US3134983A - Cap - Google Patents

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US3134983A
US3134983A US166666A US16666662A US3134983A US 3134983 A US3134983 A US 3134983A US 166666 A US166666 A US 166666A US 16666662 A US16666662 A US 16666662A US 3134983 A US3134983 A US 3134983A
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visor
sidewall
cap
forehead
rearwall
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US166666A
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Lipkin Sol
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Lipkin Sol
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A42HEADWEAR
    • A42BHATS; HEAD COVERINGS
    • A42B1/00Hats; Caps; Hoods
    • A42B1/018Hats; Caps; Hoods with means for protecting the eyes, ears or nape, e.g. sun or rain shields; with air-inflated pads or removable linings
    • A42B1/0186Hats; Caps; Hoods with means for protecting the eyes, ears or nape, e.g. sun or rain shields; with air-inflated pads or removable linings with means for protecting the ears or nape
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A42HEADWEAR
    • A42BHATS; HEAD COVERINGS
    • A42B1/00Hats; Caps; Hoods
    • A42B1/04Soft caps; Hoods
    • A42B1/06Caps with flaps; Motoring caps
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A42HEADWEAR
    • A42BHATS; HEAD COVERINGS
    • A42B1/00Hats; Caps; Hoods
    • A42B1/22Hats; Caps; Hoods adjustable in size ; Form-fitting or self adjusting head coverings; Devices for reducing hat size

Description

June 2, 1964 s. LIPKIN 3,134,983
CAP
Filed Jan. 1e, 1962 3 sheets-sheet 2 INVENTOR. SOL LIPKIN ATTORNEYS MW www June 2, 1964 s. |PK|N 3,134,983
CAP
Filed Jan. 16, 1962 3 Sheets-Sheet Z5 ISA INVENTOR.
SOL LIPKIN BY pO/Wg ATTORNEYS United States Patent O 3,134,983 CAP Sol Lipkin, 2623 Huntington Ave., St. Louis Park, Minn.
Filed Jan. 16, 1962, Ser. No. 166,666 7 Claims. (Cl. 2--172) This invention relates to improvements in caps, and particularly to an improved cap structure which is comfortable, attractive in appearance, which lits the wearer snugly, keeps its shape, and provides ear protection, and particularly a cap structure which can be manufactured in a fewer number of sizes than caps of standard construction.
When the retail purchaser buys a cap, this is the consumation of a long series of prior events. These events begin with the design of the cap. The construction of one cap is of no great difiiculty, but when a manufacturer designs a cap which is to be sold in retail stores, if the cap is to be sold in reasonable quantities, it must be stocked by the retail store in a range of sizes sufficient to lit a large number of head sizes. Caps are sold in sizes which are divided into three major classifications, namely, Menfs, Boys, and Junior Boys sizes. Mens sizes range from 6% through 7%, and require a total of nine sizes; Boys sizes range from 6% through 7% and require a total of seven sizes; Junior Boys sizes range from 6 through 6% and require a total of seven sizes. Therefore, a stock of caps, of only one color and one cap per size would involve a total of 23 caps. When several colors are stocked, as well as duplicates in the more popular sizes, the merchants total number of caps in stock can easily exceed 100 caps. This is for one style only. If several styles are stocked, thenthe number of caps increases accordingly.
Therefore, the stocking of merchandise at retail, in order adequately to serve the retail customer, involves a considerable investment for every retail store at which the cap merchandise is sold. The investment cannot be avoided if the merchant desires to have available an adequate range of sizes, colors, and styles.
A primary object of this invention is to provide a cap construction which greatly diminishes the number of sizes required to t all of the head sizes in each major size classification of Mens, Boys, and Junior Boys sizes. It is another object of the invention to provide a cap which can be manufactured at reduced unit cost, a cap that is attractive in appearance and will keep its appearance during use, a cap which provides good protection for the ears of the wearer, without gapping and a cap construction which reduces the variety of raw materials and trimmings which must be purchased by the manufacturer in order to carry through the project.
Other and further objects are those inherent in the invention herein illustrated, described and claimed, and will be apparent as the description proceeds.
To the foregoing and related ends, this invention then comprises the features hereinafter fully described and particularly pointed out in the claims, the following description setting forth in detail certain illustrative embodiments of the invention, these being indicative, however, of but a few of the Various ways in which the principles of the invention may be employed.
The invention is illustrated with reference to the drawings, in which:
FIGURE l is a side elevation of an exemplary form of cap embodying the invention, shown with the earflap portion upf FIGURE 2 is a plan View of the cap of FIGURE 1, which is to say, a View taken in the direction of arrows 2 2 of FIGURE 1.
FIGURE 3 is a front elevational view of the cap shown in FIGURES 1 and 2, which is to say a view taken in the direction of arrows 3--3 of FIGURE 1.
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FIGURE 4 is an underside view of the cap shown in FIGURE 1, which is to say a view taken in the direction of arrows `4 4 of FIGURE 1.
FIGUREv 5 is a side elevational view of the cap shown in FIGURE l, but with the earflap portion of the flap turned down so as to protect the ears of the wearer.
FIGURE 6 is a sectional View taken along the line and in the direction of arrows 6-6 of FIGURES l and 2.
FIGURE 7 is a side elevational view, corresponding to FIGURE 5 showing a slightly modified form of construction as compared with that shown in FIGURE 5.
FIGURE 8 is another side elevational view corresponding to that shown in FIGURE 5 showing another slightly modified form of construction as compared with that shown in FIGURE 5.
Throughout the drawings, corresponding numerals refer to the same parts.
Referring to FIGURES 1-6, the cap illustrated has several portions which may be unitary but are generally separate pieces sewn together. These portions are the top portion 10 which covers the top portion of the head of the wearer, a forehead portion 11, which generally covers the forehead portion of the wearer from slightly above the eyebrows to what is generally the front hairline, a visor 12 which extends forwardly, and is usually slightly stiff, and a unitary sidewall-rearwall portion 14 which attaches to the margin of the top portion 10 and to the forehead portion 11 and extends around the sides of the head and around the back of the head. This sidewall-rearwall portion 14, as shown in FIGURE 5, has a sufhcient vertical height so that when it is folded down, it has a lower termination 16 which is at a level at or slightly below the earlobes so as to cover the ears of the wearer. Forwardly from the ears, the lower termination 16 curves upwardly to points 28 on the forehead line 29, which is the junction of the foreband line 29, which is the junction of the visor and the forehead portion. Points 28 are ahead of the visor rear terminations 27-27. l
It is a feature of this invention that at least the sidewall-rearwall portion ofthe cap is composed of a knitted fabric from the seam 15 (where it joins the top 10) all the way down to the lower termination 16 of the sidewall. This knitted fabric has ribs which (preferably) extend vertically as at 14A, and it has flexibility in a transverse direction (around the head of the wearer) as indicated by the dimension 17 (see FIGURES 2 and 5). In other words, the sidewall-rearwall portion 14 is moderately flexible, and will stretch in the direction of the dimension 17 just as most knitted fabrics will thus stretch transversely of the ribs The stretching of the knitted fabric of the sidewall-rearwall portion 14 in the direction of dimension 17, which is to say around the head of the wearer, will have some tendency to shorten the vertical dimension 18 of the fabric, but not unduly. It is a feature of this invention that the entire sidewall-rearwall portion 14 of the cap extending from the seams 18 with the forehead portion 11, will stretch in a direction extending around the head of the wearer, i.e. in the direction of dimension 17, see FIGURE 2. It is this stretchiness, or resiliency of the fabric in the direction of dimension 17 which enables a given size of cap to adjust itself to a considerable variation in head size, and accordingly one size of cap is therefore suitable for use by persons of quite varying head sizes. Consequently, the number of sizes of caps which must be stocked by the merchant in order to adequately service his trade, is greatly reduced. Generally, four sizes, i.c. small, medium, large and extra-large will suffice to cover the nine sizes usually required in the Mens size classification. Likewise, three sizes, viz. small, medium and large will suice for the seven sizes usually required in the Boys sizes and three sizes, viz small, medium and large will suce for the usual seven Junior Boy s ten sizes replace twenty-three sizes.
In a preferred form of construction, the top panel has a front edge 10C. The front or forehead portion 11 is reverse folded at 18 and is sewed to the front edge of the top 10 at the seam 26. The front or forehead portion 11 is sewed to the visor at the foreband seam 29. The top panel 10 has a shape as shown in FIGURE 2, being thus provided with a very slightly curved front edge 10C and slightly curved sides 10A- 10A which blend into the general rear curve 10B which goes around the rear portion of the head. The preferred style is such that the top panel 10 is nearly flat, as shown in side elevations, FIGURES 1 and 5. The boundaries 10A-10A are stitched to the vertically ribbed material of the cap sidewall at the stitching line 15.
In the preferred form of construction, the top portion of the cap has a liner (or top lower panel) 20, see FIG- URE 6, which has generally the same plan as the top panel 10. The front edge of the liner 20 coincides with edge 10C of the top but the panel 20 is a little larger than the top 10 around the sides and rear being defined by the line 20A- 20B-20A, see FIGURE 2. This liner has an inner liner stitched to its upper surface, and this is a little stiffer fabric 21, see FIGURE 6. The stitching is exemplified by the zig-zag stitching 22, see FIGURE 4. The liner 20 and stiffner fabric 21 being slightly larger than the outer fabric 10 of the top will cause the material of the sidewall-rearwalls portion 14 to assume a curve at 14A-14A, see FIGURE 3, between the stitching line 15 and before the sidewall-rearwall fabric begins to slope down more abruptly at 14B on the side (and rear) of the head of the wearer. This, the inner layer -21 of the top 10, gives shape to the cap and helps to preserve the shape when the cap worn.
The sidewall-rearwall 14 is of ribbed knitted fabric and can be of a single layer of such fabric, if desired, but it is preferably made of two layers, and there may also be included an inner liner of some material which will add warmth and body to the composite 14. In the illustrated form of the invention shown in FIGURES 1-6, the sidewall-rearwall portion 14 has two layers, an outside layer 14-0 and an inside layer 14-1. Each of these layers has laminated to it a layer of polyurethane foam material, the foam laminate layer on the outside layer 14-0 being illsutrated at 24-0, and the foam laminate layer on the inside layer 14-I being illustrated at 24-I. Polyurethane foam is porous, it is very light in weight, it has low heat conductivity, and it stretches in all directions. The foam layer is laminated onto the knitted fabric by cementing the foam layer and knitted fabric together, and the knitted fabric and polyurethane foam layer therefore act simply as a composite fabric or laminated fabric. Although relatively new, this material is, per se, a standard article of commerce. The use of such laminate fabric is not a requisite of the invention, but it is useful and gives very desirable results, and it is illustrated in the preferred modification and is claimed.
The seam 15 between the outer layer 10 of the top and the outer layer 14-0 of the sidewall fabric 14 occurs at the stitching 15, which is substantially parallel to the plan shape 10A-10B10A of the top 10, see FIGURE 2. The seam 25, between the inner layer 20 of the top and the inner layer 14-I of the sidewall 14 follows the plan shape line 20A-20B--20A of the inner layer 20 of the top, see FIGURE 2.
The front boundaries of the sidewall-rearwall portion 14 joins the forehead portion 11 along the line 18 where the forehead portion joins the top 10, being attached thereto at the line of stitching 26. This seam and stitching extends down to terminations 27 of the visor, where the latter joins the forehead portion 11. It will be noted from a comparison of FIGURES 1 and 5 that the sidewall-rearwall portion 14 extends all the way around the head at the level of what would ordinarily be the headsizes. Thus,
band, from the corner 27 of each side of the visor. This can thus be observed in FIGURE 4, which is a view from the under-side. In addition, the material of the sidewallrearwall portion 14 is carried around a little farther forwardly on each side to a junction to points 28, which is on the foreband 29 between the forehead portion 11 and the visor 12 of the cap. These junction points 28 are forward of the rear terminations 27--27 of the visor. The material of the sidewall-rearwall portion 14 is sewed into the seam which forms foreband 29, along that portion of the seam from junction points 28 to visor terminations 27, and each side of the visor. The material of the sidewall-rearwall portion 14 will thus overlie visor 12 throughout small triangular areas 12A when the sidewall-rearwall 14 s turned down so as to form an earap configuration as in FIGURE 5. When this occurs, the visor 12 will extend under those parts of the sidewallrearwall 14 in the area 12A. When the sidewall-rearwall 14 is turned up, so as to be in the configuration shown in FIGURE 1, it will lie against a small triangular area of the forehead portion 11, as at 11A in FIGURE 1, at each side of the cap.
FIGURES 1-6 show the preferred form of construction, and by carrying the sidewall-rearwall portion 14 forwardly to the junction points 28, which are ahead of the rear termini 27 of the visor 12 there is a tension applied to the edge of the sidewall 14, regardless of whether it is in the up position of FIGURE 1, or in the down position of FIGURE 5. The result is that the cap holds its shape when it is in the up position of FIGURES 1, 2 and 3, and when the sidewall is turned down to form an earflap, it will fit tightly against the wearer and provide thermal protection, which is the intended purpose, minimizing gapping along the curve 16A where the turned-down portion 14 lies against the rear portions of the cheeks of the wearer. This is all to the good because it adds comfort without the necessity of ties or straps, heretofore used.
In the preferred form of the invention, there is used the inner layer 14-I and outer sidewall 14-0 as previously mentioned, and these are cut appropriately so that the inner layer may attach at the top along the seam 25 and the outer layer can attach to the top along the seam 15. It is noted that the seam 25 is to the inner stiffner fabric 20-21 whereas the seam 15 is to the outer fabric 10. The lower termination of the sidewall is at 16--16A, and in the preferred embodiment, this is a rolled-up edge formed by bending the inner fabric 14-1 out and up to where it is joined to the outer fabric 14-0 at seam 32, see FIGURES S and 6. Throughout most of the part of the sidewall-rearwall portions 14, the vertical height of the inner layer 14-I is such that where it is turned up and out, the seam 32 will be fairly close to and parallel with the lower termination 16. This spacing is denoted by the dimension C, FIGURE 5. However, in the region of the curve 16A of the sidewall, the shape of the inner sidewall fabric 14-1 is made such that the seam 32A will diverge from termination 16A and follow up along the shape 32A, and eventually end the rear terminations 27 of the visor 12, where the visor 12 of the cap joins the forehead portion 11.
The seam 32-32A between the inner and outer sidewall fabrics respectively, =is of the over-knit type, and while it is exible in the direction of the seam, it docs add a little in tension strength, and when the sidewall is turned down so as to form an earap, this seam 32-32A acts slightly to increase hoop tension which goes around the sidewall-rearwall portion 14, near its lower edge 16, and this tension is carried up to the terminations 27 of the visor. This is, in effect, a re-inforcement of the tension which causes portion 14 to hug the cheeks of the wearer.
It will be understood that the forehead portion 11 is lined as shown at 11L in FIGURE 4, and an inner liner may be provided between 11 and 11L; if desired. A
ais/gasa decorative emblem 35 may be added. The visor 12 is composed of an upper and lower fabric with an adequate stiffner in between, as desired. Also, as desired, a sweatband 37 of leather may be added to the inside of the cap behind the seam 29 covering the attachment of the forehead portion 11 and visor 12, the sweat-band being terminated slightly to the rear of the visor terminations 27.
It is not a requisite of the present invention that two fabrics b e used in the combined sidewall-rearwall portion 14. However, the fabric 14 should be flexible-knit fabric with sufficient exibility in the direction of the dimension 17, around the head of the wearer, so as to allow variation in size of the cap to conform with variations in head size. It is preferred to make the sidewallrearwall portion 14 of two layers of fabric shape so that when the inner layer is folded back, it will join and permit attachment to the outer layer along the seam `"i2-312A as shown in FIGURE 5 In FIGURE 7 there is illustrated a slight modification of the cut of the cap wherein the seam 32 of FIGURE 5 is simply carried along at a uniform distance from the edge 16-16A and thus follows the curve path 32B, rather than the path 32A of FIGURE 5, and terminates at 39 along the foreband 29 which joins the visor 12 and the forehead portion 11. For some fabrics, this is preferred. Otherwise, the construction shown in FIGURE 7 is the seam as shown with reference to FIGURES 1-6. Also, if desired, the seam 32 between the inner and outer sidewall layers of FIGURE 5 can be moved down to the terminal edge 16. This is illustrated in FIGURE 8 wherein this seam appears at 40 coextensive with the edge 16-16A- Otherwise, the cap shown in FIGURE 8 is the sarne as that shown in FIGURES 1 6. The inner fabric 14-1 may not be the same kind of fabric as used for the outer layer 14-0. Indeed, the inner layer may be dispensed with entirely and the polyurethane foam or other plating on the inside of the outer layer can be utilized directly against the ears of the wearer. The only disadvantage is appearance since the sidewall-rearwall portion 14 is turned up, as shown in FIGURE l, the inside is visible to the outside. The preferred embodiment, therefore, utilizes inner or outer layers 14-I and 14-0, both of attractive fabric, and where thermal protection is of great consideration, one or both of these layers may have a foam layer laminated to it or a foam layer may be disposed between the layers a suitable layer of insulating material. If desired, the portion 14 can be a single layer of knitted, vertically ribbed fabric, shaped as herein shown, and it may be made integral with the top and forehead portion 11, if desired.
As many apparently widely different embodiments of this invention may be made without departing from the spirit and scope thereof, it is to be understood that I do not limit myself to the specific embodiments disclosed herein.
What I claim is:
1. A cap comprising a top portion and forehead portion, both composed of relatively inextensible fabric, and a visor, said visor being joined to the lower edge of the forehead portion along a curved foreband line extending along the rear edge of the visor, the upper boundary of the forehead portion being continuous with and fastened to the front boundary of the top portion, a sidewall and rearwall portion composed of a continuous band having its forward boundaries connected to opposite side edges of the forehead portion and its upper boundary attached to the side and rear edges of the top portion and extending as a continuous loop attached to the top portion and hanging down therefrom, said sidewall-rearwall portion having a lower boundary which is below the level of the visor, the forward portions of said lower boundary extending upwardly and terminating at forward attachment junctions located closely adjacent the foreband line, said junctions being to the rear and laterally from the center line of the visor and forwardly of the visor rear terminations, said sidewall portions overlapping small rear terminal areas of the visor adjacent the visor rear terminations, said sidewall and rearwall portions being rib-knitted fabric having primary resiliency in the direction of said continuous loop and lesser resiliency at right angles thereto, and composed of inner and outer layers of ribbed knitted fabric, arranged with the ribs generally vertically, said layers being attached together near the lower terminal edge.
2. The cap specified in claim l further characterized in that the inner layer is bent outwardly along the lower terminal edge of the sidewall and rearwall and then upwardly for a short distance and it is fastened to the outer layer at an interwall seamline generally paralleling and slightly above said lower boundary.
3. The cap specified in claim l further characterized in that a lamination layer of soft porous stretchy plastic foam is included between the said inner and outer layers.
4. A cap comprising separate portions joined together, said portions including a forehead portion having lower, side and top edges and a top having front, side and rear marginal edge portion, said forehead and top portions both being of relatively inextensible fabric, a combined sidewall and rearwall portion and a relatively stiff visor, said visor being joined to the lower edge of the forehead portion along a line called the foreband line extending along the rear curved edge of the visor, the upper edge of the forehead portion being attached to the front edge of the top portion, combined sidewall and rearwall portion forming a continuous band having its forward boundaries connected to the side edges of the forehead portion and its upper edge connected to the side and rear edges of the top portion and extending as a continuous band around the periphery of said top portion suspended therefrom, said combined sidewall and rearwall portion having a lower boundary which is substantially below the level of the visor, said lower boundary extending upwardly along a gentle curve at its forward ends and terminating on the foreband line at junctions behind the visor center and forwardly of the visor terminations, said sidewall portions overlapping small areas of the visor adjacent the visor rear terminations, said sidewall and rearwall being composed of two layers of knitted fabric laid so as to have primarily gentle resiliency horizontally in the direction of said band and lesser resiliency transversely of the band, the inner layer extending down and then bent outwardly and upwardly at said lower boundary and terminated along a layer attachment line running generally adjacent the lower boundary, said layers being attached by a line of inter-layer stitching running along said attachment line.
5. The cap of claim 4 further characterized in that said attachment line runs close to and generally parallel to the lower boundary throughout the back and sides of the combined sidewall and rearwall portion but gradually curves away from said boundary adjacent the front portions of said sides and terminates substantially at the visor tenminations.
6. The cap specified in claim 4 further characterized in that at least one of said inner and outer layers has laminated thereto a soft porous resilient layer of plastic foam which is positioned between the layers.
7. The cap specified in claim 4 further characterized in that said top portion is composed of a top outer panel and a top inner panel, the said panels having plan shapes such that they have a common front edge, the top inner panel being of slightly larger plan than the top outer panel and having side and rear edges generally evenly spaced outwardly from the corresponding edges of the top outer panel, said inner layer of the sidewall and rearwall portion being attached to the top inner panel and the outer layer of the sidewall and rearwall portion being attached to the top outer panel.
(References on following page) References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Kendall Sept. 29, 1885 Sanborn Aug. 7, 1917 5 Semrng Dec. 27, 1921 Hurt Dec. 30, 1941 Woodbury May 1, 1956 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OE CORRECTION Patent No. 3,134,983 June Z 1964 S01 Lipkin It is hereby Certified that error appears in the above numbered patent requiring correction and that the said Letters Patent should read as corrected below.
Column 3, line 35, for "Cap worn" read Cap is Worn Column 5, line 31, for "wherein" read Where line 62, for "continuous" read Contiguous Signed and sealed this 13th day of October 1964.
(SEAL) Attest:
ERNEST W, SWIDER EDWARD J. BRENNER esting Officer Commissioner of Patents

Claims (1)

1. A CAP COMPRISING A TOP PORTION AND FOREHEAD PORTION, BOTH COMPOSED OF RELATIVELY INEXTENSIBLE FABRIC, AND A VISOR, SAID VISOR BEING JOINED TO THE LOWER EDGE OF THE FOREHEAD PORTION ALONG A CURVED FOREBAND LINE EXTENDING ALONG THE REAR EDGE OF THE VISOR, THE UPPER BOUNDARY OF THE FOREHEAD PORTION BEING CONTINUOUS WITH AND FASTENED TO THE FRONT BOUNDARY OF THE TOP PORTION, A SIDEWALL AND REARWALL PORTION COMPOSED OF A CONTINUOUS BAND HAVING ITS FORWARD BOUNDARIES CONNECTED TO OPPOSITE SIDE EDGES OF THE FOREHEAD PORTION AND ITS UPPER BOUNDARY ATTACHED TO THE SIDE AND REAR EDGES OF THE TOP PORTION AND EXTENDING AS A CONTINUOUS LOOP ATTACHED TO THE TOP PORTION AND HANGING DOWN THEREFROM, SAID SIDEWALL-REARWALL PORTION HAVING A LOWER BOUNDARY WHICH IS BELOW THE LEVEL OF THE VISOR, THE FORWARD PORTIONS OF SAID LOWER BOUNDARY EXTENDING UPWARDLY AND TERMINATING AT FORWARD ATTACHMENT JUNCTIONS LOCATED CLOSELY ADJACENT THE FOREBAND LINE, SAID JUNCTIONS BEING TO THE REAR AND LATERALLY FROM THE CENTER LINE OF THE VISOR AND FORWARDLY OF THE VISOR REAR TERMINATIONS, SAID SIDEWALL PORTIONS OVERLAPPING SMALL REAR TERMINAL AREAS OF THE VISOR ADJACENT THE VISOR REAR TERMINATIONS, SAID SIDEWALL AND REARWALL PORTIONS BEING RIB-KNITTED FABRIC HAVING PRIMARY RESILIENCY IN THE DIRECTION OF SAID CONTINUOUS LOOP AND LESSER RESILIENCY AT RIGHT ANGLES THERETO, AND COMPOSED OF INNER AND OUTER LAYERS OF RIBBED KNITTED FABRIC, ARRANGED WITH THE RIBS GENERALLY VERTICALLY, SAID LAYERS BEING ATTACHED TOGETHER NEAR THE LOWER TERMINAL EDGE.
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Cited By (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3247523A (en) * 1964-08-28 1966-04-26 Lipkin Sol Cap
US3276038A (en) * 1964-02-18 1966-10-04 Fekete Joseph Shape retaining lining for a hat or cap
US3276039A (en) * 1965-12-27 1966-10-04 Yearounder Hats Inc Hat base
US3358292A (en) * 1965-04-09 1967-12-19 Bonk Chaim Cap
US3997156A (en) * 1975-01-22 1976-12-14 Marvin Glass & Associates Magic hat
US4662007A (en) * 1986-03-03 1987-05-05 M. U. Industries, Inc. Elastic hingeless cap
US6076192A (en) * 1998-03-05 2000-06-20 American Needle Headwear piece with projecting bill
US20060230498A1 (en) * 2005-04-19 2006-10-19 Yan Suen C Cap having expansible back
US20110131711A1 (en) * 2009-12-07 2011-06-09 Marietta Kuchuris Convertible Insulating Headcover Apparatus With Flexible Face Shield
US9192203B2 (en) * 2012-09-18 2015-11-24 Peter Perthou Head covering
USD752820S1 (en) * 2013-10-07 2016-03-29 RockiNoggins, LLC Helmet cover

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BE561581A (en) *
US327273A (en) * 1885-09-29 Hat frame and body
US1235927A (en) * 1916-10-17 1917-08-07 George O Sanborn Helmet-hood.
US1401569A (en) * 1914-01-02 1921-12-27 Semmig Toska Method of reproducing hats
US2268399A (en) * 1938-06-15 1941-12-30 Us Rubber Co Run-resisting knit fabric and bathing garment
US2743454A (en) * 1954-03-17 1956-05-01 Robert L Woodbury Insulated sound transmitting ear cells for a cap
US2841515A (en) * 1956-05-18 1958-07-01 Russell Mfg Co Conveyor belts
US2869134A (en) * 1957-04-17 1959-01-20 Morris J Milstein Adjustable headwear
US2885683A (en) * 1957-03-14 1959-05-12 Lipkin Sol Cap
US3018487A (en) * 1954-02-03 1962-01-30 C E Ward Company Method of making mortar board cap
US3035273A (en) * 1958-05-22 1962-05-22 Krystal Joseph Cap

Patent Citations (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
BE561581A (en) *
US327273A (en) * 1885-09-29 Hat frame and body
US1401569A (en) * 1914-01-02 1921-12-27 Semmig Toska Method of reproducing hats
US1235927A (en) * 1916-10-17 1917-08-07 George O Sanborn Helmet-hood.
US2268399A (en) * 1938-06-15 1941-12-30 Us Rubber Co Run-resisting knit fabric and bathing garment
US3018487A (en) * 1954-02-03 1962-01-30 C E Ward Company Method of making mortar board cap
US2743454A (en) * 1954-03-17 1956-05-01 Robert L Woodbury Insulated sound transmitting ear cells for a cap
US2841515A (en) * 1956-05-18 1958-07-01 Russell Mfg Co Conveyor belts
US2885683A (en) * 1957-03-14 1959-05-12 Lipkin Sol Cap
US2869134A (en) * 1957-04-17 1959-01-20 Morris J Milstein Adjustable headwear
US3035273A (en) * 1958-05-22 1962-05-22 Krystal Joseph Cap

Cited By (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3276038A (en) * 1964-02-18 1966-10-04 Fekete Joseph Shape retaining lining for a hat or cap
US3247523A (en) * 1964-08-28 1966-04-26 Lipkin Sol Cap
US3358292A (en) * 1965-04-09 1967-12-19 Bonk Chaim Cap
US3276039A (en) * 1965-12-27 1966-10-04 Yearounder Hats Inc Hat base
US3997156A (en) * 1975-01-22 1976-12-14 Marvin Glass & Associates Magic hat
US4662007A (en) * 1986-03-03 1987-05-05 M. U. Industries, Inc. Elastic hingeless cap
US6076192A (en) * 1998-03-05 2000-06-20 American Needle Headwear piece with projecting bill
US20060230498A1 (en) * 2005-04-19 2006-10-19 Yan Suen C Cap having expansible back
US20110131711A1 (en) * 2009-12-07 2011-06-09 Marietta Kuchuris Convertible Insulating Headcover Apparatus With Flexible Face Shield
US9192203B2 (en) * 2012-09-18 2015-11-24 Peter Perthou Head covering
USD752820S1 (en) * 2013-10-07 2016-03-29 RockiNoggins, LLC Helmet cover

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