US3060659A - Packaging method and apparatus - Google Patents

Packaging method and apparatus Download PDF

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US3060659A
US3060659A US830629A US83062959A US3060659A US 3060659 A US3060659 A US 3060659A US 830629 A US830629 A US 830629A US 83062959 A US83062959 A US 83062959A US 3060659 A US3060659 A US 3060659A
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Prior art keywords
case
shaft
cases
glue
cans
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US830629A
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Maurice E Blais
John A Leach
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ST Regis Paper Co
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ST Regis Paper Co
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65BMACHINES, APPARATUS OR DEVICES FOR, OR METHODS OF, PACKAGING ARTICLES OR MATERIALS; UNPACKING
    • B65B51/00Devices for, or methods of, sealing or securing package folds or closures; Devices for gathering or twisting wrappers, or necks of bags
    • B65B51/10Applying or generating heat or pressure or combinations thereof
    • B65B51/18Applying or generating heat or pressure or combinations thereof by endless bands or chains
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65BMACHINES, APPARATUS OR DEVICES FOR, OR METHODS OF, PACKAGING ARTICLES OR MATERIALS; UNPACKING
    • B65B5/00Packaging individual articles in containers or receptacles, e.g. bags, sacks, boxes, cartons, cans, jars
    • B65B5/06Packaging groups of articles, the groups being treated as single articles

Description

Oct. 30, 1962 M. E. BLAIS ETAL 3,060,659
PACKAGING METHOD AND APPARATUS Filed July 50, 1959 15 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTORS. T MflUP/CEEBL 41s.
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1952 M. E. BLAIS ET AL 3,060,659
PACKAGING METHOD AND APPARATUS Filed July 50, 1959 15 Sheets-Sheet 4 IN V EN TORS.
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Filed July 30, 1959 Oct. 30, 1962 M. E. BLAIS ET AL PACKAGING METHOD AND APPARATUS 6 lHl h m5 m a M? W M HE E n N EL m m 2 A w w M W Oct. 30, 1962 M. E. BLAIS ET AL 3,060,659
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PACKAGING METHOD AND APPARATUS 15 Sheets-Sheet 8 Filed July 30, 1959 INVENTORS. IZQUP/CEEELfl/S.
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PACKAGING METHOD AND APPARATUS Filed July so, 1959 15 Sheets-Sheet 9 Rs Q R g Q a Q Q: I: N N
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PACKAGING METHOD AND APPARATUS Filed July 50, 1959 15 Sheets-Sheet l1 IN VEN TORS. ma /cs5: BL/q/s. BY dbl-INA. LEHCH.
Oct. 30, 1962 M. E. BLAIS ET AL PACKAGING METHOD AND APPARATUS l5 Sheets-Sheet 12 Filed July 30, 1959 w H m4 c m m 4 A E NB 5 m WEI. m m r M. E. BLAIS ETAL PACKAGING METHOD AND APPARATUS Oct. 30, 1962 15 Sheets-Sheet 13 Filed July 30, 1959 IN V EN TORS. MIUlP/CE E 51.4 15,
Oct. 30, 1962 M. E. BLAIS ETAE. 3,060,659
PACKAGING METHOD AND APPARATUS Filed July 30, 1959 15 SheetsSheet 14 Oct. 30, 1962 M. E. BLAIS ETAL PACKAGING METHOD AND APPARATUS Filed July 50, 1959 15 Sheets-Sheet l5 NAN bNN hhN r h F i lillfl @E LTIIIMMWINII|II1III hN liN 47' r ORA/E KT.
United States Patent Ofi ice 3,060,659 PACKAGING METHQD AND APPARATUS Maurice E. Blais, East Providence, and John A. Leach, Warwick, R.I., assignors to St. Regis Paper Company, New York, N.Y., a corporation of New York Filed July 30, 1959, Ser. No. 830,629 21 Claims. (Cl. 53186) This invention relates to packaging generally, and more particularly, to a method and apparatus for automatically packaging containers such as cans, and the like, into cases.
Heretofore, in an effort to reduce the relatively high cost of packing cases for containers such as cans, for example, for shipment in quantity, there has been developed a convenient and economical case manufactured of relatively stiff paper, such as heavy kraft paper, preferably of a base weight of the order of 90-200 pounds and which constitutes the subject matter of eo-pending application, Serial No. 797,647 of John I. Goodrich, filed March 6, 1959, and entitled Box-Like Containers.
Such cases have proved to be competitively superior to the conventional corrugated board cases, particularly from the standpoint of economy. However, the paper cases present two basic problems. First, they cannot be packed by conventional corrugated case packing equipment or methods. This is so because according to conventional practice, the corrugated board cases are filled by moving the containers or cans, for example, into an open end of each case until a closed opposite end stops the movement of the containers into the case, the containers filling the case, but not tightly. The case supporting platform then tips and drops the case to a sealing station where the flaps at the open end are closed and sealed. Since the paper cases do not have the inherent strength of the corrugated cases, the containers, if loaded by conventional equipment and methods would not be stopped by the closed end, but would break the case.
Secondly, since the kraft paper itself lacks the inherent strength and rigidity of corrugated board, cases manufactured of such kraft paper offer less protection against damage to the contents thereof when package relatively loosely in accordance with the present practice.
Accordingly, the present invention contributes a method and apparatus for packing paper cases which eliminates the foregoing difficulties and disadvantages.
As a particular feature of the present invention, there is provided apparatus for receiving and assembling elements to be packaged and also for receiving semi-rigid paper cases and acting upon such cases to set them up to receive a charge of assembled elements. In this connection, the present apparatus acts in a novel way upon the cases to utilize certain inherent characteristics thereof that are preserved in the cases manufactured in accordance with the teachings of the aforementioned Goodrich application, in order to bring them to setup condition. Thus, the cases are manufactured in a manner to retain certain inherent resilience in the corner regions thereof that tends to induce the cases to spring from a collapsed to a set-up condition when properly acted upon. Accordingly, the concept of the present invention includes both apparatus and a method of acting upon the cases to set them up in element receiving attitude.
Cases made in accordance with the aforesaid application are furnished in knocked down, flat condition with a pair of diagonally opposed corner lines at the opposite edges thereof and a second pair of corner lines between the first pair. As fully explained in the Goodrich application, the cases and their corner lines are so formed as to give the cases certain inherent characteristics. These chaarcteristics enable the cases, when reverse folded, that is, opened out and refiattened but along the second pair flaps pass therebetween.
tributed a highly eflicient glue supply system which has' of corner lines so that these corner lines now define the case edges, and pressed or squeezed, to spring from a collapsed to a substantially set-up condition.
A further feature of the present invention resides in apparatus for assembling and packing the elements into the cases. An accumulating area is provided at which the elements to be packaged are accumulated and aligned by guide members in rows until a predetermined number of rows are assembled with a predetermined number of elements in each row thus constituting a full charge. Means are provided to sense the presence of such elements and rows of elements, as well as the presence of a case to receive the charge, and the assembled charge of elements is then automatically introduced into a case by an inserter, while the movement of further elements into the accumulating area is prevented by stop means also under the control of the sensing means. I
By way of resolving the aforementioned first problem presented by paper cases, the end of the case opposite the end through which the elements are packed is left open and means is provided for positively stopping movement of the charge beyond the end of the case and for preventing the foremost elements in the charge from toppling forward as they move into the case.
The second problem aforesaid, that is, that of the inherent weakness of the cases, is resolved by so packing the elements in the cases that the elements themselves give supporting strength to the cases. Thus, the width of the charge is reduced during filling and is extended after filling so that the charge fills the case relatively tightly, the several elements constituting the charge thereby cooperating with one another and with the case.
as an assembled unit to accept forces acting against the exterior of the case. After the cases are thus filled, they.
are moved to a sealing station at which the case closure members or flaps are closed and sealed by the application; of adhesive, the cases then moving through a drying station. For sealing the case flaps, there is provided, in accordance with the present concept a novel means for applying glue to the flaps. applicators having at least a pair of flexible conduits angularly disposed relatively to one another. The end regions of the conduits are disposed in overlapping relation and have apertures or openings through which glue may flow. To apply glue to both sides of a flap, the case is moved relatively to the glue applicator so that the flap passes between the flexible conduits in a direction towards the apex of the angle formed thereby, thus causing th conduits to flex to bring the apertures adjacent opposed surfaces of the flap for the application of glue thereto. As a part of this feature of the invention, ,means are provided for sensing the presence of the cases as they reach the position at which glue is to be applied to the flaps, these means serving then to actuate a supply system for causing glue to flow through the applicators as the By this mean-s there is con resulted in appreciable savings in the quantity of glue necessary to seal the cases.
There has thus been outlined rather broadly the most important features of the present invention in order thata detailed description thereof that follows may be better understood and in order that the present contribution to the art may be better appreciated. There are, of course, additional features of the invention that will be described hereafter and which will form the subject of claims appended hereto. Those persons skilled in the art will appreciate that the conception on which the present disclosure is based may readily be utilized as the basis for designing other structures for carrying out the several purposes of this invention. It is important, therefore, that the claims be regarded as including such equivalent con- Patented Oct'. 30, 1962' The novel means include glue structions as do not depart from the concept and scope of this invention.
A specific embodiment of the invention has been chosen for purposes of illustration and description, and is shown in the accompanying drawings, forming a part of the specification wherein:
FIG. 1 is a perspective view, partly broken away, and illustrating a packaging machine in accordance with the present invention;
FIG. 2 is a top plan view of a portion of the machine illustrated in FIG. 1;
FIG. 3 is an enlarged fragmentary top plan view of the infeed section and accumulating area showing elements to be packaged being assembled for packaging;
FIG. 4 is a fragmentary top plan view of part of the machine with certain parts broken away to illustrate various operating members;
FIG. 5 is a cross-sectional view taken along the line 5-5 of FIG. 2;
FIG. 6 is a cross-sectional view taken along the line 6-6 of FIG. 5;
FIG. 7 is a fragmentary side elevational view illustrating operational parts of the machine for controlling movement of the cases;
FIG. 8 is a View similar to FIG. 7 but illustrating parts of the machine further advanced in the direction of movement of the cases;
FIG. 9 is a perspective view illustrating the accumulator area guide means and the stop means and their respective operating mechanisms;
FIG. 9a is a cross-sectional view taken along the line a-a of FIG. 9 when the parts are in one position;
FIG. 9b is a cross-sectional view taken along the line a-a of FIG. 9 when the parts are in another position;
FIG. 10 is a fragmentary end view of part of the mechanism illustrated in FIG. 9 in one position;
FIG. 10a is a view similar to FIG. 10, but illustrating the parts in another position;
FIG. 11 is a fragmentary top plan view illustrating incoming elements stopped short of the accumulating area while the inserter means urges a charge of elements towards a case;
FIG. 12 is a top plan view illustrating a charge of elements completing its entry into a case;
FIG. 13 is a view simliar to FIG. 12 but illustrating means realigning the elements in the case;
FIG. 14 is a fragmentary top plan view of the drying station of the machine;
FIG. 15 is an elevational view illustrating the case discharge end of the machine;
FIG. 16 is a cross-sectional view taken along the line 16-16 of FIG. 14;
FIG. 17 is a fragmentary top plan view taken along the line 17-17 of FIG. 16;
FIG. 18 is a circuit diagram illustrating the electrical machine control elements;
FIG. 19 is a power circuit diagram;
FIG. 20 is a perspective view illustrating the glue applicators applying lines of glue to the side faces of a case closure member or flap;
FIG. 21 is an end elevational view of the glue applicator illustrated in FIG. 20;
FIG. 22 is a cross-sectional view taken along the line 22-22 of FIG. 21;
FIG. 23 is a circuit diagram illustrating the hydraulic machine control elements;
FIG. 24 is a cross-sectional view taken along the line 24-24 of FIG. 23.
FIG. 25 is an end elevational view of another form of glue applicator; and
FIG. 26 is a portion of a circuit diagram showing hydraulic controls for applicators of the type shown in FIG. 25.
Referring now to the drawings, and more particularly to FIGS. 1 to 3 thereof, there is shown a packaging machine in accordance with the present invention. For purposes of description, the machine will be treated as having three sections, as indicated in FIG. 1. Section 1 includes an infeed conveyor 10, a gathering station or accumulating area 11, and an inserter mechanism 12; station 2 includes a case erecting mechanism 14, an inserting station 15, a pneumatic ram 16 for guiding the elements as they move into the case, a pair of opposed, pneumatic, realignment rams 17, 17a, a gluing station 18 and flap folding means 19; and section 3 comprises a compression unit 20 for drying the glue on the flaps.
As will be understood, as the description proceeds, elements to be packaged are fed to the infeed conveyor 10 which moves them along to the accumulating area 11 where they are assembled to constitute a charge for a case. Simultaneously, cases are fed through the erecting mechanism 14, picked up by a case conveyor and delivered to the inserting or filling station 15 where the inserter 12 urges the full charge of assembled elements into the case C. The case, after being filled moves on through the gluing station 18 at which point glue is applied to the flaps, and thence through the flap folding means 19, which close and seal the flaps, to the compression unit which conducts the cases to a discharge point while permitting the glue to dry under compression.
For purposes of description, it will be assumed that the elements being packaged are cylindrical cans, although it will be understood that other elements may also be packaged.
The power mechanism for operating the various parts of the machine is housed beneath the working surfaces and, as shown in FIGS. 4 and 8, includes a drive motor 22 and reduction transmission 23. When electrical energy is applied to the motor 22 it rotates a primary drive shaft 24 and, through a chain 26 and sprocket 26a contained within a chain box 27 a second shaft 25. The secondary drive shaft 25 drives a further shaft 28 (FIG. 4), the axis of which is at right angles to the shaft 25, by means of a right angle transmission 29. The shaft 28 is suitably supported by bearings 30 between which is rubber roller 31 driven by the shaft 28, for a purpose to be described hereinafter. The shaft 28 extends further along to drive a suitable conveyor sprocket (not shown) which drives can infeed conveyor 10 in the direction indicated by the arrow in FIGS. 1 and 2.
As shown in FIGS. 4 and 7, the ends of the rubber roller 31 are provided with V-belt drive wheels 32 which drive V-belts 34. These v-lbelts are reeved about larger idler V-belt wheels 35 which are disposed adjacent sprocket wheels 36, the wheels 35 and 36 being supported by a cross-shaft 37. Chains 39 are reeved about the sprocket wheels 36 and a pair of similar wheels 40 spaced forwardly of the wheels 36 and supported on the crossshaft 38. A series of regularly spaced dividers 41 are connected to the chains 39, and together the chains and dividers constitute an indexing conveyor, the purpose of which will become evident hereinafter.
As best illustrated in FIGS. 4 and 8, V-belts 42 are reeved around idler V-belt wheels 44 adjacent sprocket wheels 40, and also around smaller wheels 45, these V- belts constituting a package take-away belt.
Referring again to the primary drive shaft 24 (FIGS. 4 and 8), it will be seen that this shaft also drives a belt or chain 47 which drivingly engages a sprocket wheel 49 supported upon a shaft 50 along with a gear 51, the teeth of which are in turn drivingly enmeshed with the teeth of a second gear 52 supported on a shaft 54 which extends out through the chain box 27 and into a right angle transmission 55, the driving power thus being transmitted to the wheels 45 through the shaft 56 which also extends into the transmission 55 but at right angles to the shaft 54. It will be recalled that the V-belts 42 are reeved about the idler wheels 44 supported on the cross-shaft 38 and also about the wheels 45 which drive the belts in the direction indicated by the arrow in FIG. 4.
The primary drive shaft 34 also extends out beyond the chain box 27 and drives a chain or belt 57 through a slip clutch 59 (FIG. 8) which protects the equipment in the event of jamming. The belt or chain 57, in turn drives a single revolution shaft 60 through a solenoid actuated single revolution clutch 61.
A plurality of cams 62, 64, 65 and 66 are mounted on the shaft 60 for rotation therewith and are arranged to operate micro-switches 67, 69, 70 and 71, respectively, constituting part of the electrical control circuit, the details of construction and operation of which will later be described. At present, it is sufficient to understand that the shaft 61) extends beyond the cams 62 to 66 and through an indexing unit 72 and angular couplings 73 at each side of the unit, bearings 74 conveniently mounted in the machine frame, and thence to a terminal bearing 74a at the end of the machine, as shown in FIG. 6.
An indexing shaft 75 extends outwardly of the indexing unit 72 and is drivingly connected to a belt or chain wheel 76 (FIGS. 4 and 8) which drives a wheel 77 on the cross-shaft 38 by means of a belt or chain 79. The wheel 77 is conveniently coupled to the cross-shaft 38 to drive the sprocket wheels 40, and thus the chains 39 and dividers 41. It will be understood that the indexing head 72 is arranged to permit the indexing shaft 75 to remain idle for the first 240 of each revolution of the shaft 60, and to operate the indexing conveyor, that is, the chains 39 and dividers 41 during the last 120 of each revolution thereof.
The shaft 60 is also equipped with a brake 78 effective to prevent bounce due to the fly-wheel effect of the cams. This brake, indicated generally at 78 in FIG. 4, may be of the split ring clamp type having clamp arms (only one of which is shown) disposed around the shaft 60 and supported by the pin 78a integral with the machine frame. Shaft 61 also mounts an adjustable cam 83 controlling a micro-switch 83a which controls the position of the brake 78 by means yet to be described.
It will be recalled that the primary drive shaft 24, acting through the belt or chain 47, and the sprocket 49 drives a shaft 50 to transmit power through gears 51 and 52, to the shaft 56 and wheels 45. Actually, the shaft 50 continues onward beyond the gear 51, out of the chain box 27 and along the third section of the machine comprising the compression unit 20 to a right angle transmission 80, shown in FIG. 15, at the discharge end of the machine. The driving power of the shaft 51 is thus transmitted to a cross-shaft 81 from which vertical shafts 82 and 84 each derive power through a pair of additional right angle transmissions 85 and 86, respectively. Multiple belt wheels 87 and 89 are respectively keyed to the upper ends of the vertical shafts 82 and 84 thus to drive multiple V-belts 9t and 91, respectively (FIGS. 14 and 15), these belts being reeved about idler wheels 92 and 94, respectively adjacent the beginning of the compression unit, all for a purpose to be described.
Returning now to the cam shaft 69, and referring to FIGS. and 6, it will be seen that this shaft is interrupted by a crank 95 which, when rotated, serves to actuate the crank arm 96, pivoted at one end to the crank, thus rocking a rocker arm 97 to which the crank arm is pivoted as at 99, the rocker arm rocking about a pivot 1110 supported on the machine frame. The rocker arm 97 is pivotally connected at its uppermost end to a link 101 which is, in turn, pivoted as at 192 to a slide 104 which includes stationary bars 194a and 164b, the ends of which are mounted in opposed blocks 1%. A slide bearing 105, connected to the link 101 through the pivot 102, is movable along the bars 104a and 10412 and is connected by plates 105a to a similar slide bearing 1115b which extends upwardly for connection with a ram or inserter 107 to effect reciprocating movement thereof, the fore- 6 going linkage, slide and ram thus constituting the inserter mechanism 12.
Referring now to FIGS. 5, 6 and 9, it will be seen that a cam surface 109 is formed integral with the crank 95, and as the crank is rotated, the cam surface rocks the cam lever 110 and a pivot shaft 111 supported on the frame by bearings 112, as clearly shown in FIGS. 5 and 9. The pivot shaft, being thus rocked, also rocks a link 114 mounted on the pivot shaft and pivotally connected to a link 115. As shown in FIGS. 5, 6, 9, 10 and 10a, the upper end of the link 115 is pivoted as at 116 to a plate 117 which is connected to an elongate block 119 having journals 121 at its ends. The journals serve to mount the block for rotation about the journal axis upon upward and downward movement of the link 115. An L-shaped plate 121 is secured to the upper surface of the block 119 and the upper part of this plate is formed with a series of recesses 122 providing upstanding fingers 124, therebetween for movement with the block 119. Referring now to FIG. 2, it will be seen that these fingers are disposed at the end of the cam infeed conveyor 11 and at the entrance to the accumulating area 11.
As shown in FIGS. 5, 6 and 9, a link 126 is also connected at one end to the pivot shaft 111 for movement therewith and has its other end connected by a pivot 127 to a vertically extending rod 129 the upper end of which is, in turn, connected by a pivot 130 to a link 131. This link 131, together with similar links 132, 134 and 135, stationary shafts 136 and 137, movable shafts 139 and 140 and side plates 141 and 142. constitute a parallel motion mechanism. The plates 141 and 142 are generally L-shaped and support cross-rods 144 and 145 which support parallel plates 146 in spaced disposition between the upper or horizontal legs of plates 141 and 142. It will be noted that the free ends of the plates 146 are tapered and are supported within the recesses 122 of the plate 121 so that the fingers 124 are disposed between the forward ends of the plates 146.
As indicated by the arrows in FIG. 9, vertical reciprocating movement of the rod 129 will be transmitted through the parallel motion mechanism to the plates 141, 142, and 146 which will lower and rise accordingly in the accumulating area 11 (see FIGS. 2 and 3), for a purpose which will subsequently be made clear.
The crank 95 (FIGS. 5 and 6) -is also formed with a second cam surface 109a for controlling the movement of a second cam follower 1100: as the crank moves. This cam follower 11001 is mounted on a lever 113 which is pivoted to the machine frame at its lower end and to a rod 117 at its upper end, the r0d 117, in turn, being pivoted to one end of a crank arm 118. The other end of this crank arm rotates a spindle 123 to which are geared two spaced upstanding spindles 123a (FIGS. 2, 3 and 5) and a parallel spindle (not shown). The spindles are, respectively provided with top, bottom and side flap control plates 125, as shown in FIGS. 5 and 6. It will be understood that as the crank 95 is rotated the lever 113 is rocked thus moving rod 117 to rotate the crank arm 118 and the spindles 123 along with the flap control plates 125, as will be further discussed in connection with the overall operation of the machine. Suffice it to say for the present that the plates 125 hold the case flaps open while the inserter moves a charge of cans into the case.
The main power source and means for transmitting power from that source to the various powered elements of sections 1 to 3 of the machine having now been described, there will follow a description of the various operating control means.
Referring now to FIG. 19, the motor 22 is shown along with a typical starting circuit 147 powered by line current under the control of the switch 149.
FIG. 18 illustrates an accessory circuit including as a first leg thereof, a main switch 150- in the power line, a
secondary switch 151, conductors 152 and .154 connecting a solenoid 155 and a can indicator switch 156 in series, while a conductor 157 extending between terminals of switches 151 and 156 is interrupted by a case indicator switch 159.
A second leg of this circuit includes a conductor 160 connecting terminals of solenoid actuated air valves 161 and 162 in series parallel and then the terminals of the micro-switches 67, 69, 70 and 72 which, it will be recalled are operated by the cams 62, 64, 65 and 66, respectively mounted on shaft 60, as shown in FIG. 4, the return conductor being designated by the reference numeral 164.
Still a third leg of this circuit includes a conductor 165 which energizes a solenoid controlled air valve 166 and a pair of series connected micro-switches 167 and 169, the reference numeral 170 designating the return conductor.
The purpose for the various components of the circuit will become evident as the description proceeds; however, for orientation, reference may be had at this time to FIGS. 1, 2 and 3 in which the micro-switch 156 will be seen as located at the foot of the accumulating area. Actually, this micro-switch 156 may be a series of such switches connected in series for a purpose to be discussed. The manual motor switch 149 and the secondary switch 151 are conveniently mounted at the front of the machine adjacent the erecting mechanism 14.
The machine is equipped with certain pneumatically operable accessories for which there is provided a pneumatic control circuit illustrated in FIG. 23 and including an air supply line 174 which conducts pressurized air into a combined air filter, regulator and lubricator 175. An air line 176 conducts air at a regulated pressure from the unit 175 to the dual solenoid actuated air valves 161 and 162, referred to in connection with FIG. 18, through tap lines 176 and 177, the former valve 161 controlling the actuation of a double-acting pneumatic ram 179 through air lines 180 and 181 and flow regulators 186a and 181a by which the speed of movement of the ram in either direction may be controlled. The solenoid actuated valve 162 acting through lines 182 and 184, and branch lines 182a and 18411, and flow regulators 18% and 184b, controls the actuation of the opposed, double-acting pneumatic rams 17 and 17a (FIGS. 1 and 2). The valves 161 and 162 may conveniently exhaust through lines 187 and 189, respectively, and mufiler 190.
The air line 176 continues on beyond the taps 176 and 177 and is again tapped through line 191 to one side of the double-acting pneumatic ram 16, also shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 to retract the same. Line 176 terminates at a control valve 192 which is operated by the lever 113 under the control of the cam surface 199a, as clearly shown in FIG. 5, to permit air under pressure to flow through line 194 to the opposite side of the pneumatic ram 16 to extend the same.
It will be recalled that the cases, after being filled, move on through a gluing station 18 at which point glue is applied to the flaps. Without considering for the moment the novel features of the glue applicators per se, it is suificient for the present to understand that sensing means are provided in order to indicate the presence of a case at the gluing station ready to be glued, thus glue is caused to flow positively, but only when needed. For this pur- 6 will, of course, be so positioned that glue is applied precisely when needed, as will be more fully discussed hereinafter. It will also be appreciated that the glue actuating circuit will be opened as soon as the case leaves the first lever 196.
When both switches 167 and 169 are closed, the solenoid controlled air valve 166 is actuated, and, as shown in FIG. 23, permits air at regulated pressure to flow from line 176 through tap line 198 and line 201 to a glue valve 281 opening the same to permit glue to pass from a glue tanl; 262 through a feed line 204, the glue valve and branch glue lines 205 to glue applicators 206. As shown in FIGS. 23 and 24, the glue tank is supplied with a quantity of glue and air is delivered into the tank through the line 199 and a tank pressure regulator 207, the glue feed line 2114 extending down into the tank to a point adjacent the bottom.
Another method of actuating the switches 167 and 1169, rather than by the actuating levers 196 and 197, is by utilizing two sets of photoelectric cells and light sources, each longitudinally adjustably mounted so that the beam travels across the case path. Again, by positioning each set, cases of various sizes can be accommodated and the glue flow can be accurately controlled.
In operation, to start the machine, an operator throws the switches 149, 150 and 151, and the motor 22 transmits power through the primary and secondary drive shafts 24 and 25, the shaft 23 and to the conveyor 10. Thus, the cans to be packaged enter section 1 of the machine from the left side of the infeed conveyor 10, as viewed in FIGS. 1 to 3, and are guided into single file by a pair of opposed entrance guide plates 211. As the cams move forward on the conveyor 10 they pass a pair of agitator plates 212 located at each side of the conveyor 1t) and just in advance of a separating area 213. The plates are rocked by power derived from the conveyor 10. For this purpose, the edge of the belt may be provided with a chain (not shown) that moves with the belt. This chain is utilized to drive a sprocket 214, the rotary movement of which is then converted into eccentric movement in a transmission box 215, and transferred to the end of a rod 216. The rod 216, in turn, rocks an eccentric spindle 217 upon which one of the plates 212 is carried. The spindle also carries a lever 219 pivoted to one end of a cross-rod 220, which extends across the conveyor 11) and has its other end suitably pivoted to a second lever 219 carried by a second spindle 217 upon which the other plate 212 is also carried. Thus, it will be seen that power is transmitted from the conveyor to the agitator plates just in advance of the separation area 213. This separation area includes a series of longitudinally extending plates 221, seven of which are shown, to divide the cams into six rows, for example, as clearly shown in FIG. 3. The conveyor 10 actually extends only about as far as the ends of the plates 221 at which point the cans are transferred to a fiat plate 222 and are allowed to push themselves along between the plates 221 towards the accumulating area 11 (FIG. 2).
The plate 222 is formed with a plurality of elongate slots 224 therein so spaced that each slot is separated from adjacent slots by a plate 221. Thus, if a can topples over while on its way to the accumulating area, its rim will be engaged by the forward end of the slot in its row and it will not be permitted to move into the accumulating area as shown in the uppermost row of cans in FIG. 3.
Assuming no cans topple over, the six rows of cans will move forward from the plate 222 into the accumulating area where the parallel plates 141, 142 and 146 (FIGS. 2, 3, 9 and 9a) guide them until each row consists of four cans, for example.
In initially starting up the machine, the operator opens switch 151, when a charge of cans is assembled in the accumulating area, thus de-energizing that leg of the contro'l circuit which includes the can indicator switch 156 and the case indicator switch 159, as well as the solenoid 155. The main power rem: ins on, however, and the operator conditions a case C by reverse folding it and feeding it through the rubber rollers 31 constituting the erecting mechanism. The case is then placed by the operator upon a supporting plate 223 (FIGS. 2 and 3) between a pair of dividers 41 which square the case at the filling or inserting station 15 as shown in FIGS. 1 to 3. A second case is fed through the rollers and this case drops onto the belts 34 (FIGS. 3, 4 and 7) between a pair of dividers 41 (FIGS. 1 and 7). This second case contacts and actuates the case indicating switch 159 (FIGS. 2, 3 and 18).
It will be recalled that six rows of four cans each had been allowed to gather in the accumulating area so that the lead can in each row closes one of the can indicating switches 156 (FIGS. 1, 2, 3 and 18). Thus, the operator now closes the secondary switch 15-1 and the first leg of the circuit illustrated in FIG. 18 supplies power to the solenoid 155. This solenoid engages the single revolution clutch 61 shown at the right end of FIG. 8, thus transmitting power from the primary drive shaft 24 through the slip clutch 59, the belt or chain 57, and the clutch 61 to the single revolution shaft 60, further indexing of the cases as well as accumulating of a charge of cans and packaging thereof into the cases being entirely automatic, the operator merely reverse folding cases and feeding them into the machine.
The shaft 60 drives the crank 95 and, through the cam and the link arangements already described, and including the flap plate control lever 113, rod 117, crank arm 118, and spindles 123; the guide plate control cam lever 110, pivot shaft 111, link 126, rod 129 and the parallel motion mechanism (FIG. 9); the stop finger control links 114 and 11S and block 119; and, finally the crank arm 96, rocker arm 97, line 101 and slide 104, the flap control plates 125 swing in a direction to hold open the case flaps facing the inserter 107, the bottom flap control plate pressing the bottom case flap against the bed of the machine to steady the case, while the stop fingers 124 are shifted forward to project upwardly through recesses 125 in the end of the plate 222 adjacent the accumulating area to engage the forward portions of the leading cans about to enter the accumulating area to prevent them from moving forward, as shown in FIGS. 10 and 10a. At the same time, the guide plates 146 shift downwardly below the level of the accumulating area, as shown in FIG. 9b, and the inserter 107 moves the assembled cans into the open case at the filling or inserting station 15.
At this point, it should be noted that the head 226 of the inserter 107 has a central, projecting portion 226a (FIGS. 2, 3, 11 and 12) that engages the two central cans in the end row of cans and staggers these and the central cans in each row of cans longitudinally relatively to those in the exterior longitudinal tiers of six preferably by a distance equal to a can radius. The overall width of the can charge is thus reduced so that the cans move readily into the awaiting case C, as shown in FIG. 12.
While the charge of cans is being moved into the case, the lever 113 (FIG. closes switch 192 (FIGS. 5 and 25) thus extending the pneumatic ram 16 into the rear of the case to prevent the foremost cans of the charge from toppling forward as they move into the case.
It will be recalled that several cams, 62-66 are mounted on the shaft 60 (FIG. 4), and, as the foregoing action takes place, the cam 64 actuates the micro-switch 69 (FIGS. 4 and 21) which energizes the solenoid actuated air valve 162 (FIGS. 18 and 23) to retract the pneumatic rams 17 and 17a (FIGS. 1, 2 and 23).
Also during this time, the cam 66 on the shaft 60 actuates the micro-switch 71 which energizes the solenoid actuated air valve 161 (FIG. 23) to extend a doubleacting pneumatic ram 179 (FIGS. 2 and 23) which, in turn, rotates a pair of opposed rear case flap closers 228 (-FIGS. 1 and 2) to the open position. One of these flap closers is connected to the ram by a suitable crank, the flap closers being themselves interconnected by a cross connecting rod 229 (FIG. 2) passing under the case conveyor mechanism.
The various cams, linkages and cam actuated switches thus far described are so arranged relatively to the shaft 60 that all of the operations thus far described take place during the first 240 of rotation of the shaft 60. As has been mentioned, the shaft 60 also operates an indexing unit 72 which permits the case conveyor mechanism to index the cases only during the last 120 of rotation of the shaft 60, thus the cases remain stationary while the aforementioned operations take place.
During the latter 120 of rotation of the shaft 60, the indexing unit '72 is engaged so that the indexing shaft 75 (FIG. 4) rotates the sprocket wheels 41) and the indexing conveyor to advance the cases to the next position. At the same time the crank and cam surfaces 109 and 111911 continue towards the completion of a cycle thus retracting the inserter 107, rotating the spindles 123 and flap control plates 125 to release the flaps as soon as the inserter clears them, retracting the stop fingers 124 and raising the guide plates 146 as soon as the inserter clears the accumulating area thus allowing another charge of cans to move into that area. Additionally, the lever 113 disengages the control valve 192 thus permitting retraction of the ram 16 while the inserter is being retracted.
As indexing occurs, the front case flaps are engaged by curved plows 227 and closed. Then, as indexing nears completion the cam 65 on the shaft 60 actuates the microswitch 71) (FIGS. 4 and 21) which energizes the solenoid actuated air valve 161 to retract the ram 179 (FIGS. 2 and 23) thus rotating the rear flap closers 228 and closing the case rear flaps.
Also during the latter of rotation of the shaft 69, the cam 62 on that shaft actuates the micro-switch 67 thus energizing the solenoid actuated valve 162 to protract or extend the rams 1'7 and 17a. The forward ends of these rams have relatively wide abutment plates 229 thereon and as they move forward, they overlap the case front and rear flaps and realign the central cans relatively to those in the longitudinal tiers of six, as shown in FIG. 13. It will be seen that the cases are so dimensioned that this movement urges the cans in the exterior tiers of six outwardly so that the cans are tightly packaged within the case when realigned, and preferably, so tight as to draw the kraft paper of the case taut. To prevent the piston rods and the plates 229 of these rams from rotating, guide rods 232 are mounted at one end on the abutment plates and are slidingly supported in slide bearings 233.
While indexing the charged case to the next position, the indexing conveyor also carries an empty case into filling position and deposits a full case on the take-away belts 42 (FIGS. 2, 4 and 8) which carry it through the gluing station 18, about which more will be said later. It is sufficient for the present to understand that glue is applied to both surfaces of both bottom flaps, for example, although the top llap may be used for this purpose. After the bottom fiap receives the glue, the case moves on to upper and lower curved plows 230 and 231, respectively (FIGS. 1 and 2), which are so arranged as to close the top and bottom flaps so that the glued flap, in this case the bottom one, closes first. Thus the inner surfaces of the bottom flap is pasted to the outer surfaces of the front and rear flaps and the outer surface of the bottom flap is pasted to the inner surface of the upper flap. The take-away belts 42 then deliver the case to the third section or compression unit 21).
Referring now to FIGS. 14, 15 and 16, it will be seen that the bed of the compression unit comprises a series of adjacent, idler rollers 234 which extend laterally be-
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US3166879A (en) * 1962-07-09 1965-01-26 Container Corp Wrap-around carton loader
US3209512A (en) * 1961-11-10 1965-10-05 Textile Machine Works Article positioning and case loading apparatus
US3225512A (en) * 1962-09-14 1965-12-28 Bayuk Cigars Inc Packaging machine
US3264798A (en) * 1962-11-19 1966-08-09 Hayes Machine Company Packaging machine
US3282019A (en) * 1962-05-03 1966-11-01 Winkler Richard Mechanism attached to machines for the manufacture of envelopes, flat bags or the like for packing packets of the finished envelopes in folding boxes
US3289810A (en) * 1965-04-01 1966-12-06 Textile Machine Works Machine for arranging units for loading into cases
US3300947A (en) * 1961-05-01 1967-01-31 King O Matic Equipment Corp Carton closing machine
DE1234615B (en) * 1963-07-30 1967-02-16 Internat Machinery Corp N V Method and machine for packing cans in staggered rows
US3323285A (en) * 1964-06-29 1967-06-06 Ind Dev Bank Carton closing and sealing apparatus
DE1267591B (en) * 1963-06-17 1968-05-02 Imp Tobacco Co Ltd Device for unfolding flat cardboard boxes
US3513623A (en) * 1967-11-09 1970-05-26 Reinhold A Pearson Apparatus for end-loading cartons
US3634996A (en) * 1969-11-24 1972-01-18 Abc Packaging Machine Corp Bottle-packaging machine
US3941236A (en) * 1973-12-13 1976-03-02 Hans Hagedorn Infeed apparatus for carton loading machines
US3979878A (en) * 1974-10-16 1976-09-14 Berney Joseph C Container accumulating apparatus
FR2324518A1 (en) * 1975-09-19 1977-04-15 Mira Pak Inc Cardboard packaging forming equipment
US4024693A (en) * 1975-04-22 1977-05-24 Mira-Pak, Inc. Carton forming apparatus
US4078361A (en) * 1976-11-15 1978-03-14 Hartness Thomas P Apparatus for controlling the flow of articles to a case packer
US4348853A (en) * 1980-08-08 1982-09-14 Morse Hugh B Case opening and sealing apparatus
FR2502112A1 (en) * 1981-03-19 1982-09-24 Focke & Co DEVICE FOR INTRODUCING OBJECTS OR GROUPS OF OBJECTS IN AN OPEN PACKAGING
US4633655A (en) * 1984-04-20 1987-01-06 Nigrelli Systems, Inc. Case packer
US4685275A (en) * 1986-06-11 1987-08-11 Nigrelli Sr Biagio J Carton opening apparatus
US4854111A (en) * 1984-10-29 1989-08-08 Roberts Systems, Inc. Apparatus for conveying and packaging groups of articles
US4936077A (en) * 1989-05-25 1990-06-26 H. J. Langen & Sons Limited Carton loading machine
US5347796A (en) * 1992-03-24 1994-09-20 Riverwood International Corporation Cross loading apparatus for use with cartoning systems
US5537806A (en) * 1995-02-28 1996-07-23 International Paper Company Bag sealing apparatus and related method for sealing bags
US20070227927A1 (en) * 2006-03-29 2007-10-04 Andrea Coltri-Johnson Carrier packages and methods of erecting carrier packages
WO2013121550A1 (en) * 2012-02-16 2013-08-22 日本たばこ産業株式会社 Machine for packing article into box
FR3018790A1 (en) * 2014-03-18 2015-09-25 Gebo Packaging Solutions France Sas Device and method for conveying and ordering
US9567120B2 (en) 2014-12-16 2017-02-14 Graphic Packaging International, Inc. Carton for articles
US9845182B2 (en) 2015-05-07 2017-12-19 Graphic Packaging International, Inc. Carton with handle
US10384846B2 (en) 2013-05-24 2019-08-20 Graphic Packaging International, Llc Arrangement of containers in a carton

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US3300947A (en) * 1961-05-01 1967-01-31 King O Matic Equipment Corp Carton closing machine
US3209512A (en) * 1961-11-10 1965-10-05 Textile Machine Works Article positioning and case loading apparatus
US3282019A (en) * 1962-05-03 1966-11-01 Winkler Richard Mechanism attached to machines for the manufacture of envelopes, flat bags or the like for packing packets of the finished envelopes in folding boxes
US3166879A (en) * 1962-07-09 1965-01-26 Container Corp Wrap-around carton loader
US3225512A (en) * 1962-09-14 1965-12-28 Bayuk Cigars Inc Packaging machine
US3264798A (en) * 1962-11-19 1966-08-09 Hayes Machine Company Packaging machine
DE1267591B (en) * 1963-06-17 1968-05-02 Imp Tobacco Co Ltd Device for unfolding flat cardboard boxes
DE1234615B (en) * 1963-07-30 1967-02-16 Internat Machinery Corp N V Method and machine for packing cans in staggered rows
US3323285A (en) * 1964-06-29 1967-06-06 Ind Dev Bank Carton closing and sealing apparatus
US3289810A (en) * 1965-04-01 1966-12-06 Textile Machine Works Machine for arranging units for loading into cases
US3513623A (en) * 1967-11-09 1970-05-26 Reinhold A Pearson Apparatus for end-loading cartons
US3634996A (en) * 1969-11-24 1972-01-18 Abc Packaging Machine Corp Bottle-packaging machine
US3941236A (en) * 1973-12-13 1976-03-02 Hans Hagedorn Infeed apparatus for carton loading machines
US3979878A (en) * 1974-10-16 1976-09-14 Berney Joseph C Container accumulating apparatus
US4024693A (en) * 1975-04-22 1977-05-24 Mira-Pak, Inc. Carton forming apparatus
FR2324518A1 (en) * 1975-09-19 1977-04-15 Mira Pak Inc Cardboard packaging forming equipment
US4078361A (en) * 1976-11-15 1978-03-14 Hartness Thomas P Apparatus for controlling the flow of articles to a case packer
US4348853A (en) * 1980-08-08 1982-09-14 Morse Hugh B Case opening and sealing apparatus
FR2502112A1 (en) * 1981-03-19 1982-09-24 Focke & Co DEVICE FOR INTRODUCING OBJECTS OR GROUPS OF OBJECTS IN AN OPEN PACKAGING
US4633655A (en) * 1984-04-20 1987-01-06 Nigrelli Systems, Inc. Case packer
US4854111A (en) * 1984-10-29 1989-08-08 Roberts Systems, Inc. Apparatus for conveying and packaging groups of articles
US4685275A (en) * 1986-06-11 1987-08-11 Nigrelli Sr Biagio J Carton opening apparatus
US4936077A (en) * 1989-05-25 1990-06-26 H. J. Langen & Sons Limited Carton loading machine
US5347796A (en) * 1992-03-24 1994-09-20 Riverwood International Corporation Cross loading apparatus for use with cartoning systems
US5537806A (en) * 1995-02-28 1996-07-23 International Paper Company Bag sealing apparatus and related method for sealing bags
US20070227927A1 (en) * 2006-03-29 2007-10-04 Andrea Coltri-Johnson Carrier packages and methods of erecting carrier packages
US8347591B2 (en) 2006-03-29 2013-01-08 Graphic Packaging International, Inc. Methods of erecting carrier packages
US9505539B2 (en) 2006-03-29 2016-11-29 Graphic Packaging International, Inc. Methods of erecting carrier packages
US9475628B2 (en) * 2006-03-29 2016-10-25 Graphic Packaging International, Inc. Carrier packages and methods of erecting carrier packages
US10793331B2 (en) 2006-03-29 2020-10-06 Graphic Packaging International, Llc Methods of erecting carrier packages
WO2013121550A1 (en) * 2012-02-16 2013-08-22 日本たばこ産業株式会社 Machine for packing article into box
US10384846B2 (en) 2013-05-24 2019-08-20 Graphic Packaging International, Llc Arrangement of containers in a carton
FR3018790A1 (en) * 2014-03-18 2015-09-25 Gebo Packaging Solutions France Sas Device and method for conveying and ordering
US9567120B2 (en) 2014-12-16 2017-02-14 Graphic Packaging International, Inc. Carton for articles
USD811218S1 (en) 2015-05-07 2018-02-27 Graphic Packaging International, Inc. Carton
USD824758S1 (en) 2015-05-07 2018-08-07 Graphic Packaging International, Llc Carton
US10233000B2 (en) 2015-05-07 2019-03-19 Graphic Packaging International, Llc Carton with handle
US10556730B2 (en) 2015-05-07 2020-02-11 Graphic Packaging International, Llc Carton with handle
US9845182B2 (en) 2015-05-07 2017-12-19 Graphic Packaging International, Inc. Carton with handle

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