US310948A - Island - Google Patents

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US310948A
US310948A US310948DA US310948A US 310948 A US310948 A US 310948A US 310948D A US310948D A US 310948DA US 310948 A US310948 A US 310948A
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gas
air
burner
stove
refractory material
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24CDOMESTIC STOVES OR RANGES ; DETAILS OF DOMESTIC STOVES OR RANGES, OF GENERAL APPLICATION
    • F24C3/00Stoves or ranges for gaseous fuels
    • F24C3/04Stoves or ranges for gaseous fuels with heat produced wholly or partly by a radiant body, e.g. by a perforated plate
    • F24C3/042Stoves

Definitions

  • My invention relates to an improvement in the method of producing heat in a portable stove, the object of the same being to obstruct, concentrate, and radiate the heat of a flame 'at points where it is most desirable such heat should be located for the purposes of cooking, heating, Coo.
  • my invention consists in, first, the employment of a non-luminous or nearly non-luminous flame; secondly, supplying a constant flow of air to the flame by a permanent draft; thirdly, passing the flame and heated air through the interstices formed between the fragments of a bed of refractory material by a draft; and, fourthly, passing the products of combustion to the outside air.
  • FIG. 1 is a view in perspective of one formof apparatus for carrying out my inven- 95 tion.
  • Fig. 2 shows the same applied to a stove.
  • Fig. 3 is a vertical section through one of the branch feedpipes and showing the supply-pipe E beyond.
  • Fig. at is a detached view of one of the air-feed valves, and
  • Fig. 5 Ice is a detached view of the enlarged chamber provided with a fire-stop.
  • Fig. 6 is a detached view of the coupling with which is connected the gas-supply pipe.
  • A represents a cooking-range, which may be of any form and construction, the particular form of apparatus represented in this case being adapted to a stove or range in which the fire-pot is oblong, oval, or the like in shape.
  • B is the fire-pot
  • O is a draft-flue connecting the space above the tire-pot with the outside air.
  • ash-chamber commonly formed in the hearth, or any suitable receptacle,D,located in front of or below the tire;pot,is placed the apparatus for supplying air and gas to the fire-pot.
  • gas which may consist of the vapors of volatile oils, earbureted air, carburcted watergas, petroleum, and coal gases, a mixture of hydrogen and carbonic oxide, &c.
  • gas which may consist of the vapors of volatile oils, earbureted air, carburcted watergas, petroleum, and coal gases, a mixture of hydrogen and carbonic oxide, &c.
  • the pipe E is coupled onto the branch 0 of a T-coupling, a, to which is connected the small tube b, provided with a stop-cock, c, and with apilot-burner, d, at its outer end.
  • the stop-cock c the supply of gas to the pilot-burner may be regulated as desired.
  • branch pipes F F To the other ends of the T coupling a the branch pipes F F are connected, the ends of which enter the enlarged ch ambersff and constitute injector-nozzlesj" f, for the purpose of commingling air and gas and forcing the mixture onward to the burner, as will be hereinafter explained.
  • G is a stopcock for admitting gas to the chambers f f, or for cutting it oil therefrom.
  • the injector-chainbers f are each formed with a coupling, 9, which extends downwardly through an opening in the lower wall of the chamber, and projects below the same adistance sufiicient to admit of the attachment of the check-nut g.
  • the check-nuts g serveto firmly secure the apparatus against displacement. For example, when the apparatus is placed in a licartlrrecess, as represented in Fig. 2, the shouldcrf about the perforation in the lower wall of the chambersf will rest in contact with the upper surface of the bottom of the recess, while the check-nuts y will engage the lower surface of the bottom.
  • the nuts 9 are constructed with annular flat seats on one end, and are also provided with cross-bars H, having screw-threaded central openings, h.
  • I represents a hand-valve provided with a central screw that engages the opening it in the nut. 13y rotating the valve 1 it may be adjusted so as to admit any desired quantity of air to the injector and cou'nningling chamber.
  • the combustible mixture of air and gas is conveyed to the burner L by the pipes K, and admitted to the burner near the opposite ends thereof.
  • the burner L is constructed with a continuous chamber or elongated receptacle, 7, in its lower portion, and with a contracted upper portion, Z, provided with a series of perforations, Z through which the mixture of air and gas iiows in jets and is ignited.
  • Each pipe K is provided with an enlarged chamber, 7;, located between the burner and injectorchamber.
  • the chamber 7 consists, essentially, of an enlarged socket, 7v, interposed between two sections of the pipe K.
  • Socket h is provided with an annular shoulder, 7.6-, on which is placed a wire-gauze diaphragm, M, the meshes of which are of such a size as to allow of the free passage of the gas, and yet prevent the backward passage of a flame, thus preventing the ignition of the gas or explosive mixture contained in the supply-pipe in the rear of the diaphragm.
  • a coupling, m is screwed into the socket 7;, the end of the coupling engaging the outer cdge of the wire-gauze diaphragm and retaining it in its place.
  • the enlarged chamher 7 is provided, to admit of the employment of a diaphragm of such diameter that the combined area of the interstices in the diaphragm will be equal to the area of a cross-section of the supply-pipe, thus insuring a free and unobstructed iiow of the gas to the burner.
  • the iire-pot T5 is'lilled, or partially filled, with refractory material N, against which the jets of the burner impinge.
  • the refractory material may consist of broken pieces of tire-brick or any other suitable material.
  • this refractory material is to arrest the heat developed by the combustion of the gas, and having become heated to a high degree communicate the heat to cooking-vessels in a manner similar to that of a bed of red-hot coals, or radiate the heat throughout the room, or fulfill any of the purposes to which an ordinary cooking or heating stove may be adapted.
  • A. small. supply of gas is supplied to the pilotburner, which is kept constantly ig nited, or ignited before the gas is allowed to enter the burner L, for the purpose of instantly igniting the gas when supplied to the main burner.
  • the stove or range is provided on its under side with a permanently-open draft-opening, 0, while the pipe (J constitutes a permanently-open exit-flue and permanent draft.
  • the permanent draft established by the opening 0 and the exit-flue G, which connects with the outside air, is a very important feature, as it not only provides for carrying off the results of combustion, which are prejudicial to life, but causes the jets of burning gas to complete- 1y occupy the interstices between the pieces of refractory material and draws a sufficient amount of air through the permanent opening 0 to complete any partial combustion that may have taken place at the jets, and at the same time prevents an accumulation of gas from any cause below the fire-pot.
  • the stopcock 0 is adjusted so as to maintain a continuons limited flow of gas to the pilot-burner.
  • a supply of gas is admitted to the branch pipes F, and issues with sufficient force from the injector-nozzles f to cause a partial vacuum in the surrounding annular chambers o in the chambers f of the injectors, and thus draw into the chambers a supply of fresh or outer air through the airsupply openings, which extend through the bottom of the stove or range, the air-supply being regulated by the hand-valves I.
  • the gas and air are thoroughly mixed and commingled in the chambers f, and this mixture is forced into the burner, from whence it is sues in jets and is instantly ignited by the pilot-burner.
  • the jets impinging against the refractory material and drawn through the spaces between the pieces thereof stores heat therein,which is used for heating, cooking, 820., as maybe desired.
  • the method of producing heat in a portable stove which consists in, first,employing a nonluminous or nearly non-luminous flame below a body or mass of refractory material; secondly, introducing a constant and fixed supply of air to the non-luminous flame; third, cansing the flame and air to pass through the interstices between the fragments of refractory material; and, fourth, conducting the products of combustion to the outside air.

Description

s Sheets-Sheet 1 (No Model.)
W. M. JACKSON.
METHOD 'OF PRODUCING HEAT IN PORTABLE STOVBS.
- Patented Jan. 20, 1885.
(No Model.) 3 Sheets-Sheet 2. W. M; JACKSON.
METHOD OF PRODUCING HEAT IN PORTABLE STOVES.
No. 310,948. Patented Jan; 20, 1885.
fz' E.
INVE/VTUI? WIT/VE SEZWM- v I I 1 A I N PETERS PholmLithogmphor. Washmglon. n. c.
(No ModeL} 3 Sheets-Sheet 3. W. M. JACKSON. METHOD OF PRODUGINGHEAT IN PORTABLE STOVES.
No. 310,948. Patented Jan. ZO,-.1885.
IIVVE/VTOR W/T/VE SE8 linirnn Srarns WALTER MARSH JACKSON, OF
Parent @rrrcs.
PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND.
METHOD OF PRODUCING HEAT iN PORTABLE STOVES.
JJPECZFIQATION forming part of Letters Patent. No. 310,9 l8, dated January 20, 1885.
Application filed April 19, 1884. (No model.)
To aZZ whom it may concern:
Be it known that I, \VALTER M. JACKSON, of Providence, in the county of Providence and State of Rhode Island, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Methods of Utilizing the Heat Developed by the Combustion of Gas; and I do hereby declare the following to be a full, clear, and exact descrip tion of the invention, such as will enable others skilled in the art to which it appertains to make and use the same.
My invention relates to an improvement in the method of producing heat in a portable stove, the object of the same being to obstruct, concentrate, and radiate the heat of a flame 'at points where it is most desirable such heat should be located for the purposes of cooking, heating, Coo.
With these ends in view my invention consists in, first, the employment of a non-luminous or nearly non-luminous flame; secondly, supplying a constant flow of air to the flame by a permanent draft; thirdly, passing the flame and heated air through the interstices formed between the fragments of a bed of refractory material by a draft; and, fourthly, passing the products of combustion to the outside air. I
It is a well-known fact that heat may be partially obstructed in its passage through a stove, range, or fire-pot, such as is in ordinary use, and eliminated from the products of combustion, which pass off through the flues, by the interposition of diaphragms, siphons, damp ers, or by the use of extended or circuitous stove-pipes; but it is not found practicable to wholly arrest the developed heat, as some loss must necessarily occur in conducting the products of combustion out of the room,.where they can exert no prejudicial effect upon life.
In order to more fully obstruct the heat for utilization and obtain a slow and more perfect combustion of the fuel employed without dannous, I destroy its luminosity by an admixture of steam or air before it is ignited.
If the fuel be non luminous, of course this will not be necessary. The vapors of volatile oils, carbnreted air, carbureted water-gas, petro-. leum, and coal gases are examples of the for- 5 5 mer, while alcohol and what is known commercially as water-gas, a diffused mixture of hydrogen and carbonic oxide, may be taken for examples of the latter. Having thus secured the advantage of a smokeless flame, I can burn the same between the interstices of the refractory material without choking the interstitial spaces with a deposition of lampblack or unconsumcd carbon, and thus insure continuous and free draft with more perfect combustion.
To insure constant combustion and prevent the danger of explosions, I provide a permanent opening below the surface of the refractory material for the ingress of fresh air, and this opening is so arranged that it cannot be closed unless a deliberate attempt be made so to do by a willful effort to destroy the utility of the process.
It will readily be seen that where combustion takes place largely below the grate-bars and beneath the refractory material following up into the spaces between the fragments of the refractory material an adequate supply of air inust be never-failing; otherwise the flame might be extinguished by superabui'idant carbonic acid and the absence of oxygen, while the gas or vapor would continue to besupplied, thus filling the stove, fire-pot, flucs, and chim ney with a combustible material which when exposed to air by opening the apparatus at any point would violently explode upon con. tact with a flame. Therefore the permanent nature of the opening for the constant ingress of air is of the utmost importance.
For the purpose of making my method more readily understood, reference will be had to the accompanying drawings, in which- Figure 1 is a view in perspective of one formof apparatus for carrying out my inven- 95 tion. Fig. 2 shows the same applied to a stove. Fig. 3 is a vertical section through one of the branch feedpipes and showing the supply-pipe E beyond. Fig. at is a detached view of one of the air-feed valves, and Fig. 5 Ice is a detached view of the enlarged chamber provided with a fire-stop. Fig. 6 is a detached view of the coupling with which is connected the gas-supply pipe.
A represents a cooking-range, which may be of any form and construction, the particular form of apparatus represented in this case being adapted to a stove or range in which the fire-pot is oblong, oval, or the like in shape.
B is the fire-pot, and O is a draft-flue connecting the space above the tire-pot with the outside air.
Within the ash-chamber, commonly formed in the hearth, or any suitable receptacle,D,located in front of or below the tire;pot,is placed the apparatus for supplying air and gas to the fire-pot.
E represents a supply-pipe through which gas, which may consist of the vapors of volatile oils, earbureted air, carburcted watergas, petroleum, and coal gases, a mixture of hydrogen and carbonic oxide, &c., is supplied to the burner. The pipe E is coupled onto the branch 0 of a T-coupling, a, to which is connected the small tube b, provided with a stop-cock, c, and with apilot-burner, d, at its outer end. By means of the stop-cock c the supply of gas to the pilot-burner may be regulated as desired. To the other ends of the T coupling a the branch pipes F F are connected, the ends of which enter the enlarged ch ambersff and constitute injector-nozzlesj" f, for the purpose of commingling air and gas and forcing the mixture onward to the burner, as will be hereinafter explained.
G is a stopcock for admitting gas to the chambers f f, or for cutting it oil therefrom.
' The injector-chainbers f are each formed with a coupling, 9, which extends downwardly through an opening in the lower wall of the chamber, and projects below the same adistance sufiicient to admit of the attachment of the check-nut g. The check-nuts g serveto firmly secure the apparatus against displacement. For example, when the apparatus is placed in a licartlrrecess, as represented in Fig. 2, the shouldcrf about the perforation in the lower wall of the chambersf will rest in contact with the upper surface of the bottom of the recess, while the check-nuts y will engage the lower surface of the bottom.
The nuts 9 are constructed with annular flat seats on one end, and are also provided with cross-bars H, having screw-threaded central openings, h.
I represents a hand-valve provided with a central screw that engages the opening it in the nut. 13y rotating the valve 1 it may be adjusted so as to admit any desired quantity of air to the injector and cou'nningling chamber.
Different kinds of gas require different quantities of air to be mixed therewith to insure perfect combustion, and hence by the employment of the hand-valves I the proper quantity of air for different kinds of gas, and for varying conditions of pressure or quantity of gas,
can be admitted and the most perfect combustion readily obtained.
The combustible mixture of air and gas is conveyed to the burner L by the pipes K, and admitted to the burner near the opposite ends thereof. The burner L is constructed with a continuous chamber or elongated receptacle, 7, in its lower portion, and with a contracted upper portion, Z, provided with a series of perforations, Z through which the mixture of air and gas iiows in jets and is ignited. Each pipe K is provided with an enlarged chamber, 7;, located between the burner and injectorchamber. The chamber 7; consists, essentially, of an enlarged socket, 7v, interposed between two sections of the pipe K. Socket h is provided with an annular shoulder, 7.6-, on which is placed a wire-gauze diaphragm, M, the meshes of which are of such a size as to allow of the free passage of the gas, and yet prevent the backward passage of a flame, thus preventing the ignition of the gas or explosive mixture contained in the supply-pipe in the rear of the diaphragm. A coupling, m, is screwed into the socket 7;, the end of the coupling engaging the outer cdge of the wire-gauze diaphragm and retaining it in its place. As the wire-gauze would necessarily obstruct and impede the flow of gas were it of the same diameter as the supply-pipe, the enlarged chamher 7; is provided, to admit of the employment of a diaphragm of such diameter that the combined area of the interstices in the diaphragm will be equal to the area of a cross-section of the supply-pipe, thus insuring a free and unobstructed iiow of the gas to the burner. The iire-pot T5 is'lilled, or partially filled, with refractory material N, against which the jets of the burner impinge. The refractory material may consist of broken pieces of tire-brick or any other suitable material. The purpose of this refractory material is to arrest the heat developed by the combustion of the gas, and having become heated to a high degree communicate the heat to cooking-vessels in a manner similar to that of a bed of red-hot coals, or radiate the heat throughout the room, or fulfill any of the purposes to which an ordinary cooking or heating stove may be adapted. A. small. supply of gas is supplied to the pilotburner, which is kept constantly ig nited, or ignited before the gas is allowed to enter the burner L, for the purpose of instantly igniting the gas when supplied to the main burner. Should the pilot-burner be dispensed with and the gas turned on to the main burner and lighted with a match, there would be great danger of an explosion, as such an operation would result in a sudden accumulation of gas throughout the interstices in the refractory material and in the fire-pot, and were this accumulated supply suddenly ignited a disastrous accident might result therefrom; but by the employment of a pilot-burner such an accident is avoided, since if the pilot burner is kept constantly ignited, which is the ITO better and safer plan, whenever any gas escapes fromthe main burner it will be at once ignited, and an accumulation of gas in the fire-pot, stove, or lines obviated. I
The stove or range is provided on its under side with a permanently-open draft-opening, 0, while the pipe (J constitutes a permanently-open exit-flue and permanent draft. The permanent draft established by the opening 0 and the exit-flue G, which connects with the outside air, is a very important feature, as it not only provides for carrying off the results of combustion, which are prejudicial to life, but causes the jets of burning gas to complete- 1y occupy the interstices between the pieces of refractory material and draws a sufficient amount of air through the permanent opening 0 to complete any partial combustion that may have taken place at the jets, and at the same time prevents an accumulation of gas from any cause below the fire-pot. The stopcock 0 is adjusted so as to maintain a continuons limited flow of gas to the pilot-burner. By opening the cock G a supply of gas is admitted to the branch pipes F, and issues with sufficient force from the injector-nozzles f to cause a partial vacuum in the surrounding annular chambers o in the chambers f of the injectors, and thus draw into the chambers a supply of fresh or outer air through the airsupply openings, which extend through the bottom of the stove or range, the air-supply being regulated by the hand-valves I. The gas and air are thoroughly mixed and commingled in the chambers f, and this mixture is forced into the burner, from whence it is sues in jets and is instantly ignited by the pilot-burner. The jets impinging against the refractory material and drawn through the spaces between the pieces thereof stores heat therein,which is used for heating, cooking, 820., as maybe desired.
The apparatus herein described forms no part of my present invention, the same being reserved as the subject-matter of a separate application, Serial number 133,07 3, filed May 28, 1884.
I am aware that it has been proposed to use ordinary illuminating-gas in a stove provided with a receptacle filled with refractory material and having a permanent air-draft below the bed of fuel and an exit-flue communicating with the outer air; also, that it has been proposed to use diluted and non-luminous gas in a stove having burners beneath a bed of refractory material, the stove being provided either with a permanent draft-opening or with a permanent exit-flue; also, that stoves of this character have been provided with dampers for regulating and varying the draft, while it is essential to my invent-ion that the supply of air shall be constant and fixed, and hence I make no claim to such methods of utilizing the heat developed by the combustion of gas.
Having fully described my invention, whatl claim as new, and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is
The method of producing heat in a portable stove, which consists in, first,employing a nonluminous or nearly non-luminous flame below a body or mass of refractory material; secondly, introducing a constant and fixed supply of air to the non-luminous flame; third, cansing the flame and air to pass through the interstices between the fragments of refractory material; and, fourth, conducting the products of combustion to the outside air.
In testimony whereof I have signed this specification in the presence of two subscribing witnesses.
NVALTER MARSH J AOKSON.
, Witnesses:
GEORGE H. VARE, WILLIAM Mnrnnws.
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Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2790434A (en) * 1951-06-16 1957-04-30 Delux Range Company Broiler

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2790434A (en) * 1951-06-16 1957-04-30 Delux Range Company Broiler

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