US2996724A - Cushioned head scarf - Google Patents

Cushioned head scarf Download PDF

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Publication number
US2996724A
US2996724A US81688359A US2996724A US 2996724 A US2996724 A US 2996724A US 81688359 A US81688359 A US 81688359A US 2996724 A US2996724 A US 2996724A
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Prior art keywords
members
head
scarf
curlers
hair
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Expired - Lifetime
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Louis E Rose
Dorothy A Rose
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Louis E Rose
Dorothy A Rose
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A42HEADWEAR
    • A42BHATS; HEAD COVERINGS
    • A42B1/00Hats; Caps; Hoods
    • A42B1/04Soft caps; Hoods
    • A42B1/08Soft caps; Hoods with protection against blows

Description

1951 L. E. ROSE ETAL 2,996,724

CUSHIONED HEAD SCARF Filed May 29, 1959 FIG I INVENTOR. LOUIS E. ROSE 2 5 y DOROTHY A. ROSE AT M EYS 2,996,724 CUSHIONED HEAD SCARF Louis E. Rose and Dorothy A. Rose, both of 12 Ventura Court, Pedro Valley, Calif. Filed May '29, 1959, Ser. No. 816,883 Claims. (Cl. 2 --'171) This invention relates to a head scarf or clot-h which is worn over hair curlers while the wearer is asleep or reclining, and more particularly to such a scarf providing cushioning support and protection for the wearers head.

Many women are in the habit of wearing hair curlers overnight in order to set their hair in the style which they prefer, or to keep their hair in place while they sleep. However, the pressure of the hair curlers against the head caruses discomfort to the wearer. Furthermore, the movements of the wearer during the night often causes the hair curlers to become unfastened, which in turn causes the hair style to become disarranged.

Various head scarves have been developed, the purpose of which has been to keep hair styles in place while the wearer is reclining, but these are only satisfactory for use over small hair pins or over the hair when no pins are used. The use of these scarves over the hair when larger hair curlers are worn is unsatisfactory, because in order to keep the hair curlers in place the scarf must be placed tightly over the head. But this tightness causes considerable discomfort to the wearer. On the other hand, if the scarf is worn loosely, it invariably becomes detached and fails in its purpose of keeping the hair curlers in place.

Other head caps or scarves have been developed which provide a cushion outside a scarf but such arrangements obviously are incapable of relieving pressure between the tight scarf or cap and the wearer's hair curlers. Such devices are therefore little better than a plain scarf without a cushion.

One of the objects of this invention is the provision of a head protector which relieves the pressure of hair curlers against the wearers head while reclining.

Another object of this invention is the provision of a head scarf having a web extending between a pair of cushions adapted to be positioned on opposite sides of hair ourlers on a wearers head to hold the hair curlers in place and to cushion the head against pressure from such curlers.

A further object of this invention is the provision of a head scarf which can be easily adjusted to fit the wearers head and which can be fitted snugly against the head so as to hold hair curlers in place without causing discomfort to the wearer.

Other objects: and advantages will be apparent from the accompanying drawing which illustrates a preferred embodiment of this invention, and in which:

FIG. 1 is a transverse sectional view of the head scarf of this invention as worn by a reclining figure;

FIG. 2 is a plan view of the head scarf;

FIG. 3 is a side elevational view of the head scarf positioned on the head of a wearer; and,

FIG. 4 is a transverse sectional view, the plane of which is indicated by the line 4-4 in FIG. 2.

From the drawing it is evident that the head scarf or protector of this invention preferably comprises two thicknesses of fabric, generally designated 1, 2, (FIG. 4) between which are placed two elongated resilient members 3, 4 of cushion material which are held in place by rows of stitching 5, 6. Stitching 6 also serves to join together the ends of the two thicknesses of fabric 1, 2. A web 7 of the pieces of fabric 1, 2 extends between the members '3, 4 and holds them in spaced relationship Tited States Patent with each other. Fabric thicknesses 1, 2 are gathered together and stitched at 8 to form ends 9 whichextend from opposite ends of members 3, 4.

The head scarf is worn by tying the ends or extensions 9 together over the forehead of the wearer, as shown in FIG. 3. The scarf is placed so that the cushion members 3, 4 extend around the back and sides of the head and rest above and below the band or rows of hair preparation devices or curlers 10, as shown in FIG. 1. Thus, when the wearer is resting her head on the pillow 11 or bed, the weight of her head is taken up by the cushion members 3-, 4 at approximately the center of the back of the head and the nape of the neck. This cushioning effect prevents the hair curlers from exerting an uncomfortable pressure against the head when the wearer is reclining.

Furthermore, when the scarf is properly positioned on the wearers head, the web 7 covers the hair curlers and serves to hold them in place.

It will be understood that the device herein described may he made from many different materials and may take different forms without departing from the spirit of invention. Preferably the members 3, 4 are foam or sponge rubber, but they may also include down or other padding material having sufficient resiliency to perform their head protecting and cushioning function. It is obvious that suchoushion members must be of substantial thickness in order to support the wearers head against pressure of the curlers 10. In cross section (FIG. 4) members 3, 4 are preferably about to 1" square with rounded corners.

Since hair preparation devices come in various sizes and shapes it may be advantageous to employ only one of the members 3, 4 adapted to extend along one of the margins of the band of curlers 10. In such an instance an elongated element adapted to extend along the other margin of the curlers may be utilized with a connecting web 7 and fastening means such as ties 9 to support the cushion member on the wearers head in the proper location. Such single cushion member may provide suiticient protection in some cases.

In the preferred form illustrated the cushion members 3, 4 are spaced apart a slightly greater distance at their central portions than at their ends because the wearer usually uses more curlers 10 at the back of the head. The ends of the cushion members are adapted to extend to the temple of the wearers head and the lower member 4 extends over the ears (FIG. 1) so as to embrace the curlers which may be located over the wearers ears. It will be noted from FIG. 2. that both members 3, 4 (or the elongated element taking the place of one of such members) are slightly curved, in plan, to better conform to the contour of the wearers head.

As previously described, the web 7 serves to connect the members 3, '4 to prevent them from moving apart or becoming displaced and also covers the band of curlers 10 to hold them in place. It is desirable therefore that web 7 be flexible, relatively thin compared to members 3, 4, and provided with suflicient extra width, especially in the central portion, to be capable of loosely receiving the curlers 10 thereunder. The width of web 7 centrally of the ends of members 3, 4 and between the same may be about three to four times the width of said members.

FIG. 4 illustrates the preferred form of stitching the members 3, 4 in the thicknesses of fabric 1, 2 along the outer corners of said members. In this manner the web 7 is spaced outwardly from the wearers head by substantially the thickness of the members 3, 4, and the inwardly directed sides of said members provide supporting shoulders against the margins of the band of curlers 10.

Although a double thickness of fabric is illustrated, it is obvious that single thickness having members 3, 4 secured to its edges would suffice. The fabric thicknesses 1, 2 conveniently provide for connection and placement of members 3, 4 and the ends or extensions 9 may be used as ties, as previously described. By stitching such fabric at 8 at the ends of members 3, 4 (FIG. 2) the same are held in the desired location as part of the scarf.

It is clear that fastening means other than ties 9 may be employed for connecting the scarf of this invention across the upper forehead of the wearer. Snaps, hooks, or the like may be so employed. Furthermore, only a relatively narrow web will adequately connect the central portions of members 3, 4, and therefore the web need not extend throughout the length of said members if ventilation of the curler area is desired.

Although the invention has been described and illustrated in detail, such is not to be taken as restrictive thereof as modifications that would appear to one skilled in the art are intended to come within the spirit and scope of the appended claims.

We claim:

1. A cushioned head scarf comprising: a pair of elongated members of resilient cushion material of substantial thickness adapted to extend in spaced relation around the back and sides of a wearers head, relatively thin flexible web means extending between the central portions of said members and connecting the same for holding them against moving apart, and flexible extensions extending from opposite ends of said members and adapted to be connected across the upper forehead of the wearer for so supporting said members on the head of the wearer.

2. A head scarf comprising a pair of elongated cushion members, a web of fabric connected to said cushion members for holding the same in spaced relation, said cushion members adapted when worn to receive between them a plurality of hair curlers for relieving the pressure of the hair curlers against the wearers head while reclining with said web extending between said cushion members and over such hair curlers for holding such hair curlers in place, and means for supporting said web and said cushion members in place on the wearers head.

3. A head scarf comprising a pair of elongated cushion members, a web of fabric connected to said cushion members for holding the same in spaced relation, said cushion members adapted when worn to receive between them a plurality of hair curlers for relieving the pressure of the hair curlers against the wearers head while reclining with said web extending between said cushion members and over such hair curlers for holding such hair curlers in place, extensions of said web extending from opposite ends of said members for tying over the forehead of the wearer for holding said members and said web in place.

4. A head scarf comprising an elongated piece of thin flexible sheet material having end portions and a central portion, a pair of elongated members of resilient cushion material generally parallel to each other and extending along the marginal edges of said central portion throughout the lengths thereof, stitching along the length of said cushion members to connect said members to said sheet material and to hold said members in place, means for connecting said end portions together, said piece of sheet material adapted to be worn with said end portions connected across the forehead and with said central por- ]tion extending around the back and sides of the wearers ead.

5. A head scarf comprising an elongated piece of thin flexible sheet material having end portions and a central portion, a pair of elongated members of resilient cushion material generally parallel to each other and extending along the marginal edges of said central portion throughout the length thereof and projecting substantially from one side of said sheet material, stitching along the length of said cushion members to connect said members to said sheet material and to hold said members in place, means for connecting said end portions together, said piece of sheet material adapted to be worn with said end portions connected across the forehead and with said central portion extending around the back and sides of the wearers head and with the projecting portions of said members extending between said flexible sheet material and the wearers head.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 436,038 Janus Sept. 9, 1890 2,174,263 Gugliemi Sept. 26, 1939 2,642,880 Corette June 23, 1953 2,696,007 Larkin et a1. Dec. 7, 1954 FOREIGN PATENTS 685,247 France Mar. 31, 1930

US2996724A 1959-05-29 1959-05-29 Cushioned head scarf Expired - Lifetime US2996724A (en)

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Cited By (19)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3197787A (en) * 1963-01-23 1965-08-03 Victor A Toguan Protective head covering
US3319272A (en) * 1965-02-05 1967-05-16 Edwin F Eller Curler pillow
US3358698A (en) * 1964-07-28 1967-12-19 Floyd W Blanchard Hair-setting roller device with load distributing combs
US4491985A (en) * 1982-09-29 1985-01-08 Dalton Betty J Head covering for women with hair loss
US4964175A (en) * 1989-06-29 1990-10-23 Taylor Mary W Hair protecting device
US5621919A (en) * 1994-04-15 1997-04-22 Graham; Sandra A. Hair style protection device
US5920909A (en) * 1996-07-05 1999-07-13 Ellsworth; Shawna K. Hair wrap
US6189151B1 (en) * 1998-12-28 2001-02-20 Florence Curtis Absorbent band
US6427253B1 (en) * 2001-03-21 2002-08-06 Jacqueline Penny Protective headgear comprising a headband and a semi-rigid support to protect a back region of a user's head
US6481020B1 (en) * 2001-08-09 2002-11-19 Shirley A. Kirkland Head wrap for keeping a hairstyle of a user in place while sleeping
US20070192935A1 (en) * 2006-01-27 2007-08-23 Natalia Gurushina Knotted fabric headwear
US20070281568A1 (en) * 2006-06-02 2007-12-06 Gorsen Robert M Protective and therapeutic body gear
US20110231984A1 (en) * 2007-07-09 2011-09-29 Insook Choi Sleeping cap
US8181277B1 (en) * 2007-07-09 2012-05-22 Insook Choi Basic form for RYALL caps
US20120233746A1 (en) * 2011-03-14 2012-09-20 Jwa Seung Jin Snowboard and ski head protector
US20120246789A1 (en) * 2011-04-02 2012-10-04 Mia Hunter Absorbent Headband Device
US20130199562A1 (en) * 2012-02-08 2013-08-08 Nicole Ari Parker Breathable Gym Wrap Apparatus, Devices, and Methods
US8627578B1 (en) * 2011-09-23 2014-01-14 Amie L. Gibson Hooded dryer accessory system
US20160058159A1 (en) * 2014-09-03 2016-03-03 Robin Gale Groesbeck Saving Face

Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US436038A (en) * 1890-09-09 Janus
FR685247A (en) * 1929-11-20 1930-07-08 Improvements to headband nets
US2174263A (en) * 1938-10-26 1939-09-26 Arden Elizabeth Inc Hair-retaining device
US2642880A (en) * 1952-09-11 1953-06-23 Corette Dominick Theodore Hair guard
US2696007A (en) * 1951-01-30 1954-12-07 Frances R Larkin Sleeping halo or cap

Patent Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US436038A (en) * 1890-09-09 Janus
FR685247A (en) * 1929-11-20 1930-07-08 Improvements to headband nets
US2174263A (en) * 1938-10-26 1939-09-26 Arden Elizabeth Inc Hair-retaining device
US2696007A (en) * 1951-01-30 1954-12-07 Frances R Larkin Sleeping halo or cap
US2642880A (en) * 1952-09-11 1953-06-23 Corette Dominick Theodore Hair guard

Cited By (21)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3197787A (en) * 1963-01-23 1965-08-03 Victor A Toguan Protective head covering
US3358698A (en) * 1964-07-28 1967-12-19 Floyd W Blanchard Hair-setting roller device with load distributing combs
US3319272A (en) * 1965-02-05 1967-05-16 Edwin F Eller Curler pillow
US4491985A (en) * 1982-09-29 1985-01-08 Dalton Betty J Head covering for women with hair loss
US4964175A (en) * 1989-06-29 1990-10-23 Taylor Mary W Hair protecting device
US5621919A (en) * 1994-04-15 1997-04-22 Graham; Sandra A. Hair style protection device
US5920909A (en) * 1996-07-05 1999-07-13 Ellsworth; Shawna K. Hair wrap
US6189151B1 (en) * 1998-12-28 2001-02-20 Florence Curtis Absorbent band
US6427253B1 (en) * 2001-03-21 2002-08-06 Jacqueline Penny Protective headgear comprising a headband and a semi-rigid support to protect a back region of a user's head
US6481020B1 (en) * 2001-08-09 2002-11-19 Shirley A. Kirkland Head wrap for keeping a hairstyle of a user in place while sleeping
US20070192935A1 (en) * 2006-01-27 2007-08-23 Natalia Gurushina Knotted fabric headwear
US20070281568A1 (en) * 2006-06-02 2007-12-06 Gorsen Robert M Protective and therapeutic body gear
US7493663B2 (en) 2006-06-02 2009-02-24 Gorsen Robert M Protective and therapeutic body gear
US20110231984A1 (en) * 2007-07-09 2011-09-29 Insook Choi Sleeping cap
US8181277B1 (en) * 2007-07-09 2012-05-22 Insook Choi Basic form for RYALL caps
US8555417B2 (en) * 2007-07-09 2013-10-15 Insook Choi Sleeping cap
US20120233746A1 (en) * 2011-03-14 2012-09-20 Jwa Seung Jin Snowboard and ski head protector
US20120246789A1 (en) * 2011-04-02 2012-10-04 Mia Hunter Absorbent Headband Device
US8627578B1 (en) * 2011-09-23 2014-01-14 Amie L. Gibson Hooded dryer accessory system
US20130199562A1 (en) * 2012-02-08 2013-08-08 Nicole Ari Parker Breathable Gym Wrap Apparatus, Devices, and Methods
US20160058159A1 (en) * 2014-09-03 2016-03-03 Robin Gale Groesbeck Saving Face

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