US3087984A - Wiring ficture and forming board - Google Patents

Wiring ficture and forming board Download PDF

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US3087984A
US3087984A US67890757A US3087984A US 3087984 A US3087984 A US 3087984A US 67890757 A US67890757 A US 67890757A US 3087984 A US3087984 A US 3087984A
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wire
structure
correlator
plate
opening
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Waranch Myer
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Waranch Myer
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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01BCABLES; CONDUCTORS; INSULATORS; SELECTION OF MATERIALS FOR THEIR CONDUCTIVE, INSULATING OR DIELECTRIC PROPERTIES
    • H01B13/00Apparatus or processes specially adapted for manufacturing conductors or cables
    • H01B13/012Apparatus or processes specially adapted for manufacturing conductors or cables for manufacturing wire harnesses
    • H01B13/01218Apparatus or processes specially adapted for manufacturing conductors or cables for manufacturing wire harnesses the wires being disposed by hand
    • H01B13/01227Apparatus or processes specially adapted for manufacturing conductors or cables for manufacturing wire harnesses the wires being disposed by hand using a layout board

Description

April 30, 1963 r M. WARANCH 3,087,984

WIRING FIXTURE AND FORMING BOARD Filed Aug. 19, 1957 6 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR.

H64 MYER WARANCH wazzzz/ .ZM

ATTOR EY April 30, 1963 M. WARANCH 3,087,984

WIRING FIXTURE AND FORMING BOARD Filed Aug. 19, 1957 6 Sheets-Sheet 2 4O "O 'O O- 0 o 6 o:

4 5 mmvm. MYER WARANCH BY u Mail/3U Jim/u ATTORN April 30, 1963 M. WARANCH 3,087,984

WIRING FIXTURE AND FORMING BOARD Filed Aug. 19, 1957 6 Sheets-Sheet 3 MOUNTING BOARD FIG.250

JNVENTOR. M YE R WARAN CH ATTORN April 30, 1963 M. WARANCH 3,087,984

WIRING FIXTURE AND FORMING BOARD Filed Aug. 19, 1957 I 6 Sheets-Sheet 5 FIG. 20a

FIG.2O

T -1 2 INVENTOR. u

MYER WARANCH a/gu inn/1';

ATTORNEY April 30, 1963 M. WARANCH WIRING FIXTURE AND FORMING BOARD 6 Sheets-Sheet 6 INVENTOR. MY E R WA RA N CH ATTOR EY United States Patent M 3,087,984 WIRING FIXTURE AND FORMING BOARD Myer Waranch, 2919 Rosalind Ave., Baltimore 19, Md. Filed Aug. 19, 1957, Ser. No. 678,907 23 Claims. (Cl. 174--135) This invention relates generally to wire gripping devices and more particularly the invention relates to apparatus for the wiring of harness for telephone, radio, television, and other electrical and electronic apparatus. This application is a continuation-in-part of US. patent application Serial Number 367,572, filed July 13, 1953, now abandoned by applicant for an invention entitled Wiring Fixtures and Form Board.

The conventional manner of making connections or hook-ups in complicated electrical systems and network, especially for telephone switchboards and other forms of wiring, is accomplished by a unique arrangement of wires colored and/or numbered in accordance with a predetermined system. The number of wires used, in many instances, is in the hundreds and could be in the thousands. The wires are bunched together and must be compressed into a relatively limited space, yet each conductor must retain its electrical identity.

It has been usual in this practice to employ nails projected from a board or wall, and spaced at convenient intervals to allow the bunched conductors to be held together, and branched off singly or in limited sets to feed the terminals of particular parts or components in the electrical system.

Other arrangements that have been used are holes drilled in a plywood board or clips mounted on a board. The wires are laid in place singly in accordance with instructions from a dope sheet (a piece of paper which lists all the wires and gives the origin and destination of each). With all the wires placed in position, the next step is lacing or binding the bunched wires so that they are rigidly and neatly formed into the configuration called a wire form or harness. The wire form or harness can then be removed from the board and be prepared for wiring into its associated electrical equipment. The board is then ready to receive another set of wires to be formed into a harness.

The conventional methods and arrangements for making wire forms or harness have numerous disadvantages. First, the wiring operator must continuously refer to the dope sheet in order to find out what wire to use next, Where to start the wire run, and where to terminate the wire run. This procedure results in a considerable loss f time and is also conducive to wiring errors. In addition to the aforementioned disadvantage, the wires are not firmly gripped by the nails, holes in the board, or the clips. As a result when the wires are placed on the board, they cannot be pulled taut and tend to pull loose or pop-up over the nails. This causes both a waste of wire and of time.

In making the wire forms or harness, the wires are placed immediately adjacent to the board. This very limited working clearance severely restricts the speed at which the completed wire bundles can be tied. In setting up the harness board, nails or clips for each wire must be individually set in position, and/0r many holes have to be drilled in the board. This wastes both time and material.

EJ381984 Patented Apr. 30, 1963 An object of this invention, therefore, includes the design of a new and improved wire forming board that will avoid these and other disadvantages and limitations of the prior art.

Another object of this invention is to provide a wire forming fixture or harness which eliminates the use of the dope sheet in the placement of each conductor in its proper position.

Still another object of this invention is to provide an arrangement for positively gripping each wire or conductor as it is placed in position so that a wire may be inserted in its starting terminus, pulled taut, and then quickly run to its ending terminus.

A further object of this invention is to provide an arrangement for forming of the entire harness several inches above the board so as to allow ample working clearance beneath the bunched wires for tying, taping, or other means of wrapping or containing the wires. Still another object of this invention is to provide a wiring fixture and form board which is economical to manufacture, efiicient and reliable in operation, and easy to use.

These and other objects and advantages of this invention will become more apparent from the following detailed description and the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a splicing correlator embodying the features of this invention;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of a detail of FIG. 1, showing the arrangement by which conductors are anchored in the correlator;

FIG. 3 is a top plan of an assembly board with a pair of correlators mounted thereon showing a typical arrangement for running wires during assembly thereof;

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of a modified form of correlator;

FIG. 5 is a front elevation of another form of the correlator;

FIG. 6 is a plan view of FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 is a sectional view of a guide ring used for holding wires during assembly;

FIG. 8 is a perspective view of a cable guide of FIG. 3;

FIG. 9 is a typical sectional view taken through an enlarged back plate showing the arrangement for attaching the color coded buttons to the back plate;

FIG. 10 is a top perspective view of one type of wire gripping opening arrangement;

FIG. 11 is a perspective view of a modified form of a wire gripping opening arrangement;

FIG. 12 is a perspective view of still another form of wire gripping opening arrangement;

FIG. 13 is a perspective view of a modified type guide ring used for supporting wires between correlators.

FIG. 14 is a perspective view of another modified form of correlator assembly;

FIG. 15 is a perspective view at another modified form of the correlator;

FIG. 16 is a fragmentary perspective view of the correlator unit of FIG. 15 showing a modified type of base;

FIG. 17 is a perspective view of a coding unit;

H6. 18 is a perspective view of a wire distributing unit;

FIG. 18-a is a fragmentary enlargement of an enlarged detail of FIG. 18 showing how wires are tied;

FIG. 19 is a perspective view of a backing plate unit;

FIG. 20 is an end view of a mounting adapter;

PEG. 20-0 shows how one type of mounting base is mounted on the mounting adapter of FIG. 20;

FIG. 20b shows how another type of mounting base fits into the mounting adapter of PEG. 20;

FIG. 21 is a plan view of a harness board showing how wires are run between correlator assemblies;

FIG. 22 is a perspective view of a modified type of wire distributing unit;

FIG. 23 is a cross sectional view taken along line 23-23 of FIG. showing a step in the insertion of a wire into the opening;

FIG. 23-a is another sectional view taken along line 2323 of FIG. 10 showing another step in the insertion of a wire into the wire gripping opening;

FIG. 24 is a cross sectional view taken through line 2424 of FIG. 11 showing the insertion of a wire of a larger diameter;

FIG. 24-[l is a cross sectional view through line 24-24 of FIG. 11 showing the insertion of a wire of a smaller diameter;

FIG. 25 is a cross sectional view through line 25-25 of FIG. 12 showing the insertion of a wire of a larger diameter; and

FIG. 25-a is a cross sectional view through line 2525 of FIG. 12 showing the insertion of a wire of a smaller diameter.

Referring now to FIG. 1, there is illustrated a splicing correlator 59 which consists of a frame having a fasteni-ng plate 14? adapted for horizontal placement from which a back plate 11 rises vertically in an arcuate form. Arms 12 are provided on the fastening plate It} and extend toward the front. These arms 12 are provided with downwardly taut elevating members 16 having a cross member 13 joining them together.

A pair of parallel jaws 14 project from the cross member 13. These jaws 14 are spaced sufficiently to resiliently hold a number of conductors 18 together. The jaws 14 are preferably vertically disposed in regard to the fastening plate 10, and extend upwardly facing the back plate 11.

An adjusting bracket 15 extends out from the elevating members 16 and joins them transversely to form a base for the frame so the elevating members 16 serve to position the fastening plate 16 several inches above a board, table or other supporting device 25 in order to provide ample working cleanance beneath the conductors 18. The bracket 15 has a slot 22 provided therein. This slot 22 receives a T-bolt 26 which is movable in a T-slot 27 provided in the board 25 to allow adjustment in the posi tioning of the correlator. Bracket 15 also contains holes 79 through which screws or nails may be fastened so that the correlator may be mounted on a flat surface or board, such as a sheet of plywood.

The plate 1% has a number of Wire gripping holes or openings 17 pierced through it for the placement of the end sections 21 of wires- 18 through them when they are being assembled. Another set of wire gripping holes or openings 19 is located in alignment with the set of holes 17 and are made of a different size in case the holes or openings 17 are not suitable, for the wires 18 which are to be used.

Aligned with these sets of holes 17 and 19, in a vertical plane, are two sets of holes 20, in pairs, spaced above each other in the plate 11 in which sample or code conductors 23 may be inserted as guides in color or markings to visually assist the operator in placing the principal wires 18 of a network in holes 17 or 19.

The upper edge of the back plate 11 is fitted with interchangeable color coded markers 51 which are mounted in alignment with holes 17 and 19. The color coded number indicates to which opening of the other correlators the indicated wire is to be run. A wire 18, after insertion in a wire gripping opening 17, of one correlator 51 is bent forward between jaws 14 of this correlator, pulled taut, and gripped by the opening, and then run to the indicated wire gripping opening 17 of another correlator, as shown in FIG. 3 through the necessary cable guides 43, as shown in FIG. 3. An explanation of the gripping action of these holes or openings is given hereinafter.

The arcuate form of the plates 10 and 11 is preferred in many instances since such shape allows the wires to be radiated to the jaws 14 where they are brought through and bunched. Also the arcuate form of plates 10 and 11 permits all wire extremities of the correlator to be of the same length by the insertion of each Wire to the same depth through the openings 17. However, rectangular shaped fastening plates may also be used on correlator 50 and are preferable in some instances.

In FIGS. 5, 6, and 7 there is illustrated a modified form of correlator with a rectangular shaped fastening plate 48. This modified correlator 4i dilfers from correlator 50 of FIG. 1 in that spacers 45 are used rather than jaws 14 as used in connection with correlator 50. In correlator 4d, the spacers 45 are curved and have been cut from the material of the frame leaving slots 23. As shown further in FIGS. 5 t0 7, correlator 40 has a vertical leg portion with two sets of holes 41 and 42, arranged in pairs, and a horizontal leg portion also having two sets of holes 46 and 48, likewise arranged in pairs. A slot 33, of elongated shape is provided in the base of the correlator 40 and it receives the lock-nut 34 similar to lock-nut 26. In general, the modified correlator 40' is used for forming cable terminations that end at terminal boards, whereas correlator St is used to form cable terminations at multiterminal plugs or connectors. Other modified forms of correlators are described hereinafter.

Since one of the basic elements of'this invention is the wire gripping opening it will be described in detail. FIGS. 10, 11, 12, 23, 23-a, 24, 24-a, 25 and 25-a, are referred to as an aid in illustrating the characteristics of the opening arrangements and the mechanics involved in gripping a wire conductor 18 when placed in the opening. In FIG. 10, the wire gripping opening in element 57 is circular and mounted horizontally, while in FIG. 11 a rectangular opening is provided in element 58 and it is also horizontally mounted but with modified walls. In FIG. 12 is shown another circular opening in element 59, btu this opening is mounted at an angle with respect to the horizontal.

Each of these wire gripping opening arrangements has two active walls, namely a forward wall 53 to be henceforth referred to as the wire gripping wall, and an opposite wall 54 henceforth referred to as the wire restraining wall. The wire gripping wall contains the wire gripping edge 55 which is preferably a degree angle. Angles somewhat larger than 90 degrees may be used with reduced gripping effectiveness and angles smaller than 45 degrees may tend to damage the insulation of the wire conductors 18. The material of which the opening of the wall is made is hard and non-chippable so that the wire gripping edge 55 is not worn away by normal usage. The distance between the wire gripping wall 53 and the wire restraining wall 54 is preferably slightly larger than the diameter of the wire or conductor 18 to be inserted therein, although distances as great as two to three times the wire diameter may be used with reduced gripping efficiency.

The manner in which the wire griping opening is used will now be explained. One end of the wire or conductor 18 is inserted into the opening in element 57 the required distance. The wire 18 is then bent against the wire gripping wall 53 of the opening and while tension is maintained on the wire, the wire is run to its terminus which may be another wire gripping opening on another correlator. Considerable force, much more than is normally used, may be exerted on the wire while it is being run, without disengaging it from the wire gripping opening.

Since the gripping action of this opening in element 57 is not obvious, this will now be explained. Upon insertion of the conductor 18 into the wire gripping opening in element 57 and bending of the portion of the wire above the opening against the wire gripping edge 55, the por tion of the wire below the opening tends to pivot upward with wire gripping edge 55 acting as the fulcrum. This upward movement of the Wire 18, is inhibited by the wire restraining edge 56. As the portion of the wire 18 above the opening is bent against the edge 55, the resilient insulation of the wire is dented slightly by edge 55, as best seen in FIG. 23-a.

Further pull on the wire 18 has the eifect of forcing edge 55 deeper into the dent and results in a mechanical grip on the wire while it is pulled taut to a terminus on another correlator. The shape of the gripping opening, that is, the plan view, is preferably circular as illustrated in FIG. 10. However, a rectangular or even slotted opening will provide an effective gripping action provided the wire 18 is pulled in a direction perpendicular to the plane of the wire gripping wall 53. Correlators 50 and 40 utilizing this circular type of wire gripping opening have been described above. Another type correlator which can use this type opening is described below.

FIG. 11 illustrates a modified form of wire gripping element 58 having an opening therein. This element 58 differs from the element 57 described above in connection with FIGS. 10, 23 and 23-a, in that the walls 53 and 54 in the opening are at an angle with respect to the surface of the opening. However, wire gripping edge 55 still retains its 90 degree angle and provides this opening in element 58 with the same gripping action as is obtained with the opening in element 57. The advantage of this modified opening in element 58 is that it will grip eifectively wires varying considerably in diameter. Larger wires may be effectively gripped by insertion at an angle while smaller wires may be inserted perpendicularly or at an angle and still be gripped as effectively as in the opening in element 57. Although FIG. 11 shows an opening with a rectangular outline, it is appreciated that an opening with a circular, elliptical or other shape could be used provided that the basic principles described above are adhered to.

Another type of wire gripping opening arrangement or element 59 is illustrated in FIGS. 12, 25, and 25-m in which the wire gripping principles described above are utilized. The plane of the opening in element 59 is tilted with respect to the plane of the wire run to permit a larger opening to be used so that a greater range of wire diameters may be effectively gripped. Other advantages of this tilted type opening in element 59 are described below. Modified openings in elements 58 and 59 may, of course, be used with correlators Sit and 40 which have been previously described.

FIG. 14 illustrates another type of wiring correlator. This is an exploded view of a correlator assembly consisting of correlator units 60, coding units 70, a backing plate 80, and a distributing unit 83, all of which are removably mounted on a mounting adapter 90. A detailed view of one of the correlator units 60' is shown in FIG. 15. There is a similarity between this correlator 60' and correlators 50 and 40 previously described in that end sections of conductors 18 can be inserted in the wire gripping openings so that the Wires are held taut several inches above a flat board (not shown) by elevating members. However, correlator 60 contains additional features not described in connection with correlators 50 or 46 In correlator unit 60, the fastening surface 62 as shown in FIG. is not at a right angle to elevating members 64 but is tilted. This tilted fastening surface 62 is advantageous because it allows larger diameter wire gripping openings to be used so that a greater range of wire sizes can be effectively accommodated when used with wire receiving wells 66 described below. It permits improved visibility of the marker plates 69 of coding units 70 as shown in FIG. 17, and it permits correlator units containing wire funnels 61 to be mounted in tandem on mounting adapter 90, so that wire funnels from one correlator will not interfere with the wires run from the correlator behind them. It is appreciated, however, that although only the construction of the correlator with the tilted fastening plate is shown, it may be preferable in some applications to use a similarly constructed correlator with a horizontalfastening plate.

Another feature shown in correlator 60* is the Wire funnel 611.. This is a funnel shaped projection located on fastening plate 62 over wire gripping opening 5 9. The wire funnel 61 is open in front to allow proper insertion of conductor 18 but tapers elsewhere into opening 59. The wire funnel 61 saves wiring time by facilitating the insertion of the ends of conductors 1 8 into the opening 59.

Another feature shown in correlator 60 of FIGS. 14 and 15 is the wire receiving well 66. This well is formed by front wall 65 and partitions 64 of the correlator unit 60. The remaining wall of the well is normally formed by wall "73 of a coding unit 70 or, in some instances, by the wall of backing plate A stop 63 is located in well 66 which is preferably adjustably mounted to vary the depth of the well. The wire receiving well 66, with the adjustable stop 63, is advantageous because the wires are prevented from curling and interfering with each other. Also, the harnesses can be made more uniform and precise, and there is a saving of wire and time.

Mounting legs 67 serve to position the correlator 60 on mounting adapter to prevent upward movement of correlator 60, and to provide clearance between body of correlator 60' and the mounting hardware 91. All of these features, that is, the inclined fastening plate, the wire funnel 61, the wire receiving well 66, and the adjustable stop 63 can, of course, be used with the first described correlators 50 and 40 The construction of the coding unit 70 is illustrated in FIG. 17. It consists of a marker plate 711 removably mounted in wedge shaped grooves 105 of coding unit 70. Marker plate 71 holds markers 69 which are removably mounted in grooves 74 of marker plate 71. Markers 69 are made from a stiff yet flexible material so that they lan be snapped into position. Slots 72 in marker plate '71 permit easy removal of the markers 69.

Mounting of the marker plate 7 1, tilted with respect to the horizontal, is preferable in many applications because visibility of the markers is improved and space is conserved by permitting the coding unit 70 to be made thinner.

Marker 6% contains information consisting of a letter which indicates the correlator to which the wire is to be run, a number which identifies the wire to be run, and colored bars which also identify the wire further. Other coding symbols can, of course, be used if desired. The overall height of the coding unit 70' is equal to or slightly less than the overall height of the correlator 60 so as to permit grouping of coding and correlator units alternately and in tandem as shown in FIGS. 14 and 211. By this alternate tandem arrangement many wires can be correctly identified and positioned securely in a small area without interference from the marker or coding unit 70.

Two forms of distributing or spacer units 83 and are shown in FIGS. 18 and 22, respectively. In FIG. 18, tines 81, of U-shaped cross-section, are mounted in alignment with grooves 82 on an elevating member 84. The U-shaped tines 81 facilitate the binding of the wires 18 since the binding material 93 when threaded into the tines readily encircles the wires as shown in FIG. 18-a.

In FTG. 22, removably mounted peg shaped tines 101 are shown in alignment with ridges 102 on an elevating member 102, of spacer unit 1111 In spacer unit 1%, binding is readily done by inserting of tying material between ridges 162. Distributing or spacer units 83 and 100 are used primarily in applications that require proper spacing of wires 13 that run to terminal strips. Mounting legs 67 position the units 83 and lot on mounting adapter 90. FIGS. 14 and 21 illustrate typical applications of distributing units 83 or 1%.

Referring now to FIG. 19, a typical backing plate 80 is shown. It consists of a vertical plate 80 mounted integrally on mounting feet 7 8. Brackets 77 are used to support a removable post 77-a which contains a removable marker 7 7-1; which is used to identify the correlator with which the backing plate is associated. Backing plate 8%} may be used either in back or in front of a correlator or a group of correlators. The use of a backing plate 85} is illustrated in FIGS. 14 and 21. The backing plate is adjustably mounted on mounting adapter 90 by screws 79a which engage threaded, tapped holes 79 of mounting feet 78 and securely sandwich the various components of the correlator assembly.

The mounting adapter 90 is shown in FIG. 14 in perspective, and in plan view in FIG. 21, and in end views in FIGS. 20, 20-a and 20b. Mounting adapter 90 consists of a front backing plate 85 mounted vertically with respect to the base portion of the adapter. Brackets 86 are provided in the backing plate 85 for the purpose of holding correlator identifying markers or cable guides. The horizontal portion of mounting adapter 90 is made up of a special tapered split channel 95 which is integral with a flanged base 94.

Flanged base 94 has holes 84 provided therein through which screws or nails are driven so that mounting adapter 90 can be mounted on a flat surface such as a board. The wall portions of channel 95 are tapered downwardly and toward each other so that the various units which are mounted on the channel 95 cannot be dislodged by an upward pull.

Normally most of the various units are mounted as shown in FIG. 20-b. However, the smaller units are mounted as shown in FIG. 20-a, through the tapered projections 96 of the top portion of the channel 95', as shown in FIG. 20.

The purpose of the mounting adapter 90 is to adapt the various units described above, that is, the correlator 60, the coding unit 70, the backing plate 80, and the distributing unit 33 for mounting on a flat surface. It will be noted that the design of the mounting adapter is such that one standard width of the adapter will accommodate all the various widths of the other units. Mounting adapter 90 is made in various lengths so that all kinds of harness configurations can be accommodated.

In FIG. 21 there is illustrated how the mounting adapter can be made to accommodate correlator assemblies varying in width and length and layout arrangement. It will be noted that on the left of FIG. 21, there are two separate correlator assemblies on one mounting adapter while on the right side there is one correlator assembly. Correlator assemblies mounted on adapter 90 require no additional space on the board for mounting purposes since the mounting mechanism is beneath the correlator assemblies. This is a necessary feature in many harness layouts where space is very limited. Adapter 90 is very easily mounted to a board by driving nails (preferably a two headed type for easy removal) through holes 84 before the various elements are installed on the adapter.

'It can be seen by referring to FIG. 21 that the amount of time and effort required to mount the three correlator assemblies shown is but a fraction of what is required when the same harness is set up on conventional harness boards. On a conventional harness board, a nail, clip, or hole would be required for each wire, including a nail corresponding to each tine 81 and 101 of the distributing units and nails for the guide rings.

Guide ring 99, shown in FIG. 13, fulfills the same purpose as guide ring 43 shown in FIG. 8. Guide ring 99 consists of a C-shaped ring 97 to which is attached a stem mounted in a stand 98. The base of the stand 98 contains holes for mounting to a board by means of screws or nails. The function of the guide ring 99 is to guide and support the cable or wire runs at strategic locations several inches above the board. This is best illustrated in FIG. 21.

It will be noted that the constructions illustrated in this application provide a number of features not found in the arrangements previously employed in the assembly of conductors or wires 18 to form a harness or network layout. The design and versatility of the correlator assemblies is such that by use of the combinations of the various elements described herein all types of wire harnesses can be readily laid out and fabricated. Harness boards are set up faster and more accurately.

Wires are placed in position more quickly without requiring the use of dope sheets. The bunched conductors can be laced, taped, or wrapped much more easily and quickly since the entire harness is supported several inches above the board. The bound harnesses are very readily removed from the board. The harnesses are more precisely and uniformly made and require very little trimming. Use of the arrangements illustrated and claimed save much time and material.

While but several general forms of the invention are shown in the drawings and described in the specification, it is not desired to limit this application for patent to these particular forms as it is appreciated that other forms could be made that would use the same principles and come within the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A correlator for distributing conductors along separate paths, comprising a base having a longitudinal slot therein, a frame having a lower bracket adjustably mounted in said slot, a pair of upright members extending upwardly from said bracket at opposite ends thereof, a cross member secured to said members intermediate the ends thereof, a pair of guiding jaws secured to said cross member medially thereof, horizontal arms secured to and extending horizontally of the upright members, said arms having a circular portion provided with rows of holes, and a vertical back plate extending upwardly from the aforesaid circular portion, said back plate having spaced rows of openings therethrough, whereby a series of conductors guided through said jaws are selectively threadable through the aforementioned holes.

2. A correlator as set forth in claim 1, wherein the periphery of the aforesaid back plate is provided with indentations, and buttons received in said indentations to identify the conductors threaded through the openings adjacent thereto.

3. A correlator as set forth in claim 1, including hook elements secured at the junction of the upright members and the horizontal arms, said hook elements being cut out of the material of said correlator to provide the openings therethrough.

4. A wire gripping device, comprising, structure defining a hard surface with at least one opening provided thereon, one wall of said opening forming a non-rounded and cleanly formed angle less than with the top sursurface of said structure, a second wall arranged opposite said first wall of said opening, said Walls being separated by a distance substantially equal to or greater than the diameter of said wire that is to be contained in said opening, and means for supporting and elevating said structure above said board, a mounting adapter for said wire gripping device, including a base having a flat plate, and means mounted substantially perpendicular to said base, said means having structure defining a longitudinally mounted channel thereon, and structure defining a second channel spaced parallel to said base, said longitudinal channel having two legs sloping upwardly and divergently to meet said second channel, whereby said gripping device can be mounted for movement on said adapter.

5. An electrical wire harness and cable forming correlator, comprising, a board, a frame having a base which may be adjustably mounted on said board, a pair of upright members extending upwardly from opposite ends of said base, a horizontal plate secured to to of said upright members, said horizontal plate containing spaced wire gripping elements defining openings located completely within said horizontal plate yet spaced along and near one edge of said horizontal plate, with said openings being arranged substantially peropendicularly to the plane of said horizontal plate, and a pair of vertical wire guiding jaws secured to said frame, said jaws being arranged to extend upwardly beyond said horizontal plate and medially located with respect to said spaced wire gripping openings.

6. An electrical wire harness and cable forming correlator as recited in claim 5, and additionally a vertical back plate extending upwardly from said fastening plates, said back plate having spaced rows of openings extending therethrough.

7. An electrical wire harness and cable forming correlator, comprising, a board, a frame having a base which may be adjustably mounted on said board, upright members extending upwardly from said base, a horizontal plate secured to top of said upright members, said horizontal plate containing spaced wire gripping openings located completely within said horizontal plate and spaced along and near one edge of said horizontal plate, said openings being arranged substantially perpendicular to the plane of said horizontal plate, a conductor spacer unit consisting of a row of vertical tines mounted on a supporting and elevating member, said row of vertical tines being arranged substantially parallel to said spaced wire gripping openings.

8. A wire gripping and wire distributing device, com

prising, a first structure with a surface and defining a substantially rectangular plate with substantially colinearly spaced openings provided therein, said openings being located substantially parallel to the long side of said rectangular plate, an elevating structure for supporting said long side of said rectangular plate on top thereof at a substantially inclined angle thereto, a fiat mounting base, means for mounting said elevating structure substantially perpendicularly to said flat mounting base, said colinearly spaced openings in said rectangular plate being located substantially equidistant from said flat mounting base, elements located on said elevating structure and positioned beneath said rectangular plate substantially perpendicularly to said fiat mounting base, said elements extending from said elevating structure across the underside of said rectangular plate between adjacent wire gripping openings therein and also extending downwardly towards the lower end of said elevating structure and forming perpendicular compartments beneath each of said wire gripping openings.

9. An arrangement as recited in claim 8, and additionally a second structure having a surface mounted at a tilted angle to said surface of said inclined rectangular plate of said first structure, said angle between said two surfaces being substantially V-shaped, said tilted surface of said second structure being arranged to contain removable coding markers in conspicuous alignment with said spaced openings of said inclined surface of said first structure.

10. A wire gripping correlator, comprising, structure having a surface with a plurality of spaced wire gripping openings therein, an elevated structure for supporting said surface on top thereof at a substantially inclined angle thereto, a substantially horizontal mounting base, means for mounting said elevating structure substantially vertically upon said mounting base, vertical elements located beneath said surface, and extending downwardly in the vertical direction from beneath said surface and toward said mounting base, said vertical elements extending in the horizontal direction adjacent said spaced openings to said elevating structure and forming wire receiving compartments therewith.

11. A wire gripping correlator as recited in claim 10, wherein the axis of each of said Wire gripping openings in the said surface are inclined to the axis of each of the said wire receiving compartments below each of said wire gripping openings.

12. A wire gripping and distributing device, comprising, a first structure having a surface with a plurality of spaced openings therein located near one edge of said structure, a mounting base, each of said openings in said surface of said structure having a first wall near said one edge of the said first structure and a second wall opposite the said first wall, said first wall being separated from said second wall by a distance equal to the largest diameter wire to be inserted into each of said openings, wire funneling structure located on said first structure, said wire funneling structure consisting of raised portions upon said surface of said first structure, each of said raised portions being elevated with respect to that portion of said surface of the said first structure lying between each of said first walls of each of the said openings and said one edge of the said first structure, each of the said raised portions extending from between said adjacently spaced openings toward said one edge of the said first structure, and means for adjustably mounting said first structure on said mounting base.

13. A wire gripping and distributing device, comprising, a first structure having a surface with a plurality of spaced openings therein located near one edge of said structure, a mounting base, each of said openings in said surface of said structure having a first wall near said one edge of the said first structure and a second wall opposite said first wall, said first wall being separated from said second wall by a distance equal to the largest diameter wire to be inserted into each of said openings, each of said openings having two sides, said two sides of each of the said openings being defined as the part of each opening which bounds the dimension of said opening that is perpendicular to the dimension between said first wall and said second wall of each of said openings, wire funneling structure located on said first structure, said wire funneling structure consisting of raised portions upon said surface of said first structure, each of said raised por- Itions being elevated with respect to that portion of said surface of said first structure lying between each of said first walls of each of said openings and said one edge of said first structure, said raised portions being arranged in pairs adjacent to each side of each of said openings, each said pair of said raised portions extending divergently from each of said two sides of each of said openings toward said one edge of said first structure, and means for mounting said first structure on said mounting base.

14. A correl ator for gripping conductors, comprising, a first structure with a surface having therein a plurality of spaced wire gripping openings arranged in a row adjacent to one edge of the said surface, a horizontal mounting base, a vertical elevating structure for supporting said surface of said first structure above said horizontal mounting base, vertical elements mounted on said vertical elevating structure below said surface of said first structure, each of said vertical elements extending in a substantially horizontal direction from said elevating structure between adjacent wire gripping openings of said surface of said first structure from said one edge thereof, said vertical elements also extending downwardly toward the lower end of said elevating structure and forming longitudinally open compartments below each of said wire gripping openings, the open end of each of said compartments being opposite said vertical elevating structure,

and means for adjustably mounting said elevating structure on said horizontal base.

15. A correlator as recited in claim 14, and additionally means within said longitudinally open compartments for adjusting the effective length of said compartments, said length adjustment compartment means consisting of movable elements adjustably retained against said downwardly extending vertical elements and said elevating structure.

16. A correlator as recited in claim 14, and additionally vertical longitudinal elements, said vertical longitudinal elements being located parallel to said vertical elevating structure, said vertical longitudinal elements being positioned adjacent to said longitudinal open compartments and forming removable closures for said open compartments.

17. A wire gripping and distributing device, comprising, a first structure with a surface and defining a plate, said plate having a top side and an underside, said plate having spaced openings extending through said plate from said top side to said underside thereof, an elevating structure for supporting said plate on top thereof, a substantially horizontal mounting base, means for mounting said elevating structure substantially vertically to said horizontal mounting base, vertical elements located beneath said plate, said vertical elements extending from said elevating structure across said underside of said plate between said openings and also extending downwardly towards the lower end of said elevating structure and forming substantially vertical compartments beneath each of said openings, the cross sectional area of each of the same compartments as measured perpendicularly to said elevating structure and said vertical elements being greater than the area of a corresponding opening, the area of each opening being defined as the area of a square with sides equal to the diameter of the largest wire that can be inserted in the respective opening.

18. A wire gripping and distributing device as recited in claim 17, and additionally means within said compartments for adjusting the effective depth of each of said compartments, said depth adjusting means consisting of movable elements, each of said movable elements having a surface area substantially equal to the cross sec tional area of each of the said wire receiving compartments, said movable elements being vertically movable and adjustably retainable across the cross sectional area of each of the said wire receiving compartments.

19. An electrical wire harness and cable forming correlator, comprising, a first structure having a surface with a plurality of spaced wire gripping openings therein, said wire gripping openings being arranged in a row substantially parallel to one edge of said first structure, each of said wire gripping openings having a first wall substantially parallel to and near said one edge of said first structure, and a second wall located opposite said first wall, said first wall forming a non-rounded angle at less than 150 degrees with said surface of said first structure, said Walls of each of said Wire gripping openings being separated by a distance equal to the largest diameter wire that can be contained in said wire gripping openings, a substantially horizontal mounting base, a substantially vertical elevating structure for supporting said first structure substantially horizontally above said horizontal mounting base, vertical elevating structure containing channels, said channels being confluent with each of said wire gripping openings, said channels extending downwardly toward the lower end of said elevating structure, the axis of each of the said downwardly extending channels being inclined with the angle that said first wall of the respective wire gripping opening makes with said hard surface of said first structure.

20. A wire gripping device, comprising, structure defina hard top surface with at least one opening with walls provided thereon, one wall of said opening forming a nonrounded and cleanly formed angle of less than 120 degrees with said hard top surface of said structure, a second wall in said opening opposite said first wall of said opening, said first and second walls being separated by a distance substantially equal to the largest diameter wire that is to be contained in the said opening, a board positioned below said structure, means for supporting and elevating said structure above the said board, a plurality of longitudinal elements, said plurality of longitudinal elements being separated from each other by a minimum distance equivalent to the dimension between said first and said second walls of said opening, said plurality of longitudinal elements extending downwardly from said hard top surface toward said board, with said downwardly extending longitudinal elements forming a wire receiving compartment with said elevating means beneath said opening in the said hard top surface.

21. A Wire gripping device as recited in claim 20, and means within said compartment for varying the effective depth of the said compartment.

22. An electrical wire harness and cable forming correlator, comprising a first structure with a hard top surface and defining a plate, the said plate having an underside, said plate having spaced wire gripping openings extending through said plate from said hard top surface to said underside thereof, the said wire gripping openings being located substantially parallel and adjacent to one edge of said plate, each of the said wire gripping openings having a first wall adjacent to said one edge of said plate and a second wall opposite said first wall, the said first wall of each of the said wire gripping openings forming a non-rounded and cleanly formed angle with the said hard top surface of the said plate, each of the said wire gripping openings having depth not greater than three times the diameter of the largest wire that can be inserted in a corresponding wire gripping opening, the depth of a wire gripping opening being defined as the distance from the junction of said first wall of an opening with the said hard top surface of said plate and the junction of the said second wall of a corresponding opening and the underside of said plate, a substantially vertical elevating structure for supporting said plate on top thereof at a substantially inclined angle thereto, each of the said first walls being inclined with respect to the said vertical elevating structure such that a line parallel to any one of said first walls of said openings intersects said elevating structure at an acute angle, a mounting base positioned below said plate, and means for mounting said elevating structure substantially vertically to said mounting base.

23. An electrical wire harness and cable forming correlator, comprising a first structure defining a plate, the said plate having a hard top surface and an underside, said plate having spaced wire gripping openings located completely within said top hard surface of said plate and extending through said plate from said hard top surface to said underside thereof, the said wire gripping openings being located substantially parallel and adjacent to one edge of said plate, said one edge of said plate being an outer boundary of said plate, each of the said wire gripping openings having a first Wall adjacent to said one edge of said plate and a second wall opposite said first wall of each respective opening, the said first wall of each of the said wire gripping openings making a cleanly formed angle of less than degrees with the hard top surface of said plate, each of the said wire gripping openings having a depth not greater than three times the diameter of the largest wire than can be inserted in a corresponding wire gripping opening, the depth of an opening being defined as the distance from the junction of said first wall of an opening with the hard top surface of said plate and the junction of the said second wall of a corresponding opening and the underside of said plate, a substantially vertical elevating structure for supporting said plate on top thereof, said vertical elevating structure consisting of upright members connected to and located under the said plate, a board positioned below said plate, and

means for mounting said upright members substantially vertically to the said board.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS McIntosh Jan. 20, 1874 Carter May 22, 1906 Slusser Mar. 17, 1908 Kipp -2 July 28, 1925 10 Richardson Aug. 16, 1927 Jones Nov. 13, 1928 Shaffier Mar. 26, Dutzmann Nov. 28, Cruser June 1, Hasse May 23, Johnson Dec. 12, Bowly et a1 Oct. 29, Gall Jan. 27, Hadden et al Mar. 9, Franz July 12, vGorrie July 24, Morsehel Feb. 5, Bleier Apr. 1,

Claims (1)

10. A WIRE GRIPPING CORRELATOR, COMPRISING, STRUCTURE HAVING A SURFACE WITH A PLURALITY OF SPACED WIRE GRIPPING OPENINGS THEREIN, AN ELEVATED STRUCTURE FOR SUPPORTING SAID SURFACE ON TOP THEREOF AT A SUBSTANTIALLY INCLINED ANGLE THERETO, A SUBSTANTIALLY HORIZONTAL MOUNTING BASE, MEANS FOR MOUNTING SAID ELEVATING STRUCTURE SUBSTANTIALLY VERTICALLY UPON SAID MOUNTING BASE, VERTICAL ELEMENTS LOCATED BENEATH SAID SURFACE, AND EXTENDING DOWNWARDLY IN THE VERTICAL DIRECTION FROM BENEATH SAID SURFACE AND TOWARD SAID MOUNTING BASE, SAID VERTICAL ELEMENTS EXTENDING IN THE HORIZONTAL DIRECTION ADJACENT SAID SPACED OPENINGS TO SAID ELEVATING STRUCTURE AND FORMING WIRE RECEIVING COMPARTMENTS THEREWITH.
US3087984A 1957-08-19 1957-08-19 Wiring ficture and forming board Expired - Lifetime US3087984A (en)

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US3411043A (en) * 1966-03-03 1968-11-12 Amp Inc Wire retainer for panelboard
US3631378A (en) * 1970-08-10 1971-12-28 Bell Telephone Labor Inc Wire-connecting blocks
US3949457A (en) * 1975-03-20 1976-04-13 Fortsch William A Means and method for branching wire bundles
US4998343A (en) * 1989-12-12 1991-03-12 Costello Clifford T Electrical wiring method and apparatus
US20030109323A1 (en) * 2001-12-11 2003-06-12 David Edel Putter fitting template
US6619997B1 (en) * 2001-06-18 2003-09-16 Bombardier Transportation Modular connector strain relief back shell and wiring method
US20050016617A1 (en) * 2003-07-24 2005-01-27 Spain Thomas Francis Guide tool for telecommunications cables
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US20060057887A1 (en) * 2004-09-16 2006-03-16 Hon Hai Precision Industry Co., Ltd. Connector securing apparatus
US20060169850A1 (en) * 2004-10-13 2006-08-03 Airbus Deutschland Gmbh Holder
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US20090173844A1 (en) * 2007-08-02 2009-07-09 Weixiong Huo Conduit and cable support bracket and method therefor
US20100218969A1 (en) * 2006-07-29 2010-09-02 Protectconnect, Inc. Adjustable plaster ring cover
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US3631378A (en) * 1970-08-10 1971-12-28 Bell Telephone Labor Inc Wire-connecting blocks
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US4998343A (en) * 1989-12-12 1991-03-12 Costello Clifford T Electrical wiring method and apparatus
US8388371B2 (en) 2000-01-05 2013-03-05 Protectconnect, Inc. Safety electrical outlet and switch system
US8678856B2 (en) 2000-01-05 2014-03-25 Protectconnect Safety electrical outlet and switch system
US8105107B2 (en) 2000-01-05 2012-01-31 Protectconnect, Inc. Safety electrical outlet and switch system
US20080235943A1 (en) * 2000-01-05 2008-10-02 Protectconnect, Inc. Safety electrical outlet and switch system
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USRE45430E1 (en) 2004-03-13 2015-03-24 Protectconnect Universal electrical wiring component
US7303431B2 (en) * 2004-09-16 2007-12-04 Hon Hai Precision Industry Co., Ltd. Connector securing apparatus
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US20100218969A1 (en) * 2006-07-29 2010-09-02 Protectconnect, Inc. Adjustable plaster ring cover
US20090173844A1 (en) * 2007-08-02 2009-07-09 Weixiong Huo Conduit and cable support bracket and method therefor

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