US3109416A - Multicylinder inline overhead valve engine - Google Patents

Multicylinder inline overhead valve engine Download PDF

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US3109416A
US3109416A US2755160A US3109416A US 3109416 A US3109416 A US 3109416A US 2755160 A US2755160 A US 2755160A US 3109416 A US3109416 A US 3109416A
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Prior art keywords
engine
exhaust
cylinders
intake
cylinder
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Frederick M Rose
John W Hurst
Raymond L Latham
Charles D Moore
John B Platner
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Chrysler Corp
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Chrysler Corp
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02BINTERNAL-COMBUSTION PISTON ENGINES; COMBUSTION ENGINES IN GENERAL
    • F02B75/00Other engines
    • F02B75/16Engines characterised by number of cylinders, e.g. single-cylinder engines
    • F02B75/18Multi-cylinder engines
    • F02B75/20Multi-cylinder engines with cylinders all in one line
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02BINTERNAL-COMBUSTION PISTON ENGINES; COMBUSTION ENGINES IN GENERAL
    • F02B2275/00Other engines, components or details, not provided for in other groups of this subclass
    • F02B2275/34Lateral camshaft position

Description

F. M. ROSE ETAL MULTICYLINDER INLINE OVERHEAD VALVE ENGINE Nov. 5, 1963 Filed May 9, 1960 6 Sheets-Sheet 1 M EE m NOSTRN v .u A N wMH .Mm W 0 1 H 0 N5 n M M M Rm Nov. 5, 1963 F. M. ROSE ETAL MULTICYLINDER INLINE OVERHEAD VALVE ENGINE Filed May 9, 1960 6 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTORS FREDERICK M. ROSE JUHN W. HURcST R/I'YMOND L.L/1THM CHARLES D. MOORE JOHN B. PLfiTNER.

flTTORNEXZ Nov. 5, 1963 F. M. ROSE ETAL 3,109,416

MULTICYLINDER INLINE OVERHEAD VALVE ENGINE Filed May 9. 1960 e SheetS -Sheet s INVENTOR-S FREDER/CK M. ROSE JOHN W HURST CH/IRLES 0. MOORE mm BnOHN 5. PL. HTNER HTTORNEY.

6 Sheets-Sheet 4 E m wm M M M M H .MP v V0 M MMW mwmmw M Emm ' F. M. ROSE ETAL lllllllllllllllllllll MULTICYLINDER INLINE OVERHEAD VALVE ENGINE Nov. 5, 1963 Filed May 9, 1960 Nov. 5, 1963 F. M. ROSE ETAL MULTICYLINDER INLINE OVERHEAD VALVE ENGINE 6 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed May 9, 1960 IN L/ENTOR FEEDER/UK M. ROSE.

CJOHN W- HURST RHYMOND L. LflTHflM JOHN B. PL/YTNER BY A a/Maw 9 /641444;

\ HTTORNEY.

Nov. 5, 1963 F. M. ROSE ETAL 3,109,416

MULTICYLINDER INLINE OVERHEAD VALVE ENGINE Filed May 9, 1960 e Sheets-Sheet e "INUENTOR-S FREDERICK M. ROSE.

JOHN w. HURST RHYMOND L.. LATHAM C'H/IRLES 0. MOORE 1': L41: fl uomv 5. PL/ITNER.

HTT'ORNEYSQ United States Patent 3,109,416 MULTICYLINDER ENLINE OVERHEAD VALVE ENGINE Frederick M. Rose, Detroit, John W. Hurst, Royal Oak,

Raymond L. Latham, Detroit, Charles D. Moore, Bin

This invention relates to multicylinder inline engines for driving motor vehicles. It especially relates to inline engines of the carburetor fed type in which the cylinder axis has been oriented to produce a tipped engine axis making possible a manifold arrangement providing improved charging of the cylinders, and better performance and facilitating a lower hood silhouette and accessibility of parts and accessories when assembled in the engine compartment of a vehicle.

It is the principal object of the invention to provide an inline engine with a carburetor fed intake manifold system making possible improved charge distribution, better engine breathing, and operational economy.

A further object is to provide an inline engine with an improved intake system as in the previous object making possible some dynamic charging of the cylinders.

An additional object is to provide an inline engine as in the previous objects wherein provision is made for heating of the intake manifold below .the carburetor by means of an exhaust manifold connection to the engine head exhaust passages on the same side of the engine as the intake manifold and which exhaust manifold is fed by all cylinders and in such a manner that the exhaust impulses do not oppose each other but facilitate feeding of the exhaust gases in the same direction of movement.

Still another object is to provide an inline engine having a tipped axis adapted to provide the engine with a lower center of gravity.

It is an object of the invention to provide an inline engine provided with a tipped cylinder axis which makes possible the utilization of engine compartment space to the best advantage from the standpoint of overall height and accessibility of parts for service and adjustment.

A further object is to provide an inline engine having a tipped axis wherein the water pump may be mounted longitudinally inside the fan drive end of the engine and adjacent the uppermost side of the engine block so as to reduce to a minimum the overall length of the engine.

A specific object is to provide an inline overhead valve engine installed on a vehicle chassis with its cylinder axis inclined at an acute angle between 2! to 45 and preferably in the order of 30 or more to the right of the vertical looking forward of the vehicle.

A further specific object is to provide an inline overhead valve engine having its cylinder axes inclined at an angle to the vertical and which has an intake manifold including a laterally positioned charge distribution or plenum chamber approximately midway the length of the engine and connected with the head intake ports of the engine by elongate-d passages providing a smooth flow of the air-fuel charge to the cylinders.

Another specific object is to provide an engine as in the preceding object whose intake and exhaust valves are substantially in alignment longitudinally of the engine and wherein the floor of the plenum chamber is in heat exchange relationship with a wall portion of a chamber or hot spot of the engine exhaust manifold located on the same side of the engine as the intake manifold and drawing exhaust gas from all cylinders of the engine.

ice

A still further object is to provide an engine as in the preceding object wherein no two head exhaust passages are in juxtaposition.

It is also a specific object to provide an engine as in the two preceding objects wherein the exhaust gas hot spot chamber includes a heat control valve adapted to route the exhaust gas from the inlet side thereof to the muffler bypassing the heat exchange area of the chamber.

Other objects and advantages of our invention will appear from the following description, reference being had to the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIGURE 1 is an isometric external view of the power plant of a vehicle embodying the engine of our inven tion looking at the left side thereof from the forward or fan end and particularly showing the intake and exhaust system, the engine starter and exhaust manifold, the electric power developing alternator and its belt drive, the oil dip stick and the power transmission.

FIGURE 2 is a further isometric view of the power plant of FIGURE 1 looking at the right side thereof from the forward or fan end of the engine, this view in particular showing the canted or slanted cylinder bank of the engine, the chain case and fan drive, the water pump, the fuel pump, the distributor and drive, the power transmission, and the engine breathing tube.

FIGURE 3 is an elevational view partly in section of the engine of FIGURES 1 and 2 embodying our invention taken through one of the cylinders and showing the intake system valve and passages and hot spot.

FIGURE 4 is a fragmentary portion of a section similar to that in FIGURE 3 showing the exhaust system valve and passages.

FIGURES 5 and 6 are schematic end and side elevational views of one form of crank for an engine embodying the invention, the Roman numerals in these figures indicating the positioning of the crank throws counting from the front or fan end of the engine, and the numerals in the brackets indicating cylinder numbers Whose pistons are connected with the crank throws.

FIGURE 7 is a plan view of the intake and exhaust manifolding of the engine of the invention shown in FIGURE 3, looking in the direction of the arrows 7-7 in FIGURE 3, the carburetor and air cleaner being omitted and showing in schematic form the head of the engine, the cylinders thereof and intake and exhaust ports and passages in relation to the corresponding parts of the intake and exhaust manifolding, the numerals within the parenthesis outside the cylinder circles designating cylinder numbers for firing order and crankshaft reference.

FIGURE 8 is a side elevational view of the intake and exhaust manifolds of the engine in position on the head thereof, a portion of the carburetor being broken away.

FIGURE 9 is. a plan view of the intake manifold of FIGURE 7 shown detached from the engine proper.

FIGURE 10 is a side elevational view of the manifold of FIGURE 9 looking in the direction of the arrows Ill- 10* of FIGURE 9.

FIGURE 11 is a sectional elevation taken at 1111 of FIGURE 9.

FIGURE 12 is a sectional elevation taken at 12-l2 of FIGURE 9.

FIGURE 13 is a sectional elevation taken at 1313 of FIGURE 9.

FIGURE 14 is a plan View similar to that of FIGURE 7 illustrating a modified form of intake manifold associated with a somewhat different arrangement of the intake and exhaust valves of the engine.

FIGURE 15 is a fragmentary plan view of a modified plenum chamber of the FIGURES 7 and 14- manifold for mounting a multibarrel carburetor.

Referring now to the drawings wherein similar numerals are used to designate similar parts in the structure, FIGURE 3 shows a transverse section of the engine 20 of our invention looking rearwardly from the fan drive 22 end of the engine :of FIGURES 1 and 2. As evident from this FIGURE 3 and FIGURE 7, the cylinders 24 of the engine are longitudinally aligned in a cylinder block 26 providing a single bank 28 of cylinders canted at an acute angle to the vertical preferably about 30. A cylinder head 30, is secured to the block 26 and provides an open wedge type combustion chamber 32 over each cylinder 24. As seen in FIGURE 3, the axes of the cylinders lie in a common plane 34 tipped to the left in this figure of a vertical plane 36 through the longitudinal axis of the crankshaft of the engine. For convenience of reference as seen in FIGURE 7, the cylinders of the bank 28 going rearwardly from the forward or fan end of the engine are numbered 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6, there being six cylinders illustrated in the engine of FIGURE 7 but it being understood that a greater or lesser number may be employed. The cylinder numerals are for convenience made to appear externally of the cylinder representations in FIGURES 7 and 14.

Each cylinder is provided with a piston 38 reciprocable therein and operably connected to a crankshaft 40 through a connecting rod 41 and wrist pin 42. The crankshaft may be of any suitable type but preferably will, as seen in FIGURE 5, be a 120 type wherein the crank throws are arranged in aligned pairs with each pair 120 apart. FIGURE 6 shows the longitudinal arrangement of the throws, the aligned pairs being I and VI, II and V, and double throws III and IV. Throw I connects with the piston of cylinder 1, throw II with the piston of cylinder 2, throw III with the piston of cylinder 3, throw IV with the piston of cylinder 4, throw V with the piston of cylinder, and throw V1 with the piston of cylinder 6. Although various firing orders are possible with this crank arrangement, a preferred firing order is 1-5-3-6- 24 thus providing alternate impulses between the front and rear sections of the intake and exhaust manifolds.

The wedge-type combustion chamber or cavity 32 of each cylinder 24 is by preference provided with a single inlet opening or port 44 closed by an inlet valve 46 and with a single exhaust outlet or port 48 closed by an ex- [haust valve 50, these ports and valves as seen in FIGURE 7, being preferably arranged in line longitudinally of the engine with the inlet ports 44 of cylinders 3 and 4 in juxtaposition medially of the engine and the remaining inlet ports 44 alternating longitudinally of the engine with the exhaust ports 48. With such an arrangement no two exhaust valves are directly adjacent each other to cause overheating. Itwill be understood however that other "valve arrangements may be used, for example that in FIGURE 14 wherein the exhaust ports and valves of cylinders 3 and 4, the inlet ports and valves of cylinders 2 and 3 and of cylinders 4 and are in juxtaposition or a valve arrangement wherein the intake and exhaust valves of each cylinder are arranged transversely of the longitudinal axis of the engine as in Patent No. 2,766,743.

The inlet and exhaust valves 46 and 50 are preferably operable from a single camshaft 52 located above and to the left of the crankshaft in FIGURE 3, this camshaft actuating push rods 54 and 56 respectively of the inlet and exhaust valve mechanism which turn actuate respectively the inlet valve rocker arm 58 and exhaust valve rocker arm 60 arranged in the cylinder head, these arms in turnactuating the normally spring held closed valves 46 and 50. p g By preference the camshaft 52 is arranged to open the respective inlet valves 46 about 8 before top dead center position of the piston, and to close the exhaust valve 50 at top dead position of the piston was to maintain the intake valve open during a large portion approximately 232 degrees of crank rotation and to maintain the exhaust valve open long enough approximately 228 degrees of crank rotation to obtain an overlap between opening of 4 the inlet valve and closing of the exhaust valve of each cylinder.

As seen in FIGURES 3, 7, and 14 the inlet openings 44 of the inlet valves 46 for each cylinder 24 are located at the inner termini of intake or induction passages or conduits generally designated by the numeral 62 in the head 30. These passages 62 terminate in apertures 64 in the inner side face 66 of the head where they connect with associated passages 68, 70, 72, 74, 76, and 78 or conduits of an intake manifold generally designated by the numeral 80, which passages are by preferance of generally rectangular character, as seen in FIGURES 8 and 10.

Due to the inclination of the cylinder axis, it is possible for the manifold 80 to extend across a major portion of the width of an engine compartment of a vehicle in which the engine is placed for operation and thereby provide, as seen in FIGURE 7, unusually long individual branch induction manifolding passages aforesaid without incurring the penalty of excessive Width in the engine compartment.

The induction passages are preferably arranged as seen in FIGURES 3 and 7 to lead or stem from a lateral outboard distribution or plenum chamber 82 associated with a suitable carburetor source of air and fuel preferably a single throat downdraft carburetor 84 seated upon the upper face 85 of the chamber 82 and having associated therewith an air cleaner 86 having an air intake 87. It will be understood that a multit-hroat carburetor, for example a dual or 4-barrel carburetor, may also be used in which case the throats may be staged if desired as described in Patent No. 2,766,743. It will be noted that the'chamber 82 is preferably midway longitudinally of the engine, for instance midway of the two middle cylinders 3 and 4 of the engine in FIGURE 7 making it possible for the induction passages 68, 70, 72, 74, 76, and 78 to fan outwardly from similarly arranged individual generally rectangular apertures 88, 90, 92, 94, 96, and 98 respectively, provided in the bounding vertical side wall 100 of the chamber 82 so as to provide long substantially smoothly curved passage connections between the chamber 82 and the intake passage apertures 64 of the head. This construction minimizes the angles around which the fuel charge must flow from the carburetor to the intake valves and thereby permits freer breathing of the engine. By preference the branch passages 68, 70, and 72 connecting respectively with the intake passages 62 of the cylinders 1, 2, and 3 will be of graduated length with that'to the cylinder No. 1 of the greatest length and will preferably be complementary in size and shape to the branch intake passages 78, 76, and 74 connecting respectively with the cylinders numbers 6, 5, and 4. To further assure unrestricted flow of the combustion charge to the cylinders and obtain better breathing, more efliciency, and higher outputs per cubic inch of displacement, the manifold passages 68, 70, 72, 74, 76, and 78 as evident from FIGURE 3, are arranged to extend in a generally horizontal plane between the distribution chamber 82 and the head 30 and to be of substantial length. Moreover, the intake valves 46 are made as large as possible. It is preferred that these manifold passages be provided with sufficient downdraft between the distribution chamber and the cylinders to make the manifold self-draining thereby avoiding accumulation of slugs of fuel which might cause overrichness under certain conditions 'of drive or fouling of the spark plugs during cold starting.

Although the passage lengths from the air inlet of the carburetor to the intake port of the cylinders are not those for obtaining the character of resonant tuning which is a feature of Patent No. 2,791,205, some dynamic charging is nevertheless available due to mass inertia effects provided by the longerthan conventional passage lengths provided by the new manifold and engine arrangement. The resulting effects obtained materially assist in providing a substantially flat torque curve for the engine. An

engine employing this manifold construction and which has a 3.4 bore, a 3.1 stroke, an 8.5 :1 compression ratio and operating on standard fiuel will have its torque output peak at about 15 1 lbs. feet in the engine range of 2400 to 2800 r.p.m. and will have a comparable level of performance over the engine speed range of 1600 to 3200 r.p.m. It will be understood that the passage lengths may all be made of such size that resonant tuning effects may be obtained for all cylinders in addition to mass inertia eifects.

The carburetor 84 is provided with the customary adjustable throttle control blade 102 arranged in the throat or riser r104 thereof and in juxtaposition to the seat 85 of the manifold 80. The carburetor riser V104 communicates with the interior of the distribution chamber 82 of the intake manifold by a short vertical riser 1%. It will be evident that the fuel charge entering the chamber 82 from the carburetor 84 is distributed and discharged through the individual outlets 88, 90, 92, 94, 96 and 98 of this chamber to the intake conduits 63, 7t 72, 74, 76, and 78 respectively in response to the intake suction impulses of the cylinders which these conduits feed.

'In order to assist warmup of the fuel charge for cold starting of the engine, the floor 103 of the chamber 82 (see FIGURES 3 and 9) is provided on its outer or lower side with a heat interchanger or stove generally identified by the numeral 110 and which comprises a plurality of short pin-like projections 1|12 arnanged in staggered relation over the floor 108 within a surrounding rim or wall 114 having a seating face 116 for a purpose to which reference will hereinafter be made.

The exhaust manifold generally designated by the numeral 12% is mounted as best seen in FIGURES 3, 7, and 10, on the same side of the engine as the intake manifold 80 and to the identical face 66 of the head It comprises a pair of runner conduits 1.22, 124 of generally rectangular cross section extending longitudinally of the engine below and in juxtaposition to the horizontal branches of the intake manifold '89. The forward runner conduit 122 is provided with relatively short lateral branches 1126, 128 and 130, also of generally rectangular cross section which connect with the exhaust passages 132 (see FIGURE 4) of the forward half of the total number of cylinders of the engine which in FIGURE. 1 are the cylinders l, 2, and 3. These lateral exhaust branches are preferably formed with large radius curves (see FIGURE 8) in order to minimize back pressure in the exhaust gas flow. The rearward runner conduit 124 connects with the exhaust passages 132 of the remaining cylinders 4, 5, and 6 by similar short lateral branches 13-4, 1 36, and 138. It will be observed that the lateral branches 126 and 133 form continuations of their respective runner conduits to close the outer ends of these conduits.

-A feature of the invention is the use of the exhaust gases of all cylinders in providing heat for the intake manifold and the feeding of this exhaust gas by means of the runner conduits 1 22, 1124- to a central collection body or hot box 140* without any clash occurring between the exhaust impulses of the different cylinders of the engine. Thus the exhaust runners 122 and 1 24 are in the nature of separate feed lines, one carrying the exhaust gases of the cylinders l, 2, and 3, and the other the exhaust gases of the cylinders 4, 5, and 6. These runners enter their respective adjacent inner ends turned outwardly with sweeping curves in a direction opposite to their lateral branches and connect independently of each other and by separate ports 142, 144 and with a slight downdraft, with the body 140 after making the turn. The ports 142, 14-4 open into an enlarged chamber 146 formed by the body 140. By this construction it will be apparent that while the exhaust gases in the runner 122 initially move in a direction opposite to that of the exhaust gases in the runner 124, the exhaust gases of each move in the same direction after negotiating a turn at the entrance to the body and thus avoid any clash between the exhaust impulses of the cylinders which feed their gases to these runners.

The body 14% has an upwardly extending rectangular wall portion 148 rising above the connecting ends of the exhaust conduits 122, 1 24 with the body 14'!) and which coincides with and through a suitable gasket 150 abuts the downwardly projecting rim of the heat stove 110. Moreover, the body .140 has a downwardly extending exhaust gas outlet conduit portion 152 positioned to permit a free flow of the exhaust gases entering the chamber 146, therefrom through this conduit 1 52, the latter connecting by suitable pipe connection means 154 with the engine exhaust pipe for carrying the exhaust gases to the mufller and tail pipe of the vehicle (not shown).

The body 144 is so constructed that it may be compartmentized by a thermostatically controlled heat valve generally designated by the numeral 156 having a movable throttle blade 158. The operation of this heat valve is so controlled that when the blade 15 8 is in the full line position in FIGURE 3, the stove 110 is isolated except for leakage from the full effects of the exhaust gases passing through the exhaust manifold and between the conduits 122, 124 and outlet i152 of the body 140, it being noted that the throttle blade 1'58 sections the interior space 146 of the body 14% to provide a compartment connecting the conduits '122 and 124 with the conduit L152. This is the position of the heat valve blade 153 when the engine has reached its operating temperature and no further heat is required at the stove 1710. When the blade 156 is in the phantom position in FIGURE 3', which is its warmup position, it serves to direct or divert the exhaust gases entering the chamber 146 from the conduits 122, 12 i upwardly toward the heat stove 111 where the exhaust gases pass over the pins 112 to heat the same and then fiows downwardly around the opposite side of the blade 158 and out the conduit 152. The pins I112 transfer their heat to the fuel charge entering the distribution chamber 82 from the carburetor 84 to aid in warmup operation.

it will be noted that the blade 158 has an angulanly and upwardly directed lip 159 formed by bending the outer end portion of the blade i158 adjacent the wall 161 of the body 149. The lip extends the full width of the chamber 146. This lip has two functions first to provide a suitable stop for the blade in its closed position and prevent digging of the blade into the wall 161, and secondly to obtain a greater scrubbing action of the exhaust gases over the pins of the stove 1110. The longer the lip 159 is made, the greater will be the extent of scrubbing attained since it will assure movement of the gases over a greater pin area before turning down to the discharge conduit 152.

As previously described, he intake and exhaust manifolds are each mounted against a common face 66 of the head 30. For this purpose and as seen in Fl-GURES '7, 8, 9, and 10 the intake manifold 81 is provided with suitable mounting wings or flanges 162 at the opposite corners of the inner ends of the conduits 6B, 70, 72, 74, 76, and 715 such that there are in effect two such wings on each conduit at diagonally opposite corners. Similar pairs of mounting wings or flanges 164 are provided at the inner ends of the lateral branches 126, 128, 130, 134, 136, and 138 of the exhaust manifold. It will be observed that except for the end wings 153 of the intake manifold these wings are positioned such that one wing 164 of the intake manifold is in immediate juxtaposition to a Wing 66 of the exhaust manifold with such wings belarge clearance holes for the studs 169, common mounting studs 171 and nuts 168 serve to secure both manifolds to the face of the head and the arrangement is such 7 as to permit expansion of these manifolds due to heat changes without overstressing these parts.

It will be noted as best seen in FIGURE 7, that wings 162 of the intake manifold are slightly thicker than the companion wings 164 of the exhaust manifold so that the washer 170 is somewhat cocked when in contact with these. juxtaposed wings and that the washer is of conical shape to facilitate this assembly and obtain a three point contact by the washer. This arrangement enables a higher loading pressure on the intake manifold wings 162 against the gasket and head face than against the exhaust manifold wing 164, this feature facilitating sliding or creeping of the exhaust manifold under the changes in temperature to which it is subjected.

The intake manifold St) of FIGURES 8, 9, and 10 is particularly adapted for casting in aluminum utilizing cores which'may be adequately supported in the casting process. It is moreover adapted for die casting without cores by making the manifold split in two halves 170, 172 along a line of division indicated by the dot and dash line 174 in FIGURE 10. After casting, these halves may be suitably secured together as by bolts and the like with a conventional intervening gasket layer or by utilizing a high temperature epoxy or other resin cement. An advantage of such die casting procedure is that it facilitates the making of smooth surfaced conduits.

FIGURE 14 shows a modified form of intake manifold, an exhaust manifold embodying many of the features described with respect to the arrangement in FIGURE 7 and which is brought about by a rearrangement of the intake and exhaust ports. Thus it will be noted that while the intake manifold 80a in this modification has comparable induction branches 68a, 70a, 72a, 74a, 76a, and 78a, and the exhaust manifold 120a has comparable runners 122a and 124a and side branches 126a, 128a, 130a, 134a, 136a, and 138a, the actual construction is different because of a different arrangement of the intake and exhaust valves, whereas in FIGURE 7 the intake ports of cylinders 3 and 4 were adjacent each other and the intake and exhaust ports of the remaining cylinders alternated with each other, in FIGURE 14 it is the exhaust ports of cylinders 3 and 4 which are adjacent each other, the intake ports of cylinders 2 and 3, and 4 and 5 adjacent each other and the intake and exhaust ports of cylinders 1 and 2 and 5 and 6 adjacent each other. This arrangement is not preferred since it places two exhaust conduits 130a and 134a immediately adjacent each other and also makes somewhat more diificult the exhaust gas flow control into the hot box 140a provided at the inner ends of the runner conduits 122a and 124a. However, it does permit the use of somewhat longer intake passages 72a and 74a.

FIGURE shows a modification of the plenum chambet and carburetor mounting structure of the intake manifold 80 of FIGURE 7 arranged to receive a multi barrel carburetor, specifically a four barrel carburetor (not shown). In this construction the plenum chamber 82 has its carburetor seating face 85 provided with four riser openings 180, 181, 182, and 183. The openings 189 and 181 coincide with the risers of the primary barrels of the carburetor and the openings 182, 183 coincide with the risers of the secondary barrels of the carburetor, the

.primary barrels being arranged to be open at all operating speeds and during idle operation and the secondary barrels coming into action at predetermined car or engine speed.

of the rear section of the manifold.

If desired, the wall 186 may be provided with an inter- 8 connecting opening 189 for efiecting apressure balance between the two compartments and for enabling each cylinder to draw charge from all barrels of the carburetor. Moreover, depending upon the characteristics of the carburetor employed, the wall 186 may be entirely omitted.

Since the firing order 1-53624 provides for alternate firing between cylinders of the front and rear sections of the engine there will also beuniform suction impulses for the corresponding sections of the manifold with consequent charge distribution benefits. It will be understood that instead of a four barrel carburetor a dual barrel one maybe used in which case there will be only one riser for each of the sections 187, 188 of the plenum chamber 82. i

It will also be apparent that the modification of FIG URE 15 may also be applied to the FIGURE 14 manifold construction.

It will be apparent from FIGURES 1, 2, and 3 that other important advantages flowing from the tipped cylinder axis of the engine and long branch manifold are that the center of gravity of the engine may in this manner be slightly lowered, the overall engine length is reduced, and the overall height is reduced. In addition, the major service items are by reason of this construction more readily accessible for adjustment or repair. Thus as seen in FIGURE 1, the air cleaner 86, carburetor 84, dip stick 190, starter 192, and oil filler 194 are either located on the left side of the engine as seen in FIGURE 1, or are immediately adjacent thereto. Moreover, the spark plugs 43, distributor 196, oil filter 198 and fuel pump 200 are on the right side as in FEGURE 2, and easily reached for service.

Canting of the cylinder axis moreover made it possible to cast the water pump 202 integral with the block with a portion thereof in the pocket adjacent the left side of the engine to efiect the overall engine length reduction referred to above.

From the foregoing description of the invention it will be evident that a new and novel construction embodying many new structures by way of manifolding and arrangement of parts have been made by which the engine torque and power performance may be improved and made more desirable. It will be apparent that various departures from the specific disclosed embodiment may be made by those skilled in the art without departure from the letter, spirit and intent of the invention as embodied in the following claims. a

We claim:

1. In an inline engine having overhead valves, a cylinder block and head providing a row of cylinders each having an inlet passage and having their axes in a common plane, said block and plane being inclined at a substantial angle to a vertical plane through the axis of the crankshaft of the engine and an intake manifold for supplying a charge to said cylinders extending laterally beyond said vertical plane from the side of said head in juxtaposition to said vertical plane, said manifold comprising a plenum chamber for receiving air and fuel from a source of supply thereof and a plurality of relatively long generally horizontal induction passage means, one for each cylinder extending between said plenum chamber and said inlet passages, each of said passage means having a separate opening in said plenum chamber and said passage means and inlet passage for each cylinder being arranged and constructed to provide unrestricted flow of the charge between said plenum chamber and cylinder. 7

2. In an inline engine having overhead valves, a cylinder block and head providing a row of cylinders each having an inlet passage and having their axes in a common plane, said block and plane being inclined at a substantial angle to a vertical plane through the axis of the crankshaft of said engine, an intake manifold extending laterally from the side of said head and beyond said vertical plane and charge forming means for feeding said manifold, said manifold comprising means at the outboard side thereof supporting said charge forming means and providing a distribution zone connecting with said charge forming means, and a plurality of elongated ram passage means one for each cylinder interconnecting the inlet passage of the cylinder it is to feed and said distribution zone.

3. An inline engine as claimed in claim 1 wherein said angle of inclination is between 20 to 40.

4. An inline engine as claimed in claim 1 wherein said angle of inclination is about 30.

5. An inline engine as claimed in claim 1 wherein said manifold is substantially in the plane of the head and said passage means are pitched downwardly a relatively small amount toward the inlet passages with which they connect.

6. In an inline engine having overhead valves, a cylinder block and head providing a row of cylinders each having an inlet passage and having their axes in a common plane, said block and plane being inclined at a substantial angle to a vertical plane through the axis of the crankshaft of said engine, an intake manifold extending laterally from the side of said head and beyond said verti cal plane and charge forming means for feeding said manifold, said manifold comprising means at the outboard side thereof supporting said charge forming means and providing a distribution Zone connecting with said charge forming means, and a plurality of elongated ram passage means one for each cylinder interconnecting the inlet passage of the cylinder it is to feed and said distribution zone, said passage means radiating from said distribution Zone in fan-like fashion with half of said passage means being substantially complementary in shape to the other half.

7. In an inline engine having overhead valves, a cylinder block and head providing a row of cylinders having their axes in a common plane, said block and plane being inclined at a substantial angle to a vertical plane through the axis of the crankshaft of said engine, said head including a combustion chamber for each cylinder and a single intake valve port and passage and a single exhaust valve port and passage for each combustion chamber, said intake and exhaust ports being in substantial alignment longitudinally of the head and said valve passages extending laterally from their respective ports to the side of said head in juxtaposition to said vertical plane and said intake and exhaust ports being arranged such that the intake ports of the medial cylinders of said engine are in adjacency and the intake ports of the remaining cylinders are in adjacency to an exhaust port, and an intake manifold extending laterally from said side of said head comprising means forming a charge distribution Zone at the outboard side thereof substantially in general alignment with said adjacent intake ports and a plurality of elongated ram passage means connecting said intake valve passages with said distribution zone, there being an individual passage means for each such intake valve passage and each such passage means having its own inlet port in said distribution zone.

8. An engine as claimed in claim 7 wherein the said passage means connecting with the intake passages of said adjacent intake valve ports are substantially straight and wherein the remaining passage means extend in a generally smooth substantially continuous curve.

9. In an inline engine having overhead valves, a cylinder block and head providing a row of cylinders having their axes in a common plane, said block and plane being inclined at a substantial angle to a vertical plane through the axis of the crankshaft of said engine, said cylinders each having a combustion chamber in said head having associated therewith a single intake port and passage and a single exhaust port and passage, said intake and exhaust passages extending transversely of said head from the said ports to terminal openings in the side of said head which is in juxtaposition to said vertical plane, the said terminal openings being substantially in the same horizontal plane, an intake manifold and an exhaust manifold extending laterally from the said side of said head having said terminal openings, said intake manifold comprising an outboard combustion charge receiving plenum chamber positioned opposite said chamber and having a plurality of ports opening into the same one for each cylinder of the engine and all substantially in the same plane, a plurality of elongated passage means radiating from said plenum chamber one each connecting one of said ports of said plenum chamber with a single terminal opening of an intake passage of said head, said plenum chamber having a floor wall adapted to be heated, said exhaust manifold having a heating chamber underlying said plenum chamber and abutting the same, the said floor Wall constituting the top wall of said heating chamber, a pair of generally horizontal runner passage means extending longitudinally of the engine in opposite directions from inlet ports in said heating chamber, said runner passage means having lateral branches connecting with the terminal openings of all said exhaust passages of said head, each said lateral branch connecting with a single such terminal opening and half of said lateral branches being on one runner and the other half on the other runner passage means.

10. In an inline engine having overhead valves, a cylinder block and head providing a row of cylinders having their axes in a common plane, said block and plane being inclined at a substantial angle to a vertical plane through the axis of the crankshaft of said engine, said cylinders each having a combustion chamber in said head having associated therewith a single intake port and passage and a single exhaust port and pasage, said intake and exhaust passages extending transversely of said head from the said ports to terminal openings in the side of said head which is in juxtaposition to said vertical plane, the said terminal openings being substantially in the same horizontal plane, the said terminal openings of said intake and exhaust passages alternating with each other longitudinally of the engine except as to the terminal openings of the intake passages of the medial cylinders which latter openings are in adjacency to each other, an intake manifold and an exhaust manifold extending laterally from the said side of said head having said terminal openings,

said intake manifold comprising an outboard combustion charge receiving plenum chamber positioned opposite said cylinders, said chamber having a plurality of ports opening into the same one for each cylinder of the engine and all substantially in the same plane, a plurality of elongated passage means radiating from said plenum chamber one each connecting one of said ports of said plenum chamber with a single terminal opening of an intake passage of said head, said plenum chamber having a floor wall adapted to be heated, said exhaust manifold having a heating chamber underlying said plenum chamber and abutting the same, the said floor wall constituting the top Wall of said heating chamber, a pair of generally horizontal runner passage means extending longitudinally of the engine in opposite directions from inlet ports in said heating chamber, said runner passage means having lateral branches connecting with the terminal openings of all said exhaust passages of said head, each. said lateral branch connecting with a single such terminal opening and half of said lateral branches being on one runner and the other on the other runner passage means.

11. In an inline engine structure as claimed in claim 10 wherein said exhaust manifold passage means extend laterally from said inlet ports of said heating chamber to- Ward said head before extending longitudinally of the engine and make said change of direction by a smooth curve.

12. In an inline engine having overhead valves, a cylinder block and head providing a row of cylinders each having an inlet passage and an exhaust passage and having their axes in a common plane, said block and plane being inclined at a substantial angle to a vertical plane .into said heating chamber.

through the axis of the crankshaft of the engine, an intake manifold for supplying a charge to said cylinders extending laterally beyond said vertical plane from the side of said head in juxtaposition to said vertical plane, said manifold comprising a plenum chamber for receiving air and fuel from a source of supply thereof and a plurality of relatively long generally horizontal induction passage means, one for each cylinder extending between said plenum chamber and said inlet passages, each of said passage means having a separate opening in said plenum chamber, and an exhaust manifold on the same side of said head as said intake manifold, said exhaust manifold comprising a heating chamber below said plenum chamber, a pair of substantially in line conduit means extending longitudinally of the engine below said passage means, each having a discharge end portion extending laterally 0f the engine and connecting with said heating chamber and lateral branches on said conduit means connecting With said exhaust passages.

13. In an inline engine having overhead valves, a cylinder block and head providing a row of cylinders each having an inlet passage and an exhaust passage and having their axes in a common plane, said block and plane being inclined at a substantial angle to a vertical plane through the axis of the crankshaft of the engine and an intake manifold for supplying a charge to said cylinders extending laterally beyond said vertical plane from the side of said head in juxtaposition to said vertical plane, said man ifold comprising a plenum chamber for receiving air and fuel from a source of supply thereof and a plurality of relatively long generally horizontal induction passage means, one for each cylinder extending between said plenum chamber and said inlet passages, each of said passage means having a separate opening in said plenum chamber and an exhaust manifold on the same side of said head as said intake manifold, said exhaust manifold comprising a heating chamber underlying said plenum chamber for heating the floor of the latter, a pair of runner conduit means connecting the exhaust passages of all said cylinders with said heating chamber, an exhaust discharge outlet connecting with said heating chamber and control means operable for directing the exhaust gases entering said chamber directly to said discharge outlet or to said discharge outlet after passing over the said floor of 'said plenum chamber.

14. -In an engine structure as claimed in claim 13 wherein said floor'of said plenum chamber includes a heat stove exposed to the exhaust gases of said heating chamber.

15. 111 an engine structure as claimed in claim 13 wherein said floor of said plenum chamber includes a plurality of pin-like heat exchange elements projectin 16. 'In an inline engine structure, an intake manifold 12 for feeding'air-fuel mixture to the' cylinders of the engine having a distribution chamber for receiving a charge of air and fuel from a source of supply thereof and a plu- V rality of passages connecting therewith for conducting airfuel mixture from said chamber to the cylinders, an exhaust manifold on the same side of said engine as said intake manifold, said exhaust manifold comprising a pair of conduits for collecting exhaust gases discharged by the cylinders of said engine, each conduit having a discharge end, a heating chamber underlying the floor of said distribution chamber and having a pair of inlets connecting with the discharge ends of said conduits and having a discharge outlet and movable means in said heating chamber movable from a position where it forms with the wall of said heating chamber, a conduit therein directly connecting said inlets and discharge outlet to a second position where it forms a passage in said heating chamber conducting the exhaust gas from said inlets past the floor of said distribution chamber and to said discharge outlet.

17. An intake manifold as claimed in claim 1 wherein the average length of the intake passages between air entrance and valve inlet is sulficient to provide a dynamic charging effect due to mass inertia on the air fuel charge during operation of the engine.

18. An intake manifold as claimed in claim 1 wherein the plenum chamber is divided into two separate interconnected compartments each arranged to feed half the total number of cylinders of the engine and each said compartment having a separate riser opening through which to receive a charge of air and'fuel.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,359,166 Good Nov. 16, 1920 1,458,481 Good June 12, 1923 1,706,817 Pokorny Mar. 26, 1929 1,766,854 Trussell June 24, 1930 1,886,455 Thonger Nov. 8, 1932 1,903,607 Moorhouse Apr. '11, 1933 1,982,596 Moore Nov. 27, 19,34

1,984,010 Catlin et a1. Dec. 11, 1934 1,986,542 Sparrow Jan. 1,1935 1,998,497 Firth Apr. 23, 1935 2,032,876 Haltenberger Mar. 3, 1936 2,038,085 Roos Apr. 21, 1936 2,154,011 Reinoehl et al Apr. 11, 1939 2,434,192 Braun Jan. 6, 1948 2,493,974 Joz-if Jan. 10, 1950 2,571,254 Keller Oct. 16, 1951 2,660,988 Reindl Dec. 1, 1953 j 2,714,376 Bakke et a1. Aug. 2, 1955 FOREIGN PATENTS 287,812 Great Britain Mar. 29, 1928

Claims (1)

1. IN AN INLINE ENGINE HAVING OVERHEAD VALVES, A CYLINDER BLOCK AND HEAD PROVIDING A ROW OF CYLINDERS EACH HAVING AN INLET PASSAGE AND HAVING THEIR AXES IN A COMMON PLANE, SAID BLOCK AND PLANE BEING INCLINED AT A SUBSTANTIAL ANGLE TO A VERTICAL PLANE THROUGH THE AXIS OF THE CRANKSHAFT OF THE ENGINE AND AN INTAKE MANIFOLD FOR SUPPLYING A CHARGE TO SAID CYLINDERS EXTENDING LATERALLY BEYOND SAID VERTICAL PLANE FROM THE SIDE OF SAID HEAD IN JUXTAPOSITION TO SAID VERTICAL PLANE, SAID MANIFOLD COMPRISING A PLENUM CHAMBER FOR RECEIVING AIR AND FUEL FROM A SOURCE OF SUPPLY THEREOF AND A PLURALITY OF RELATIVELY LONG GENERALLY HORIZONTAL INDUCTION PASSAGE MEANS, ONE FOR EACH CYLINDER EXTENDING BETWEEN SAID PLENUM CHAMBER AND SAID INLET PASSAGES, EACH OF SAID PASSAGE MEANS HAVING A SEPARATE OPENING IN SAID PLENUM CHAMBER AND SAID PASSAGE MEANS AND INLET PASSAGE FOR EACH CYLINDER BEING ARRANGED AND CONSTRUCTED TO PROVIDE UNRESTRICTED FLOW OF THE CHARGE BETWEEN SAID PLENUM CHAMBER AND CYLINDER.
US3109416A 1960-05-09 1960-05-09 Multicylinder inline overhead valve engine Expired - Lifetime US3109416A (en)

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US3949715A (en) * 1974-08-20 1976-04-13 General Motors Corporation Manifold construction for an internal combustion engine
US4132207A (en) * 1976-05-28 1979-01-02 Pettengill Ned H Vehicle fuel injection system
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US4567865A (en) * 1983-06-27 1986-02-04 Honda Giken Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Crankcase for an internal combustion engine
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US5076218A (en) * 1991-04-24 1991-12-31 Richard Graziadei Constant velocity intake manifold
US20070283687A1 (en) * 2006-06-07 2007-12-13 Ford Global Technologies, Llc Exhaust flow director and catalyst mount for internal combustion engine
US20110174566A1 (en) * 2010-01-15 2011-07-21 GM Global Technology Operations LLC Internal Combustion Engine and Vehicle Packaging for Same
US20110174257A1 (en) * 2010-01-15 2011-07-21 GM Global Technology Operations LLC Intake Manifold
US20110174260A1 (en) * 2010-01-15 2011-07-21 GM Global Technology Operations LLC Internal Combustion Engine
US8943797B2 (en) 2010-01-15 2015-02-03 GM Global Technology Operations LLC Cylinder head with symmetric intake and exhaust passages
WO2015134492A1 (en) * 2014-03-03 2015-09-11 Mkc Flow, Llc Intake manifold
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US3949715A (en) * 1974-08-20 1976-04-13 General Motors Corporation Manifold construction for an internal combustion engine
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DE2843334A1 (en) * 1977-10-05 1979-04-12 Renault Inclined to the vertical internal combustion engine
US4354461A (en) * 1980-08-04 1982-10-19 Outboard Marine Corporation Two-cycle internal combustion engine including horizontal crankshaft
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US4817569A (en) * 1985-08-28 1989-04-04 Hitachi, Ltd. Single or twin valve type fuel injection system
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US8347615B2 (en) * 2006-06-07 2013-01-08 Ford Global Technologies Exhaust flow director and catalyst mount for internal combustion engine
US9103305B2 (en) 2010-01-15 2015-08-11 GM Global Technology Operations LLC Internal combustion engine
US20110174257A1 (en) * 2010-01-15 2011-07-21 GM Global Technology Operations LLC Intake Manifold
US20110174566A1 (en) * 2010-01-15 2011-07-21 GM Global Technology Operations LLC Internal Combustion Engine and Vehicle Packaging for Same
US8528510B2 (en) * 2010-01-15 2013-09-10 GM Global Technology Operations LLC Intake manifold
US8714295B2 (en) 2010-01-15 2014-05-06 GM Global Technology Operations LLC Internal combustion engine and vehicle packaging for same
US8943797B2 (en) 2010-01-15 2015-02-03 GM Global Technology Operations LLC Cylinder head with symmetric intake and exhaust passages
US20110174260A1 (en) * 2010-01-15 2011-07-21 GM Global Technology Operations LLC Internal Combustion Engine
US20150275747A1 (en) * 2012-11-02 2015-10-01 GM Global Technology Operations LLC Exhaust compound internal combustion engine with controlled expansion
US9897000B2 (en) * 2012-11-02 2018-02-20 GM Global Technology Operations LLC Exhaust compound internal combustion engine with controlled expansion
WO2015134492A1 (en) * 2014-03-03 2015-09-11 Mkc Flow, Llc Intake manifold
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