US3137645A - Jet electrolytic treating apparatus - Google Patents

Jet electrolytic treating apparatus Download PDF

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US3137645A
US3137645A US142843A US14284361A US3137645A US 3137645 A US3137645 A US 3137645A US 142843 A US142843 A US 142843A US 14284361 A US14284361 A US 14284361A US 3137645 A US3137645 A US 3137645A
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chain
jet
plating
parts
means
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Robert T Vaughan
Donald J Weisel
William H Scott
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Space Systems Loral LLC
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Space Systems Loral LLC
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    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C25ELECTROLYTIC OR ELECTROPHORETIC PROCESSES; APPARATUS THEREFOR
    • C25DPROCESSES FOR THE ELECTROLYTIC OR ELECTROPHORETIC PRODUCTION OF COATINGS; ELECTROFORMING; APPARATUS THEREFOR
    • C25D5/00Electroplating characterised by the process; Pretreatment or after-treatment of workpieces
    • C25D5/08Electroplating with moving electrolyte, characterised by electrolyte flow, e.g. jet electroplating
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T29/00Metal working
    • Y10T29/49Method of mechanical manufacture
    • Y10T29/49002Electrical device making
    • Y10T29/49117Conductor or circuit manufacturing
    • Y10T29/49204Contact or terminal manufacturing
    • Y10T29/49208Contact or terminal manufacturing by assembling plural parts
    • Y10T29/4921Contact or terminal manufacturing by assembling plural parts with bonding
    • Y10T29/49211Contact or terminal manufacturing by assembling plural parts with bonding of fused material
    • Y10T29/49213Metal
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T29/00Metal working
    • Y10T29/49Method of mechanical manufacture
    • Y10T29/49002Electrical device making
    • Y10T29/49117Conductor or circuit manufacturing
    • Y10T29/49204Contact or terminal manufacturing
    • Y10T29/49224Contact or terminal manufacturing with coating

Description

n 1964 R. "r. VAUGHAN ETAL 3,137,645

JET ELECTROLYTIC TREATING APPARATUS I Filed Oct. 4, 1961 2 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTORS 055,417 7: I AUG/IA/V DONALD WZ I June 1964 R. -r. VAUGHAN ETAL 3,137,645

JET ELECTROLYTIC TREATING APPARATUS Filed Oct. 4, 1961 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTORS I past/er r: was/l4 004 410 1/. Wi/IGZ any! United States Patent JET ELECTROLYTIC TREATENG APPARATUS Robert T. Vaughan, Cheltenharn, Donald 3. Weisel, Chalfont, and William H. Scott, Seilersville, Pa, assignors,

by mesne assignments, to Philco Corporation, Philadelphia, Pa, a corporation of Delaware Filed Oct. 1961, Ser. No. 142,843 17 Ciaims. (til. 2ll4-206) This invention relates to improvements in the electrochemical processing art and more particularly to improved apparatus for the jet electrolytic treatment of continuously moving parts. While this invention has broad application and can be used in the treatment of numerous types of materials by either plating or etching techniques it will be described in connection with the jet plating of electrical contacts or terminations.

It is desirable, and often times necessary, to the proper functioning of electrical terminations, to plate the wear area with a heavy deposit of metal. Prior art practice has been to plate the entire surface of the part or manually to mask off portions not requiring plating. Both of these procedures have their disadvantages. The first approach results in a waste of material and the second is excessively time consuming.

Moreover, certain applications require the deposition of exceedingly heavy deposits of metal which requirement cannot be achieved in an economic manner using present processing techniques.

It is accordingly a broad object of the present invention to provide apparatus which overcomes the limitations of the prior art.

It is a further object of this invention 'to provide apparatus for the jet electrolytic treatment of moving parts by a continuous fabricating process.

A still further object of the invention is to provide jet electrolytic processing apparatus capable of handling material moving at difierent speeds of travel while maintaining substantially constant treatment time.

A further and more particularized object of the invention is to provide apparatus for the jet electrolytic treatment of continuously moving parts while simultaneously providing for indexing and precise, localized treatment of individual parts.

These and other objects within contemplation will be more readily understood by reference to the accompanying detailed description and drawings, in which:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of one form of apparatus embodying the present invention;

FIGURES 1A and 1B are enlargements showing respectively the material being processed before and after treatment;

FIGURE 2 is a fragmentary perspective showing details of the plating apparatus and depicts the constructional features of a sector of jets comprising the plating wheel;

FIGURE 3 illustrates an arrangement for eifecting speed regulation of the plating wheel in accordance with the traversing speed of material being treated.

FIGURE 4 shows a mechanical arrangement for correlating the speed of movement of the strip stock through the plating station with its speed of movement at another location in a multistation assembly line.

The invention, briefly described, comprises apparatus for the jet electrolytic treatment of continuously moving parts. The apparatus in its most elemental form consists of a rotatable wheel made up of one or more sectors each comprised of a predetermined number of jet forming orifices. To permit indexing of each sector with parts undergoing treatment each sector is constructed to be independently movable through a narrow arc of motion about a predetermined mean position. The material to be treated is desirably transported in such 'manner as to present a chain of components having a predictable and preferably uniform spacing between individual elements. Portions of the chain are automatically aligned with individual jet sectors and the sector and chain are transported in synchronism around the plating Wheel much like the action of a bicycle chain around its drive sprocket. Each sector of the wheel and its associated jets is automatically indexed with a predetermined portion of the strip so as to permit treatment of the entire strip in successive increments. By this technique immobilization of incremental portions of the strip relative to the jets is effected for the prescribed period of time necessary for the jet electrolytic treatment of individual elements comprising the chain. A further refinement is to provide apparatus capable of handling different traversing speeds while maintaining substantial constant treatment time. This is achieved by modifying the period of time each jet sector is operational in accordance with the speed of traverse of the material being treated. By designing the wheel to accommodate the maximum expectable speed, lower speeds may be handled by reducing the length of the arc during which the jets of each sector are operational. In this manner each element is insured a uniform residence time under the jets regardless of the speed with which the part circles the plating wheel. In sum there is provided apparatus for the jet electrolytic treatment of a constantly moving chain of components by a continuous fabricating process, which apparatus is so constructed as to permit variable indexing of the wheels jet sectors with segmental portions of the component chain thereby permitting localized electrolytic treatment of the chains component parts.

In achievement of the above objectives it is desirable that parts requiring treatment be supplied in some form which insures their uniform spacing, such for example, as results from blanking contacts from strip stock leaving remaining a connecting tie or web between successively punched parts. By this technique there is produced a continuous chain of parts having a fixed and predetermined spacing which facilitates their handling by automatic means.

However, the term strip-fed as used hereinafter in the specification and claims is to be given a content of wider import than merely referring to terminations punched from a ribbon of metal. The term is used to refer to parts which have been arranged to have a uniform spacing whether that spacing results from a previous punching operation or, for example, is the result of using a separate fixture into which such parts are placed preparatory to treatment. The essential criterion is that the parts to be treated be capable of machine handling in a form which is equivalent to a continuous chain of components, although the parts themselves might be physically separated and distinct. If the parts are substantially uniformly spaced and present, in essence, a chain of components the parts are herein characterized as stripfed.

As is seen in FIGURE 1, the chain or strip of components 10 is successively fed over sprocketed plating wheels 11 and 12. The sprocket teeth 13 (FIGURE 2) of these wheels each control the alignment of a battery of jets 14 relative to a fixed number of punched contacts. Two wheels are required in the illustrated application in order to provide plating on opposite'faces of the part undergoing treatment. The strip prior to being fed through the plating wheel is given a twist to facilitate wrapping around the wheels. The strip undergoes a 90 restoring twist prior to entering the rinsing station 27. As the strip is brought into engagement with the sprocket teeth 13, the wheel and certain increments of the strip rotate in synchronism. This maintains the plating jets stationary with respect to that segment of the strip for a period of aga /year 3 time sufficient to deposit the required amount of metal. On completion of the required residence time, the part is transported out of the plating station, rinsed in chamber 27 and dried under the hood 28.

The treatment apparatus is in each instance modified in accordance with the specific application for which it is to be used, the machine illustrated being designed for the continuous jet plating of terminations of the type shown in enlarged form in FIGURE 1A. These terminations are normally stamped out of brass or Phosphor bronze and are shown formed as a continuous chain of components. The terminations 15 consist of a pair of linger-like depending members 16 and 17 and an upper shank portion 18 formed with a series of wirewrapping lugs or segments 19. The balance of the assembly shown in FIGURE 1A con sists of the strip stock from which the part was punched and comprises the web or tie 2G interconnecting successive terminations and the inverted L-shaped support member 21 which lends the necessary rigidity to the punched assembly. Terminations 15 are designed for low voltage application. In such applications, in order to achieve ohmic contact between engaging surfaces, it is desirable to plate the area of contact with an inert metal such as gold. Although silver is superior in electrical and thermal conductivity and can be employed in various other applications it is generally not used in applications of the type described since it readily combines with oxygen forming a rectifying barrier region or surface film of oxide between contacting surfaces which can only be disrupted by high voltage gradients.

In order to make the process economically feasible a considerable number of contacts must undergo plating substantially simultaneously. This presents a problem of considerable magnitude when using stamped terminations inasmuch as the tolerance variation between individual stampings, when accumulated, can be sufiicient to cause the jet to miss the desired plating area. To overcome this, each plating wheel is divided into a plurality of sectors constructed and arranged as shown in FIGURE 2. Each of these sectors contains a plurality of nozzles 22 which are gravity fed plating solution from a common manifold 23. A pair of nozzles is used in plating each contact to achieve the oblong plating configuration 24 shown in FIGURE 1B. The plated bead 24 is approximately .090 inch in width.. Each of the finger-shaped terminations is only a few thousands of an inch wider than the diameter of the impinging jet stream 25. The required precision of operation necessitates dividing the plating apparatus into a number of plating stations each capable of handling a predetermined number of parts. In blanking terminations from strip stock, for example, a tolerance of about 11003" per stamping is normally to be expected.

The error which results from this tolerance variation can, however, be readily compensated for if the strip stock is handled in small enough increments. By employing the arrangement shown in FIGURE 2, for example, the cumulative error, based on the above mentioned tolerance variation, can be held to a maximum of .006".

In contrast with the precise, localized treatment afforded by the present invention, the prior practice in plating terminations of this type was to immerse the entire termination in a plating bath. This was done notwithstanding the fact that the only part of the termination actually requiring plating was the wear surface 24. This practice is highly ineflicient since the percentage of the termination actually requiring plating is less than ten percent of the terminations total surface area.

As illustrated in FIGURE 1, the chain of connectors iii is drawn into engagement with the plating wheels 11 and 12 by the pull-type motor drive means 26. As this occurs the wedge-shaped indexing tabs 13 (FIGURE 2), hereinbefore referred to as sprocket teeth-one of which is shown associated with each of the jet sectors ltd-carries its respective bank or sector of nozzles 14 into alignment with a predetermined number of stamped terminations 15. As discussed above, because of tolerance considerations, this number in the illustrated instance has been fixed at five. The indexing of discrete segments of the component chain is achieved by the novel arrangement shown in FIG- URE 2. Each sector of nozzles 22 is pivotally mounted between rotationally driven plates 30 by means of a bushing 31 containing a centrally disposed spring loaded retractable shaft 32. This construction permits easy removal and placement of the sector between plates 30.

To limit the range of the sectors circumferential movement insulative stops 33 are dependingly mounted from the overlying revolvable plate 34. The stops are positioned adjacent each jet sector and delimit its range of motion about a predetermined mean position. The sectors are resiliently centered between stops 33 by meansof springs 33' secured at one end to the stop 33 and anchored at their opposite end around a projecting boss 35 carried by the manifold 23. 1

The indexing tab 13 is made of insulative material in order that the desired plating potential may be maintained between the nozzles 22 and chain 10. One desirable arrangement is to construct the door of the manifold 23 of insulating material and to form the tab 13 as an integral part thereof.

Electrolyte is supplied to each of the jet sectors 14 through flexible tubing 4% fed from a common reservoir or standpipe 41. One formulation of electrolyte used to produce the desired gold deposit consists of a dilute alkaline solution of potassium gold cyanide [KAu(Cn) having a basicity of approximately pl-I 1 1. The required plating pressure of 1 psi. is obtained by means of the hydrostatic head developed in reservoir 41. During operation, the plating solution is continuously recirculated. Unused electrolyte is drained to a reclaiming tank 42 (FIGURE 1) from whence it is returned through pipes 43 to the standpipe 41 by conventional pump means 44. If desired a filter may be installed in the return conduit:

To deposit a .030 mil thick coating of gold requires the part to be maintained under the plating jets for about 3 seconds while maintaining a plating potential of from 20-24 volts. Referring to FIGURE 2, the manifold 23 is operated as the anodic terminal, and is supplied voltage through individual banks of stationary brush connections 45. Each brush is retained within a recess 46 provided in an inwardly directed stationary apron 47 and is held in resilient sliding engagement with the upper surface of the manifold 23 by means of attached compression springs 48. The leading edge 49 of each manifold is chamfered to permit smooth camming of individual brushes as each successive manifold is brought into operating engagement therewith. This unique arrangement makes possible the achievement of constant plating time in the event it becomes desirable to change the traversing speed of the strip stock. In the illustrated appplication the apparatus is designed to accommodate speeds ranging from 6-12 inches per second.

The operational period of each bank of jets is determined by the length of time it is electrically energized. To handle material mow'ng at the maximum design speed requires the brushes in each bank of four to be energized. For example, with the plating wheel rotating in the direction indicated by the arrow in FIGURE 2, and brushes 50- 53 energized, plating would be initiated immediately the leading edge of the manifold makes electrical contact with brush 5'3 and does not terminate until its trailing edge 54 breaks contact with brush 53. By this arrangement lesser speeds may be accommodated by simply deactivating certain of the brush contacts thereby reducing each jet sectors effective arc of operation. This procedure is designed to compensate for the increase in residence time resulting from a decrease in the time necessary. for the part to complete its circuit around the plating wheel. The use of a plurality of brushes provides a Vernier control of each jet sectors arc of operation making possible the enemas attainment of a uniform plating time regardless of traversing speed. An alternative method which might suggest itself for accomplishing this same purpose is to vary the plating action by simply modulating the plating potential. This procedure, however, has been found unsatisfactory in the present instance for the reason that adequate adherence of the gold to the part being plated is not achieved until a certain plating potential is exceeded after which there is no sensible increase in the amount of metal deposited with increase in plating potential.

One arrangement for electrically controlling the operation of the jets in accordance with strip input speed is shown in FIGURE 3. For simplicity of illustration the control means for only a single set of jets is shown. The control system for the entire machine is housed in cabinet 55 and consists of a plurality of units of the type diagrammatically illustrated in FIGURE 3. Preferably one is pr0- vided for each sector.

One method of determining strip speed is to electrically sense the passage of contacts past a fixed point by photoelectric means 56. A desirable location for the means 56 is at the end of the plating wheel. The output of the photoelectric cell is then fed through a pulse frequency discriminator 57 tuned to the strip medial speed of 9 inches/ second. Speeds in excess of the norm are designed to produce a decrease in negative DC. potential While those below the norm are designed to produce a negative voltage. The voltage output of the discriminator is used to bias tube 58. One arrangement is to place the solenoid or armature actuating coil 59 in series circuit with tube 58. Any decrease in negative grid bias results in an increased current flow through coil 59 pullin the armature 66 upwardly. This motion acting through the intermediation of arm 61 causes the wedge-shaped actuator 62 to move against the resilient contact fingers 63. Each of these fingers is attached to a common bus bar 64 connected to a fixed source of D.C. potential 65. Because of its wedge shape the actuator bar 62 actuates contacts 67-70 successively in the order mentioned. The construction is such that when the strip stock is running at maximum speed all the contacts are actuated. Contacts 6770 are electrically connected to brushes 5043' respectively by means not shown. As the speed of the strip decreases increasing numbers of brushes are deactivated through the gradual withdrawal of bar 62 from the contact fingers 63. By reducing the effective arc of operation for each jet sector by deactivation of one or more brushes, the increased time required for the strip to go around the plating wheel at its reduced rate of travel is automatically compensated for. By balancing the length of the arc during which each jet sector is activated against the length of time required to traverse the plating wheel the actualtime during which plating occurs can be maintained substantially constant. Desirably this control in exercised at the beginning or end of the plating run in order to avoid intermittent plating which may result in lamination of the deposited metal. In the event, however, that an etching operation is involved, control may be exercised at discrete stations along the arc of travel since intermittent operation in the instance has no deleterious effect. There are numerous Ways in which the speed of the strip stock could be sensed, the described method being but one possible arrangement. As previously noted it requires the use of two plating wheels 11 and 12 to plate opposing faces of terminal fingers l6 and 17. The first wheel directs a series of jet streams against the tip portion 71 of tab 16, the gold being deposited only at and closely adjacent the point of actual jet impingement. The hydraulic pressure required for effective plating, as mentioned previously, is quite nominal a jet pressure of about 1 psi. being found sufficient for most purposes. This pressure is developed by the hydrostatic head of plating solution developed in reservoir 41. To prevent loss of plating solution, which clings to the strip on its emergence from the plating wheel, an air jet 72 (FIGURE 1) is trained on the exit port of each wheel to blow any residue back into the reclaiming tank 42.

In installations Where the plating apparatus forms only a part of an overall system it is necessary to correlate its speed of operation with that of other portions of the system. In accomplishment of this end an arrangement of the type shown in FIGURE 4 may be employed. The component chain til at some point remote from the plating station is looped over a fixed multitrack pulley 75 and a vertically translatable idling pulley 76. The lower pulley 76 is mounted for substantially frictionless movement along guide rails 7'7 by means of ball bearing mounts 78. Any difference between the input and output speeds of the belt is reflected in the form of vertical movement of pulley 76. As illustrated, the input is considered as being to the left of pulley 75 and the output to the right. Connected to the idling pulley 76 for movement therewith is a rack 79 which translates this vertical movement into rotary motion through the intermediation of pinion 8t connected to the shaft of potentiometer 81. By connecting the potentiometer in electrical circuit with the field windings of the D.C. drive motor 26, the speed of the strip stock through the plating station may be slaved to that which exists at any specified location in the overall system. The extreme position assumed by the idling pulley 76 as a result of an increase in the input speed of chain it) is shown in phantom.

The above described preferred form of apparatus permits continuous and automatic jet-electrolytic treatmeat-which characterization is meant to be inclusive of both etching and plating processes-cf a chain of moving parts by an arrangement which achieves both precise localized treatment of the individual parts comprising the chain and is productive of an end product wherein each part receives substantially identical treatment regardless of its particular speed of traverse.

Localized treatment is achieved by use of a rotatable wheel composed of a plurality of floating sectors each controlling the positioning of one or more jet-forming orifices. Each of these sectors is constructed and arranged to be independently and circumferentially movable about a predetermined mean position and is individually aligned with incremental corresponding portions of the chain undergoing treatment whereby the jetforming nozzles of each sector are brought into precise registration with successive incremental portions of the chain for synchronous movement therewith throughout its traverse of the treatment wheel.

As to uniformity of end product it should be noted that to produce, for example, a substantially uniform deposit of metal on parts having different wheel traversing speeds each sector of jets is placed under the control of a number of brushes so that its effective are of operation, namely, that period of time during which the jet is electrically activated or operational, may be modified in accordance with the parts residence time under the jets which is of course a function of the pants traversing speed. Since the amount of material plated is solely a time dependent function, given a fixed plating potential, each part may be uniformly treated through Vernier control of the electrical energization of each sector of jets. While only four brushes have been shown in the preferred embodiment it should be understood that this number may be added to or reduced in accordance with the degree of control desired.

While a preferred form of the present invention has been depicted and described, it will be understood by those skilled in the art that the invention is susceptible of changes and modifications without departing from the essential concepts thereof, and that such changes and modifications are contemplated as come within the terms of the appended claims.

We claim:

1. Apparatus for the continuous jet-electrolytic treatment of a moving chain of parts, which comprises: a rotatable wheel comprised of a plurality of independently movable sectors of jet-forming means, and mean operable by said chain for individually aligning and mechanically interlocking individual ones of said sectors with incremental portions of said chain during its movement around said wheel whereby the jet-forming means of said sectors are brought into and maintained in precise registration with parts comprising said incremental portion of said chain for synchronous movement therewith during its traverse of said wheel.

2. Apparatus for the continuous jet-electrolytic treatment of a moving chain of parts, which comprises: a rotatable wheel composed of a plurality of independently and circumferentially movable sectors of jet-forming nozzles; and means associated with said sectors and activatable by said chain to provide for alignment and mechanical interlocking of individual ones of said sectors with corresponding incremental portions of said chain during its traverse of said wheel whereby the jet-forming nozzles of said sectors are sequentially brought into and maintained in precise registration with parts comprising said incremental portion of said chain for synchronous movement therewith during their traverse of said wheel.

3. Apparatus for the jet-electrolytic treatment of a moving chain of distinct, individually formed parts, which comprises: a rotatable carriage supporting a plurality of independently and circumferentially movable manifold sections each provided with a plurality of jet-forming orifices; means for transporting said chain in synchronism with said sections including means for aligning and mechanically interlocking individual manifold sections with incremental portions of said chain during its treatment traverse whereby jet-forming orifices of adjacent manifold sections are successively brought into and maintained in precise registration with individual parts comprising said chain for synchronous movement therewith during such treatment.

4. Apparatus for the continuous jet-electrolytic treatment of a moving chain of parts, which comprises: a rotatable plating wheel comprised of a plurality of independently and circumferentially movable manifold sections each provided with a plurality of jet-forming orifices; means for transporting said chain of parts around said wheel; and means carried by each of said manifold sections and engageable with said chain to align and me chanically interlock individual ones of said sections with incremental portions of said chain during its movement around said wheel whereby the jet-forming orifices of said manifold sections are successively brought into and maintained in precise registration with individual parts comprising said chain for synchronous movement therewith during their traverse of said wheel.

5. Apparatus for the continuous jet-electrolytic treatment of a strip-fed chain of parts, which comprises: a rotatable wheel comprised of a plurality of independently and circumferentially movable sections of jet-forming means; means for transporting said chain around said wheel; means operable by said chain providing for successive individual alignment and mechanical interlocking of individual ones of said sections with an incremental portion of said chain during its movement around said wheel whereby the jet-forming means of each sector is brought into and maintained in precise registration with individual parts comprising said incremental portion of said chain for synchronous movement therewith during its traverse of said wheel; and means for maintaining uniform treatment time for parts moving within a predetermined range of traversing speeds.

6. Apparatus for the continuous jet-electrolytic treatment of a strip-fed chain of parts, which comprises: a rotatable wheel comprised of a plurality of independently and circumferentially movable sectors of jet-forming means; means for transporting said chain around said wheel; means operable by said chain providing for successive individual alignment and mechanical interlocking of each of said sectors with a corresponding incremental portion of said moving chain whereby the jet-forming means of individual ones of said sectors is brought into precise registration with individual parts comprising said incremental portion of said chain for synchronous movement therewith during its traverse of said wheel; and means responsive to the speed of chain traverse for modifying the length of arc during which said jet-forming means are operational to provide a uniform treatment time for parts moving at different Wheel-traversing speeds.

7. Apparatus for the continuous jet-electrolytic treatment of continuously moving strip-fed parts, comprising: a rotatable wheel composed of a plurality of independently and circumferentially movable groups of jet-forming means; means for supplying treatment media to said jetforming means; means for transporting said parts around said wheel; means for impressing an electrical potential between said jet-forming means and parts undergoing treatment; means cooperable with said chain providing for the sequential alignment and mechanical interlocking of individual ones of said groups of jet-forming means with corresponding successive strip-fed parts on their movement around said wheel; and means responsive to the speed of chain traverse for modifying that portion of traverse during which said groups of jet-forming means are operational to provide a uniform treatment time for parts moving at different wheel-traversing speeds.

8. Apparatus for the continuous jet-electrolytic treatment of a moving chain of strip-fed parts, comprising: a rotatable wheel composed of a plurality of independently and circumferentially movable manifold sections each provided with jet-forming means; means providing for movement of said chain around said wheel; means responsive to the position of segmental portions of said chain providing for individual alignment and mechanical interlocking of individual ones of said sections with corresponding incremental portions of said chain during its traverse of said wheel; means for supplying electrolyte to said jetforming means; means for selectively electrically energizing said jet-forming means to effect treatment of said parts by said electrolyte; and means responsive to the speed of chain traverse for modifying the length of are during which individual ones of said manifold sections are electrically energized to provide a uniform treatment time for parts moving at different wheel-traversing speeds.

9. Apparatus for the continuous jet-electrolytic treatment of a moving chain of strip-fed parts, comprising: a rotatable plating wheel composed of a plurality of independently and circumferentially movable manifold sections each provided with a bank of jet-forming nozzles; means providing for movement of said chain around a sector of said wheel; means activatable by said chain for aligning and mechanically interlocking individual ones of said manifold sections with corresponding incremental portions of said chain during its traverse of said wheel whereby the nozzles of one manifold section are brought into and maintained in precise registration with individual parts comprising said incremental portion of said chain for synchronous movement therewith; means for supplying electrolyte to said nozzles through said manifold sections; means for electrically energizing each of said banks of jet-forming nozzles selectively to efiectuate plating of said parts; and means for automatically modifying the length of arc during which each of said manifold sections is electrically energized during its course of movement around said wheel in accordance with the chains speed of traverse in order to maintain substantially constant plating time for parts moving at different wheel-traversing speeds.

10. Apparatus for jet-electrolytically plating a chain of moving strip-fed parts, which comprises: rotatable jetforming nozzles; and means cooperable with said chain providing for alignment and mechanical interlocking of said nozzles with corresponding moving parts of said chain during movement thereof in locked engagement with said nozzles.

11. Apparatus for the continuous jet-electrolytic treatment of a moving chain of strip-fed electrical terminations, which comprises: a rotatable plating wheel composed of a plurality of manifold sections each provided with one or more jet-forming nozzles, and each of which sections are additionally independently and circumferentially movable about a predetermined mean position with respect to said wheel; means providing for movement of said chain about a sector of said wheel; means operable by said chain providing for individual alignment and mechanical interlocking of individual ones of said manifold sections with incremental portions of said moving chain whereby the nozzles of said sections are successively brought into and maintained in precise registration with terminations comprising said incremental portions of said chain; means establishing a potential between said nozzles and terminations undergoing treatment; and means responsive to the speed of chain traverse for maintaining substantially constant plating time for varying speeds of traverse.

12. Apparatus for the continuous jet-electrolytic treatment of a moving chain of strip-fed parts, which comprises: means for forming jets of electrolyte; means for imparting movement to said first mentioned means; and means associated with said moving jet-forming means and operable by said chain to align and mechanically interlock said moving jets with corresponding incremental portions of said moving chain during treatment thereof.

13. Apparatus for the continuous jet-electrolytic treatment of a moving chain of strip-fed parts, which comprises: a movable carriage carrying a plurality of independently movable sections of jet-forming means; and means operable by said chain for aligning and mechanically interlocking the jet-forming means of individual ones of said sections with incremental portions of said moving chain whereby the jet-forming means of one section is brought into registration with parts comprising said incremental portion of said chain for synchronous movement therewith during treatment thereof.

14. Apparatus for the continuous jet-electrolytic treatment of a moving chain of strip-fed parts, which comprises: a movable carriage containing a plurality of independently movable sections of jet-forming nozzles each of which sections is mounted on said carriage for translational movement therewith and for lirnited oscillatory motion with respect thereto; means operable by said chain providing for alignment of the nozzles of individual ones of said sections with parts forming an incremental portion of said moving chain; and means providing for synchronous movement of said sections and parts during treatment thereof.

15. Apparatus for the continuous jet-electrolytic treatment of a strip-fed chain of parts, which comprises: a carriage constructed and arranged for movement along a predetermined path and containing a plurality of sections of jet-forming means each of which sections is mounted for movement with said carriage and for limited'independent movement with respect thereto; means operable by said chain for individually aligning each of said sections with a corresponding incremental portion of said moving chain; and means providing for the synchronous movement of said carriage and aligned portions of chain during treatment thereof.

16. Apparatus for the continuous jet-electrolytic treatment of a strip-fed chain of parts, which comprises: a plurality of independently movable manifold sections each provided With one or more jet-forming orifices; means providing for movement of said sections over a predetermined path; and means cooperating with each of said manifold sections and operable by said chain for aligning and mechanically interlocking individual ones of said sections with incremental portions of said chain during its movement along said predetermined path, whereby the jet-forming orifices of one section are brought into and maintained in precise registration with parts comprising said incremental portion of said chain for synchronous movement therewith during treatment thereof.

17. Apparatus for the continuous, jet-electrolytic treatment of a strip-fed chain of parts, which comprises: a translatable carriage containing a plurality of independently movable sections each provided with one or more jet-forming orifices and each of which sections is constructed for translational movement with said carriage and for limited oscillatory movement with respect thereto; means providing for synchronous movement of said carriage and chain over a predetermined path; means activatable by said chain for aligning individual sections of jet-forming orifices with an incremental portion of said chain during its movement along said predetermined path whereby the jet-forming orifices of one section are brought into and maintained in precise registration with parts comprising said incremental portion of said chain during treatment thereof; and means for modifying the duration of travel during which each section of jets is elfective in the electrolytic treatment of said parts in order automatically to compensate for variation in jet exposure time experienced by said parts caused by variations in translational speed.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,300,015 Schomaker Oct. 27, 1942 2,876,184 Geppert Mar. 3, 1959 2,913,383 Topfer Nov. 17, 1959 FOREIGN PATENTS 592,770 Canada Feb. 16, 1960

Claims (1)

1. APPARATUS FOR THE CONTINUOUS JET-ELECTROLYTIC TREATMENT OF A MOVING CHAIN OF PARTS, WHICH COMPRISES: A ROTATABLE WHEEL COMPRISED OF A PLURALITY OF INDEPENDENTLY MOVABLE SECTORS OF JET-FORMING MEANS, AND MEAN OPERABLE BY SAID CHAIN FOR INDIVIDUALLY ALIGNING AND MECHANICALLY INTERLOCKING INDIVIDUAL ONES OF SAID SECTORS WITH INCREMENAL PORTIONS OF SAID CHAIN DURING ITS MOVE-
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Cited By (14)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3340162A (en) * 1964-01-27 1967-09-05 Philco Ford Corp Pitch tolerance compensator for a jetelectrolytic treatment apparatus
US3340166A (en) * 1967-03-13 1967-09-05 Ex Cell O Corp Electrochemical trepanning process and apparatus to accomplish the same
US3691654A (en) * 1969-05-29 1972-09-19 Gen Electric Metal foil lead manufacture
US3780247A (en) * 1972-05-18 1973-12-18 Bunker Ramo Contact element having noble wear area
US3797108A (en) * 1972-01-10 1974-03-19 Bunker Ramo Method for fabricating selectively plated electrical contacts
US3894918A (en) * 1973-12-20 1975-07-15 Western Electric Co Methods of treating portions of articles
US3957614A (en) * 1973-12-20 1976-05-18 Western Electric Company, Inc. Apparatus for treating portions of articles
US4029555A (en) * 1975-05-23 1977-06-14 Electroplating Engineers Of Japan, Limited High-speed continuous plating method and apparatus therefor
US4032422A (en) * 1975-10-03 1977-06-28 National Semiconductor Corporation Apparatus for plating semiconductor chip headers
US4033833A (en) * 1975-10-30 1977-07-05 Western Electric Company, Inc. Method of selectively electroplating an area of a surface
DE3108358A1 (en) * 1981-03-05 1982-09-16 Siemens Ag Device for partial galvanizing of electrically conducting tapes, strips or the like summary parts in a continuous process
EP0091209A1 (en) * 1982-03-25 1983-10-12 AMP INCORPORATED (a New Jersey corporation) Electric terminals having plated interior surfaces, apparatus for and method of selectively plating said terminals
DE3447582A1 (en) * 1983-12-30 1985-07-11 Piher Navarra Sa Method for producing metal contactor elements for electronic components
US4825541A (en) * 1986-12-22 1989-05-02 Erni Elektroapparate Gmbh Method of making contact springs

Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2300015A (en) * 1939-05-24 1942-10-27 Rapid Electrotype Company Method for treating electrotype matrices
US2876184A (en) * 1954-06-02 1959-03-03 Motorola Inc Transistor process and apparatus
US2913383A (en) * 1957-05-02 1959-11-17 Philco Corp Jet-electrolytic method of configuring bodies
CA592770A (en) * 1960-02-16 Philco Corporation Semiconductive device and method

Patent Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
CA592770A (en) * 1960-02-16 Philco Corporation Semiconductive device and method
US2300015A (en) * 1939-05-24 1942-10-27 Rapid Electrotype Company Method for treating electrotype matrices
US2876184A (en) * 1954-06-02 1959-03-03 Motorola Inc Transistor process and apparatus
US2913383A (en) * 1957-05-02 1959-11-17 Philco Corp Jet-electrolytic method of configuring bodies

Cited By (14)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3340162A (en) * 1964-01-27 1967-09-05 Philco Ford Corp Pitch tolerance compensator for a jetelectrolytic treatment apparatus
US3340166A (en) * 1967-03-13 1967-09-05 Ex Cell O Corp Electrochemical trepanning process and apparatus to accomplish the same
US3691654A (en) * 1969-05-29 1972-09-19 Gen Electric Metal foil lead manufacture
US3797108A (en) * 1972-01-10 1974-03-19 Bunker Ramo Method for fabricating selectively plated electrical contacts
US3780247A (en) * 1972-05-18 1973-12-18 Bunker Ramo Contact element having noble wear area
US3894918A (en) * 1973-12-20 1975-07-15 Western Electric Co Methods of treating portions of articles
US3957614A (en) * 1973-12-20 1976-05-18 Western Electric Company, Inc. Apparatus for treating portions of articles
US4029555A (en) * 1975-05-23 1977-06-14 Electroplating Engineers Of Japan, Limited High-speed continuous plating method and apparatus therefor
US4032422A (en) * 1975-10-03 1977-06-28 National Semiconductor Corporation Apparatus for plating semiconductor chip headers
US4033833A (en) * 1975-10-30 1977-07-05 Western Electric Company, Inc. Method of selectively electroplating an area of a surface
DE3108358A1 (en) * 1981-03-05 1982-09-16 Siemens Ag Device for partial galvanizing of electrically conducting tapes, strips or the like summary parts in a continuous process
EP0091209A1 (en) * 1982-03-25 1983-10-12 AMP INCORPORATED (a New Jersey corporation) Electric terminals having plated interior surfaces, apparatus for and method of selectively plating said terminals
DE3447582A1 (en) * 1983-12-30 1985-07-11 Piher Navarra Sa Method for producing metal contactor elements for electronic components
US4825541A (en) * 1986-12-22 1989-05-02 Erni Elektroapparate Gmbh Method of making contact springs

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