US3112669A - Controlled-jet-supported hovering platform chiefly for use in mine clearing - Google Patents

Controlled-jet-supported hovering platform chiefly for use in mine clearing Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US3112669A
US3112669A US158204A US15820461A US3112669A US 3112669 A US3112669 A US 3112669A US 158204 A US158204 A US 158204A US 15820461 A US15820461 A US 15820461A US 3112669 A US3112669 A US 3112669A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
platform
rockets
hovering
nozzles
series
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US158204A
Inventor
Damblanc Louis Jean
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Safran Aircraft Engines SAS
Original Assignee
Safran Aircraft Engines SAS
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to FR846883A priority Critical patent/FR1288750A/en
Application filed by Safran Aircraft Engines SAS filed Critical Safran Aircraft Engines SAS
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US3112669A publication Critical patent/US3112669A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41HARMOUR; ARMOURED TURRETS; ARMOURED OR ARMED VEHICLES; MEANS OF ATTACK OR DEFENCE, e.g. CAMOUFLAGE, IN GENERAL
    • F41H11/00Defence installations; Defence devices
    • F41H11/12Means for clearing land minefields; Systems specially adapted for detection of landmines
    • F41H11/16Self-propelled mine-clearing vehicles; Mine-clearing devices attachable to vehicles
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B64AIRCRAFT; AVIATION; COSMONAUTICS
    • B64CAEROPLANES; HELICOPTERS
    • B64C39/00Aircraft not otherwise provided for
    • B64C39/02Aircraft not otherwise provided for characterised by special use
    • B64C39/026Aircraft not otherwise provided for characterised by special use for use as personal propulsion unit

Description

Dec. 3, 1963 D M 3,112,669
CONTROLLED-JET-SUPPORTED HOVERING PLATFORM CHIEFLY FOR USE IN MINE CLEARING Filed Dec. 11, 1961 FIG:1
Louis Damblcuoc.
WATSON, COL, 61in; 4- Jo-Eon Afibmzey:
United States Patent CONTROLLED-JET-SUPPORTED HOVERING PLAT- FORM CHIEFLY FOR USE IN CLENG Louis Jean Damblanc, Paris, France, assignor to Socicte Nationale dEtude et de Construction de Moteurs dAviation, Paris, France, a company of France Filed Dec. 11, 1961, Scr. No. 158,294 I Claims priority, application France Dec. 14, 1960 6 Claims. (Cl. 891) 1 The explosion of land-mines is generallydue to the .pressure exerted on the ground by a foot-soldier or a Q on the ground a local'pressure of given magnitude that t is unrelated to the weight of the platform, which may be very low. Such a platform may thus be caused to move at high speed through a minefield. A high rate of travel,
which is in itself advantageous inasmuch as it enables the device to sweep a large area in' unit time, automatically provides a secondary benefit in that the platform is rapidly placed out of range of dangerous splinters and blast effects.
A preferred form of this invention comprises a battery of rockets equipped with nozzles which direct towards the ground juxtaposed jets that sweep the strip to be cleared of mines. This battery of rockets is disposed in a general direction oriented transversely relative to the line of travel of the platform. The weight of the platform is very much less than the thrust developed by the rockets with which it is equipped. It is therefore a further object of the invention to provide these rockets with countering nozzles which equilibrate, in part at least, the downwardly directed thrust.
Since rockets are motors possessing very little flexibility, particularly the less expensive solid fuel type, fine adjustment of the resultant thrust is ensured by other rockets whose function is to propel the device and which are slightly inclinable relative to the horizontal.
Since the pressure exerted on the ground is solely the consequence of a jet of particles the reaction from which provides the lift required to support the platform, the said platform may be said to constitute the means whereby a directed jet force is ensured, this force being greater than the resultant of the thrust developed by the reaction motors as a whole, equipped with their countering noz zles. This characteristic may be applied for purposes other than mine clearing, for example in space vehicles.
The description which follows with reference to the accompanying drawing, filed by way of example only and not of limitation, will give a clear understanding of the invention and of the method of carrying it into practice, such particularities as emerge from the description or the drawings naturally falling within the scope of this invention.
Referring to the single drawing filed herewith:
FIGURE 1 is a highly diagrammatic perspective view of a rocket platform according to the invention;
FIGURE 2 is a schematic sectional view of one of the lift rockets;
FIGURE 3 is a schematic view of a propulsive nozzle which is inclinable to permit fine adjustment of the total lift; and
FIGURE 4 is a section through a rocket equipped with I an additional propulsive nozzle.
1 Reference is now had to FIGURE 1, which is a rear three-quarter view of a platform consisting basically of a supporting structure 1 and a battery of vertical rockets 2 and propulsive rockets 3.
The structure 1 comprises pre-utilization supporting means which may be used also for guidance during the launch phase, an example being skis i.v The structure 1 supports the propulsion rockets 3 through the medium of pivots 5, and said rockets are operated by servo-mechanisms 6 controlled by a device 7 (not shown).-
Stabilizing control surfaces, such as fins 8, areaffixed to the structure. i:
The rockets 2 are preferably of the solid fuel type, but
may, for certain applications, utilize a liquid or other conzles 13 will be determined by the effect sought on the ground, and that of the countering upper nozzles 14 by the weight of the device and the thrust exerted by the nozzles 13.
Considering now FIGURE 1, it will be seen that the rockets 2 are mounted in a bank of which the transverse" dimension, as referred to the direction of travel A, is greater than the longitudinal dimension, and said rockets are preferably set up in staggered rows. The diameter of the section of the jet efliux, at the point where the jet impinges on the ground, is generally less than the diameter of the rocket casing.
The propulsive rockets 3, which may utilize solid liquid or any other convenient fuel, pivot about trunnions 5 in response to actuators 6. When they are so pivoted downwardly, their thrust P has a vertical component V which may be varied to compensate for the lightening process as the fuel is consumed.
The propulsive function of the rockets 3 may alternatively be fulfilled by appropriately oriented nozzles in the casings 9 of a number of said rockets 2.
Such a nozzle 15 is illustrated in FIGURE 4.
The platform hereinbefore described is operated in the 'fOHOWiHg manner:
After mounting the platform on a suitable launching ramp for instance on a rail-mounted carriage-and after orienting it in the direction of the minefield'through which a path is to be cleared, the rockets are ignited.
The resultant of the thrust exerted bythe nozzles 13 used for mine clearing amply exceeds the weight of the device, but the countering nozzles 14 produce a thrust which is opposite to said resultant, and this thrust is added to the weight of the device in order to ensure equilibrium at least during the steady state while rocket combustion is under way.
The variable inclination of the propulsive rockets permits fine lift adjust-ment, which may be slaved to the altitude or to the vertical accelerations of the platform.
A platform according to the present invention thus provides a mine clearing device operating at very high speed, it being possible to clear several dozen yards per second. In addition, the platform is easy to transport and to operate, and is relatively inexpensive.
Manife-stly, a vertical disposition of the rockets is by no means mandatory, and it is equally clear that this invent-ion covers any alternative layout of reaction motors than mine clearing, Wherever the object sought or the means envisaged involve recourse to equivalent technical means.
What I claim is:
1. A hovering platform adapted for mine clearing purposes and having a longitudinal axis comprising, in combination, a battery of rockets with countering nozzles all oriented in a substantially vertical direction and disposed in two series, a first series directed toward the ground and transversely ranked with regard to said axis in such manner that the hot gases ejected apply a high pressure onto the ground along at least a continuous line substantially as broad as said first series and a second series directed upward so as to reduce the resulting thrust applied to the platform to a value substantially equal to its weight, propulsive and stabilizing means, whereby the platform hovering at a small height causes the mines to explode within a path crossing a mine field.
2. A hovering platform adapted for mine clearing purposes and having a longitudinal axis comprising, in combination, a battery of substantially vertical rockets equipped each with two coaxial countering nozzles of unequal area and transversely ranked with regard to said axis, a first series of larger area nozzles being directed toward the ground in such manner that the hot gases ejected apply a high pressure onto the ground along at least a continuous line substantially as broad as said first series and a second series of smaller area nozzles being directed upward so as to reduce the resulting thrust applied to the platform to a value substantially equal to its 4 weight, propulsive and stabilizing means, whereby the platform hovering at a small height causes the mines to explode within a path crossing a mine field.
3. A hovering platform as claimed in claim 2 wherein the nozzles directed toward the ground form alternate rows to reinforce the transverse continuity of the hot gas action on the ground.
4. A hovering platform as claimed in claim 2 wherein said propulsive means consists of a reaction motor independent of said rockets.
5. A hovering platform as claimed in claim 4 wherein said reaction motor is mounted on a pivot which is substantially horizontal and perpendicular to the direction of travel of the platform, in order that its oscillation about said pivot should produce an adjustable lift component of thrust.
6. A hovering platform as claimed in claim 2 wherein said propulsive means consists of a nozzle oriented toward the rear of the platform and fed with gas by said rockets.
References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,409,848 Gruelich Oct. 22, 1946 2,613,497 MacDonald Oct. 14, 1952 2,771,841 De Fino Nov. 27, 1956 2,850,976 Seifert Sept. 9, 1958 2,947,500 Dreyer et al. Aug. 2, 1960 2,981,501 Schaefer Apr. 25, 1961 3,022,026 Shaw Feb. 20, 1962

Claims (1)

  1. 2. A HOVERING PLATFORM ADAPTED FOR MINE CLEARING PURPOSES AND HAVING A LONGITUDINAL AXIS COMPRISING, IN COMBINATION, A BATTERY OF SUBSTANTIALLY VERTICAL ROCKETS EQUIPPED EACH WITH TWO COAXIAL COUNTERING NOZZLES OF UNEQUAL AREA AND TRANSVERSELY RANKED WITH REGARD TO SAID AXIS, A FIRST SERIES OF LARGER AREA NOZZLES BEING DIRECTED TOWARD THE GROUND IN SUCH MANNER THAT THE HOT GASES EJECTED APPLY A HIGH PRESSURE ONTO THE GROUND ALONG AT LEAST A CONTINUOUS LINE SUBSTANTIALLY AS BROAD AS SAID FIRST SERIES AND A SECOND SERIES OF SMALLER AREA NOZZLES BEING DIRECTED UPWARD SO AS TO REDUCE THE RESULTING THRUST APPLIED TO THE PLATFORM TO A VALUE SUBSTANTIALLY EQUAL TO ITS WEIGHT, PROPULSIVE AND STABILIZING MEANS, WHEREBY THE PLATFORM HOVERING AT A SMALL HEIGHT CAUSES THE MINES TO EXPLODE WITHIN A PATH CROSSING A MINE FIELD.
US158204A 1960-12-14 1961-12-11 Controlled-jet-supported hovering platform chiefly for use in mine clearing Expired - Lifetime US3112669A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
FR846883A FR1288750A (en) 1960-12-14 1960-12-14 Platform supported by reaction, with calibrated thrust, used in particular for demining

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US3112669A true US3112669A (en) 1963-12-03

Family

ID=8744730

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US158204A Expired - Lifetime US3112669A (en) 1960-12-14 1961-12-11 Controlled-jet-supported hovering platform chiefly for use in mine clearing

Country Status (2)

Country Link
US (1) US3112669A (en)
FR (1) FR1288750A (en)

Cited By (16)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3165924A (en) * 1963-07-18 1965-01-19 Wolff Harry Nozzle material firing evaluation means and system
US3215112A (en) * 1962-01-30 1965-11-02 Jr Elmer A Beck Apparatus and methods for sweeping mines
US3338330A (en) * 1965-05-11 1967-08-29 Sinclair Research Inc Gas exploder having thrust nozzle reaction means
US3461672A (en) * 1966-11-18 1969-08-19 United Aircraft Corp Aft end igniter
US3498177A (en) * 1967-10-03 1970-03-03 Alberto Moro Mine clearing machine
US3638569A (en) * 1968-08-01 1972-02-01 Messerschmitt Boelkow Blohm Method and equipment for the elimination of mine blockades
US3685453A (en) * 1969-09-11 1972-08-22 Joseph T Hamrick Antipersonnel mine destruct system
US4008644A (en) * 1973-12-20 1977-02-22 Lutz Tilo Kayser Clearing of land mines
US4773298A (en) * 1985-12-04 1988-09-27 Heinz Tischer Method for neutralizing surface-laid or camouflaged land mines and mobile unit for performing the method
US5223666A (en) * 1992-06-04 1993-06-29 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Navy Apparatus for clearing mines
US5979290A (en) * 1998-07-20 1999-11-09 Simeone; Salvatore Mine clearing device
US5983551A (en) * 1998-03-06 1999-11-16 Lalor; Tom Remote controlled apparatus and method for training retrieving dogs
US6484617B1 (en) 1999-05-10 2002-11-26 Alliant Techsystems Inc. Assembly and process for controlled burning of landmine without detonation
US7162943B1 (en) * 2005-02-14 2007-01-16 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Navy Cavitating explosively augmented water-jet mine cutter system
US20080245256A1 (en) * 2004-05-27 2008-10-09 Bernard Teneze Flying Object for Observing the Ground
FR3018261A1 (en) * 2014-03-05 2015-09-11 Zapata Holding DEVICE AND PROPULSION SYSTEM

Citations (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2409848A (en) * 1943-03-10 1946-10-22 Carnegie Illinois Steel Corp Twin tube mine clearing snake
US2613497A (en) * 1947-04-01 1952-10-14 Macdonald Gilmour Craig Controllable rocket thrust device
US2771041A (en) * 1950-12-28 1956-11-20 Budd Co Panel structure, particularly letterboard for railway cars
US2850976A (en) * 1955-06-28 1958-09-09 Howard S Seifert Thrust cancellation device for use in solid propellant rocket
US2947500A (en) * 1956-04-06 1960-08-02 Bolkow Entwicklungen Kg Rocket power plants for aircraft and the like
US2981501A (en) * 1957-04-04 1961-04-25 Edison T Schaefer Directional thrust control means
US3022026A (en) * 1958-04-23 1962-02-20 Power Jets Res & Dev Ltd Air intake for jet sustained aircraft

Patent Citations (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2409848A (en) * 1943-03-10 1946-10-22 Carnegie Illinois Steel Corp Twin tube mine clearing snake
US2613497A (en) * 1947-04-01 1952-10-14 Macdonald Gilmour Craig Controllable rocket thrust device
US2771041A (en) * 1950-12-28 1956-11-20 Budd Co Panel structure, particularly letterboard for railway cars
US2850976A (en) * 1955-06-28 1958-09-09 Howard S Seifert Thrust cancellation device for use in solid propellant rocket
US2947500A (en) * 1956-04-06 1960-08-02 Bolkow Entwicklungen Kg Rocket power plants for aircraft and the like
US2981501A (en) * 1957-04-04 1961-04-25 Edison T Schaefer Directional thrust control means
US3022026A (en) * 1958-04-23 1962-02-20 Power Jets Res & Dev Ltd Air intake for jet sustained aircraft

Cited By (19)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3215112A (en) * 1962-01-30 1965-11-02 Jr Elmer A Beck Apparatus and methods for sweeping mines
US3165924A (en) * 1963-07-18 1965-01-19 Wolff Harry Nozzle material firing evaluation means and system
US3338330A (en) * 1965-05-11 1967-08-29 Sinclair Research Inc Gas exploder having thrust nozzle reaction means
US3461672A (en) * 1966-11-18 1969-08-19 United Aircraft Corp Aft end igniter
US3498177A (en) * 1967-10-03 1970-03-03 Alberto Moro Mine clearing machine
US3638569A (en) * 1968-08-01 1972-02-01 Messerschmitt Boelkow Blohm Method and equipment for the elimination of mine blockades
US3685453A (en) * 1969-09-11 1972-08-22 Joseph T Hamrick Antipersonnel mine destruct system
US4008644A (en) * 1973-12-20 1977-02-22 Lutz Tilo Kayser Clearing of land mines
US4773298A (en) * 1985-12-04 1988-09-27 Heinz Tischer Method for neutralizing surface-laid or camouflaged land mines and mobile unit for performing the method
US5223666A (en) * 1992-06-04 1993-06-29 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Navy Apparatus for clearing mines
US5983551A (en) * 1998-03-06 1999-11-16 Lalor; Tom Remote controlled apparatus and method for training retrieving dogs
US5979290A (en) * 1998-07-20 1999-11-09 Simeone; Salvatore Mine clearing device
US6484617B1 (en) 1999-05-10 2002-11-26 Alliant Techsystems Inc. Assembly and process for controlled burning of landmine without detonation
US20080245256A1 (en) * 2004-05-27 2008-10-09 Bernard Teneze Flying Object for Observing the Ground
US7763834B2 (en) * 2004-05-27 2010-07-27 Mbda France Flying object for observing the ground
US7162943B1 (en) * 2005-02-14 2007-01-16 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Navy Cavitating explosively augmented water-jet mine cutter system
FR3018261A1 (en) * 2014-03-05 2015-09-11 Zapata Holding DEVICE AND PROPULSION SYSTEM
WO2015132478A1 (en) * 2014-03-05 2015-09-11 Zapata Holding Device and system for propelling a passenger
CN106573165A (en) * 2014-03-05 2017-04-19 扎帕塔控股公司 Device and system for propelling a passenger

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
FR1288750A (en) 1962-03-30

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3112669A (en) Controlled-jet-supported hovering platform chiefly for use in mine clearing
US3094072A (en) Aircraft, missiles, missile weapons systems, and space ships
JP2647220B2 (en) Booster vehicles for orbital flight, superorbital flight and low-orbital flight, rocket-propelled, aerial deployed and boosted lift
JP2016026125A5 (en)
US3261571A (en) High altitude aircraft
US6293091B1 (en) Axisymmetrical annular plug propulsion system for integrated rocket/ramjet or rocket/scramjet
US4505442A (en) Transient surface contact vehicle
US3093348A (en) Hypersonic aircraft
IL82200A (en) Method and apparatus for launching a projectile at hypersonic velocity
GB2222635A (en) A propulsion system for an aerospace vehicle
US5189248A (en) Perforating munition for targets of high mechanical strength
CN101277868B (en) Movement generation system and method for controlling movement
US3295790A (en) Recoverable single stage spacecraft booster
EP2946166B1 (en) Rocket motors and their use
US2879955A (en) Airborne bodies and in particular self propelled missiles
RU2338659C1 (en) Sea platform to launch rockets
US3302908A (en) Unmanned flying machine
US3176464A (en) Ducted rocket engine
US3014410A (en) Blast deflectors
US3981224A (en) Missile trans porter-launcher
US2946285A (en) Rocket projectiles
US2924148A (en) Induced pitch launcher device
US3461672A (en) Aft end igniter
US3007372A (en) Recoverable rocket launching unit
US3028122A (en) Landing arrangement for aerial vehicles