US2964144A - Airplane hangar - Google Patents

Airplane hangar Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US2964144A
US2964144A US691404A US69140457A US2964144A US 2964144 A US2964144 A US 2964144A US 691404 A US691404 A US 691404A US 69140457 A US69140457 A US 69140457A US 2964144 A US2964144 A US 2964144A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
hangar
floor
aircraft
closure
rod
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US691404A
Inventor
James E Wheeler
Original Assignee
James E Wheeler
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by James E Wheeler filed Critical James E Wheeler
Priority to US691404A priority Critical patent/US2964144A/en
Priority claimed from US869860 external-priority patent/US3035131A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US2964144A publication Critical patent/US2964144A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04BGENERAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTIONS; WALLS, e.g. PARTITIONS; ROOFS; FLOORS; CEILINGS; INSULATION OR OTHER PROTECTION OF BUILDINGS
    • E04B1/00Constructions in general; Structures which are not restricted either to walls, e.g. partitions, or floors or ceilings or roofs
    • E04B1/343Structures characterised by movable, separable, or collapsible parts, e.g. for transport
    • E04B1/346Rotary buildings; Buildings with rotary units, e.g. rooms
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04HBUILDINGS OR LIKE STRUCTURES FOR PARTICULAR PURPOSES; SWIMMING OR SPLASH BATHS OR POOLS; MASTS; FENCING; TENTS OR CANOPIES, IN GENERAL
    • E04H6/00Buildings for parking cars, rolling stock, aircraft, vessels or like vehicles, e.g. garages
    • E04H6/44Buildings for parking cars, rolling stock, aircraft, vessels or like vehicles, e.g. garages for storing aircraft

Description

Dec. 13, 1960 J. E. WHEELER AIRPLANE HANGAR 7 Sheets- Sheet 1 Filed Oct. 21, 1957 INVENTOR James .5. Wheeler ATTORNEYS De. 13', 1960 J, E. WHEELER 2,964,144

AIRPLANE HANGAR Filed Oct. 21, 1957 7 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR James E. Wheeler Wm eel/M414 4 2 ATTORNEYS Dec. 13, 1960 J. E. WHEELER AIRPLANE HANGAR 7 Sheets- Sheet 3 Filed Oct. 21, 1957 INVENTOR James E. whee/er ATTORNEYS Dec. 13, 1960 .1. E. WHEELER ,9

- AIRPLANE HANGAR Filed Oct. 21, 1957 7 Sheets- Sheet 4 Q. INVENTOR e James E. Wheeler m ame, @444 M ATTORNEYS Dec. 13, 1960 J. E. WHEELER AIRPLANE HANGAR Sheets- Sheet 5 Filed 001:. 21, 1957 INVENTOR James E. Whee/er ATTORNEYS Dec. 13, 1960 J. E. WHEELER AIRPLANE HANGAR 7 Sheetssheet 6 Filed Oct. 21, 1957 INVENTOR James E. Whee/er 4 ATT RNEYS Dec. 13, 1960 .1. E. WHEELER 2,964,144

AIRPLANE HANGAR Filed Oct. 21, 1957 7 Sheets-Sheet 7 67.656 x IK x INVENTOR James E Wheeler AIRPLANE HANGAR James E. Wheeler, 2256 Kent Blvd. NE, Grand Rapids 3, Mich.

Filed Oct. 21, 1957,-Ser. No. 691,404

"6 Claims. (Cl. 189-15) This invention relates generally to building structures, and more particularly to an ingenious building structure .1 for housing a plurality of aircraft.

In modern day airport operation, there hasbeen a severe need for economical and easily constructed building structures which may be used for housing aircraft. This need has been particularly accentuated by the. increased use of private aircraft for business purposes and the like.

Accordingly, therefore, a primary object of this invention is to provide a sturdy and economical building structure for use in housing aircraft.

Another object of this invention is to disclose an ingenious airplane hangar provided with a .rotatable floor surface for rendering possible ready ingress and egress of a number of individual airplanes.

Another object of this invention is to disclose a readily fabricated structure adaptable for use in'protecting aircraft from the elements.

Another object of the invention is to teach a combination of structure and components for use in fabricating an aircraft hangar.

Another object of the invention is to provide an economical and maintenance-free closure for an aircraft hangar.

A further object of the invention is to provide an entire building structure, with associated components, at a cost substantially less than that presently expended for a satisfactory door assemblies in previous structures.

A further object of the invention is to exploit the wind resistant qualities of circular buildings in the fabrication of a sturdy economical aircraft hangar.

A further object of the invention is to disclose an air- 4 craft hangar provided with a common entrance and closure lines 2-2 of Figure land looking in the directionlof the arrows.

. Figure 3 is a top plan view of the structure for tilting the airplanes within the hangar in orderto stagger the wings thereof and provide maximum space utilization.

Figure 4 illustrates a front elevation of the structure employed for tilting the airplanes within thehangar in 5 order to effect the staggered relationship.

' Figure 5 comprises an enlarged view ofthe drive means provided for'rotating the floor of the hangar structure,-and

ice

2 illustrates the details of the actuating assembly used to elevate the closure for the hangar.

Figure 6 is a top plan view of the floor'structure' pro vided by the invention.

Figure 7 is a sectional view of the floor structure taken along the lines 7-7 in Figure 5.

" Figure 8 comprises a section view taken along the lines 88 in Figure 5, and illustrates the details of the lift lever. Figure 9 illustrates a sectional view of the positioning switch used in practicing the invention.

Figure 10 shows a sectional view ofthe positioning switch taken along the lines 10-10 in Figure 9.

Figure 11 shows a front elevation of a complete hangar structure constructed according to the teachings 'of'the present invention.

Turning now to the drawings and more particularly to Figure 1 thereof, the numeral 1 has -been-used to indicate generally an airplanehangar constructed according to the teachingsof the present invention. The hangar will be seen to include a hollow central column 2 which terminates at its lower surface in a flat annular flange 3. The

. column 2 is provided with a vent cap above the roof which permits air circulation aroundthe apparatus contained 'within the column, and eliminates dampness within'the during those intervals when the closure is not supported by the floor. If desired, a sourceof' heat energy may be provided within the column 2. The flange 3 is penetrated by a plurality of anchor bolts 4 which are embodded in a suitable concrete pier 5.

At the upper portion of the central column 2 there is provided a pluralityof umbrella truss members. Eight of such truss members are disposed in radially-spaced relationship around the central column, and two'of' the individual umbrella truss members have been designated in Figure 1 by reference numerals 6A and 6B. It will be appreciated in this connection that more than eight such members may be employed in practicing the invention. The individual umbrella truss members are secured at their radially innermost ends to the central column 2 bymeans of a plurality of bolts 7. It will be appreciated that other equally suitable fastening means such as rivets or the like may be employed for the purpose of securing the individual truss members to the central column.

The enclosure within the airplane hangar 1 is protected from the elements by means of a circular metallic roof 8 which is affixed by suitable fastening means,-suchas purlins which are secured to theindividual tunbr'ella truss members.

The periphery of the airplane hangar is partially enclosed by means of a corrugated wall member 9 which extends approximately three quarters of the circumferential distance therearound. The material employed for the wall member 9 may comprise a horizontally corrugated metallic material in the form of a patented product marketed commercially by the Wonder Building Corporation. However, the use of a non-metallic or plastic material'for the wall 9 or anyportion thereofwould be deemed to fall within the spirit and scopeof the appended claims.

Continuing now with the detailed'description and referring more particularly to the lower central section of Figure 1, the reference numeral 10 has been used to plurality of rotatably disposed rollers. The floor 10may be fabricated of both-fixed and movable preformed-sections in order to allow access to the space therebeneath.

In Figure 1, it will be observed that one eithe -itinermost rollers 11A is mounted to roll upon and engage the upper surface of the hat annular flange 3. The outermost roller 11B is adapted to roll upon a metal track plate or sill 12. The plate or sill 12 comprises an L- shaped channel which is formed or bent in an arcuate configuration. The plate 12 is supported at the proper grade by means of the concrete pier '13. The pier 13 comprises one of a group of eight or more radially spaced piers which are used to support the track plate 12. Rollers 11A and 11B are mounted upon an elongated axle member 14 which is mounted in spaced relationship with respect to the floor surface by means of the axle hangers 15. It will be appreciated that eight of the indicated axles with associated inner and outermost rollers are provided in spaced relationship beneath the rotatable floor surface 10. Four of the alternate axles are provided with drive gears, in a manner to be explained more fully later in the present patent specification.

In the lefthand portion of Figure l, the reference numeral 16 has been used to designate generally the ingenious closure assembly provided by the present invention. The closure assembly 16 is seen to include an arcuate outer member 17, which may be fabricated from the same type of horizontal corrugated building material which is used to fabricate the wall member 9. The outer member 17 is characterized by a slightly smaller radius than the wall member 9, in order to provide a circularly telescopic relationship therewith.

The arcuate outer member 17 is vertically suspended by means of a plurality of overhead brace members 18A,

. 18B, and 180 as seen most clearly in Figure 2. The radially innermost ends of the brace members 18A, 18B,

and 18C terminate in a ring member 19. The ring member 19 is rotatably disposed with respect to the central column 2 by means of conventional anti-friction bearings, or the like.

The lower sill of the arcuate outer member 17 is provided with locator means which take the form of three conically shaped plugs 20, 21, and 22, respectively. The abutting portion of the rotatably disposed floor surface 10 is provided with mating conically shaped holes 20A, 21A, and 22A, respectively.

In operation, the arcuate closure member 17 may be caused to rotate simultaneously with the rotatable floor surface 10. This is accomplished by the conically shaped plugs 20, 21, and 22 which penetrate the conically shaped holes 20A, 21A, and 22A, respectively.

In order to accomplish the movement of the conically shaped plugs 20, 21, and 22, there is provided a lift lever 26 as seen most clearly in Figure 1. The lever 26 is pivotally mounted adjacent the wall of the central column 2, on a bracket which extends vertically from the underside of the ring member 19. A cable 27 formed of braided wire or the like is attached at one end to the lift lever 26. The opposite end of the cable 27 is attached to a closure elevation assembly 28. The tensile stress applied to the assembly 28 by cable 27 causes an upward movement of the arcuate closure member 17, and efiects a selective engagement and disengagement of the conically shaped holes by the mating plugs 20, 21, and 22.

In its elevated position, the closure member 17 is suspended free from the rotatable floor in a stationary position from an outer extremity supported by the umbrella trusses.

Continuing now with the detailed description of the invention and, more particularly with the embodiment thereof shown in Figure 4, the method of staggering the various aircraft within the hangar is illustrated. This is accomplished by tilting the wings of the aircraft. This tilting of the wings is accomplished by means of interchangeable tracks 30A, 30B, and 30C. Because of the universal applicability of the inventive structure to all manufacture of aircraft, the tracks 30A, 30B, and 30C may be readily positioned to accommodate the various wheel treads. In this case, one of the tracks is provided with an elevation greater than the'op'po'site track in order to provide the wings of the aircraft with the requisite angularity. The disposition of the various aircraft within the hangar is illustrated clearly in the plan view provided in Figure 3, as well as in the elevation view of Figure 4.

In Figure 5, the drive means provided for supplying torque to the rotatable floor surface is illustrated. In order to expedite the detailed description, this view has been enlarged in order to show more clearly the details of the component parts.

It will be observed that the driving means illustrated in this figure includes a power unit 31 which is bolted or otherwise affixed to a transverse partition plate 2A within the central column 2. The power unit 31 may comprise an electric motor in combination with a gear reduction unit contained in a single housing. Torque generated by the power unit 31 is supplied to a bevel gear drive pinion 32 via shaft 33 which penetrates the wall of the central column 2. The drive pinion 32 is connected to engage the toothed upper surface of an annular ring gear 34 and impart a turning effort thereto. It will be observed that the ring gear 34 comprises a double-bevel type gear structure journaled for rotation upon the column 2 by suitable means.

The turning effort supplied the annular ring gear 34 is transferred to drive pinions 35 which mesh with the toothed undersurface of the ring gear. The drive pinions 35 are keyed or otherwise securely afiixed to the elongated axles 14. The turning effort supplied axles 14 is transmitted to the outermost rollers 11B which are keyed to the axles 14.

It will be recalled from previous portions of the-dctailed description that there are provided eight axle and roller assemblies, and that alternately disposed axles are provided with access to the driving gear train. In other words, four of the alternately disposed axle and roller assemblies function solely as idlers. The outermost rollers connected to all of the axles are, of course, disposed to roll upon the metal track plate 12 as earlier explained in this specification.

Turning now to the detailed description of the actuating assembly 28, references will be made to the upper central portion of the drawing. The lift lever 26 is pivotally disposed in a bracket 26A which depends from the underside of the ring 19. Lever 26 is connected to impart a tensile stress to the cable 27. Cable 27 is con nected at its opposite extremity to a book 36. The hook 36 is pivotally disposed with respect to brace member 18A by means of pivot pin 37. In addition, the hook 36 is pivotally disposed with respect to brace member 18A by means of pivot pin 37. In addition, the hook 36 is resiliently biased by means of a spring clip 38. The upper portion of the hook 236 is mounted to engage a channel member 39 which is secured to the underside of the various umbrella truss members.

In operation, the actuation of the lever 26 causesthe cable 27 to displace the book '36 to the right. The consequent engagement of the channel member 39 by book 36 effects an upward displacement on the part ofthe closure member 17. This disengages the conically shaped plug 20 from the mating aperture 20A.

The apparatus for propelling aircraft into the interior of the hangar is depicted within the column 2, slightly above the partition 2A. This system will be seen to inelude a hoist motor 40 which is bolted to the radial support plate 41. Tensile stress is applied by the hoist motor to the hoist cable 42 which engages a pair of oppositely disposed roller members 43. The single hoist 40 may be employed for successively towing all aircraft from a common ramp into their respective stalls within the hangar.

Continuing with the description of the invention, and more particularly with the details of the floor mechanism thereof, reference to Figure 6 will now be made. In this a ena-1 1s 5 figure, the numeral 44 has been used todesignate an annular outer channel member.- concentrically disposed with respect to the column 2, there is provided an'annular inner channel member 45. The members 44 and 45 are mechanically innerconnected by means of a plurality of eight radial struts. These .struts are identified by the reference numerals 46A, 46B, 46C, 46D, 46E, 46F, 46G, and 46H. Rigidity is lent to the; structure by means of pnrlins which are innerconnected between adjacent pairs of struts. For instance, the purlins 47A and 47B are mounted in spaced relationship between the radial struts 46A and 46B. The floor assembly is additionally strengthened by means of arcuate metallic segments 49A, 49B, 49C, 49D, 49E, 49F, 496, and 49H. In each case, the arcuate metallic segments are mechanically innerconnected to abut a portion of the annular outer channel member contained between adjacent radial struts.

I It should be appreciated that the floor assembly, shown in Figure 6, may employ a plurality of preformed sec tions of steel mesh or thelike. In other words, the area defined in the sector between adjacent radial struts may employ three separate preformed sections which occupy the space between the struts, the purlins, and the annular inner and outer members respectively.

In Figure 7, the top plan view of the roller axle and sill assembly is shown in detail. The location of the outer rollers 118 on the annular sill 12 and the disposition of the inner rollers 11A on the flange 3 is clearly illustrated. Moreover, the use of bevel pinions 35 on alternate axles 14, with idler axles therebetween, is illustrated.

Continuing with the detailed description, and turning more particularly to Figure 8,additional details on the structure of the lift lever and associated linkage are shown. The view shown in Figure 8 comprises a sectional view taken along the lines 8-8 in Figure 5 and illustrates the provision which is made for cables 27, 27A and 27B. It will be observed that the respective cables 27, 27A and 27B are mounted to engage pulleys 50, 50A and 5013 respectively. These pulleys are affixed to the underside of the overhead brace members 18A, 18B and 18C, respectively. The relationship of the lift lever 26 to the member 26A secured to the underside of the ring 19 is clearly illustrated in this view.

In Figure 9, there is provided an illustration of the structural-details of the positioning switch provided by the present invention. In general, it will be appreciated that electric current may be caused to energize the electric power unit 31 bymeans of conventional manually operable switching circuitry. The rotatable floor then revolves to a position in which the flow of current is automatically interrupted with any chosen aircraftpositioned for ready egress or ingress. The automatic interruption of the electric current is accomplished by the positioning switch shown in Figure 9. The switch 9 includes a metallic housing 50 which is embedded in the approach ramp to the hangar. The housing 50 is equipped with a cover plate 51 which is mounted flush with the grade level of the approach ramp by means of suitable screws 52. Within the interior of the housing 50, there is provided a pair of actuating rods 53 and 54, respectively. Each of the rods 53, 54 is provided with a roller member in the outermost extremity thereof. Thus, the roller 55 is mounted in the rod 53 and the roller 56 is mounted in the rod 54.

The rod 53 is mounted for slidable movement with respect to the vertical end wall of the housing 55). In addition, the rod 53 is resiliently biased by means of a compression spring 57 which is located between a fixed partition plate 58 and an annular shoulder 59 which is secured to the rod 53. The rod 53 is movably secured to the rod 54 by means of the swivel element 64).

In order to form one contact of the make and break f portion --of the positioning switch, there isprovidecl an annular metallic disc 61 which is securelyaflixed to'the rod 53. The disc 61 is', of course, insulated-from the r the spring contact 62. Thus, if the-linear movement of the rod 53 can be caused to occur when the rotatable floor reaches a certain predetermined position, the movement of the floor and the airplanes thereon can be correlated with respect =to the position of the closure for the hangar.

This linear movement of rod 53 is effected by engage ment with one of the deflecting members 63,- as shown most clearly in Figure 10. It will be appreciated from an inspection of Figure 10 that when one of the deflecting members 63 is rotated far enough, it is able to deflect the roller 55 and cause a separation between the disc 61 and the spring contact 62. It should be appreciated in this connection that the radially spaced deflecting members 63 are intended for use when four aircraft are housed Within the structure.

However, as will be recalled from earlier portions of the specification, it is also possible to house five aircraft within the inventive hangar structure. Under these circumstances, the automatic interruption of energizing current for drive unit 31 is efiected by the rod 54 and its associated components. In order to accomplish the change over to five aircraft operation, the cover plate 51 may be removed from the metallichonsing 50. Then, a suitable elongated member is inserted through the hole 64 located in tab 65 which comprises a flattened extension of the rod 53. When the tab 65 has been rearwardly retracted in order to compress the spring 57, it is rotated 90 in order to lock the rod 53 in retracted position. It should be appreciated that the tab 65 is normally. centered for movement within an elongated slot 66 which is provided in the fixed partition plate 58A.

After the actuating rod 53, for use in connection with a four aircraft system has been retracted, the lower actuating rod 54 is readied for operation. This is accomplished by rotating tab 67 on rod 54 through 90, in order to position the rod 54 for slidable movement. This action has the effect of releasing rod 54 from its retracted position, and places roller 56 in position for actuation by any one of the deflecting members 68. The deflecting members 68 are radially spaced around the outer rim of the floor 10, and are vertically spaced somewhat below the earlier mentioned set of deflecting members 63. It will be observed in Figure 9 that the actuating rod 54 is equipped with a compression spring 69 which is positioned between the fixed partition plate 58 and an annular shoulder 70 located on the rod 54. The make and break portion of the positioning switch in this instance again takes the form of two contacts. One of these contacts is formed by the annular metallic disc 71 which is secured upon and insulated from the rod 54. The op posite contact is, of course, the spring contact 62.

During the intervals when five aircraft are housed within the structure, rotation of the floor It) may be initiated by efiecting a flow of electric current to the power unit 31. Then, rotation of the fioor 10 continues until one of the deflecting members 68 engages the roller 56 mounted in the end of rod 54. This, of course, has the effect of displacing the annular metallic disc 71 on rod 54- out of engagement with the resilient spring contact 62. As a result, the flow of current to the drive unit 31 is selectively interrupted when any or each of the aircraft is centrally positioned for ingress or egress with respect to the closure for the hangar structure.

In Figure 11, a front elevation of a complete airplane hangar constructed according to the teachings of the present invention is illustrated. The exploitation of the central support column 2 in supporting the roof load is clearly evident. The pleasing external appearance presented by the use of the corrugated wall member 9 is emphasized in this view. The maximum utilization of the interior space which is made possible by maintaining the tail surfaces adjacent is also rendered obvious in the illustration. In addition, the advantages inherent in the use of towing a plurality of airplanes into the aircraft hangar from a common approach ramp will be evident from the view of the invention shown in Figure 11.

Although the present system has been described in connection with aircraft, it should be appreciated that the inventive structure may be employed equally well in connection with land-borne or water-borne vehicles. For instance, the employment of the invention on a rotatable buoyant float member as a water livery with a single means for ingress and egress with a common closure, would fall within the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. In an aircraft hangar of generally circular configuration adapted to house a plurality of aircraft with their tail surfaces adjacent, said hangar provided with a partially enclosing Wall, the combination which comprises a rotatable floor extending substantially throughout the circular interior within said hangar, a movable door section mounted to form a part of said enclosing wall when closed and adapted to move simultaneously with said floor, and means for elevating said door to prevent said simultaneous movement with said floor.

2. In a circular aircraft hangar provided with a wall defining surface comprised of corrugated metallic building material and a rotatable floor therewithin, a rotatably disposed closure member mounted to seal an aperture in said wall defining surface between opposite vertical edges of said building material, locator means affixed to a surface of said closure member to selectively engage a depression in said floor, and manually operable means mounted to displace said closure member to effect said selective engagement of said depressions by said locator means.

3. In an aircraft hangar provided with a central support column as well as a circular rotatable floor with a roof surface thereover and a circular wall mounted to enclose all but a portion of said hangar, a rotatably disposed closure member mounted to enclose the remaining portion of said hangar, locator means extending downwardly from said closure member to selectively engage said floor, and means including lever and cable means connected to raise said closure member and effect said selective engagement of said floor by said locator means.

4. In an airplane hangar for housing a plurality of airplanes, a central column, roof means including a sloping circular surface aflixed to an upper portion of said column, wall means mounted to enclose at least a portion of the circumferential distance bounding said circular surface; closure means comprising a curved portion pivotally mounted for arcuate movement within said wall means, said closure means including a plurality of downwardly extending locator plugs on the bottom surface thereof; floor means mounted for concentric rotation with respect to said wall means and provided with recesses for engagement of said locator plugs therewithin, and drive means mounted to impart rotational movement to said floor means.

5. In a circular airplane hangar for housing a plurality of airplanes, vertically extending fixed support means, perforated circular floor means mounted within said hangar for concentric rotation around said support means, roof means connected to said fixed support means to cover the space above said circular floor means, wall means including a first arcuate member vertically mounted between said circular floor means and said roof means for at least a portion of the peripheral distance therearound, closure means including a second arcuate member rotatably mounted for concentric rotation within said first arcuate member, locator means including tapered plug means aflixed to the lowermost surface of said closure means for engagement with said perforations in said floor means, and means including a lift lever for elevating said closure means to disengage said tapered plug means from said perforations in said floor means to permit relative movement with respect thereto.

6. In a circular aircraft hangar provided with a central support column and a perforated rotatable floor, a closure mechanism which comprises an arcuate member mounted for concentric rotation with respect to the walls of said hangar, locator means comprising a plurality of downwardly extending tapered plugs secured to the lowermost surface of said arcuate member to engage said perforated floor, a ring member journaled for rotation about said support column, means including brace means mechanically interconnected between the upper portion of said arcuate member and said ring member, and means including a lift lever and cable means for vertically displacing said closure member to selectively engage and disengage said tapered plugs from said perforated floor.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,773,656 Wasilkowski Aug. 19, 1930 2,282,756 Curran May 12, 1942 2,414,929 Civkin Jan. 28, 1947 2,587,353 Marschak Feb. 26, 1952 2,651,689 Bame Sept. 8, 1953 2,661,407 Jones Dec. 1, 1953 2,721,630 Williams Oct. 25, 1955

US691404A 1957-10-21 1957-10-21 Airplane hangar Expired - Lifetime US2964144A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US691404A US2964144A (en) 1957-10-21 1957-10-21 Airplane hangar

Applications Claiming Priority (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US691404A US2964144A (en) 1957-10-21 1957-10-21 Airplane hangar
US869860 US3035131A (en) 1957-10-21 1960-02-15 Switch structure

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US2964144A true US2964144A (en) 1960-12-13

Family

ID=24776421

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US691404A Expired - Lifetime US2964144A (en) 1957-10-21 1957-10-21 Airplane hangar

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US2964144A (en)

Cited By (24)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3398843A (en) * 1966-05-23 1968-08-27 Clark W. Smith Airplane hangar
US3670464A (en) * 1970-05-06 1972-06-20 Robert C Cutter Aircraft hangars
US3672178A (en) * 1970-11-23 1972-06-27 Paul A Trautwein Rotary dock
US3675378A (en) * 1970-06-11 1972-07-11 Cubic Corp Multi-level automatic storage and recovery system for aircraft
US3708200A (en) * 1970-12-17 1973-01-02 D Richards Combination house trailer and airplane hangar
US3737057A (en) * 1970-06-11 1973-06-05 Cubic Corp Multi-level automatic storage and recovery system for aircraft
US3742932A (en) * 1970-07-24 1973-07-03 Medical Res And Dev Inc Medical office facility with two or more examining rooms having a common equipment core area
US3815298A (en) * 1970-09-25 1974-06-11 R Pope Rotatable multi-purpose building
US3855755A (en) * 1973-08-30 1974-12-24 Rolair Syst Inc Rotatable building structure having fluid bearings
US3941146A (en) * 1971-06-29 1976-03-02 Institut Francaise Du Petrole, Des Carburants Et Lubrifiants Apparatus for storing a flexible elongated member, such as a flexible drill column
US4156994A (en) * 1977-09-28 1979-06-05 Lawrence Peska Associates, Inc. Garage assembly for two-wheeled vehicles
US4172422A (en) * 1977-05-10 1979-10-30 Mcbride Peter B Turntable for automobiles
US4219036A (en) * 1978-08-31 1980-08-26 Biggs Joel T Portable shelter
DE3541868A1 (en) * 1985-11-27 1987-06-04 Siegfried Silzle Aircraft
US5988564A (en) * 1998-02-11 1999-11-23 Lee Precision Inc. Aircraft turnaround apparatus
US6155003A (en) * 1999-08-30 2000-12-05 Smith; Clark W. Vehicle storage building
US20030145760A1 (en) * 2002-02-05 2003-08-07 Hadley Carleton J. Aircraft storage turntable, hangar assembly and method
US20060038069A1 (en) * 2004-07-21 2006-02-23 Rectrix Aerodrome Centers, Inc. Multi-level vehicle storage facility
US7013607B1 (en) * 2003-09-12 2006-03-21 South David B Monolithic dome structure having unitary contoured laterally moveable access door
US20090223164A1 (en) * 2008-03-07 2009-09-10 Structural Components Llc Vertical rotating aerodynamic tower
US20090261210A1 (en) * 2008-04-17 2009-10-22 Moore Iii Marbert G Modular Carousel Assembly and Method
CN102233953A (en) * 2011-04-11 2011-11-09 董兰田 Movable aircraft landing gear pad for landing field
DE102015001415A1 (en) * 2015-02-06 2016-08-11 Thorsten Fichtler Parking facility for bicycles
WO2016155954A1 (en) * 2015-04-01 2016-10-06 S.S.D. Platform for aircraft

Citations (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1773656A (en) * 1927-07-25 1930-08-19 Wasilkowski Franciszek Shelter or shed for aircraft
US2282756A (en) * 1941-11-06 1942-05-12 Curran Hugh Hangar
US2414929A (en) * 1943-12-14 1947-01-28 Gen Electric Combined closure and rack for refrigerators
US2587353A (en) * 1946-04-25 1952-02-26 Howard J Marschak Circular building
US2651689A (en) * 1952-02-04 1953-09-08 Bame Karl Door operated switch
US2661407A (en) * 1951-11-28 1953-12-01 Gen Motors Corp Switch
US2721630A (en) * 1948-10-25 1955-10-25 Williams Evan Owen Building construction

Patent Citations (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1773656A (en) * 1927-07-25 1930-08-19 Wasilkowski Franciszek Shelter or shed for aircraft
US2282756A (en) * 1941-11-06 1942-05-12 Curran Hugh Hangar
US2414929A (en) * 1943-12-14 1947-01-28 Gen Electric Combined closure and rack for refrigerators
US2587353A (en) * 1946-04-25 1952-02-26 Howard J Marschak Circular building
US2721630A (en) * 1948-10-25 1955-10-25 Williams Evan Owen Building construction
US2661407A (en) * 1951-11-28 1953-12-01 Gen Motors Corp Switch
US2651689A (en) * 1952-02-04 1953-09-08 Bame Karl Door operated switch

Cited By (28)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3398843A (en) * 1966-05-23 1968-08-27 Clark W. Smith Airplane hangar
US3670464A (en) * 1970-05-06 1972-06-20 Robert C Cutter Aircraft hangars
US3737057A (en) * 1970-06-11 1973-06-05 Cubic Corp Multi-level automatic storage and recovery system for aircraft
US3675378A (en) * 1970-06-11 1972-07-11 Cubic Corp Multi-level automatic storage and recovery system for aircraft
US3742932A (en) * 1970-07-24 1973-07-03 Medical Res And Dev Inc Medical office facility with two or more examining rooms having a common equipment core area
US3815298A (en) * 1970-09-25 1974-06-11 R Pope Rotatable multi-purpose building
US3672178A (en) * 1970-11-23 1972-06-27 Paul A Trautwein Rotary dock
US3708200A (en) * 1970-12-17 1973-01-02 D Richards Combination house trailer and airplane hangar
US3941146A (en) * 1971-06-29 1976-03-02 Institut Francaise Du Petrole, Des Carburants Et Lubrifiants Apparatus for storing a flexible elongated member, such as a flexible drill column
US3855755A (en) * 1973-08-30 1974-12-24 Rolair Syst Inc Rotatable building structure having fluid bearings
US4172422A (en) * 1977-05-10 1979-10-30 Mcbride Peter B Turntable for automobiles
US4156994A (en) * 1977-09-28 1979-06-05 Lawrence Peska Associates, Inc. Garage assembly for two-wheeled vehicles
US4219036A (en) * 1978-08-31 1980-08-26 Biggs Joel T Portable shelter
DE3541868A1 (en) * 1985-11-27 1987-06-04 Siegfried Silzle Aircraft
US4697392A (en) * 1985-11-27 1987-10-06 Siegfried Silzle Airplane hangar
US5988564A (en) * 1998-02-11 1999-11-23 Lee Precision Inc. Aircraft turnaround apparatus
US6155003A (en) * 1999-08-30 2000-12-05 Smith; Clark W. Vehicle storage building
US20030145760A1 (en) * 2002-02-05 2003-08-07 Hadley Carleton J. Aircraft storage turntable, hangar assembly and method
US6672221B2 (en) * 2002-02-05 2004-01-06 Carousel Hangars, Inc. Aircraft storage turntable, hangar assembly and method
US7013607B1 (en) * 2003-09-12 2006-03-21 South David B Monolithic dome structure having unitary contoured laterally moveable access door
US20060038069A1 (en) * 2004-07-21 2006-02-23 Rectrix Aerodrome Centers, Inc. Multi-level vehicle storage facility
US20090223164A1 (en) * 2008-03-07 2009-09-10 Structural Components Llc Vertical rotating aerodynamic tower
US20090261210A1 (en) * 2008-04-17 2009-10-22 Moore Iii Marbert G Modular Carousel Assembly and Method
US7665685B2 (en) 2008-04-17 2010-02-23 Deepflex, Inc. Modular carousel assembly and method
CN102233953A (en) * 2011-04-11 2011-11-09 董兰田 Movable aircraft landing gear pad for landing field
DE102015001415A1 (en) * 2015-02-06 2016-08-11 Thorsten Fichtler Parking facility for bicycles
WO2016155954A1 (en) * 2015-04-01 2016-10-06 S.S.D. Platform for aircraft
BE1022924B1 (en) * 2015-04-01 2016-10-19 S.S.D Platform for aircraft

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US4766708A (en) Shock and vibration resistant structures
ES2563312T3 (en) Fairing of a gondola of a wind power installation
US2563279A (en) Wind turbine
US5829200A (en) Fire protection apparatus for a building structure
US4469198A (en) Outside rescue elevator system for high-rise buildings
EP1549405B1 (en) Flying device
US3398779A (en) Flexible door for building closures
US2799368A (en) Collapsible structure
US2233055A (en) Automobile parking device
US2764783A (en) Building structures and rotary transportation platform therein
US4660787A (en) Food supply system for an aircraft
US20040115593A1 (en) Free fall simulator
US3114333A (en) Submarine amusement ride
US3516706A (en) Freight vehicles
US3510996A (en) Retractable covering
US4665857A (en) Landing pad and hangar structure for vertical take-off and landing aircraft
AU470167B2 (en) Composite floor utilizing sheetmetal decking units
US3137041A (en) Expandable house trailer
SU665779A3 (en) Device for decelerating the fall of bodies at fire in multi-storey building
US2712875A (en) Garage construction
CA966321A (en) Self-propelled platform tower having mechanical and hydraulic supporting means
US2229908A (en) Removable roof and screen top for cottages
US1940030A (en) Means for facilitating the takingoff and landing of aircraft and refueling the same
CA2112149A1 (en) Motor-Vehicle Parking System
CA1157650A (en) Balcony greenhouse