US2995349A - Fuel injector - Google Patents

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US2995349A
US2995349A US4116A US411660A US2995349A US 2995349 A US2995349 A US 2995349A US 4116 A US4116 A US 4116A US 411660 A US411660 A US 411660A US 2995349 A US2995349 A US 2995349A
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hollow shaft
fuel
ports
sleeve member
sleeve
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Sr Walter L Kennedy
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Sr Walter L Kennedy
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02MSUPPLYING COMBUSTION ENGINES IN GENERAL WITH COMBUSTIBLE MIXTURES OR CONSTITUENTS THEREOF
    • F02M61/00Fuel-injectors not provided for in groups F02M39/00 - F02M57/00 or F02M67/00
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02MSUPPLYING COMBUSTION ENGINES IN GENERAL WITH COMBUSTIBLE MIXTURES OR CONSTITUENTS THEREOF
    • F02M69/00Low-pressure fuel-injection apparatus ; Apparatus with both continuous and intermittent injection; Apparatus injecting different types of fuel
    • F02M69/04Injectors peculiar thereto
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02MSUPPLYING COMBUSTION ENGINES IN GENERAL WITH COMBUSTIBLE MIXTURES OR CONSTITUENTS THEREOF
    • F02M2700/00Supplying, feeding or preparing air, fuel, fuel air mixtures or auxiliary fluids for a combustion engine; Use of exhaust gas; Compressors for piston engines
    • F02M2700/07Nozzles and injectors with controllable fuel supply

Description

Aug. 8, 1961 w. KENNEDY, SR

FUEL INJECTOR 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Jan. 22, 1960 INVENTOR. WALTER. L. KENNEDQSQ ATTORNEY-S 1961 w. L. KENNEDY, SR 2,995,349

FUEL INJECTOR Filed Jan. 22, 1960 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVEN TOR. WALTER. LKENMEDY, 52.

1961 w. L. KENNEDY, SR 2,995,349

FUEL INJECTOR Filed Jan. 22, 1960 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 I INVENTOR. 30 44 WALTEIZ LKENNEDY, S2.

ATTORNEYS United States Patent Ofiice 2,995,349 Patented Aug. 8, 1961 2,995,349 FUEL INJECTOR I Walter L. Kennedy, Sr., 6039 Rolton Court,

Waterford, Mich. Filed Jan. 22, 1960, Ser. No. 4,116 8 Claims. (Cl. 261-41) This invention relates to a fuel injector for internal combustion engines, and more particularly to a fuel metering device adapted to be employed in place of a conventional carburetor in an internal combustion engine.

A main object of the invention is to provide a novel and improved fuel injection device for an internal combustion engine, said device being simple in construction, providing accurate metering of the fuel passing therethrough, having only one moving part, and being adaptable for use with a wide range of engines, such as those in common use on automobiles, motor trucks, marine craft, and the like.

A further object of the invention is to provide an improved fuel injector for internal combustion engines, said injector requiring relatively inexpensive parts, being easy to install, being reliable in operation, and providing substantially improved performance and fuel economy.

A still further object of the invention is to provide an improved fuel injector for internal combustion engines,

said injector being durable in construction, being easy to adjust, and being adaptable for use on any four-cycle engine, and in some cases on two-cycle engines.

A still further object of the invention is to provide an improved fuel injection device for internal combustion engines which provides complete and accurate adjustable fuel metering in all ranges of operation of the associated engine, which is completely self-contained, which prevents splashing or spilling of the fuel, which employs a relatively small amount of fuel therein, which is positive in operation, and which provides immediate response.

A still further object of the invention is to provide an improved fuel injection device for an internal combustion engine which does not rely for its operation on the pres! ence of vacuum in the intake manifold of the engine to which it is connected, which produces reduced fire hazard, which is operable in practically any position, which can be adjusted to provide either maximum fuel economy or maximum engine performance and which may be easily adjusted to provide both a desirable degree of performance and fuel economy, which is free from the possibility of icing or vapor lock, which does not require floats or float chambers, which requires no choke devices or air venturis, and which may be readily manufactured at low cost by the use of mass production methods.

Further objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent from the following description and claims, and from the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of an improved fuel injector constructed in accordance with the present invention.

FIGURE 2 is an enlarged vertical cross sectional view taken substantially on the line 2-2 of FIGURE 1.

FIGURE 3 is a fragmentary vertical cross sectional view taken substantially on the line 3-3 of FIGURE 2.

FIGURE 4 is a fragmentary horizontal cross sectional view taken substantially on the line 4-4 of FIGURE 3.

FIGURE 5 is a vertical cross sectional detail view taken on theline 5-5 of FIGURE 4.

FIGURE 6 is a perspective view showing the hollow shaft member and the sleeve member and butterfly valve element employed in the fuel injector of FIGURE 1, the parts being shown in separated positions.

FIGURE 7 is a diagrammatic view showing the relationship between the ports of the hollow shaft member and the sleeve member cooperating therewith when the parts are in positions corresponding to the idling condition of the associated engine, the relationship of the ports being shown in a developed sketch included in this figure.

FIGURE 8 is a diagrammatic illustration similar to FIGURE 7 but showing the relative positions of the parts when the injector is set to provide mid range operation of the associated engine.

FIGURE 9 is a diagrammatic illustration similar to FIGURES 7 and 8 but showing the relationship of the parts when the fuel injector device is setto provide full throttle operation.

FIGURE 10 is a transverse vertical cross sectional view taken through a modified form of sleeve member and butterfly valve element constructed in accordance with the present invention and which may be employed in the injector device of FIGURE 1.

FIGURE 11 is an enlarged fragmentary longitudinal cross sectional view taken through the portions of the hollow shaft member and cooperating sleeve member containing the mid range ports, and showing a further modification in accordance with the present invention.

FIGURE 12 is a perspective view of a further form of fuel injector device constructed in accordance with the present invention.

FIGURE 13 is an enlarged vertical cross sectional view taken substantially on the line 13-13 of FIGURE 12.

FIGURE 14 is a cross sectional view taken substantially on the line 14-14 of FIGURE 13.

FIGURE 15 is a fragmentary side elevational view of cooperating portions of the adjustable fuel supply control element, the butterfly valve sleeve and the hollow shaft portion cooperating therewith, as employed in the modified form of fuel injector device illustrated in FIGURES 12, 13 and 14.

Referring to the drawings, and more particularly to FIGURES 1 to 9, 16 generally designates a fuel injection device according to the present invention. The device 16 comprises a main fuel mixture conduit 17 which is open to atmosphere at its top end, as shown at 18, and which is adapted to be connected at its opposite end 19 to the intake manifold of an internal combustion engine. The conduit member 17 is provided with a pair of apertured base flanges 20, 20 by means of which the conduit member 17 may be rigidly secured to the frame of an engine or to any other suitable support adjacent the engine.

Designated at 21 is a hollow shaft member which is transversely mounted in the main conduit 17 and being suitably secured in a fixed position in said main conduit, for example, by being secured to a supporting boss 22 provided in one side wall portion of the upstanding main conduit 17, as illustrated in FIGURE 3. The hollow shaft member 21 is formed externally adjacent the supporting boss 22 with a conduit element 23 adapted to be connected to the liquid fuel supply line associated with the internal combustion engine with which the device is employed.

The hollow shaft member 21 is formed with the centrally apertured transversely extending partition wall 24 located adjacent the fuel supply conduit 23 and defining a fuel entry chamber 25 at the external end of the hollow shaft member 21. A primary metering screw 27 is threadedly engaged in the end portion of the hollow sleeve shaft 21 and is formed with a conical end 28 which is adjustable with respect to a conical seat 29 formed in the central aperture 30 of wall 24 so lhat the primary rate of flow of fuel from the chamber 25' to the next successive chamber, shown at 31, in the hollow shaft 21 is regulated by the adjustment of the screw 27. Screw 27 is provided with an external head portion 32 which may be employed to manually rotate the screw so as to adjust the primary rate of fuel flow from chamber 25 to chamber 31. 1

The hollow shaft 21 is provided with apair of spaced intermediate partition walls 33 and 34 connected by an axially extending conduit element 35, thus defining an annular fuel discharge space 36 between the walls 33 and 34. Conduit element 35 is provided with a plurality of apertures 37 establishing communication between the conduit element 35 and the annular space 36. A needle valve 38 extends axially through the screw 27 and through the aperture 30, being threadedly engaged with the screw 27 at 39 so that it may be axially adjusted. A slotted head portion 40 is provided on the external end of the needle valve 38, allowing said needle valve to be adjusted by means of a screw driver or similar implement. The inner end of the needle valve 38 is adjustable with respect to a valve seat 41 formed around the central opening of the wall member 33 so that by adjusting the needle valve 38, the secondary rate of fuel metering may be adjusted, namely, the rate of flow of fuel from the space 31 to the space 36.

A protective cap 42 is threadedly engaged on the end of the hollow shaft 21, covering the adjustment head 32 of screw 27 and the slotted end 40 of needle valve 38.

As shown in FIGURE 3, a fuel space 43 is defined between the wall 34 and the end wall 44 of the hollow shaft 21. A needle valve 45 is threadedly engaged through the center of the end wall 44 and is provided with a tapered tip 46 which is adjustable with respect to a conical seat 47 formed around the central opening of the wall 34 so as to regulate the flow of liquid fuel from the conduit 35 to the space 43 in accordance with the adjustment of the metering screw 45.

The chamber 43 is provided with a port 50, which is in the form of a relatively short circumferentially elongated slot. The space 36 is provided with a port 49 which is of generally triangular shape and which is flared in a circumferential direction, being angularly spaced from the port 48 in the manner illustrated in FIGURES 7, 8 and 9, for a purpose presently to be described. The chamber 31 is likewise provided with a port 48, which is in the form of a longer circumferentially elongated slot, which is located adjacent the widest end of the mid range port 49, as shown in FIGURES 7, 8 and 9.

Designated at 51 is a sleeve member which is rotatably mounted on the hollow shaft 21 and which extends out of the housing 17 at the side thereof opposite the conduit element 23. Sleeve member 51 is rotatably supported in a bearing bracket 52 secured to the housing member 17, as is clearly shown in FIGURES 1 and 3. A throttle control arm 53 is secured to the outer end portion of the sleeve 51 and is connected to the acce erator pedal or other throttle control element of the associated engine, as by a link rod 55. The member 53 is provided with an auxiliary arm element 56 through which is threadedly engaged an adjustable stop screw 57 which is in turn engageable with a fixed abutment member 58 provided on the housing 17, thus providing an idling speed adjusting means for the throttle arm 53.

As shown in FIGURE 3, a closure plug 59 is threadedly engaged in the end of the sleeve member 51, the plug 59 being removable to provide access to the slotted end of the needle valve 45, whereby said needle valve may be at times adjusted by means of a screw driver or other suitable implement.

Designated at 60 is a butterfly valve element which is. integrally formed with the sleeve 51 and which is rotatable in the housing 17 to adjust the rate of atmospheric air flow into the top portion of the housing, simultaneously with the adjustment of the rate of admission of fuel into the space in the housing below the butterfly valve, as will be presently described.

Sleeve member 51 is formed with an idling port 61 which is located so as to be registrable with the arcuate port 50 communicating with the chamber 43. Sleeve 4 member 51 is further formed with an axially elongated slot 62 which is rotatable into registry with the different width portions of the generally triangular port 49 communicating with the space 36. The sleeve member 51 is further formed with a port 63 which is rotatable into registry with the port 48 communicating with the chamber 31. As shown in FIGURES 7, 8 and 9, the ports 61, 62 and 63 are substantially longitudinally aligned, but due to the generally staggered relationship of the ports 48, 49 and 50, registration of the sleeve ports with the hollow shaft ports depends upon the rotated position of the sleeve member 51.

The sleeve member 51 is formed with a longitudinally extending canopy flange 64 which is spaced from the butterfly element 60, the ports 61, 62 and 63 being located between the canopy flange 64 and the butterfly element 60, as is clearly shown in FIGURES 7, 8 and 9, whereby to define a low pressure atomization space 65 between the flange 64 and the butterfly element. The channelshaped space 65 is generally semicylindrical in shape, but has a generally outwardly flaring configuration so that the pressure therein is reduced responsive to the emission of liquid fuel from the registering ports, whereby the liquid fuel is atomized and difiused, promoting the mixture-of the fuel with air passing downwardly through the housing 17 under theinfluence of the suction produced by the pistons of the associated internal combustion engine. Under idling conditions, namely, when the control firm 53 is in a position corresponding to the idling position of the engine, the port 50 is in registry with the port 61, allowing a predetermined amount of fuel to pass from the space 43 into the atomization area 65, the predetermined amount of fuel being regulated in accordance with the adjustment of the needle valve 45 in the idling chamber 43. As will be further apparent, the idling adjustment is affected by the adjustment of the primary metering screw 27 and the needle valve 38. However, after the necessary adjustment of the primary screw 27 and the needle valve 38 has been made, the adjustment of the idling fuel supply may be made by adjusting needle valve 45.

Suflicient air for idling is provided by an adjustable air admission port 67 provided in the housing 17 below the butterfly valve element 60, the port 67 being provided with a needle valve 68 which is externally adjustable and which regulates the supply of atmospheric air between an intake port 69 and the air supply port 67, as is clearly illustrated in FIGURE 5.

As will be readily apparent, the richness of the idling mixture may be regulated by suitably adjusting the idling air supply needle valve 68.

By rotating the sleeve member 51 in a clockwise direction from the position of FIGURE7 to the position of FIGURE 8, the slot 62 is brought into registry with the triangular port 49, the slot 62 first registering with the narrower portion of port 49 and gradually registering with wider portions of port 49 as clockwise rotation of sleeve member 51 continues. This provides an increasing supply of fuel to the engine. As shown in FIGURE 8, the idling port 61 is moved out of registry with respect to the port 50 under these conditions, so that mid range operation is in no way afiected by the setting of the idling adjustment screw 45. The adjustment of the mid range fuel supply thus depends on the setting of the primary metering screw 27 and the needle valve 38, since these elements determine the maximum rate at which liquid fuel will be admitted into the conduit member 35.

At a predetermined position of the sleeve member 51 in the mid range setting thereof, the port 48 comes into registry with the port 63, thereafter providing full throttle operation of the engine, as shown in FIGURE 9. In this position of the sleeve member 51 the butterfly valve element 60 is positioned vertically, as shown in FIGURE 9, providing maximum air supply through the chamber 17. Clockwise rotation of the sleeve member 51 substantially beyond the position illustrated in FIGURE 9 causes ports 63 and 62 to be moved to positions beyond registry with the ports 48 and 49, cutting off the fuel supply.

As illustrated in FIGURE 10, the sleeve member, shown at 51' on which the butterfly valve element 60 is mounted may be provided with a pair of canopy flanges 64', 64' spaced symmetrically on opposite sides of the butterfly valve element 60 to define two atomization spaces 65', 65', and the sleeve member 51' may be provided with ports, such as the ports 63', 63' communicating with said spaces 65', 65'. In accordance with the modification illustrated in FIGURE 10, the hollow shaft 21 will be formed with suitable ports located to register with the discharge ports of the sleeve member 51' in the different positions of the butterfly valve, corresponding to the positions illustrated in FIGURES 7, 8 and 9.

In the modification illustrated in FIGURE 11, the rotary sleeve member carrying the butterfly valve element, shown at 151, is provided with longitudinally spaced ports 163 located to register with the triangular port 49 of the hollow shaft 21 in the mid-range position of the butterfly valve. As shown in FIGURE 11, the longitudinally spaced apertures 163 are arranged to provide a downwardly flaring jet of fuel entering the atomization space immediately therebeneath, whereby to promote more effective and complete atomization of the fuel. In the arrangement of FIGURE 11, each of the orifices 163 acts as an individual opening, each nozzle opening contributing a jet of liquid fuel into the atomization space 65, the jets being distributed over a substantial length so that they will diffuse uniformly in the atomization space 65 Referring now to the form of the invention illustrated in FIGURES 12 to 15, the fuel injector device shown therein is designated generally at 16' and comprises the housing 17 in which is transversely mounted the hollow shaft member 21', said shaft member being provided with an abutment flange 22 which is clamped against a supporting boss 23' formed on housing 17 by an annular fastening nut 24' threadedly engaged on the boss 23. The hollow shaft 21 is provided with the centrally apertured spaced intermediate partition walls 25' and 26 defining the chambers 27', 28 and 29'. A sleeve member 30 is rotatably engaged on the hollow shaft 21 and extends rotatably through a boss 31' formed on the housing 17' diametrically opposite the boss 23. Respective sealing rings 32' and 33' of resilient deformable material are provided between sleeve 30 and hollow shaft 21' and between boss 31' and sleeve 30', as shown in FIGURE 13, to seal these elements. A primary meter ing sleeve 32' is rotatably mounted on the sleeve 30 and is provided with a tapering inner portion 33' which is received within a correspondingly tapered bore 34 formed in the boss 31. An annular clamping ring 35 is threadedly engaged on the boss 31 and clampingly engages the outer shoulder defined by the end of the tapering portion 33', whereby to lock the sleeve 32' in an adjusted position. The tapering portion 33 of sleeve 32 is formed with a triangular port 36 which is registrable with a longitudinal slot 37' formed in the sleeve 36. The clamping ring 35 may be employed to lock the sleeve 32' in a position wherein the slot 37' registers with a de sired width of the generally triangular aperture 36 of the tapered portion 33', to provide a desired primary rate of fuel flow into the injector.

As shown in FIGURE 14, the boss 31 is formed with a fuel inlet passage 40 to which is connected the fuel supply line 38 leading from the outlet side of the fuel pump associated with the internal combustion engine on which the device is employed. The passage 40 registers with a selected portion of the generally triangular aperture 36 of the metering sleeve 32', said sleeve being adjusted to provide a rich or lean mixture, in accordance with the conditions of operation of the engine with which the device is employed, the sleeve 32 being locked in the adjusted position by the clamping ring 35' as above described. A pair of flattened surface portions 39' are provided on opposite sides of the metering sleeve 32' to facilitate the engagement of a suitable tool, such as a wrench, or the like, with the sleeve so that it may be rotated to a desired position of adjustment.

The fixed hollow shaft 21' is formed with a relatively large aperture 42' which is registrable with the triangular opening 36 in all positions of the butterfly valve element, shown at 160, so as to allow fuel to enter the space 29' under all conditions.

Sleeve 30' is sealed with respect to the primary metering sleeve 35 by the provision of a sealing ring 43' of resilient deformable material surrounding the sleeve member 30' and clamped in an annular cap member 44' threadedly engaged on the outer end of metering sleeve 32 as is clearly shown in FIGURE 14.

A needle valve 45 is threadedly engaged in the outer end portion of the sleeve member 30' and is adjustable with respect to a valve seat provided in the central aperture '46 of partition wall 26', the needle valve being provided with a slotted end 48 which is protected by a threaded plug 49' threadedly engaged in the outer end of sleeve member 30, as shown in FIGURE 14. Needle valve 45 provides a means of adjusting the maximum rate of flow of liquid fuel from the space 29' to the space 28', namely, for the maximum rate of fuel flow obtained for the mid-range operation of the engine.

A further metering needle valve 50' is threadedly engaged in the outer end portion of the hollow shaft 21', being sealed at its outer portion by the provision of a resilient deformable sealing ring 70 surrounding the outer portion of the needle valve and clamped against the end of the hollow shaft 21' by an annular clamping ring 71 threadedly engaged on the outer end portion of said hollow shaft. The needle valve 54) is provided with a slotted end 73' which may be engaged by a screw driver or similar implement to adjust the needle valve. The inner end of the needle valve is adjustable with respect to a valve seat provided in the central aperture 74' of the partition wall 25, whereby to adjust the maximum rate of liquid fuel flowing from the space 28 to the space 27, namely, the rate of fuel flow under idling conditions of the engine.

Hollow shaft 21' and the rotatable sleeve 30 are provided with cooperating registrable ports to provide the varied rates of fuel supply into the atomization space 65 in the same manner as described above in connection with the form of the invention illustrated in FIGURES 1 to 9. A suitable throttle arm 53 is secured on the exposed end portion of the sleeve member 30, the throttle arm 53 being similar to that previously described in connection with the form of the invention shown in FIGURES l to 9.

As in the previously described form of the invention, liquid fuel is supplied under pressure from the fuel pump of the engine tto the fuel line 38, the fuel entering the space 29' through passage 40, aperture 36', opening 37', and opening 42. Primary metering is performed by the sleeve 32, providing either a rich or lean mixture, as desired. The liquid fuel enters the space 28' past the needle valve 45', being thus made available for mid range operation of the engine, and enters the space 27 past the metering valve 50', being thus made available for idling operation of the engine.

As in the previously described form of the invention, the registering ports provided for the intermediate space 28 and for the space 29' are at times concurrently effective to allow fuel to be supplied to the atomization space 65 to provide full throttle operation of the engine, as previously described in connection with FIGURE 9. However, in the idling position of the butterfly valve element 160, corresponding to the position of the butterfly valve 60 shown in FIGURE 7, only the space 27' is placed 7 in communication with the atomization space 65 by the registry of the cooperating ports in sleeve 30' and hollow shaft 21', whereby to provide a sufficient amount of fuel to allow the engine to idle.

While certain specific embodiments of an improved fuel injection device for an internal combustion engine have been disclosed in the foregoing description, it will be understood that various modifications within the spirit of the invention may occur to those skilled in the art. Therefore, it is intended that no limitations be placed on the invention except as defined by the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

l. A fuel injection device of the character described comprising a main fuel mixture conduit open to atmosphere at one end and adapted to be connected at its other end to the intake manifold of an internal combustion engine, a hollow shaft member mounted transversely in said main conduit, means to connect said hollow shaft member to a liquid fuel supply line, a sleeve member rotatably mounted on said hollow shaft member within said main conduit, a butterfly valve element mounted on said sleeve member within said main conduit, means to rotate said sleeve member, whereby to adjust said butterfly valve element, at least three longitudinally spaced ports formed in said 'hollow shaft member, longitudinally spaced ports formed in said sleeve member located to successively register with the ports of said hollow shaft member responsive to the rotation of said sleeve member, and manually adjustable restriction means in the hollow shaft member between the portions thereof containing the first-named ports.

2. A fuel injection device of the character described comprising a main fuel mixture conduit open to atmosphere at one end and adapted to be connected at its other end to the intake manifold of an internal combustion engine, a hollow shaft member mounted transversely in said main conduit, means to connect said hollow shaft member to a liquid fuel supply line, a sleeve member rotatably mounted on said hollow shaft member within said main conduit, a butterfly valve element mounted on said sleeve member within said main conduit, means to rotate said sleeve member, whereby to adjust said butterfly valve element, at least three longitudinally spaced angularly separated ports formed in said hollow shaft member, aligned longitudinally spaced ports formed in said sleeve member located to successively register with the ports of the hollow shaft member responsive to the rotation of said sleeve member, and manually adjustable rcstriction means in the hollow shaft member between the portions thereof containing the first-named ports.

3. A fuel injection device of the character described comprising a main fuel mixture conduit open to atmosphere at one end and adapted to be connected at its other end to the intake manifold of an internal combustion engine, a hollow shaft member mounted transversely in said main conduit, means to connect said hollow shaft member to a liquid fuel. supply line, a sleeve member rotatably mounted on said hollow shaft member within said main conduit, a butterfly valve element mounted on said sleeve member within said main conduit, means to rotate said sleeve member, whereby to adjust said butterfly valve element, at least three longitudinally spaced, angularly separated ports formed in said hollow shaft member, said ports respectively comprising an idle port of limited circumferential length, a mid range port of relatively extended circumferential length and flaring in width, and a high range port of extended circumferential length, aligned longitudinally spaced ports formed in said sleeve member and located to successively register with the ports of the hollow shaft member responsive to the rotation of said sleeve member, said last-named ports including a longitudinal slot whose length is sufficient to substantially register with the widest portion of said mid range port, and manually adjustable restriction means in the hollow 8 shaft member between the portions thereof containing the first-named ports.

4. A fuel injection device of the character described comprising a main fuel mixture conduit open to atmosphere at one end and adapted to be connected at its other I end to the intake manifold of an internal combustion engine, a hollow shaft member mounted transversely in said main conduit, means to connect said hollow shaft member to a liquid fuel supply line, a sleeve member notatably mounted on said hollow shaft member within said main conduit, a butterfly valve element mounted on said sleeve member within said main conduit, means to rotate said sleeve member, whereby to adjust said butterfly valve element, at least three longitudinally spaced ports formed in said hollow shaft member, longitudinally spaced ports formed in said sleeve member located to successively register with the ports of the hollow shaft member responsive to the rotation of said sleeve member, a longitudinal canopy flange on said sleeve member spaced from said butterfly valve element, said second-named ports being located between said canopy flange and said butterfly valve element, whereby the space between the flange and the valve element defines a low-pressure atomization area, and manually adjustable restriction means in the hollow shaft member between the portions thereof containing the first-named ports.

5. A fuel injection device of the character described comprising a main fuel mixture conduit open to atmosphere at one end and adapted to be connected at its other end to the intake manifold of an internal combustion engine, a hollow shaft member mounted transversely in said main conduit, means to connect said hollow shaft member to a liquid fuel supply line, a sleeve member rotatably mounted on said hollow shaft member within said main conduit, a butterfly valve element mounted on said sleeve member within said main conduit, means to rotate said sleeve member, whereby to adjust said butterfly valve element, at least three longitudinally spaced, angularly separated ports formed in said hollow shaft member, said ports respectively comprising an idle port of limited circumferential length, a mid range port of relatively extended circumferential length and flaring in width, and a high range port of extended circumferential length, aligned longitudinally spaced ports formed in said sleeve member located to successively register with the ports of the hollow shaft member responsive to the rotation of said sleeve member, said last-named ports including a longitudinal slot whose length is sufficient to substantially register with the widest portion of said mid-range port, a longitudinal canopy flange on said sleeve member spaced from said buterfly valve element, said secondnamed ports being located between said canopy flange and said butterfly valve element, whereby the space between the flange and the valve element defines a low-pressure atomization area, and manually adjustable restriction means in the hollow'shaft member between the portions thereof containing the first-named ports.

6. A fuel injection device of the character described comprising a main fuel mixture conduit open to atmosphere at one end and adapted to be connected at its other end to the intake manifold of an internal combustion engine, a hollow shaft member mounted transversely in said main conduit, means to connect said hollow shaft member to a-liquid fuel supply line, a sleeve member rotatably mounted on said hollow shaft member within said main conduit, a butterfly valve element mounted on said sleeve member within said main conduit, means to rotate said sleeve member, whereby to adjust said butterfly valve element, at least three longitudinally spaced angularly separated ports formed in said hollow shaft member, aligned longitudinally spaced ports formed in said sleeve member located to successively register with the ports of the hollow shaft member responsive to the rotation of said sleeve member, and manually adjustable restriction means in the hollow shaft member between the portions thereof containing said first-named ports.

7. A fuel injection device of the character described comprising a main fuel mixture oonduit open to atmosphere at one end and adapted to be connected at its other end to the intake manifold of an internal combustion engine, a hollow shaft member mounted transversely in said main conduit, means to connect said hollow shaft member to a liquid fuel supply line, a sleeve member rotatably mounted on said hollow shaft member within said main conduit, a butterfly valve element mounted on said sleeve member within said main conduit, means to rotate said sleeve member, whereby to adjust said butterfly valve element, a plurality of longitudinally spaced, angularly separated ports formed in said hollow shaft member, said ports respectively comprising an idle port of limited circumferential length, a mid range port of relatively extended circumferential length and flaring in width, and a high range port of extended circumferential length, aligned longitudinally spaced ports formed in said sleeve member located to successively register with the ports of the hollow shaft member responsive to the rotation of said sleeve member, said last-named P rts including a longitudinal slot whose length is sufficient to substantially register with the widest portion of said mid range port, a longitudinal canopy flange on said sleeve member spaced from said butterfly valve element, said secondnamed ports being located between said canopy flange and said butterfly valve element, whereby the space between the flange and the valve element defines a lowpressure atomization area, and manually adjustable restriction means in the hollow shaft member between the portions thereof containing said first-named ports.

8. A fuel injection device of the character described comprising a main fuel mixture conduit open to atmosphere at one end and adapted to be connected at its other end to the intake manifold of an internal combustion engine, a hollow shaft member mounted transversely in said main conduit, means to connect said hollow shaft member to a liquid fuel supply line, a sleeve member rotatably mounted on said hollow shaft member within said main conduit, a butterfly valve element mounted on said sleeve member within said main conduit, means to notate said sleeve member, whereby to adjust said butterfly valve element, a plurality of longitudinally spaced, angu larly separated ports formed in said hollow shaft member, said ports respectively comprising an idle port of limited circumferential length, a mid range port of relatively extended circumferential length and flaring in width, and a high range port of extended circumferential length, aligned longitudinally spaced ports formed in said sleeve member located to successively register with the ports of the hollow shaft member responsive to the rotation of said sleeve member, said last-named ports including a longitudinal slot whose length is suflicien-t to substantially register with the widest portion of said mid range port, said high range port being substantially longitudinally aligned with said widest portion of the mid range port, a longitudinal canopy flange on said sleeve member spaced from said butterfly valve element, said second-named ports being located between said canopy flange and said butterfly valve element, whereby the space between the flange and the valve element defines a low-pressure atomization area, manually adjustable restriction means in the hollow shaft member between the portions thereof containing said first-named ports, and further manually adjustable restriction means betwen the means to connect the hollow shaft member to the fuel supply line and the portion of the shaft member containing the high range port.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,120,183 Duff Dec. 8, 1914 1,125,069 Coulter Jan. 19, 1915 1,178,960 Smith Apr. 11, 1916 1,753,235 Duff Apr. 8, 1930 1,839,102 Kessel Dec. 29, 1931 2,190,314 Firth Feb. 13, 1940 2,246,408 Hammond June 17, 1941 2,681,216 Knecht June 15, 1954

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Cited By (24)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3132191A (en) * 1962-03-09 1964-05-05 Sr Walter L Kennedy Fuel injection device
US3220709A (en) * 1962-12-14 1965-11-30 Thadie H Pickron Device for supplying a fuel and air mixture to internal combustion engines
US3266785A (en) * 1964-04-17 1966-08-16 Sr Walter L Kennedy Fuel injector
US3711068A (en) * 1970-09-25 1973-01-16 J Perry Carburetor fuel metering valve
US3834679A (en) * 1972-12-26 1974-09-10 R Baribeau Fuel injection system for internal combustion engine
US3943207A (en) * 1973-11-14 1976-03-09 Harootian Simon G Injection carburetor
US4001355A (en) * 1974-07-12 1977-01-04 Kenneth Edwin Day Carburetor
US4097562A (en) * 1975-11-04 1978-06-27 Blakeway Industries Ltd. Carburetor
US4099505A (en) * 1975-07-03 1978-07-11 Robert Bosch Gmbh Fuel injection system
US4102952A (en) * 1977-07-25 1978-07-25 Thayer Snipes Fuel burning control apparatus
US4132204A (en) * 1976-08-30 1979-01-02 Chrysler Corporation Fuel spray bar and pressure regulator system
US4190032A (en) * 1978-11-29 1980-02-26 Wright Albert T Flow homogenizer
US4526729A (en) * 1983-01-26 1985-07-02 Braun Alfred J Vortex carburetor
US4572809A (en) * 1982-12-17 1986-02-25 Bothwell Peter W Carburettor
US4981500A (en) * 1987-10-09 1991-01-01 Thyssen Industrie Ag Venturi type cooler for flue gas desulphurization device
US5126079A (en) * 1990-11-19 1992-06-30 James Nagamatsu Carburetor
WO1995015810A1 (en) * 1993-12-09 1995-06-15 Keystone International Holdings Corp. Steam conditioning butterfly valve
WO2002040851A1 (en) * 2000-11-17 2002-05-23 Kleenair Systems, Inc. Fuel-air mixer
US20060225715A1 (en) * 2005-04-08 2006-10-12 Aisin Seiki Kabushiki Kaisha Mixer for engine, air conditioning apparatus driven by engine, and power generation apparatus driven by engine
US20080116594A1 (en) * 2004-08-31 2008-05-22 Anthony John Williams Mechanical Air Fuel Ratio Regulating Carburettor with Fuel Pressure Regulation
CN100408840C (en) * 2000-11-17 2008-08-06 克林空气系统国际公共有限公司 Sonic flow gasifier
US20090057930A1 (en) * 2007-09-03 2009-03-05 Lien Sheng Chang Carburetor of a remote control model
US20150028501A1 (en) * 2010-07-02 2015-01-29 Apt Ip Holdings, Llc Carburetor and methods therefor
US20150056564A1 (en) * 2012-02-15 2015-02-26 Kyungdong Navien Co., Ltd. Dual venturi for combustion apparatus

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1120183A (en) * 1909-10-06 1914-12-08 Ralph A Duff Carbureter.
US1125069A (en) * 1914-01-31 1915-01-19 Harry M Coulter Carbureter.
US1178960A (en) * 1915-05-17 1916-04-11 Elmer S Smith Throttling device for carbureters.
US1753235A (en) * 1924-05-10 1930-04-08 Ralph A Duff Carburetor
US1839102A (en) * 1927-12-08 1931-12-29 Johannes B Kessel Carburetor
US2190314A (en) * 1936-02-03 1940-02-13 Borg Warner Carburetor
US2246408A (en) * 1938-08-03 1941-06-17 Hammond Company Carburetor
US2681216A (en) * 1951-04-10 1954-06-15 Knecht Henry Slotted jet carburetor

Patent Citations (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1120183A (en) * 1909-10-06 1914-12-08 Ralph A Duff Carbureter.
US1125069A (en) * 1914-01-31 1915-01-19 Harry M Coulter Carbureter.
US1178960A (en) * 1915-05-17 1916-04-11 Elmer S Smith Throttling device for carbureters.
US1753235A (en) * 1924-05-10 1930-04-08 Ralph A Duff Carburetor
US1839102A (en) * 1927-12-08 1931-12-29 Johannes B Kessel Carburetor
US2190314A (en) * 1936-02-03 1940-02-13 Borg Warner Carburetor
US2246408A (en) * 1938-08-03 1941-06-17 Hammond Company Carburetor
US2681216A (en) * 1951-04-10 1954-06-15 Knecht Henry Slotted jet carburetor

Cited By (32)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3132191A (en) * 1962-03-09 1964-05-05 Sr Walter L Kennedy Fuel injection device
US3220709A (en) * 1962-12-14 1965-11-30 Thadie H Pickron Device for supplying a fuel and air mixture to internal combustion engines
US3266785A (en) * 1964-04-17 1966-08-16 Sr Walter L Kennedy Fuel injector
US3711068A (en) * 1970-09-25 1973-01-16 J Perry Carburetor fuel metering valve
US3834679A (en) * 1972-12-26 1974-09-10 R Baribeau Fuel injection system for internal combustion engine
US3943207A (en) * 1973-11-14 1976-03-09 Harootian Simon G Injection carburetor
US4001355A (en) * 1974-07-12 1977-01-04 Kenneth Edwin Day Carburetor
US4099505A (en) * 1975-07-03 1978-07-11 Robert Bosch Gmbh Fuel injection system
US4097562A (en) * 1975-11-04 1978-06-27 Blakeway Industries Ltd. Carburetor
US4132204A (en) * 1976-08-30 1979-01-02 Chrysler Corporation Fuel spray bar and pressure regulator system
US4102952A (en) * 1977-07-25 1978-07-25 Thayer Snipes Fuel burning control apparatus
US4190032A (en) * 1978-11-29 1980-02-26 Wright Albert T Flow homogenizer
US4572809A (en) * 1982-12-17 1986-02-25 Bothwell Peter W Carburettor
US4526729A (en) * 1983-01-26 1985-07-02 Braun Alfred J Vortex carburetor
US4981500A (en) * 1987-10-09 1991-01-01 Thyssen Industrie Ag Venturi type cooler for flue gas desulphurization device
US5126079A (en) * 1990-11-19 1992-06-30 James Nagamatsu Carburetor
US5439619A (en) * 1993-12-09 1995-08-08 Keystone International Holdings Corp. Steam conditioning butterfly valve
WO1995015810A1 (en) * 1993-12-09 1995-06-15 Keystone International Holdings Corp. Steam conditioning butterfly valve
CN100408840C (en) * 2000-11-17 2008-08-06 克林空气系统国际公共有限公司 Sonic flow gasifier
US6446940B1 (en) * 2000-11-17 2002-09-10 Kleenair Systems, Inc. Fuel-air mixer
WO2002040851A1 (en) * 2000-11-17 2002-05-23 Kleenair Systems, Inc. Fuel-air mixer
US20080116594A1 (en) * 2004-08-31 2008-05-22 Anthony John Williams Mechanical Air Fuel Ratio Regulating Carburettor with Fuel Pressure Regulation
US7744066B2 (en) * 2004-08-31 2010-06-29 Anthony John Williams Mechanical air fuel ratio regulating carburetor with fuel pressure regulation
US7427056B2 (en) * 2005-04-08 2008-09-23 Aisin Seiki Kabushiki Kaisha Mixer for engine, air conditioning apparatus driven by engine, and power generation apparatus driven by engine
US20060225715A1 (en) * 2005-04-08 2006-10-12 Aisin Seiki Kabushiki Kaisha Mixer for engine, air conditioning apparatus driven by engine, and power generation apparatus driven by engine
CN1847636B (en) * 2005-04-08 2010-08-18 爱信精机株式会社 Mixer for engine, air conditioning apparatus, and power generation apparatus
US20090057930A1 (en) * 2007-09-03 2009-03-05 Lien Sheng Chang Carburetor of a remote control model
US7862012B2 (en) * 2007-09-03 2011-01-04 Golden Lion Enterprise Co., Ltd. Carburetor of a remote control model
US20150028501A1 (en) * 2010-07-02 2015-01-29 Apt Ip Holdings, Llc Carburetor and methods therefor
US10371100B2 (en) * 2010-07-02 2019-08-06 Technology Elevated Holdings, Llc Carburetor and methods therefor
US20150056564A1 (en) * 2012-02-15 2015-02-26 Kyungdong Navien Co., Ltd. Dual venturi for combustion apparatus
US10393370B2 (en) * 2012-02-15 2019-08-27 Kyungdong Navien Co., Ltd. Dual venturi for combustion apparatus

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