US2962922A - Chord organ - Google Patents

Chord organ Download PDF

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US2962922A
US2962922A US695679A US69567957A US2962922A US 2962922 A US2962922 A US 2962922A US 695679 A US695679 A US 695679A US 69567957 A US69567957 A US 69567957A US 2962922 A US2962922 A US 2962922A
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switch
button
rod
finger
arm
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US695679A
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Cutler Stanley
Hunt Byron Roy
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PACIFIC MERCURY TELEVISION Manufacturing
PACIFIC MERCURY TELEVISION Manufacturing CORP
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PACIFIC MERCURY TELEVISION Manufacturing
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10HELECTROPHONIC MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
    • G10H1/00Details of electrophonic musical instruments
    • G10H1/36Accompaniment arrangements
    • G10H1/38Chord
    • G10H1/386One-finger or one-key chord systems
    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10HELECTROPHONIC MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
    • G10H1/00Details of electrophonic musical instruments
    • G10H1/32Constructional details
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S84/00Music
    • Y10S84/20Monophonic
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S84/00Music
    • Y10S84/22Chord organs

Description

Dec. 6, 1960 Filed Nov. 12, 1957 S. CUTLER ET'AL CHORD ORGAN 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 STANLEY CUT/.ER d

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cHoRD oRGAN 4 Sheets-Sheet 5 e2 la (wmmemav (amw/Awfsmen Filed NOV. l2, 1957 G O @GGO O O G MOOO G D O Kw4 o u O 0 n O O rr o 0 BO do 4, EO wwli AHGZWV o O .am/ug@ O OO 0 0 moooooo .H3 o @O nf@ O O u G OOO 0000 O a OOOOOO F O O O O O H B o O A E o H w O1 om Awww? mmwmww nuca; mcmmmm mmmwmm MWMMSD Dec. 6, 1960 s. CUTLER ET AL CHORD ORGAN 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed Nov. l2, 1957 iv un K f y. P Mmm. wk. Wm QM U N R CVE J0 0V 6T HRW n LN w N0 Z m n SB H a Q w nited States Patent O CHORD ORGAN Stanley Cutler, Van Nuys, and Byron Roy Hunt, Studio City, Calif., assignors to Pacific Mercury Television Mfg. Corp., Sepulveda, Calif., a corporation of Callfornia Filed Nov. 12, 1957, Ser. No. 695,679

4 Claims. (Cl. 84-1.01)

This invention relates to an electric chord organ, and particularly to such an organ wherein the base keyboard is arranged in a button board disposed or laid out like the base button board of an accordion.

It is an object of this invention to provide a simplified chord organ which may be played with facility by the merest musical novice.

It is another object of this invention to provide a chord organ which may be played virtually without prior instruction or practice by those who know how to play a conventional accordion.

It is another object of this invention to provide simplified oscillator circuitry whereby excellent organ and chord tones may be generated by a novice, and which. is lsimple and economical to construct and service.

In accordance with these and other objects which will become apparent hereinafter, a preferred form of the present invention will now be described with reference to the accompanying drawings, wherein:

Fig. 1 is a perspective external view of a chord organ constructed in accordance with the present invention;

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary plan view looking down on a portion of the console or shelf of the organ;

Fig. 3 is a schematic plan view of the obliquely arranged bass button board of the organ;

Fig. 4 is a schematic diagram illustrating the relationship between the bass buttons and the two sets of bass oscillators;

Fig. 5 is an elevational view of the switch mechanism associated with the bass button board, with the housing removed;

Fig. 6 is a fragmentary section taken on line 6-6 in Fig. 5;

Fig. 7 is another fragmentary section taken on line 7-7 in Fig. 5;

Fig. 8 is a still further fragmentary section taken on line 8 8 in Fig. 5;

Fig. 9 is a fragmentary perspective view with numerous parts of the bass mechanism omitted, showing a given bass button and its several linkages;

Fig. 10 is another fragmentary perspective view of the bass mechanism with other parts omitted and showing other portions of the mechanism; and

Fig. 1l is a schematic diagram of the entire organ including loud speaker.

Referring to the drawings, 16 designates the body or housing of an electric organ having an elongate console or shelf, at which the organist is seated when playing. Mounted transversely of the shelf in the usual fashion are a plurality of transverse treble keys 18. The lefthand portion of the console 17 is occupied by a bass button board 19 having a plurality of manually operable members in the form of manually depressible buttons 21, disposed in parallel rows arranged obliquely of the length `or axis of the console 17. Each row of buttons 21 represents notes and chords in or of a given key of the chromatic musical scale. In Figures 2, 3 and 4, the row for :the key of C has been designated by the arrowed line 22.

2,962,922 Patented Dec. 6, 1960 Certain of the buttons, specifically 23 and 24, are connected so as to produce when depressed, individual notes in the key of C. More specifically, the first of the buttons 23 in the row, is connected so as to produce the mediant note of the key, in this case the note E. The second of the buttons, 24 in the row, is connected so as to produce the tonic of the key, in this case the note C. The other buttons of the row, specifically 26, 27, 28, and 29, are connected so as to produce a plurality of notes constituting a chord in the given key, in this case the key of C. More specifically, the button 26 is linked or connected so as to produce a C major chord, namely, the notes C, E, and G; the button 27 is connected so as to produce a C minor chord, namely, the notes C, E at and G; the button 28 is connected so as to produce a C seventh chord; and the button 29 is connected so as to produce a C diminished chord. For uniformity, the major fifth of the seventh chord is omitted, so that only three notes are produced by depression of the button 28, namely, the root or tonic, C, the major third, E, and the diminished seventh, B fiat. It is still regarded, however, as a seventh chord. Thus, each of the chord buttons 26-29 produces a three note chord in its given key, the key of C.

The overall arrangement described above is pictured in Fig. 3. It will be recognized from Fig. 3 that this arrangement is substantially the same as the bass notes or buttons of a typical accordion. Thus, the present invention is very readily adaptable to use by anyone familiar with the operation of a typical accordion.

The tone generating means which are operated by the several bass buttons 21 are divided into two major electric oscillators or sets of oscillators, 31 and 32, shown schematically in Fig. 4. The bass note oscillator` means 31 is essentially a single monophonic tone generating oscillator, capable of generating any one of the l2 notes in the chromatic scale, but since it consists of a single oscillator, only one pitch can be generated at a given time. Thus, the actuation or depression of either the button 23 or the button 24 serves to simultaneously adjust the oscillator 31 so that it oscillates at a given pitch. Depression of the button 23 adjusts the oscillator 31 so that it oscillates at the note E. In the particular instance shown, this is the pitch of the note E0 being approximately 41 cycles per second. This is done by the closing of a switch 33 which adjusts the oscillator 31 to that frequency or pitch. Depression of the button 23 also simultaneously closes another switch 34 in the oscillator 31, which applies the signal or tone generated by the oscillator 31 to the output terminal 36 of the oscillator.

Similarly, depression of the button 24 adjusts the oscillator 31 to oscillate at a frequency of approximately 33 cycles per second, which is the pitch of C0. This is done by closing the switch 37 in the oscillator. Simultaneously the switch 34 is also closed to apply the output of the oscillator to the output terminal 36. The oscillator 31 is so designed that if two or more bass buttons 23, 24 are depressed simultaneously, the oscillator will oscillate only at the frequency of the highest pitch note.

The treble keys 18, when depressed, serve to sound corresponding notes in the upper or treble range of the scale. This is done by bringing in to play a third oscillator means or set of oscillators 35 (Fig. 11).

Any suitable monophonic tone generating means or oscillator may be used for the oscillator 31. In the speciiic instance illustrated herein, and particularly in Fig. 4, it is contemplated that there will be used a monophonic tone generating oscillator having a plurality of series connected resistors 38 associated with the switches represented by the numerals 33 and 37. Such an oscillator is disclosed in co-pending application Serial No. 622,466, tiled November 15, 1956, inventor Don L. Bonham.

2,962,922v t f The other oscillator means 32 is a polyphonic tone generating means, which is preferably comprised of a series of oscillators so arranged and connected that a piurality of pitches may be generated and develope-d simultaneously. The oscillator means 32 may, if desired, consist of twelve separate oscillators, each capable, respectively, of putting out the respective 12 notes of chromatic musical scale, or if desired, the oscillator means 32 may be constructed along the shared note principle, in which fewer oscillators than tones are employed, with each oscillator generating two or three different, but congruent notes. Such musical tone generators are known in the art.

ln the specific example shown in Fig. 4, it has been assumed that the polyphonic tone generating means 32 will consist of six duo tone oscillators. One such oscillator is represented by the numeral 41 and is capable of developing either the note B2 or the note C3, depending on which of two switches 42 or 43 is actuated. Similarly, the musically adjacent oscillator 44 will develop either C3 sharp or D3, depending upon which of its two switches is actuated. in this manner, six oscillators provide twelve tones, and any desired chord in any key may be developed, as long as it is not one of those unusual chords which calls for two adjacent tones half steps to be played simultaneously.

The button 23, in addition to being linked tothe switches 33 and 3d of the monophonic tone generating oscillator 31, is also iinked to the oscillator of the polyphonic tone generating oscillator means 32 which produces the note E, in this case the particular pitch being E3, having a frequency of approximately 330 cycles per second. Thus, depression or actuation of the button 23 produces simultaneously E3, from the monophonic tone generator 31, and E3, from the polyphonic tone generator 32, E3 being the same note as E3, but higher in the key, namely, three octaves higher.

ln similar manner, the button 24 is linked to the switch 43 of the polyphonic tone generator 32 to produce the note C3, which is three octaves above the note C produced by the monophonic tone generator 31.

The buttons 26-29 are not linked to the monophonic tone generator 31 at all, but instead have three respective linkages which are linked to operate three different notes of the polyphonic tone generator 32. The button 26 is the major chord buttton and is linked to those oscillators of the polyphonic tone generator 32 which produce C, E, and G, this being a major chord in the key of C. Specically, the pitches produced are C3, E3, and G2, this being the second inversion of the major chord.

The button 27 is linked to the polyphonic tone generator 32 so as to cause it to develop and place on its output terminal 46 the tones C3, D3 sharp and G2, this being a minor chord in the key of C, and speciiically the second inversion thereof. In similar vein the buttton 2S is linked to the generator 32 to produce a C seventh chord, this being comprised of the root C, the mediant E, and the diminished seventh B at, or A sharp. Since it is not uncommon to eliminate the fifth note or G, this is done in the case of the seventh chord, and has the advantage of reducing to three the number of controls which must be actuated by the button 28, making it uniform with the other buttons. The last button 29 in the row 22 is linked to C, E fiat and A, to produce a diminished chord.

A specific organ constructed in accordance with the present invention has employed tones for the polyphonic tone generator 32, ranging from F2 with a pitch of approximately 175 cyles per second, progressively upward to E3 with a pitch of approximately 330 cycles per sec ond. The bass note or monophonic tone generator 31 was designed to develop tones ranging from C0, having a pitch of approximately 33 cycles per second, up to B0, having a pitch of approximately 62 cycles per second.

In order toarchieve in a simple and facile manner unique tonal combinations, each of the tone generators 31 and 32 is provided with its own individual volume control means, illustrated respectively at 51 and 52, which serve to give selective attenuation to the bass notes from the monophonic tone generator 31 and the chord notes from the polyphonic tone generator 32.

Chord signals from the' generator 32 go through a chord formant network 4S (Fig. 11) and thence to a common bus 5G which feeds a speaker S3 through an amplifier 55. Bass note signals `from generator 31 are applied directly to 4the bus 5G. rl`reble signals are applied to the bus 5t) through a formant network 65. If desired, sepsrate amplifier 55 and/ or speaker 53 may be used for the three types of vgenerators 35, 32, and 31.

Y`the linkages between the six buttons of the row C shown in Fig. 4 and the various switches of the tone generating means 31, 32, these being the linkages exemplified by the schematic lines between the buttons 24, for example, and the respective switches 37, 34 and 43, are essentially mechanical linkages, and are effected by mechanisms exempliiied by way of illustration, in Figs. v5-10, it being understood that the remaining linkages are similar in nature.

These various linkages are supported immediately beneath the bass button board 19 and housed within a pendantcasing S4. i

The bass button board 19 is preferably constructed as a sub-assembly which is removably mounted within an opening 60 of the console 17 with an upper plate 61 thereof substantially flush with the upper surface of the console or shelf 17. The bass button board 19 preferably includes the previously mentioned switches 34, 37, 42, 43, 47, 48, and 49, the upper plate 61, having a plurality of apertures through which the buttons 22-29 extend, and the linkage by which the buttons operate the switches. The board 19 lfurther includes depending side walls 62 and a back wall 63 and is removably mounted within the opening 6) as by a pair of rearwardly extending brackets 64, One of which is shown broken away in Fig. 5 for clarity. The buttons are depressible through the apertures of the top plate 61 to actuate the linkage, which is mounted on the side members 62 and the back wali 63 thereby to operate the switches, which are mounted on the outer surface of the back wall 63.

Referring more particularly to Figure 9, the linkage associated with the button 24 is schematically shove/n to more clearly illustrate only the linkage and parts closely related to that button for actuation of the switches 34, 37, and 43. The button 24 slidingly resides within an aperture 66 of the top plate 61 and is secured to the upper end of a substantially vertical push rod 67. The rod 67 is formed with a flattened portion 63 which is slidingly disposed in a guide bar 69. The guide bar 63 preferably inciudes a pliant strip of `felt or the like, 71 to minimize vibrations and sounds during the actuation of the rod 67. The flat portion 63 of the rod 67 includes a transverse pin 72 at the upper end thereof, which, when the button 24 and rod 67 are depressed, engages a horizontally extending finger 73 of a rotata` ble rod 74. The rod 74 is pivoted at its ends in any suitable manner in the side-walls 62 of the button board 19 and includes an upwardly extending finger 76, spaced from the finger 73, which is rotated forwardly about the axis of the rod 74, as indicated by the arrow 77, when the button 24 and its accompanying pin 72 rotate the rod 74 by actuating the finger 73.

As the finger 76 is rotated forwardly, a horizontally hooked upper end 78 of the nger engages a vertically hooked extension 79 of an upwardly extending arm 8i. The arm 81 is pivotally attached at its bottom end as in a bracket 82 attached to the back wall 63. The arm 81 further includes a reaiwardly hooked extension 83 which extends through an aperture 84 (Figs. 5 and 7) of the back wall 63 to engage a blade 86 of the switch 37.

A torque spring 87 is preferably mounted adjacent the lower pivoted end 88 of the arm 81 and includes an end 89 which is secured to the bracket 82, and an upwardly extending elongated end 91 which bears against the upper portion of the arm 81 to bias the arm to its normal position whereby the switch 37 is reopened when the button 24 has been released. The spring arm 91 biases the arm 81 in a counterclockwise direction thereby bearing the hooked member 79 against the hooked finger 76 of the rod 74 to rotate the rod 74 in la counterclockwise direction, rotating the finger 73 upwardly against the pin 72 to return the rod 67 and button 24 to its normally raised position. The attened portion 68 of the rod 67 is preferably provided with a bent portion or tab 92 to act as a stop to limit the upward movement of the rod 67 and the rotation of the rod 74 and arm 81.

As the arm 81 is rotated forwardly, it is brought into engagement with a hooked arm 93 extending upwardly from a substantially horizontal pivoted rod 94 which is pivotally mounted in the sidewalls 62, similarly to the rod 74. The rod 94 includes a rearwardly extending finger 96 which has an upwardly extending portion 97. A cam-button 98, preferably of insulating material, is provided on the upper end of the upwardly extending portion 97, and is urged upwardly by the lrotation of the rod 94 when the finger 93 is urged in a forward direction by the upwardly extending arm 81, to engage a blade 99 of the switch 34, thereby closing the switch 34 when the button 24 is depressed. The finger 93 is rearwardly offset from the vertical axis of the rod 94, and by virtue of its weight, and the weight of the finger 96, forms a gravity return to a normal position when the arm 81is retracted by its associates spring arm 91, together with the downwardly camming force of a switch blade 99 when the vertical arm 81 is removed. The finger 96 extends through asuitable slot 101 provided in the back wall 63, to reach the switch 34.

The upwardly extending arm 81 further includes a horizontally `bent tab portion 102 which is engageable with a downwardly extending pivoted arm 103. The arm 103 is provided with a horizontally extending upper end 104 which is pivotally mounted in a bracket 105 mounted on the upper portion of the back wall 63. The arm 103 includes a rearwardly extending hooked finger 106 which extends through an aperture 109 (Figs. 5 and 6) of the back wall 63 to engage a switch blade 107 o-f the switch 43 mounted thereon. A torque spring 108 is mounted adjacent the pivoted end 104 of the arm 103 and includes an end 109 which is anchored to the bracket 105, and a downwardly extending elongated end 111 which engages and biases the arm 103 toward the back wall y63 into a normal position in which the switch blade 107 is in a position whereby the switch 43 is open. An insulating sleeve of dielectric material such as indicated at 112 is preferably provided to prevent electrical contact between the linkage at points at which the hooks come into contact with switch blades like 86 and 107, and to minimize noise and vibration at the contact point between actuating members such as between the arms 81 and 103, and between the arm 81 and the finger 93.

It will now be understood from the foregoing description that when the button 24 is depressed within the apertureA 66 of the top plate 61, the rod 67 and its flattened portion 68 is moved downwardly, and the pin 72 of the flattened portion engages the finger 73 of the rotatably mounted rod 74 to rotate the rod in a clockwise direction. This rotation also rotates the finger 76 extending upwardly from the rod 74 to engage the hooked member 79 of the pivoted arm 81. As the rod 74 is rotated, the arm 81 is pivoted in its bracket 82 to bear against a finger 93 extending upwardly from the rotatablyV mounted rod 94, thereby raising the horizontally extending finger 96 to cam the switch blade 99 of the switch 34 inwardly and close the switch. At the same time, the rearward extending finger 83 engages the blade 86 of the switch 37 to close the switch. The

,6 arm V81 further engages the downwardly extending arm 103 to actuate the blade 107 and close the switch 43. When the button 24 is released, the springs 87 and 108 bias the arms 91 and 103 respectively to their normal position, thereby opening the switch 43, the switch 37, and the switch 34.

It is to be understood that although only parts pertaining to the button 24 are shown, i.e., fingers 73 and 76 of the rod 74 and fingers 93 and 96 of the rod 94, additional fingers are provided on these rods to actuate other switches by other buttons like 24. As an example, if another finger like 73 is actuated by another button like 24, the finger 73 illustrated in Figure 9 will rotate away from the linger 72, without causing any desired actuation of the members related with the rod 67. Similarly, as the finger 93 and its associated rod 94 are rotated by the arm 81, other fingers, one of them being indicated at 93', will be rotated away from the associated upwardly extending arm like 81, pivoted to the same bracket 82, without actuating the switch like 37, indicated at 37' (Fig. 5) associated therewith. Whenever fingers like 93 and 93 are rotated by the depression of a corresponding button, the switch 34 is closed, because the arm 96 is raised by the counter-clockwise rotation of the rod 94. In the present arrangement, when the button 24, which represents the tonic, is depressed, the buttons in the mediant chord row of buttons as indicated in Figs. 2 and 3, as buttons 113 and 114 which are G sharp, are alsodepressed. Furthermore, when either of the buttons 113 or 114 is depressed, the other two buttons 114 and 24 or 113 and 24 will be depressed by providing kappropriate fingers like fingers 73 and 76 to operate corresponding linkage, whereby the switches 43, 37, and 34 are closed by the actuation of any one of these buttons.

Referring more particularly to Fig. l0, the linkage and associated parts relative to the buttons 26 and 28 are illustrated. The button 26 is slidingly disposed in an aperture 66 of the top plate 61 for vertical reciprocation therein. The button 26 is mounted on the upper end of a rearwardly offset rod 121 which includes a lower flattened, vertical portion 122 having a plurality of transverse outwardly extending pins 123 extending therefrom. A plurality of inwardly extending fingers, one of which is indicated at 135, extend forwardly from a longitudinal rod 136 which ispivotally mounted at its ends in the sidewalls 62 in any suitable manner. The finger 135 extends beneath the uppermost pin 134 of the fiattened portion 122 to be engaged thereby when the button 26 and associate rod 121 are depressed. As a button 26 is depressed, the finger 135 is actuated by the uppermost pin 134 to rotate the rod 136 in a clockwise direction. This rotation forwardly rotates an upwardly extending hooked finger 137 secured thereto and spaced from the finger 135 to swing a downwardly extending pivoted arm 138 forwardly by engaging a downwardly hooked member 139 secured thereto. The arm 138 includes a rearwardly extending hooked member 141 which forms an actuator for the switch 43. A torque spring 142 is preferably mounted on the bracket and includes a depending leg 143 to bias the arm 138 into its normal non-switch-actuating position.

When the button 26 is depressed, the uppermost pin 134 actuates the finger 135 to rotate the pin or rod 136 and the finger 137. The finger 137 engages the hooked member 139 of the arm 138 to pivot the arm forwardly, causing the actuator 141 to close the switch 43 (Figs. 5, 6). As the button 26 is released, the spring arm 143 biases the depending arm 138 rearwardly to open the switch 43 and rotate the linger 137 counterclockwise thereby raising the rod 121 to its normal upper position by4engagement of the nger 135 on the uppermost pin 13 The centermost pin 134 of the attened rod portion 122 bears against an inwardly extending finger 143 of a longitudinal rod 144 which is pivoted in the sidewall 62 similarly to the rod 136. An upwardly extending hooked finger 146 is secured to the rod 144 to engage a downwardly hooked member 147 of a dependingpivoted arm 148. A rearwardly extending finger 149 is secured to the arrn 148 to form an actuator for the switchv 47 (Fig. A torque spring 151, similar to the spring 142, is provided with a depending leg 152 to bias 'the arm 148 in a normal vertical non-switch-actuating position.

The lowermost pin 134 of the flattened rodV portion 122 bears against an inwardly extendingfingr 153 of a pivoted rod 154, similar to the rods 136 and 144.V An upwardly extending hooked nger`156 is secured'to the rod 154 and spaced from the finger 153 to engage a hooked member 157 of a downwardly extending pivoted arm 158. The arm 158 includes a'rearwardly extending hooked nger 159 which'forms an actuator for the switch 48 (Fig. 5), and is provided With a torque spring 1'61 having a downwardly extending leg 162 to bias the arm 158 and actuator 159 into a non-switch-a'ctuating position.

' AIt will appear from the foregoing description that as the switch 43 is closed by theA depression ofr the button 26 andthe rod 121, the centermost pin 134'engage`s'the finger 143 to'rotate the rod 144 and its accompanying up'- wardly extending finger 146 to swing the rod 148 forwardly through its hooked member 147 to close theA switch 47 by engagement of a blade thereof by the actuator 149. At the same time, the lowermost pin 134 engages the finger 153 to rotate the rod 154 counterclockwise and its accompanying upwardly extending hookedv finger 156 to swing the arm 15.8 forwardly against the bias of the torque spring 161 to close the switch 48 by theengage- `merit by the actuator 159. The springs 151 and 161 assist the spring 142 to return thebutton 26'to` its uppermost position which is determined by a tab 164A formed at the lower end of the fiat member 122 disposed' in a bar similarly tothe rod 67.

The button 28 is similarly secured to the upper end of a forwardly offset rod 166 which includes a lower flattened portion 167. A plurality of pinsk 168 are secured to the flattened portion 167 and extend transversely therefrom.

The uppermost pin 168 bears against the finger 135 ofthe rod 136 to rotate the rod 136 when the button 28 is depressed and thereby close the switch 43 as previously described, when actuated by the uppermostpin 134. If the finger 135 is depressed by the button `28, it will be noted that the finger is lowered away from the uppermost pin 134 of the rod 121, whereby actuation of the button 26 and its associated linkage by 'the' buttonV 28 is avoided.

The centermost pin 168 of the flattened portion rod 167 bears against the inwardly extending finger 143 of the pivoted rod 144 to rotate its corresponding upwardly extending finger 146 when the button at 28 is depressed and thereby close the switch 47 through the hooked member 147, the depending arm 148, and the rearwardly extending hooked actuator 149.

The lowermost pin 168 of the flattened rod portion 167 bears against a forwardly extending finger 169 which is secured to a pivoted longitudinal rod 171. An upwardly extending hooked finger 172 is secured to the rod 171 and spaced from the finger 169 to bear against the downwardly extending hooked member 173 of a depending pivoted arrn 174. The arm 174 includes a rearwardly extending hooked finger or actuator 176 which forms an actuator for the switch 49 (Fig. 5). A torque spring 177 includes a depending arm 178-which bears against the pivoted arm 174 to bias the arm into a substantially vertical non-switch-actuating position.

It will therefore be understood from the foregoing description that when the button 28 is depressed, the uppermost pin 168 actuates the rod 136 throughthe finger 135 to swing the aim 138 forwardly and close the switch 43 by the actuator 141. Simultaneously, the entermost pin 168 actuates the finger 143 to rotate the rod 1,44` and its accompanying finger 146 to swing the arm 148 forwardly and close the switch 47 by the actuator 149. At the same time, the lowermost pin 168 rotates the rod 171 through the finger 169 to engage the finger 172 against the hooked member 173 of the arm 174 thereby swinging the arm 174 forwardly and closing the switch. 49 byy the actuator 176. T he torque spring 177 assists the springs 142, 151 and 161 to return the button 28 in its normal uppermost position as determined by a tab 179 formed at the lowermost end of the flattened portion 167, similarly to the tabs 92 and 164.

As previously mentioned, when the button 28 'is depressed, the button 26 is unmoved by the linkage actuated by the button 28. The fingers 135 and 143 are rnoved away from the uppermost and centermost pins 134, respectively, of the rod 121 and therefore no motion is imparted to the rod 121. The flattened portions 122 and 167 are guided in a strip similar t'o the strip 69 shown in Fig. 9. It is to be understood that only the finger 135 relative to the buttons 26 and 28 is shown on the shaft 136, and additional fingers 135 are provided to be actuated by other buttons like 26 which are appropriate to their individual and particular function. As a finger 135 is actuated by another button, the finger 135 shown in Fig. l0 simply moves downwardly away from the uppermost pin 134 thereby avoiding imparting any motion to the button 26 and its relative parts. Similarly, additional fingers 143, 153, and 169, are provided to function as desired by corresponding buttons.

In Figures 9 and 10, the rods 74, 136, 144, 154, and 171, are shown in broken lines at intermediate portions between the portions relative to the linkage described; these broken lines indicate that other fingers like 135, 143, 153 and 169 may be present, but are omitted for clarity.

Suitable sleeves of dielectric or non-conducting material may be slipped over the hooked portions of the actuators 141, 149, 159, and 176 to avoid electrical contact between the fingers associated with each switch. A shaft 181 is preferably mounted in the bracket 105 for convenience in mounting the springs 108, 142, 151, 161, and 177. The bracket and the shaft 181 are illustrated in broken lines in intermediate portions not related to the present linkage described, and indicate that further depending arms and torque springs are present in these areas.

The entire assembly 19 may be prefabricated and wires attached to the various switches located on the rear of the back wall 63, said wires being preferably attached to amale plug (not shown) for convenience in connecting the wires to the oscillators 31 and 32. The assembly 19 is inserted into the opening 60 and secured therein by means of the brackets 64, and may therefore be readily removed for repair and/ or service.

Referring to Figure 9, the hooked finger 106 is preferably provided with a tubular dielectric member 182 which surrounds the blade 107 of the switch 143 to provide a double actuation of the switch 43 for use as a double throw switch, i.e., when the arm 103 is in a normal position as biased by the torque spring 108, the switch blade 107 is in contact with the rear or outer blade 183 and making a contact therewith. Whenthe button 24 is depressed, and as previously'described, the arm 103 is swung forwardly against the bias and spring 111, the finger 106 swings the blade 107 into contact with the forward switch blade 184 causing contact of the blade 107 therewith.

What is claimed is:

l. A chord organ comprising: a console having a front edge, a plurality of transverse treble keys on said console, a button board on said console disposed to the left of said treble keys and having a pluralityof parallel rows of manually depressible buttons arranged obliquely of said console,` each row representing a given key in the chromatic musical scale, monophonic tone-generating means including switch means and generating any one of the notes in the chromatic musical scale, polyphonic tone-generating means including switch means and generating simultaneously a plurality of notes in said scale, means linking the button most distant from said edge, in a given row, to said monophonic tone-generating switch means and effecting a bass mediant note in said key and to said polyphonic tone-generating switch means and effecting a mediant note higher in said key, means linking the next button in the row to said monophonic tone-generating switch means and effecting a bass tonic note in said key and to said polyphonic tone-generating switch means and effecting a tonic note higher in said key, means linking the next button in the row to said polyphonic tone-generating switch means and effecting a plurality of notes constituting a major chord of said key, means linking the next button in the row to said polyphonic tone-generating switch means and effecting a plurality of notes constituting a minor chord of said key, means linking the next button in the row to said polyphonic tone-generating switch means and effecting a plurality of notes constituting a seventh chord of the key represented by the row, and means linking the next button in the row to said polyphonic tone-generating switch means and effecting a plurality of notes constituting a diminished chord of said key.

2. A chord organ comprising: a keyboard having a plurality of manually operable members arranged in a plurality of rows, each row representing notes and chords in a given key, monophonic tone-generating means including switch means and generating any one of the notes of a scale, polyphonic tone-generating means including switch means and generating simultaneously a plurality of notes of said scale, at least one member in any given row being linked to said monophonic tone-generating switch means and effecting a given note of the key represented by that row and to said polyphonic tone-generating switch means and effecting the same note at least an octave higher, at least one other member in said row being linked to said polyphonic tone-generating switch means and effecting a plurality of notes constituting a chord in the key represented by said row.

3. A chord organ comprising: a keyboard having a plurality of manually operable members arranged in a plurality of rows, each row having at least six members therein and representing notes and chords in a given key, monophonic tone-generating means including switch means and generating any one of the notes of a scale, polyphonic tone-generating means including switch means and generating simultaneously a plurality of notes of said scale, the first of said members in any given row being linked to said monophonic tone-generating switch means and effecting a bass mediant note of the key represented by that row and to said polyphonic tone-generating switch means and effecting a higher mediant note of said key, the second member in said given row being linked to said monophonic tone-generating switch means and effecting a base tonic note of said key and to said polyphonic tonegenerating switch means and effecting a higher tonic note of said key, the third member in said row being linked to said polyphonic tone-generating switch means and effecting a plurality of notes constituting a major chord in said key, the fourth member in said row being linked to said polyphonic tone-generating switch means and effecting a minor chord in said key, the fifth member in said row being linked to said polyphonic tone-generating switch means and effecting a seventh chord in said key, and the sixth member in the row being linked to said polyphonic tone-generating switch means and effecting a diminished chord in said key.

4. A chord organ comprising: a keyboard having a plurality of manually operable members Yarranged in a plurality of rows, each row having at least six members therein and representing notes and chords in a given key, monophonic tone-generating means including switch means for generating any one of the notes of a scale, polyphonic tone-generating means including switch means for generating simultaneously a plurality of notes of said scale, the first of said members in any given row being linked to said monophonic tone-generating switch means and effecting a bass mediant note of the key represented by that row and to said polyphonic tone-generating switch means and effecting a higher mediant note of said key, the second member in said given row being linked to said monophonic tone-generating switch means and effecting a base tonic note of said key and to said polyphonic tone-generating switch means and effecting a higher tonic note of said key, the third member in said row being linked to said polyphonic tone-generating switch means and effecting a plurality of notes constituting a major chord in said key, the fourth member in said row being linked to said polyphonic tone-generating switch means and effecting a minor chord in said key, the fifth member in said row being linked to said polyphonic tone-generating switch means and effecting a seventh chord in said key, and the sixth member in the row being linked to said polyphonic tone-generating switch means and effecting a diminished chord in said key, electro-audio transducing means for audibly sounding said notes, circuit means connecting the respective outputs of said monophonic and polyphonic tone-generating means to said electro-audio transducing means, first individual volume control means for manually controlling the output volume of said monophonic tone-generating means, and second individually controlled means for manually controlling the output volume of said polyphonic tone-generating means.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,645,968 Hanert July 21, 1953

US695679A 1957-11-12 1957-11-12 Chord organ Expired - Lifetime US2962922A (en)

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Cited By (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3064517A (en) * 1959-12-24 1962-11-20 Nihon Gakki Seizo Kabushiki Ka Mechanism for regulating chord base tones of a chord organ
US3193607A (en) * 1961-03-07 1965-07-06 Chicago Musical Instr Co Key switch assembly
US3247311A (en) * 1960-08-31 1966-04-19 Jenny Georges Electronic musical instrument
US3562396A (en) * 1969-07-24 1971-02-09 Richard H Peterson Electronic gating and component assembly for electronic musical instrument
US3590129A (en) * 1969-04-23 1971-06-29 Alfred B Freeman Electronic chord selection device for a musical instrument
US3711618A (en) * 1971-02-22 1973-01-16 A Freeman Automatic harmony apparatus
US3715442A (en) * 1970-12-15 1973-02-06 A Freeman Chord tone generator control system
US3813474A (en) * 1972-08-25 1974-05-28 Wurlitzer Co Electronic musical instrument circuit
US3828108A (en) * 1972-03-22 1974-08-06 F Thompson Binary organ and coding system for operating same
US3918342A (en) * 1973-09-14 1975-11-11 Keio Giken Kogyo Kabushikikais Monophonic electronic musical instrument of equal tempered scale

Citations (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2645968A (en) * 1950-06-23 1953-07-21 Hammond Instr Co Electrical musical instrument

Patent Citations (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2645968A (en) * 1950-06-23 1953-07-21 Hammond Instr Co Electrical musical instrument

Cited By (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3064517A (en) * 1959-12-24 1962-11-20 Nihon Gakki Seizo Kabushiki Ka Mechanism for regulating chord base tones of a chord organ
US3247311A (en) * 1960-08-31 1966-04-19 Jenny Georges Electronic musical instrument
US3193607A (en) * 1961-03-07 1965-07-06 Chicago Musical Instr Co Key switch assembly
US3590129A (en) * 1969-04-23 1971-06-29 Alfred B Freeman Electronic chord selection device for a musical instrument
US3562396A (en) * 1969-07-24 1971-02-09 Richard H Peterson Electronic gating and component assembly for electronic musical instrument
US3715442A (en) * 1970-12-15 1973-02-06 A Freeman Chord tone generator control system
US3711618A (en) * 1971-02-22 1973-01-16 A Freeman Automatic harmony apparatus
US3828108A (en) * 1972-03-22 1974-08-06 F Thompson Binary organ and coding system for operating same
US3813474A (en) * 1972-08-25 1974-05-28 Wurlitzer Co Electronic musical instrument circuit
US3918342A (en) * 1973-09-14 1975-11-11 Keio Giken Kogyo Kabushikikais Monophonic electronic musical instrument of equal tempered scale

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