthermore it provides effective ram tuning at full throttle so that part throttle operation and economy may go unchanged from that of a conventional engine.

The foregoing combination of results is obtained by an induction system employing two outboard mounted multi-barrel carburetors, preferably of four barrels each but which may be of the dual type, in connection with a V-8 engine. In such arrangement each carburetor is positioned laterally outwardly beyond the cylinder head of the bank of cylinders which is opposite to that which it is to feed, and in a plane above the same. Each carburetor connects with a main plenum or distribution chamber generally immediately below such carburetor and this chamber in turn connects by separate long induction pipes, passages, ducts or conduits with the respective intake passages of the bank of cylinders it is to feed, forming therewith ram air resonator tubes or passages. The plenum chambers feeding such conduits are preferred to be of such shape and dimension as not to upset the free resonant condition in the pipes. The carburetor at the left bank of the engine in such an arrangement feeds the right bank of cylinders and that at the right bank feeds the left bank of cylinders.

A feature of the construction is that each conduit is separate from its neighbor and to obtain maximum induction effects each extends from its associated plenum chamber in a continuous smooth sweeping and looping curve over the bank of cylinders not containing the cylinder it is to serve, to the inlet passage of the cylinder of the bank it is to feed. Moreover, the plenum chambers serving the two banks of cylinders are interconnected by an equalizer or balancing tube to further facilitate the new result.

The principal object of the invention is therefore to provide an engine of the opposed cylinder type with an intake system providing unusual performance characteristics and capable of providing when desired, high torque output in the medium speed range of the engine enabling quick passing of a vehicle on the highway without resorting to kickdown or passing gears.

Another object is to provide a V-type engine with a long branch induction system having a pair of carburetorfed plenum chambers each outwardly of and in juxtaposition to and in a plane over one of the banks of cylinders and each connecting by individual long sweeping conduits extending over the bank to which its plenum chamber is in juxtaposition with the intake passages of the cylinders of the opposite bank and which pair of plenum chambers are interconnected by a balance tube.

A further object is to provide an intake system for a V engine as in the previous objects wherein each of the pairs of plenum chambers has an exhaust gas heated hot spot and wherein the plenum feeding the cylinders of one bank of the engine has its hot spo't heated by the exhaust gases of all of the cylinders of the bank which it does not feed and which bank is in juxtaposition to this plenum chamber and similarly the hot spot of the other plenum chamber is heated by the exhaust gases of all of the cylinders of the bank of cylinders it does not feed.

A further object is to provide a hot spot heating arrangement as in the previous object wherein an exhaust gas flow restriction is provided in the conduit means leading to the hot spot to control heating of the same and wherein the arrangement may also provide for return of the exhaust gases from the hot spot to the exhaust pipe of the engine in a manner to prevent overheating of the hot spot by exhaust gas when the engine is up to temperature.

Other objects and advantages of our invention will appear from the following description and from the drawings wherein:

FIGURE 1 is an end elevation partially in section of a V-engine to which the novel intake and exhaust system of our invention has been applied and which is viewed from the front or fan end of the engine.

FIGURE 2 is a plan view, partially schematic, showing the intake manifolding of FGURE 1 as applied to a V-8 engine and designed to provide dynamic charging of the intake system by harmonic resonant tuning and inertia effects, the long branch manifold illustrated being arranged with plenum chambers adapted for multi-barrel carburetor feeding;

FIGURE 3 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional plan view of the plenum chamber of one of the manifold scctions of FIGURES 1 and 2 and which is taken at 3-3 of the left hand bank of the engine of FIGURE 1, this view especially showing the individual inlets thereto from the intake conduits;

FIGURE 4 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional plan view taken at 4-4 of the left hand bank carburetor of FIGURE 1 showing the paired primary and paired secondary throttle blades of the four-barrel carburetor there shown;

FIGURE 5 is a plan view partially schematic, similar to that of FIGURE 2 but showing the carburetor throttle operating linkage and operator therefor;

FIGURE 6 is an enlarged elevational view of a portion of the carburetor throttle linkage showing the manner of interconnecting the primary and secondary throttle blade shafts for timed operation; and

FIGURE 7 is an elevational view partially in section typical of both banks of the engine showing the exhaust manifold of the left hand bank and intake hot spot heating system associated therewith for heating the hot spot of the intake system feeding the right hand bank of cylinders.

Referring now to the drawings wherein similar numerals are used to designate similar parts of the structure, FIGURE 1 shows a cross section of a V engine, for example, a V-8 engine to which our invention has been applied.

As seen in FIGURE 1, the engine has two banks 9 and 9a of cylinders 10 each arranged at a suitable angle to the vertical and forming for example an angle of 90 to each other in the cylinder block 11. Secured to the block 11 are left and right cylinder heads 12 and 12a respectively, provided with suitably shaped combustion chambers 13 preferably of the wedge type, immediately above each cylinder 10. It will be understood that combustion chambers of other shapes may be used, for example, a hemispherical-type chamber.

The cylinders of each bank are preferably aligned longitudinally of the engine as schematically illustrated in FIGURE 2, with the cylinders of the opposite banks offset longitudinally relative to each other. For convenience of reference, the cylinders of the left hand cylinder bank which is to the left looking forwardly from the ilywheel end of the engine are numbered l, 3, 5, and 7 starting such numbering at the opposite or fan end of the engine and those of the right hand bank are numbered 2, 4, 6, and 8 respectively, these numerals appearing internally of 'the cylinder representations in FIGURES 2 and 5.

Each cylinder is provided with a piston 14, recipro` cable therein and operably connected to a crankshaft 15 CII through a connecting rod 16 and wrist pin 17. Crankshaft 1S may be of any type but will preferably be of the type wherein double crank throws are arranged at 90 to each other, the first connecting with the pistons of cylinders 1 and 2, the second with the pistons of cylinders 3 and 4, the third with the pistons of cylinders 5 and 6, and the fourth with the pistons of cylinders 7 and 8. Alternatively the second and third throws may be interchanged such that the second throw is 270 of crank rotation from the first throw counting clockwise looking at the flywheel end of the engine whereas in the first described arrangement the second throw is only 90 of crank rotation from the first. Crankshafts of this type are described in our Patent 2,766,743 and shown in FIG- URES 6, 7, 8, and 9 thereof which disclosure is incorporated herein by reference.

Various firing orders are obviously possible for the two described crank arrangements, an example of that for the first being 1-ti-436-572 and an example for that for the second being 1-8-6-5-4-3-7-2, these tiring orders providing alternate suctions between opposite banks of cylinders except for two cylinders of each bank which fire successively, to wit, the cylinders 8 and 4 and 5 and 7 in the first crank arrangement and the cylinders 8 and 6 and cylinders 3 and 7 of the alternative crank arrangement.

The combustion chambers or cavities 13 of the cylinders 10, are by preference each provided with a single inlet opening or port 20, closed by an inlet valve 22, and with a single smaller exhaust outlet or port 24 closed by an exhaust valve 26, these ports and valves as seen in FIGURE 2 being preferably arranged in line longitudinally of the engine with the inlet ports of cylinders 1 and 3, 5 and 7, 2 and 4 and 6 and 8 in juxtaposition. It will be understood, however, that other valve arrangements may be used, for example, those in our copending application Serial No. 657,153 wherein the intake and exhaust valves of each cylinder are arranged transversely of 'the longitudinal axis of the engine. By preference each combustion chamber has a single sparking means 27 projecting therein which, as seen in FIGURES 1 and 2 for example, is preferably located intermediate the valves 22 and 26 in the wall of the chamber at the outer side of the bank where it is readily accessible for service.

The inlet and exhaust valves of both banks of the engine are preferably operable from a single camshaft 28 located above the crankshaft 15, the camshaft preferably actuating hydraulic tappets 30 and thereby the push rods 32 and 34 respectively, and inlet valve rocker arms 36, and exhaust valve rocker arms 38 of the inlet and exhaust valves mechanism respectively, which in turn actuate the normally spring 4u held closed valves 22 and 26.

By preference, the camshaft 28 is arranged to open the respective inlet valves 22 before top dead center position of the piston and to close the same sufficiently after bottom dead center position of the piston to take advantage of the additional charging influence of the ram intake pipes and obtain optimum charging. For example, for a pipe length of above 30 inches, the intake opening will preferably occur about 20 before top dead center and the intake closing will occur about 68 after bottom dead center. This will vary with the pipe length.

Opening and closing of the exhaust valves should be selected to provide optimum blow down and scavenging of the cylinders. Thus in the above example opening of the exhaust valve about 60 before bottom dead center position of the piston and closing about 28 after top dead center position will provide optimum outputs in the engine.

W As seen in FIGURES 1 and 2, the inlet opening 20 and the inlet valves 22 for each cylinder arc located at the inner terminus of intake or induction passages or conduits in the heads designated by the numeral 42 in the head 12 and 42a in the head 12a. These passages have outer terminal apertures 44 and 44a respectively in the inner side faces 456 and 46a respectively of the heads 12 and 12a where they connect with associated passages of an intake manifold generally designated by the numeral 48 (FIGURE 2). The mainfold 48 preferably comprises two substantially identical separable interlaced elongated sections 50 and Stia respectively, fed by suitable carburetor sources 52 and 52a of air and fuel. Section Sti is supported by its mounting flange 47 at the inner side 46 of the left bank and section 50a by its mounting iiange 47a at the inner side @da of the right bank by bolts I. In order to permit interlacing assembly of the units Si), 50a, a central portion 49 of the mounting flange i7 of unit 50 is made removable and may be secured in position by the bolts 51 after the units 50 and 50a are in place.

The section 50 directs a charge from its source 52 at the right hand bank 9a of the engine to the cylinders 1, 3, 5 and 7 of the opposite left hand bank 9 and the section 50a feeds the cylinders 3, 4, 6, and 3 of the right hand bank 9a from its source 52a.

The intake manifold sections 50 and Stia are each preferably provided with relatively compact but sizeable distribution boxes or plenum chambers 54 and 54a respectively, positioned outwardly of the heads 9a and 9 of the engine for receiving air-fuel mixture from the carburetor sources 52 and 52a respectively. These plenum chambers 54 and 54a respectively connect by groups of separate elongated tunable pipes, ducts, passages or conduits preferably of generally rectangular cross section and of generally similar size and shape to the intake passages i2 and 42a respectively of the cylinder head 12 and 12a, there being four such conduits in each group, as shown in FIGURE 2, for servicing an 8-cylinder Vrengine.

Thus the plenum chamber 54 located laterally outside of the right hand bank 9a of cylinders connects by conduits 56, 58, 60, and 62 with the entrance apertures 44 of the left hand bank 9 of cylinders l, 3, 5, and 7 while the plenum chamber 54a located laterally outside of the left hand bank 9 of the engine connects by conduits 56a, 58a, 69a, and 62a with the entrance apertures 44a of the intake passages of the right hand bank 9a of cylinders 2, 4, 6, and 8.

The plenum chambers 54, 54a will preferably be of such dimension and volume as to provide air feed to the tunable conduits without upsetting the free resonant condition in these conduits. Stated otherwise, the plenum chambers will be of sucient size and Width as to have a minimum effect upon the overall resonant frequency of the induction systems. For example, it has been found by test that optimum results of this character can usually be obtained when the distance from the end of the conduit to the nearest opposite wall of the chamber is at least about 11/2 to 21/2 times the diameter of a round conduit of equivalent section. Moreover, the walls of the chamber should preferably not intrude upon the resonating edges of the conduits.

As particularly evident in FIGURES 1 and 3, the chamber 54a is of substantially generally rectangular or oval shape. The depth of the chamber is substantially the depth of the tunable cross conduits 56a, 53a, 69a, and 62a, each of which opens into the chamber 54a by independent apertures 66a, 68a, 70a, and 72a respectively. These apertures are preferably in the same vertical plane as are the cross conduits aforesaid as will be evident from FIGURE 1. It will be noted that each aperture is located on the same inner side 74a of the chamber 54a. This feature operates Vto prevent a clash between suction impulses of the different cylinders of the opposite bank fed by this chamber. It will also be noted that the floor 76a of the chamber preferably forms a continuous level with the floors of the conduits 56a, 58a, 60a, and 62a. A

The plenum chamber 54 and the connections thereto of the conduits 56, 58, 60, and 62 will be of the same character as that described with respect to the plenum chamber 54a and its cross conduits. The cross conduits 56, 53, 6i), and 62 of the section Sti opens into the plenum chamber 54 by similar apertures 66, 68, 70, and 72.

As also seen in FIGURE 1, each plenum chamber 54 and 54a is provided with a heat stove or hot spot chamber designated 78 and 78a respectively for heating the floors 76 and 76a respectively of the chambers 54 and 54a.

The cross conduits of each of the sections 5i) and 50a, as evident from FIGURE 2, are in the interest of simplified interlacing, preferably arranged such that the conduits of each section are paired. Moreover, although these paired conduits may be independent of each other, they may have, as shown, a common parting wall. Thus the section 59 has its conduits 56 and 58 paired and its conduits 60 and 62 paired while the section 50a has its conduits 56a and 58a paired and its conduits 60a and 62a paired. It Will also be observed from FIGURE 2 that these paired conduits extend smoothly with sweeping curves of somewhat undulated pattern from their respective plenum chambers to the cylinder heads with which they connect and that the cross conduits 60 and 62 of the section Sti lie intermediate in FIGURE 2 the paired conduits 56a, 58a of the section Stia and the paired conduits 60a and 62a of this section. Moreover, the paired conduits 66a and 62a of the section Stia lie intermediate the paired conduits 6i) and 62 of the section Sii and the paired conduits 56 and 58 of the same section.

Referring now to FIGURE l, it will be further evident that the cross conduits of each of the sections 5t) and Stia are of similar shape in elevation transversely of the engine and in the same general plane. As typified by the cross conduit 62a shown in section in this view, it will be seen that it and its companion conduits of the section Stia connecting the plenum chamber 54@ with the intake passages 44a of the head 12a sweep smoothly upwardly from their respective apertures in the chamber 54a and loop over the head 12 of the cylinder bank 9 of the engine and in relatively close proximity thereto in a smooth curve and then extend laterally downwardly in a relatively straight line at substantially the same angle as the intake passages 42a of the cylinder bank 9a to connect with the apertures 46a of these passages in the inner face 46a of the cylinder head 12a. Manifestly, the curvature described with respect to the conduits of the section 56a likewise apply to the conduits of the section 50.

It will be evident that by this arrangement the central portion of the sections 5t) and 50a are humped above the cylinder heads 12 and 12a and their respective valve mechanism covers while their conduit ends are below the cylinder head covers, the latter facilitating a lowering of the carburetors S2 and 52a. With such an arrangement it is possible to obtain a low silhouette or hood level for the engine while at the same time obtaining the proper length of conduits facilitating resonant tuning of a character to provide the desired engine performance characteristics and an overall transverse width to lit into a vehicle compartment.

The plenum chambers 54 and 54a are each provided with upper mounting pads upon which to mount either a carburetor source of air and fuel mixture 52a which in the illustrated embodiment in the drawings is shown to be a four-barrel downdraft carburetor of the Carter AFB type having a built-in throttle control and venturi. When the manifold system is to be used with fuel injection, this unit 52a will be replaced by an air filter and intake provided with a similar throttle control and the same may be of a single or multiple barrel character. Moreover, in such cases each of the conduits will be provided with suitable fuel injection nozzles` 79 fed as described in our prior Patent 2,791,205.

The carburetor mounting face 80 of each of the plenum chambers 54 and 54a will be provided with suitable vertical h:'ip'ertures or risers coinciding with the corresponding barrels or throats of the carburetor or air source feeding the same. Each of the carburetors 52 and 52a, as

evident from FIGURES 1, 4, and 5, has a pair of primary barrels 82 and 84 and a pair of secondary barrels or throats 86 and 8S which coincide with relatively short similar pairs of risers 83, 8S, and 87, 89 in the carburetor mounting face or pad 80 of the plenum chambers 54 and 54a respectively.

The primary barrels and risers are preferably located as seen in FIGURES 2, 3, and on the side of the plenum chambers nearest to the apertures of the intake conduits fed by these chambers. This arrangement contributes to better initial feeding of the cylinders as well as more uniform distribution of the air or air-fuel mixture. Moreover, in order to further improve the uniformity of distribution of the air-fuel mixture delivery of the carburetors to the engine cylinders over the entire speed range, the plenum chambers are preferably further provided with a cross over or balancing conduit generally designated by the numeral 90 which extends across the engine intermediate the pairs of conduits 60, 62, and 60a, 62a as seen in FIGURES 2 and 5. This balance tube 90 serves to lean out the mixture delivered to the cylinders at low speeds of the engine and prevents overenrichment of the cylinders, which might occur because of the strong suction pulses of the manifold at low speeds.

In order to facilitate manufacture of intake sections 5t) and 50a of the same construction and provide for the balance tube structure 99, these intake sections are provided with stub connections 92, 92a which respectively connect with and open into the plenum chambers 54, 54a respectively. FIGURE 3 shows the stub connection 92a opening into the chamber 54a by an aperture 94a intermediate the conduits 68a and 73a and independently thereof. A similar stub connection 92 connects with and opens into the chamber 54 in a similar manner by an aperture 94.

The stub connections 92 and 92a curve upwardly respectively from the plenum chambers 54 and 54a following the shaping of the intake conduits of the sections 50 and 50a associated with such chambers and in a plane therewith. Once above the top portion of the rocker arm covers 93, these stub portions extend in a generally horizontal plane and are coupled together with a straight tubular metal section 95 and short flexible rubber-like pipe sections 96 by conventional screw-type clamping unions generally designated by the numeral 98 (see FIG- URE 5). These rubber sections 96 permit relative movement between the intake sections during engine operation.

The exhaust ports 24 and valves 26 are associated with exhaust gas passages 104 in the cylinder head 12 and passages 104:1 in the cylinder head 12a, these passages conducting the exhaust gases to a pair of exhaust manifolds 106 and 106e respectively, secured to the outer faces S and 108er respectively, of the cylinder heads 12 and 12a respectively, as seen in FIGURE l. The left hand bank exhaust manifold 106 includes a header or runner 110 which connects by side branches 112 with the passages 104 of the head 12. The right hand bank exhaust manifold 1tl6a includes a header or ruimer 11th: which connects by side branches 112a with the exhaust passages 16441 of the head 12a of the right hand cylinder bank 9a.

As best seen in FIGURE 7 showing the exhaust manifold structure 166er at the left hand bank and which is typical of that of the right hand bank, each of the exhaust headers 110 and l10n is comprised of two integral longitudinal runner portions designated by the numerals 114, 116 for the left hand runner and 11411 and 1160 for the right hand runner. These integral portions extend toward each other and curve downwardly in a V formation meeting in a common generally central discharge chamber 120 controlled by a thermostatically operable heat valve 122 whose blade 124 is arranged to move from a closed position (shown) during cold starting of the engine to a full open position when the engine is up to temperature. This chamber has a flanged discharge outlet 126 below the throttle 124 to which an exhaust pipe 128 connects the latter conveying the out moving exhaust gases to a muffler 130 (see FIGURE 1) suitably located on the vehicle, It will be understood that the discharge conduit or chamber 129 for either or both of the exhaust manifolds may if necessary because of space requirements be located fore and aft of the position shown in FIGURE 7, adjacent one end thereof. The central connection is, however, preferred from the standpoint of power output.

Each of the exhaust runners 110 and l10n is also provided with a lateral conduit outlet designated 132 ahead of the V on one of the sections thereof shown as the section 114 of the runner 110, and designated 132:1 on the runner 110a which outlets 132, 132a respectively, connect by conduits 134, 134m of generally elbow shape with the hot spots 78a and 78 respectively of the plenum chambers 54a and 54 respectviely, as seen in FIGURES 1 and 7. These elbows 134, 134:1 are preferably of reduced section at the end connecting with the hot spot so as to provide a restriction 136 of suitable size to control the amount of exhaust gas passing to the hot spot through openings 137 in the runners and prevent overheating of the floors of the plenum chambers. The exhaust gases tlowing to the hot spots 78 and 78a from their respective exhaust headers 110a, 110 pass therefrom through a discharge opening 139 in the bottom thereof into a conduit 140 which connects downstream of the heat control valve 122 with the exhaust pipe 128, as seen in FIGURES l and 7.

A further feature of the invention is the connection of the discharge conduit 140 with the exhaust pipe at the outer side 142 of the curved bend made by this pipe. By placing the connection at this point the velocity pressure of the discharging exhaust gases when the valve 122 is open reduces to a minimum any tendency of exhaust gas to flow through the hot spot '78 through the pipe 140. In operation, when the engine is cold, the automatic heat valves 122 will be closed and the exhaust gases in manifold 11Go from cylinders 2, 4, 6, and 8 of the right bank will be directed through the restricted opening 136 of elbow 134er to the hot spot 78 to heat the air or charge entering the plenum chamber 54 to feed the cylinders 1, 3, 5, 7 of the left bank. Similarly the exhaust gases of cylinders 1, 3, 5, and 7 of the left bank will be directed by the independent exhaust manifold system 106 of the left bank to the hot spot 78a to heat the air charge entering the plenum chamber 54a for feeding cylinders 2, 4, 6, and 8. In each instance the exhaust gases after scrubbing the floors 76, 76a of the plenum chambers will pass from the hot spots through openings 139 into the discharge pipes 140 and thence to the exhaust pipes 128. When the engine is up to temperature, the heat valves 122 of each exhaust system will open and the exhaust gases will pass directly to the exhaust pipe 12S through the chamber 120 and only minor flow of exhaust gases will take place to the hot spots.

Provision may also be made adjacent the plenum chamber floor heating chambers 78 and 78a respectively for suitable heating compartments 144 (see FIG- URE 7) directly in the path of the hot exhaust gases entering with upward movement through the openings 137 which may receive some of such exhaust gases while passing through the chambers 78 and 7 8a to heat thermostats 145 enclosed in heat exchange casings 146 located in the compartments 144 which thermostats may actuate rods 147 of automatic choke mechanisms (not shown) of the engine.

The carburetors 52 and 52a are as seen for example in FIGURES 1 and 5, arranged with their throttle blade axes extending longitudinally of the engine. Such positioning is contrary to the conventional carburetor arrangements where these axes are normally at 90 to the longitudinal axis of the engine. It has a two-fold advantage 9 in the present invention. First, as previously described, it enables the positioning of the primary barrels of the carburetors on the inner side of the engine immediately adjacent the connections of the tunable cross conduits of the intake manifolds with their respective plenum chambers. Secondly, it facilitates provision of a simple control linkage arrangement between the carburetors such that both carburetors may be simultaneously operated from the accelerator 150.

Thus as seen in FIGURES and 6, the accelerator pedal connects by a suitable link 152 with a lever 154 on a rocker shaft 156 supported on the intake manifold section 5). Shaft 156 carries a double-ended lever 158, one end of which is connected by a suitable clevis 160 and link 162 with the control arm 164 of the primary throttle shaft 166 of the carburetor 52 while the opposite end of the lever 158 is connected by a similar clevis 160 and link 162 with the primary throttle control lever 168 secured to the primary throttle blade shaft 170 of the carburetor 52a. Depression of the accelerator 150 will cause operation of the throttle levers 164, 168 in a direction to move the primary throttle blades 171 to open position.

As seen in FIGURE 6, such operation will move the lever 164 counterclockwise in this figure rotating the shaft 166 to which it is Xed in the same direction. Such Will also similarly rotate the paired throttle blades 171 and also a lever 172 lixed to the shaft 166 at the opposite side of the carburetor. Lever 172 has a pair of fingers 174, 176 at an angle to each other, the latter having a rounded end 178 normally engaged with a cam face 180 of a secondary throttle operating lever 182. The lever 182 is fixed to a shaft 184, rotation of which operates the pair of secondary throttle blades 186. Rotatably mounted on shaft 166 is a further lever 188 having a facial projection 196 engageable by the finger 174 of lever 172. Lever 188 is interconnected with lever 182 by a wire link 192.

It will be observed that rotation of the shaft 166 and lever 172 by lever 164 opens the primary throttle but initially has no effect on the secondary throttle. Once, however, the finger 174 has moved into abutting relation with the projection 190 of lever 188, the latter is caused to rotate counterclockwise and through the link 192 move the lever 182 clockwise and blades 186 of the secondary barrels in a similar direction to open position.

Suitable tension springs (not shown) are associated with levers 164, 168 to return the primary throttle 171 to closed position upon release of the accelerator 150. In such operation lever 176 will engage the lever 182 at the cam face 180 to rotate this lever counterclockwise to return the secondary throttle blades 186 to closed position. It will be noted that the engagement between levers 176 and 182 is such as to permit lost motion between them once the secondary throttle is closed such permitting the primary throttle 171 to return to fully closed position after the secondary throtlte is closed.

In order to prevent too rapid a return of the throttles to closed position, a vacuum type dashpot 200 is preferably provided in the throttle operating linkage. As seen in FIGURE 5 the dashpot is secured by a bracket 202 to the intake section 50 adjacent one end of lever 158. In such position its operating plunger 204 may abut the lever 158 or clevis 160 in their throttle closing movement and cushion or slow-up the same.

We claim:

l. In an engine having two banks of cylinders arranged angularly about the crankshaft, cylinder head means on each bank providing a combustion chamber and an inlet opening and passage for each cylinder; intake manifolding for feeding said cylinders with a combustible charge comprising a pair of distribution chamber means one positioned laterally outwardly beyond each bank and in adjacency thereto and a plurality of elongated transversely 10 extending passage means, one per cylinder, interconnecting the inlet passage of the cylinder which it is to feed and the distribution chamber means of said pair thereof which is in adjacency to the cylinder bank not containing this cylinder.

2. In an engine having two banks of cylinders arranged angularly about the crankshaft, cylinder head means on each bank providing a combustion chamber and an inlet opening and passage for each cylinder; intake manifolding for feeding said cylinders with a combustible charge comprising a pair of distribution chamber means one positioned laterally outwardly beyond each bank and in adjacency thereto and a plurality of elongated transversely extending passage means one per cylinder interconnecting the inlet passage of the cylinder which it is to feed and the distribution chamber means of said pair thereof which is in adjacency to the cylinder bank not containing this cylinder, the distance in inches between each cylinder inlet opening and the distribution means connected therewith measured along the inlet passage and elongated passage means interconnecting each such inlet opening and distribution means being approximately N i3 where N is the engine speed in revolutions per minute at which performance is to peak and C is the velocity of sound in feet per second in air in the said passage means under the atmospheric temperature and pressure conditions at which the engine is to be operated.

3. In an engine having two banks of cylinders arranged angularly about the crankshaft, cylinder head means on each bank providing a combustion chamber and an inlet opening and passage for each cylinder; intake manifolding for feeding said cylinders with a combustible charge comprising a pair of distribution chamber means one positioned laterally outwardly beyond each bank and in adjacency thereto and a plurality of elongated transversely extending passage means one per cylinder interconnecting the inlet passage of the cylinder which it is to feed and the distribution chamber means of said pair thereof which is in adjacency to the cylinder bank not containing this cylinder, each of said elongated passage means opening into the distribution chamber means with which it connects by an independent aperture and no two of said apertures in a distribution chamber means being opposite to each other so as to substantially connect with each other if their respective passage means were extended into said chamber means in the same general direction they have when opening into said chamber.

4. In an engine having two banks of cylinders arranged angularly about the crankshaft, cylinder head means on each bank providing a combustion chamber and an inlet opening and passage for each cylinder; intake manifolding for feeding said cylinders with a combustible charge comprising a pair of distribution chamber means one positioned laterally outwardly beyond each bank and in adjacency thereto and a plurality of elongated transversely extending passage means one per cylinder interconnecting the inlet passage of the cylinder which it is to feed and the distribution chamber means of said pair thereof which is in adjacency to the cylinder bank not containing this cylinder, there being a single distribution chamber means serving each bank of cylinders, said chamber means being of substantially rectangular shape when viewed from above and all said elongated passage means opening into said chamber means through a wall portion thereof defining a single side of said rectangle.

5. In an engine having two banks of cylinders arranged angularly about the crankshaft, cylinder head means on each bank providing a combustion chamber and an inlet opening and passage for each cylinder; intake manifolding for feeding said cylinders with a combustible charge comprising a pair of distribution chamber means one positioned laterally outwardly beyond each bank and in adjacency thereto, a plurality of elongated transversely extending passage means one per cylinder interconnecting the inlet passage of the cylinder which it is to feed and the distribution chamber means of said pair thereof which is in adjacency to the cylinder bank not containing this cylinder, and throttle controlled means mounted on each distribution chamber means including a primary throttle and a secondary throttle and means for staging said throttles.

6. In an engine having two banks of cylinders arranged angularly about the crankshaft, cylinder head means on each bank providing a combustion chamber and an inlet opening and passage for each cylinder, intake manifolding for feeding said cylinders with a combustible charge comprising a pair of distribution chamber means one positioned in adjacency to each bank and a plurality of elongated transversely extending passage means one per cylinder interconnecting the inlet passage of the cylinder which it is to feed and the distribution chamber means of said pair thereof which is in adjacency to the cylinder bank not containing this cylinder, means mounted on each distribution chamber means for supplying a fluid medium to said chamber, said supply means having a primary feeding throat and a Secondary feeding throat, throttle means in each of said throats, means for staging said throttles, said primary throat being located on the same side of said chamber as the connection between said elongated passage means and said chamber and said secondary throat being located more remote from said connection.

7. In an engine having two opposite banks of cylinders arranged angularly about the crankshaft, cylinder head means on each bank providing a combustion chamber and an inlet opening and passage for each cylinder; intake manfolding for feeding said cylinders with a combustible charge comprising a pair of distribution chamber means, one positioned laterally outwardly beyond each bank and in adjacency thereto, a plurality of elongated transversely extending passage means, one per cylinder interconnecting the inlet passage of the cylinder which it is to feed and the distribution means of said pair thereof which is in adjacency to the cylinder bank not containing this cylinder, a mounting pad interconnecting the elongated passage means at each bank, one of said mounting pads having a removable section.

8. In an engine having two opposite banks of cylinders arranged angularly about the crankshaft, cylinder head means on each bank providing a combustion chamber and an inlet opening and passage for each cylinder; intake manfolding for feeding said cylinders with a combustible charge comprising a pair of interlaced sections, each of said sections including a mounting pad mounting it to one of said banks, a distribution chamber means for receiving a uid medium to be fed to the cylinders of said one bank and a plurality of conduits one for each cylinder of this one bank, interconnecting said distribution chamber means for feeding this one bank with the inlet passages of this bank, said conduits having a length positioning its connecting distribution chamber means outwardly beyond the bank opposite to that to which the section is mounted and the mounting pad of one of said sections comprising a pair of spaced portions facilitating interlacing of said section.

9. In an engine having two banks of cylinders arranged angularly about the crankshaft; cylinder head means on each bank providing a combustion chamber, an inlet opening and passage for each cylinder, an exhaust gas discharge opening and passage for each cylinder, an exhaust manifold mounted on each bank into which exhaust gases from all the exhaust discharge passages of the bank to which it is mounted are directed, each said exhaust manifold having an exhaust gas discharge pipe, intake manifolding for feeding said cylinders, comprising a pair of distribution chamber means positioned in adjacency to each bank and a plurality of elongated transversely extending passage means interconnecting the inlet passages of the cylinders which they are to feed and the distribution chamber means of said pair thereof which is in adjacency to the cylinder bank not containing these cylinders, heat exchange means comprising a heating chamber on each said distribution chamber means, conduit means interconnecting each of said heating chambers with the exhaust gas manifold of the cylinder bank to which its associated distribution chamber means is in adjacency and conduit means interconnecting each of said heating chambers with the exhaust manifold discharge pipe of the same bank.

10. In an engine having two banks of cylinders arranged angularly about the crankshaft; cylinder head means on each bank providing a combustion chamber, an inlet opening and passage for each cylinder, an exhaust gas discharge opening and passage for each cylinder, an exhaust manifold mounted on each bank into which exhaust gases from all the exhaust discharge passages of the bank to which it is mounted are directed, each said exhaust manifold having an exhaust gas discharge pipe, intake manifolding for feeding said cylinders, comprising a pair of distribution chamber means positioned in adjacency t0 each bank and a plurality of elongated transversely extending passage means interconnecting the inlet passages of the cylinders which they are to feed and the distribution chamber means of said pair thereof which is in adjacency to the cylinder bank not containing these cylinders, heat exchange means comprising a heating chamber on each said distribution chamber means, conduit means interconnecting each of said heating chambers with the exhaust gas manifold of the cylinder bank to which its associated distribution chamber means is in adjacency, conduit means interconnecting each of said heating chambers with the exhaust manifold discharge pipe of the same bank, and means forming a uid flow restriction in said first mentioned conduit means.

11. In an engine having two banks of cylinders arranged angularly about the crankshaft; cylinder head means on each bank providing a combustion chamber, an inlet opening and passage for each cylinder, an exhaust gas discharge opening and passage for each cylinder, an exhaust manifold mounted on each bank into which exhaust gases from all the exhaust discharge passages of the bank to which it is mounted are directed, each said exhaust manifold having an exhaust gas discharge pipe, intake manifolding for feeding said cylinders, comprising a pair of distribution chamber means positioned in adjacency to each bank and a plurality of elongated transversely extending passage means interconnecting the inlet passages of the cylinders which they are to feed and the distribution chamber means of said pair thereof which is in adjacency to the cylinder bank not containing these cylinders, heat exchange means comprising a heating chamber on each said distribution chamber means, conduit means interconnecting each of said heating chambers with the exhaust gas manifold of the cylinder bank to which its associated distribution chamber means is in adjacency and conduit means interconnecting each of said heating chambers with the exhaust manifold discharge pipe of the same bank, said exhaust gas discharge pipe having a longitudinal curved portion, and said second mentioned conduit means connecting with said discharge pipe on the outer side of said curved portion.

12. In an engine having two banks of cylinders arranged angularly about the crankshaft; cylinder head means on each bank providing a combustion chamber, an inlet opening and passage for each cylinder, an exhaust gas discharge opening and passage for each cylinder, an exhaust manifold mounted on each bank into which exhaust gases from all the exhaust discharge passages of the bank to which it is mounted are directed, each said exhaust manifold having an exhaust gas discharge pipe, intake manfolding for feeding said cylinders, comprising a pair of distribution chamber means positioned in adjacency to each bank and a plurality of elongated transversely extending passage means interconnecting the inlet passages of the cylinders which they are to feed and the distribution chamber means of said pair thereof which is in adjacency to the cylinder bank not containing these cylinders, heat exchange means comprising a heating chamber on each said distribution chamber means, con* duit means interconnecting each of said heating chambers with the exhaust gas manifold of the cylinder bank to which its associated distribution chamber means is in adjacency, conduit means interconnecting each of said heating chambers with the exhaust manifold discharge pipe of the same bank, said exhaust gas discharge pipe having a longitudinal curved portion, and said second mentioned conduit means connecting with said discharge pipe on the outer side of said curved portion, and thermostatically controlled heat valve means in said exhaust discharge pipe between said curved portion and said exhaust manifold.

13. A V engine manifolding comprising a pair of independent sections one for mounting on each bank, each section including a mounting portion having apertures for opening into the intake passages of the cylinders of the bank to which such section is to be secured, a distribution chamber means positiouable in adjacency to the bank opposite that to which such section is to be secured, and a plurality of elongated conduits one for each cylinder of the engine bank to which such section is to be secured interconnecting said distribution chamber means of such section and said apertures, each section also having a stub conduit extending from its distribution chamber means intermediate the elongated conduits of said sections, and there being a further conduit for resiliently connecting said stub conduits.

14. Intake manifolding as claimed in claim 6 including a double ended lever means pivotally mounted on one of said elongated passage means intermediate said cylinder banks, an operating lever on each of said primary throttle means, linkage connecting said operating levers with opposite ends of said double ended lever means, and accelerator operable means for operating said double ended lever means.

15. In an engine having two banks of cylinders arranged angularly about the crankshaft, cylinder head means on each bank providing a combustion chamber and an inlet opening and passage for each cylinder; intake manifolding for feeding said cylinders with a combustible charge comprising a pair of distribution chamber means one positioned laterally outwardly beyond each bank and in adjacency thereto, said chamber means each having a floor wall, a plurality of elongated transversely Erd extending passage means one for each cylinder interconnecting the inlet passage of the cylinder which it is to feed and the distribution chamber means of said pair thereof which is in adjacency to the cylinder bank not containing this cylinder, carburetor means on each of said chamber means for delivering a charge of air and fuel to said chamber means, said carburetor means including a choke control, a heating chamber on each of said distribution chamber means for receiving a fluid medium for heating the door walls of said distribution chamber means and a second heating chamber above said rst mentioned heating chamber and connected therewith for heating thermostatically controlled means receivable therein for controlling said choke control.

16. In an engine having two banks of cylinders arranged angularly about the crankshaft, cylinder head means on each bank providing a combustion chamber and an inlet opening and passage for each cylinder; intake manifolding for feeding said cylinders with a combustible charge comprising a pair of distribution chamber means one positioned laterally outwardly beyond each bank and in adjacency thereto, a plurality of elongated transversely extending passage means, one per cylinder, interconnecting the inlet passage of the cylinder which it is to feed and the distribution chamber means of said pair thereof which is in adjacency to the cylinder bank not containing this cylinder, air intake means connecting with each of said distribution chamber means and fuel injection means for supplying fuel to each of said elongated passage means.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,763,726 Timian June 17, 1930 2,002,049 Waseige May 21, 1935 2,014,317 Fedden et al. Sept. 10, 1935 2,434,192 Braun Jan. 6, 1948 2,437,724 Brown Mar. 16, 1948 2,725,859 Turlay Dec. 6, 1955 2,764,140 Stone Sept. 25, 1956 2,865,341 Dolza Dec. 23, 1958 2,896,597 Patrick July 28, 1959 2,916,027 Chayne et al. Dec. 8, 1959 2,936,746 Rundquist May 17, 1960 2,963,009 Dolza Dec. 6, 1960 FOREIGN PATENTS 518,518 Great Britain Feb. 29, 1940

Claims (1)

1. IN AN ENGINE HAVING TWO BANKS OF CYLINDERS ARRANGED ANGULARLY ABOUT THE CRANKSHAFT, CYLINDER HEAD MEANS ON EACH BANK PROVIDING A COMBUSTION CHAMBER AND AN INLET OPENING AND PASSAGE FOR EACH CYLINDER; INTAKE MANIFOLDING FOR FEEDING SAID CYLINDERS WITH A COMBUSTIBLE CHARGE COMPRISING A PAIR OF DISTRIBUTION CHAMBER MEANS ONE POSITIONED LATERALLY OUTWARDLY BEYOND EACH BANK AND IN ADJACENCY THERETO AND A PLURALITY OF ELONGATED TRANSVERSELY EXTENDING PASSAGE MEANS, ONE PER CYLINDER, INTERCONNECTING THE INLET PASSAGE OF THE CYLINDER WHICH IT IS TO FEED AND THE DISTRIBUTION CHAMBER MEANS OF SAID PAIR THEREOF WHICH IS IN ADJACENCY TO THE CYLINDER BANK NOT CONTAINING THIS CYLINDER.
US31930A 1960-05-26 1960-05-26 High output engines Expired - Lifetime US3142289A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US31930A US3142289A (en) 1960-05-26 1960-05-26 High output engines

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US31930A US3142289A (en) 1960-05-26 1960-05-26 High output engines

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US3142289A true US3142289A (en) 1964-07-28

Family

ID=21862173

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US31930A Expired - Lifetime US3142289A (en) 1960-05-26 1960-05-26 High output engines

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US3142289A (en)

Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
USB282390I5 (en) * 1972-05-12 1975-01-28
US4445466A (en) * 1981-07-10 1984-05-01 Honda Giken Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Carburetion system for V-type internal combustion engines
DE3408899A1 (en) * 1983-03-16 1984-09-20 Porsche Ag Air intake system of a multi-cylinder internal combustion engine
US20090217899A1 (en) * 2008-02-28 2009-09-03 Dart Machinery, Ltd. Intake manifold for internal combustion engines
US8733312B1 (en) * 2010-11-22 2014-05-27 Wayne Kever Tunnel ram intake manifold for improved low RPM operation

Citations (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1763726A (en) * 1928-12-14 1930-06-17 Wheeler Schebler Carbureter Co Duplex carburetor system
US2002049A (en) * 1931-02-06 1935-05-21 Eclipse Aviat Corp Internal combustion engine
US2014317A (en) * 1933-09-08 1935-09-10 Bristol Aeroplane Co Ltd Supercharged internal-combustion engine
GB518518A (en) * 1937-08-20 1940-02-29 Audi Ag Improvements in or relating to induction pipes for v-type internal combustion engines
US2434192A (en) * 1948-01-06 Dual carburetor fuel system
US2437724A (en) * 1945-08-24 1948-03-16 Carter Carburetor Corp Manifold heat valve control
US2725859A (en) * 1954-01-07 1955-12-06 Gen Motors Corp Intake manifold
US2764140A (en) * 1954-02-26 1956-09-25 Bank Of America Nat Trust & Savings Ass Intake manifold construction
US2865341A (en) * 1955-01-19 1958-12-23 Gen Motors Corp Engine frame construction
US2896597A (en) * 1957-08-07 1959-07-28 Robert E Patrick Carburetor adapter for internal combustion engines
US2916027A (en) * 1956-12-28 1959-12-08 Gen Motors Corp Charge forming means
US2936746A (en) * 1954-09-10 1960-05-17 Gen Motors Corp Water heated intake manifold
US2963009A (en) * 1955-01-19 1960-12-06 Gen Motors Corp Engine

Patent Citations (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2434192A (en) * 1948-01-06 Dual carburetor fuel system
US1763726A (en) * 1928-12-14 1930-06-17 Wheeler Schebler Carbureter Co Duplex carburetor system
US2002049A (en) * 1931-02-06 1935-05-21 Eclipse Aviat Corp Internal combustion engine
US2014317A (en) * 1933-09-08 1935-09-10 Bristol Aeroplane Co Ltd Supercharged internal-combustion engine
GB518518A (en) * 1937-08-20 1940-02-29 Audi Ag Improvements in or relating to induction pipes for v-type internal combustion engines
US2437724A (en) * 1945-08-24 1948-03-16 Carter Carburetor Corp Manifold heat valve control
US2725859A (en) * 1954-01-07 1955-12-06 Gen Motors Corp Intake manifold
US2764140A (en) * 1954-02-26 1956-09-25 Bank Of America Nat Trust & Savings Ass Intake manifold construction
US2936746A (en) * 1954-09-10 1960-05-17 Gen Motors Corp Water heated intake manifold
US2865341A (en) * 1955-01-19 1958-12-23 Gen Motors Corp Engine frame construction
US2963009A (en) * 1955-01-19 1960-12-06 Gen Motors Corp Engine
US2916027A (en) * 1956-12-28 1959-12-08 Gen Motors Corp Charge forming means
US2896597A (en) * 1957-08-07 1959-07-28 Robert E Patrick Carburetor adapter for internal combustion engines

Cited By (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
USB282390I5 (en) * 1972-05-12 1975-01-28
US3924576A (en) * 1972-05-12 1975-12-09 Gen Motors Corp Staged combustion engines and methods of operation
US4445466A (en) * 1981-07-10 1984-05-01 Honda Giken Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Carburetion system for V-type internal combustion engines
DE3408899A1 (en) * 1983-03-16 1984-09-20 Porsche Ag Air intake system of a multi-cylinder internal combustion engine
US20090217899A1 (en) * 2008-02-28 2009-09-03 Dart Machinery, Ltd. Intake manifold for internal combustion engines
US8733312B1 (en) * 2010-11-22 2014-05-27 Wayne Kever Tunnel ram intake manifold for improved low RPM operation
US9163594B1 (en) 2010-11-22 2015-10-20 Wayne Kever Tunnel ram intake manifold for improved low RPM operation

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
EP0159834B1 (en) An internal combustion engine and a method of operating the engine
US3408992A (en) Internal combustion engine and process utilizing heated auxiliary air to obtain complete combustion
US4440120A (en) Compact ram tube engine air intake manifold
US3653212A (en) Exhaust emission control system
US4732117A (en) Two-cycle internal combustion engine
US2292233A (en) Internal combustion engine
US4957071A (en) Intake system for V-type internal combustion engine
US6691661B2 (en) Tuned induction system for a motorcycle
US2257631A (en) Internal combustion engine
US3673798A (en) Turbocharged internal combustion engine
US2285905A (en) Apparatus for forming fuel charges for internal combustion engines
US3680305A (en) Clean combustion engine system
US4702203A (en) Intake means of internal combustion engine
US2916027A (en) Charge forming means
US6427647B1 (en) Internal combustion engines
US4766866A (en) Intake system for engine
US3964451A (en) Internal combustion engine with a supercharger
US2522649A (en) Two-stroke cycle engine cylinder and pump
US4641610A (en) Air intake system of a multicylinder internal combustion engine
US4244333A (en) Induction system for an internal combustion engine
US3413803A (en) Exhaust manifold reaction system and apparatus
US4732118A (en) Two-cycle internal combustion engine
US2305946A (en) Internal combustion engine
US4732116A (en) Two-cycle internal combustion engine
EP0627045B1 (en) Internal combustion engine intake and exhaust systems

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: FIDELITY UNION TRUST COMPANY, 765 BROAD ST., NEWAR

Free format text: MORTGAGE;ASSIGNOR:CHRYSLER CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:003832/0358

Effective date: 19810209

Owner name: FIDELITY UNION TRUST COMPANY, TRUSTEE,NEW JERSEY

Free format text: MORTGAGE;ASSIGNOR:CHRYSLER CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:003832/0358

Effective date: 19810209