US3028867A - Dry bowl pipe - Google Patents

Dry bowl pipe Download PDF

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Publication number
US3028867A
US3028867A US34216A US3421660A US3028867A US 3028867 A US3028867 A US 3028867A US 34216 A US34216 A US 34216A US 3421660 A US3421660 A US 3421660A US 3028867 A US3028867 A US 3028867A
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Prior art keywords
smoke
bowl
bore
passage
pipe
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Expired - Lifetime
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US34216A
Inventor
Edward H Calkins
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Edward H Calkins
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A24TOBACCO; CIGARS; CIGARETTES; SIMULATED SMOKING DEVICES; SMOKERS' REQUISITES
    • A24FSMOKERS' REQUISITES; MATCH BOXES; SIMULATED SMOKING DEVICES
    • A24F1/00Tobacco pipes
    • A24F1/02Tobacco pipes with arrangements for cleaning or cooling the smoke
    • A24F1/04Tobacco pipes with arrangements for cleaning or cooling the smoke with smoke chamber or slobber traps
    • A24F1/06Tobacco pipes with arrangements for cleaning or cooling the smoke with smoke chamber or slobber traps inside the pipe
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A24TOBACCO; CIGARS; CIGARETTES; SIMULATED SMOKING DEVICES; SMOKERS' REQUISITES
    • A24FSMOKERS' REQUISITES; MATCH BOXES; SIMULATED SMOKING DEVICES
    • A24F1/00Tobacco pipes
    • A24F1/02Tobacco pipes with arrangements for cleaning or cooling the smoke
    • A24F1/20Tobacco pipes with arrangements for cleaning or cooling the smoke with absorbent linings

Description

April 10, 1962 E. H. CALKINS DRY BOWL PIPE 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed June 6, 1960 April 10, 1962 v E. H. CALKINS DRY BOWL PIPE 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed June 6, 1960 Q ili INVENTOR. EDWARD H. CALKINS ATTORN Y Free Patented Apr. 10, 1962 3,028,867 DRY BOWL PIPE Edward H. Calkins, 1492 E. Maple Road, Birmingham, Mich. Filed June 6, 1960, Ser. No. 34,216 9 Claims. (Cl. 131-203) This invention relates to smokers pipes and more particularly to pipes having absorbent means for trapping saliva to eliminate soggy bowl. This application is a continuation-in-part of my application Serial No. 690,804, filed October 17, 1957, now abandoned.
Conventional pipes utilize the main stem channel as a common passage for smoke and saliva from the heel of the bowl to the bit end of the stem. Saliva from the mouth of a user flows to the heel area of the bowl and eventually dampens tobacco in the lower portion of the bowl. This tobacco will not burn. Smoke from the burning tobacco passes through the dampened tobacco leaving an accumulation of nicotine and tars. The result is soggy bowl. All of the contamination collected in the heel affects the flavor of the smoke delivered at the bit end of the stem. The pipe becomes strong in taste and disagreeable in odor. Eventually, even frequent cleaning will not avoid tongue bite and odor, and in this manner, even the finest briars become unuseable.
To obviate these stated disadvantages of conventional pipes by provision of a pipe which will yield a cool, dry smoke with full tobacco flavor and without bite is a primary object of this invention.
It is a further object of the invention to provide a smoking pipe so constructed as to separate the smoke passage from the saliva passage in the area of the heel of the bowl.
A still further object of the invention lies in the provision of a tobacco pipe having replaceable means for absorbing untainted saliva, completely separated from the tobacco combustion chamber, to insure complete burning of almost all of the tobacco in the chamber.
Another object of the invention lies in the provision of a tobacco pipe having separated smoke and saliva passages, the former being positioned above the latter so as to take advantage of the natural tendency for the heavier liquids to seek a lower level.
Still another object of the invention lies in the provision of a tobacco pipe having replaceable means for filtering the smoke.
The novel features that are considered characteristic of the invention are set forth with particularity in the appended claims. The invention itself, however, both as to its organization and its method of operation, together with additional objects and advantages thereof, will best be understood from the following description of specific embodiments when read in connection with the accompanying drawings, wherein like reference characters indicate like parts throughout the several figures and in which:
FIG. 1 is a top plan view of a tobacco pipe constructed in accordance with the invention;
FIG. 2 is a section taken on line 2-2 of FIG. 1;
FIG. 3 is a section of the replaceable saliva absorbent cartridge shown in FIG. 2, but on an enlarged scale;
FIG. 4 is a vertical section through another embodiment of the invention;
FIG. 5 is a fragmentary section of the pipe shown in FIG. 4 illustrating a smoke filter mounted therein, and
FIG. 6 is another fragmentary section of the pipe shown in FIG. 4 illustrating another manner of mounting a smoke filter.
Referring to the drawings in detail, there is shown a tobacco pipe of more or less conventional shape and having an integral bowl 1 and stem 2 formed of briar,
ceramic, plastic or other suitable material. Into the stem 2 is inserted a removable mouthpiece or hit 3 having a central bore 4. The combustion chamber of bowl 1 is designated by numeral 5 and is defined by a preferably flat, unbroken floor 6 and tubular upstanding wall 7. A relatively small opening 8 is drilled through one side of the bowl 1 at the bottom or level of floor 6. Opening 8 is normally closed by a threaded plug 9 which, upon removal, permits cleaning of tobacco from the bottom of the chamber 5.
Stem 2 and bowl 1 are pierced by a longitudinal passage 10, completely separated from the combustion chamber and generally parallel to its floor 6. Replaceably inserted into one end of passage 10 is a threaded cartridge 11 having saliva or liquid absorbent material 12 therein. Preferably, cartridge 11 is molded in the tubular shape shown in FIG. 3 from a plastic material, and the absorbent 12 is likewise formed as a molded cylinder removably inserted into the cartridge. Cylinder 12 may be formed of any suitable absorbent material and is provided at its inner end with an axial opening 13 to slidably receive a tube 14 whose other end is removably inserted into bore 4 of the mouthpiece 3. An aperture 15 is drilled in tube 14, between cartridge 11 and mouthpiece 3 for the entrance of smoke. Preferably, aperture 15 is disposed in the upper surface of tube 14 when the latter is assembled.
An opening 16 of relatively large diameter is drilled downwardly for a predetermined distance from the upper surface of the bowl 1. From the bottom of opening 16, there is drilled at an angle downwardly and outwardly the smoke passage 13 of smaller diameter and which communicates at its lower end with the stern passage lil. Another smoke passage 17 is drilled downwardly from the bottom of opening 16 and angled inwardly toward the floor 6 of bowl chamber 5. A short bore 19 at the level of the floor 6 is drilled inwardly from the chamber 5 as a continuation of bore 8 to communicate as a lower smoke conducting opening with the passage 17.
If a filtered smoke is desired, a cartridge 20 containing suitable filter material 21 may be removably inserted into the opening 16 from the top surface of the bowl 1. Preferably, cartridge 20 is molded of plastic in a shape similar to cartridge 11 and like the latter is provided with a molded cylindrical insert of filter material. Alternatively, a threaded plastic cap or plug may be attached to one end of the filtering or absorbent material so that the entire unit can be discarded and replaced at cleaning intervals.
The described pipe functions in the following manner. Tobacco in chamber 5 of the bowl is lighted and suction is applied to the bit 3 by the smoker. This creates a series of low pressure points; at the outer end of bore 4, at aperture 15, at the bottom of passage 18, in opening 16 and at opening 19. These low pressure points will determine the path of smoke travel which accordingly will be from chamber 5, through opening 19, passage 17, filter 21 or opening 16, passage 18, passage 10, aperture 15, tube 14, bore 4 and thence to the mouth of the smoker. Saliva from thesmokers mouth, because it is heavier than smoke, will after a period of time gravitate along bore 4, tube 14 and directly into the absorbent material 12. Thus, saliva is prevented from gaining direct access to tobacco in the bowl, which, therefore, remains relatively dry to burn freely and substantially completely.
It will be noted that the described path for smoke is generally above and separated from that of the saliva except in bore 4. When the smoke and saliva do meet, it is close to the smokers mouth where the saliva is relatively untainted by absorption of tars or nicotine.
Should any liquids, tars or other contaminants condense,v
form in, or be carried by the smoke in its passage, these will be absorbed by filter 21, or, if this is omitted, will collect at the bottom of passage 18 in passage 10 where they will be absorbed by the material 12.
FIG. 4 illustrates a modification wherein prime numerals are used to designate parts corresponding to those in the embodiment of FIGS. 1-3. The floor 6 of the bowl tapers downwardly toward a small smoke conducting opening 19 formed therethrough. This opening communicates with a smoke passage 18' which is inclined upwardly from passage 10 and extends through the same wall of the pipe as does passage 10'. A removable closure member 20 is disposed in the outer end of smoke passage 18 and may be removed to permit easy cleaning of the pipe.
Another closure member 11 is disposed in the end of passage 10' and an absorbent material 12 is located intermediate the member 11' and tube 14 with the end of the tube being inserted into and held by one end of the absorbent material. If desired, the closure memher and absorbent material may take the form illustrated in FIG. 3. Thus, saliva is absorbed by material 12', and smoke may pass from bowl 5 through opening 19, smoke passage 18', passage Hi, tube aperture 15 and into central bore 4- of mouthpiece 3'. In this manner, the smoke and saliva are kept separated from each other.
If desired, a smoke filter may be incorporated into the pipe as shown in FIGS. 5 and 6. In FIG. 5, the filter takes the form of a cylindrical pad 121 having a bore 46 formed therethrough to accommodate tube 14. The smoke must thus pass through the filter before entering the mouthpiece, and the filter may be removed and replaced after removing mouthpiece 3'.
In FIG. 6, the smoke filter takes the form of an insert 21' positioned in passage 18' and preferably having one end disposed within closure member 20 for ease in replacement. This insert has two section, 21a and 21b. Section 21a which underlies opening 19' is constructed of a porous nonfiammable material such as asbestos so that any heat and glowing ashes from the bowl 5' will not burn the filter. Section 21b is formed of the usual filtering material and fills passage 18 so that the smoke must pass therethrough. The absorbent material 12a, similar to that shown at 12 in FIG. 3, receives an end of the tube 14 as shown.
It will be apparent from the above description that the invention afi'ords many advantages. The tobacco in the combustion area is entirely separated from the saliva passage which permits free and complete burning. The bowl will remain dry and the smoke passages uncontaminated. The saliva absorption and smoke filter cylinders can be easily and quickly replaced at cleaning intervals. The separation of the smoke and saliva passages also prevents contamination of the smoke. All of these features and advantages result in a dry, cool smoke having a clean tasting, pure tobacco flavor.
Although certain specific embodiments of the invention have been shown and described, it is obvious that many modifications thereof are possible. The invention, therefore, is not to be restricted except insofar as is necessitated by the prior art and by the spirit of the appended claims.
What is claimed and desired to be secured by Letters Patent is:
l. A tobacco pipe comprising a bowl having a tobacco combustion chamber defined by a side wall and a floor, a stem attached to the bowl having a bore therein extending through the pipe below the bowl, a detachable bit connected to said stem having a passageway formed therethrough and communicating with said bore, a first smoke passage above said bore and extending upwardly from the floor of the bowl and communicating with the chamber, said pipe bowl having an opening in the upper end portion thereof communicating with the first smoke passage, a second smoke passage communicating said opening with said bore, a smoke filtering cartridge removably seated in said opening, a second cartridge removably seated in the outer end of said bore below the bowl, a removable tubular duct in said bore having one end supported by and in communication with the passageway in said bit, a liquid absorbing insert in said second cartridge having a recess formed therein receiving and supporting the other end of said tubular duct in spaced relation from the internal surface of said bore, said duct having a smoke passing aperture in its wall closely adjacent said bit so that when smoke travels through the pipe saliva is prevented from entering said combustion chamber.
2. A tobacco pipe according to claim 1 wherein said bowl is provided with an additional passage at iioor level for cleaning, said additional passage being normally closed by a threaded closure member.
3. A tobacco pipe comprising a bowl having a tobacco combustion chamber, a stem attached to the bowl and having a bore therein extending through the pipe below the bowl and terminating in a first opening in an outer wall of the pipe, a detachable bit connected to said stem and having a passageway therethrough in communication with said bore, said bowl having a lower smoke conducting opening extending from said combustion chamber and in communication with said bore, a closure member removably seated in said first opening and closing said bore, a tubular duct in said bore having one end rcrnovably supported in spaced relation from the internal surface of said bore by and in communication with the passageway in said bit, said duct having a smoke passing aperture in its wall, and an insert of liquid absorbing material removably disposed in said bore adjacent said first closure member, said insert being preformed with a centrally disposed recess in its inner end removably receiving the other end of said tubular duct to collect saliva therefrom and supporting said other duct end in spaced relation from the internal surface of said bore, whereby said duct is spaced from the walls of said bore and smoke is free to travel through the pipe but saliva is prevented from entering said combustion chamber.
4. A tobacco pipe according to claim 3 wherein said closure member comprises a cartridge carrying said liquid absorbing insert.
5. A tobacco pipe comprising a bowl having a tobacco combustion chamber, a stem attached to the bowl and having a bore therein extending through the pipe below the bowl and terminating in a first opening in an outer wall of the pipe, a detachable bit connected to said stem and having a passageway therethrough in communication with said bore, said pipe having a smoke passage extending upwardly from said bore and terminating in a second opening in an outer wall of the pipe, said bowl having a lower smoke conducting opening extending from said combustion chamber and in communication with said smoke passage, a first closure member removably seated in said first opening and closing said bore, a second closure member removably seated in said second opening and closing said smoke passage, a tubular duct in said bore having one end removably supported in spaced relation from the internal surface of said bore by and in communication with the passageway in said bit, said duct having a smoke passing aperture in its wall, and an insert of liquid absorbing material removably disposed in said bore adjacent said first closure member, said insert being pre-formed with a centrally disposed recess in its inner end removably receiving the other end of said tubular duct to collect saliva therefrom and supporting said other duct end in spaced relation from the internal surface of said bore, whereby said duct is spaced from the walls of said bore and smoke is free to travel through the pipe but saliva is prevented from entering said combustion chamber.
6. A tobacco pipe according to claim 5 wherein smoke filtering means is removably disposed in said pipe between said lower bowl and said duct aperture.
7. A tobacco pipe according to claim 6 wherein said smoke filtering means comprises an annular filter member in said bore surrounding said duct and overlying the smoke admitting aperture therein.
8. A tobacco pipe according to claim 6 wherein said smoke filtering means is attached to said second closure member and is removably inserted with said member in said smoke passage.
9. A tobacco pipe according to claim 8 wherein said smoke passage underlies said bowl, and said filtering 6 means comprises a nonflammable material underlying the lower smoke conducting opening from said bowl to said smoke passage.
References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,710,440 Torrese Apr. 23, 1929 2,019,017 McMackin Oct. 29, 1935 2,255,848 Kefeller Sept. 16, 1941 FOREIGN PATENTS 449,561 Great Britain June 30, 1936
US34216A 1960-06-06 1960-06-06 Dry bowl pipe Expired - Lifetime US3028867A (en)

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Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3098493A (en) * 1961-10-16 1963-07-23 Frank J Garrison Pipe for smoking tobacco
US3422821A (en) * 1967-12-06 1969-01-21 Edward H Calkins Air insulated dry bowl pipe
US4362169A (en) * 1980-12-05 1982-12-07 Calkins Edward H Air flow dry bowl pipe

Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1710440A (en) * 1928-06-05 1929-04-23 Torrese Apollo Smoker's pipe
US2019017A (en) * 1935-05-03 1935-10-29 John C Mcmackin Tobacco pipe
GB449561A (en) * 1935-01-17 1936-06-30 Thomas Mayes Warwick Improvements in and relating to tobacco pipes
US2255848A (en) * 1940-05-15 1941-09-16 Keffeler Lambert Smoking pipe

Patent Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1710440A (en) * 1928-06-05 1929-04-23 Torrese Apollo Smoker's pipe
GB449561A (en) * 1935-01-17 1936-06-30 Thomas Mayes Warwick Improvements in and relating to tobacco pipes
US2019017A (en) * 1935-05-03 1935-10-29 John C Mcmackin Tobacco pipe
US2255848A (en) * 1940-05-15 1941-09-16 Keffeler Lambert Smoking pipe

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3098493A (en) * 1961-10-16 1963-07-23 Frank J Garrison Pipe for smoking tobacco
US3422821A (en) * 1967-12-06 1969-01-21 Edward H Calkins Air insulated dry bowl pipe
US4362169A (en) * 1980-12-05 1982-12-07 Calkins Edward H Air flow dry bowl pipe
US4577645A (en) * 1980-12-05 1986-03-25 Calkins Edward H Reduced moisture smoker's pipe

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