US2932233A - Reed organ - Google Patents

Reed organ Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US2932233A
US2932233A US590007A US59000756A US2932233A US 2932233 A US2932233 A US 2932233A US 590007 A US590007 A US 590007A US 59000756 A US59000756 A US 59000756A US 2932233 A US2932233 A US 2932233A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
bass
keys
piano
chord
organ
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US590007A
Inventor
Eli D Czarnecki
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
THERESA CZARNECKI
Original Assignee
THERESA CZARNECKI
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by THERESA CZARNECKI filed Critical THERESA CZARNECKI
Priority to US590007A priority Critical patent/US2932233A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US2932233A publication Critical patent/US2932233A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10BORGANS, HARMONIUMS OR SIMILAR WIND MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS WITH ASSOCIATED BLOWING APPARATUS
    • G10B1/00General design of organs, harmoniums or similar wind musical instruments with associated blowing apparatus
    • G10B1/08General design of organs, harmoniums or similar wind musical instruments with associated blowing apparatus of harmoniums, i.e. reed organs
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S84/00Music
    • Y10S84/22Chord organs

Description

April 12, 1960 E. D. CZARNECKI REED ORGAN Filed June 7. 1956 3 Sheets-Sheet l N VEN TOR.

. I EL/ D. CZ/JR/VFCK/ maw April l2, 1960 E. D. czARNEcKl 2,932,233

REED ORGAN Filed June 7, 1956 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 c MAJOR /30 C HORDS 4f- ]NVENTOR.

www@ W April 12, 1960 E. D. czARNr-:cKl 2,932,233

REED ORGAN Filed June v, 195e s sheets-sheet s 2% z ac m l 233 1 J 23g/zza 230 2 28( INVENTOR. 88 L/ D. CZA/Q/VEC/f/ @u Mig United States Patent O REED ORGAN Eli D. Czarnecki, Detroit, Mich., assignor of onehalf to Theresa Czarnecki, Detroit, Mich.

Application June 7, 1956, Serial No. 590,007

8 Claims. (Cl. 84-351) This invention relates generally to musical instruments, and, more particularly, to improvements in organs of the type using accordion reeds.

It has heretofore been proposed to construct organs employing accordion reeds wherein the treble keyboard section which is operated by the right hand, and the bass section keyboard which is operated by the left hand, are both mounted on the same base plate which supports upon its under side a bellows, whereby, the operator may play the organ in a sitting position. Heretofore, the keyboard of the accordion bass section in such an accordion organ has been made with a large number of keys, the usual number being one hundred and twenty keys or buttons. In the 120 base keyboard, forty keys, or two rows, are low single note basses, and, the balance of the one hundred twenty keys, or eighty keys, are chords.

In order to properly play a 120 base keyboard, a person must be skilled in the knowledge of the arrangement and sequence of these keys or buttons, and a person skilled in the playing of another form of organ, or the piano, would find it impossible to perform on such a keyboard, without rst being trained in the manipulations of the buttons. Accordingly, it is the primary object of this invention to provide a bass section, or a left hand rhythm section for accordion organs and the like using accordion reeds which includes a keyboard having l2 piano type keys and 24 levers, which finger the same as a piano, whereby, various combinations of bassnotes and chords may be played with a minimum of training.

It is another object of this invention to provide a left hand rhythm section keyboard for an organ accordion comprising, l2 piano style bass keys mounted on a horizontal base plate and adapted to operate the reeds for l2 bass notes, and, 2 rows of 12 levers each mounted on a vertical grill or cover adjacent to the base plate, with the lower row adapted to operate the reeds for major chords and the upper row adapted to operate the reeds for minor chords, whereby, a bass note may be played with the thumb of the left hand and a major or minor chord may be selected with the forenger of the left hand.

It is a further object of this invention to provide a cornpact left hand keyboard for an accordion organ comprising l2 piano type bass keys and 24 chord levers and an associated control means whereby, all bass notes and major and minor chords may be played by non-profes sional players, and, whereby a professional player may automatically eliminate the bass notes and manually play any chords desired by playing 3 or 4 of the bass piano keys simultaneously.

It is still another object of this invention to provide a novel left hand rhythm section for an accordion organ which is compact in construction, economical of manufacture, and easy to operate.

Other objects, features and advantages of this invention will be apparent from the following detailed description and appended claims, reference being had to the accompanying drawings forming a part of the speci- 2,932,233 Patented Apr. 12, 1960 tication wherein like reference numerals designate corresponding parts of the several views.

ln the drawings:

Fig. l is a partial perspective view of an accordion organ provided with a left hand rhythm section made in accordance with the principles of the invention;

Fig. 2 is a partial elevational sectional view of the structure illustrated in Fig. l, taken along the line 2-2 thereof;

Fig. 3 is a partial front elevational view of the struc-v ture shown in Fig. 5, taken in the direction of the arrow marked 3;

Fig. 4 shows the schematic layout of the reed valve control rods;

Fig. 5 is a top plan view, partly in section with parts broken away, of the structure illustrated in Fig. 2, taken along the line 5 5 thereof;

Fig. 6 is an enlarged partial elevational view, partly in section and with parts broken away, of the structure illustrated in Fig. 5, taken along the line 6-6 thereof;

Fig. 7 is a fragmentary plan view of the structure shown in Fig. 6, taken in the direction of the arrow marked 7;

Fig. 8 is a perspective View of a few of the plate springs employed in the invention and showing one of the springs being bent by a control rod;

Fig. 9 is a fragmentary perspective View of the structure illustrated in Fig. 6, taken from the right side thereof, as viewed in Fig. 6; and,

Fig. l0 is a fragmentary elevational view of the structure illustrated in Fig. 6, taken in the direction of the arrow marked 10.

Referring now to the drawings, and in particular to Fig. l wherein is shown an illustrative embodiment of the invention, the numeral 10 generally indicates the usual right hand or treble section of an accordion organ which is provided with a left hand rhythm section 12 made in accordance with the principles of the invention. The right and left hand sections 10 and 12, respectively, are disposed so that an operator may play the organ in a sitting position. The organ structure includes a compartment for housing the control elements of the organ which comprises the bottom wall 14, the front wall 16, the rear wall I18, the top wall 20 and the end walls 22 and 24. The organ may be supported by any suitable structure, as by a plurality of legs 26 which are iixedly mounted on the bottom wall 14 by any suitable means. The bottom wall 14 extends forwardly from the front wall 16 and has iixedly mounted thereon a base plate 28 which extends the length of the organ and supports the keyboards of the right and left hand sections.

Fixedly mounted on the lower side of the bottom wall 14 by any suitable means, is an air box 3'6 which runs the length of the organ and which comprises the bottom wall 32, the front wall 34, the rear wall 36, and suitable end walls as 38. As shown in Fig. 2, the various reed blocks of the right and left hand sections extend downwardly into this air box or chamber 30. he operating controls and reed blocks of the right hand section are not shown since the structure thereof does not comprise any part of the invention, and since any conventional accordion organ right hand section may be used in an organ made in accordance with the invention.

As shown in Figs. l and 2, a suction motor-box, generally indicated by the numeral 49, is xedly mounted on the lower side of the bottom wall 32 of the air box by any suitable means, as by the screws 42. T he suction motor-box is mounted on the left end of the organ, as viewed in Fig. l, and toward the rear of the organ. Fixedly mounted in the suction motor-box 40, by any suitable means is a suitable suction motor 44 to which is operatively connected the suction conduit 46 which is spaanse Connected to the vair box 30 hy means Gf the aperture 48 in the wall 32. The suction motor Ybox 40 is exhausted to the atmosphere by means of the aperture 54 in the suo tion motor-box. The suction motor 44 maintains a vsuction or negative pressure in the air box Sil and pullsair therethrough in the usual manner. As shown in Figs. 2 and 5, the suction motor sucks air into the upper control box through the apertures S in the backY wall 18, and

then through the reed blocks in the usual manner and into. Vthe air box 30, and then out to the atmosphere through the suction motor box. The suction motor 44 may be any conventional type, as a suction motor from a player piano. t i

As shown in Figs, l and 2, an auxiliary bellows, gener-f ally designated by the numeral 56, is operatively mounted on the lower side of the air box 3Q by any suitable means, as by the screws 57. The inside of the bellows 56 cornmuncates with the air box through a plurality of @Portures Sti which are formed in the air box bottom wall 32. The bellows 56 is adapted to provide an extra suction pressure in the air box when sudden demands are made for air, as when a number Vof keys are depressed in both the right and left` hand sections of the organ. Accord-- ingly, the bellows 56 works only partially and is extended by the weights 6d. However,V during normal operation, the suction pressure in the air box, due to the suction motor 44, is strong enough to compress the bellows.

As shown in Figs. 2 and 5, the controls of the left hand section are built into an inner box having a front wall 66, a side wall 68, and, with the walls 18 and 24 completing the box. Slidably mounted in the front wall 66 are three rows of buttons marked with the numerals 7i), 72and 73,

as shown in Fig. 3; The buttons in rows 70 and'72 are diagonally disposed relative to each other, and the lower row is disposed in alignment with the middle row 72. This arrangement of the buttons permits closer spacing thereof relatively to each other so that a greater number of said buttons ma' be operated without shifting the hand, in amanner more fully disclosed hereinafter.

lEach of the rows of buttons 70, 72, and 73 contains twelve buttons each. The top row buttons are adapted to operate the valves to produce the fixed minor chords C, Cfsharp, D, Eilat, E, F, F-sharp, G, A-iiat, A, B-flat, and B, as viewed in Fig. 3, and starting from the left and going to the right. T he middle row buttons are adapted to operate the valves to produce the fixed major chords C, Cv-sharp, D, E-llat, E, F, F-sharp, G, A-flat, A, dlat, and B, starting from the left and going to the right. The bottom row buttons are adapted to operate the valves to produce the basses C, C-sharp, D, E-ilat, E, F, F-sharp, 550

G, A-flat, A, B-llat, and B, starting from the left and going to the right.

As shown in Figs. l and 2, the top and middle rows of buttons, 70 and 72, respectively, are adapted to be operated by a bank of levers 74 and 76, respectively. The bottom row of buttons 73 are adapted to be operated by a bank of piano keys generally indicated by the numeral 7S.

The top bank of levers 74 each comprises a horizontal portion 81B which extends outwardly from the front wall 16 through the raperture 82. The horizontal arm portions Sli are normally held in abutment against the upper side of the aperture 82 by means of the outward thrust thereon exerted by the buttons 70. The aperture 82 is large enough to permit depression of the levers for pushing the buttons 70 inwardly. The lever arms 89 'are each connected to an integral crank portion 84 which is pivotally mounted as at 86 in the groove 88 in the upper end of the wall 66. The crank 84 is retained in the lon gitud-inal groove 88 by any suitable means, as by the screws 90.

The middle bank of levers 76 each comprises a horizontal portion 92 which extends outwardly from the front wall 16 through the aperture 94. The horizontal arm portions 92 are normally held in abutment against the upper side4 of the aperture 94 by means of the outward thrust thereon exerted by the buttons 72. The aperture 94 is large enough to permit depression of the levers forv pushing the buttons 72 inwardly. The levers 92 are each connected to'an integral crank portion 96 which is pivotally mounted as at 98 in the groove 161i in the upper end of the wall 66. The crank 96 is retained in the longitudinal groove 100 by any suitable means, as by the screws 102.

The lower row of buttons 73 are operated as follows. The bank of piano keys 78 comprises seven white piano keys as 104, as seen in Fig. l, and live black piano keys as 106. As shown in Fig. 2 all of the piano keys are pivoted as at 10S on a bracket as 110 which is suitably fixed on the base plate 28. Fixedly mounted in the rear end ofl each piano key is a downwardly and inwardly extending arm 112 which engages the underside of a horizontal arm 114 on the lower end ol? the spring arm 116. The spring arm 116 is ntegra] withY a substantially- Ueshaped head 11d which abuis the buttons in row 73. 'Integral with the head 118 is a second spring arm 12! which CX tends downwardly and is lixedly mounted as at 122 by means of the screw 124 on the tapered inner face 126. of the base plate 2S. The buttons in row 73 exert an outward thrust on the spring heads 113'to normally maintain the piano keys in the horizontal position shown in 21 y Since each of the buttons in rows 70 and 72 operates three reed valves to produce their respective chords, the

control rods for one button are sho-wn, and the rest of*k the chord buttons will be operated by similar structure. f

As shown in Figs. 2, 4 and 5, each of the buttons in rows 70 and 72 is provided with an inwardly and upwardly extending arm 128 which is integral with ahorizontal control rod or lever 130, the rear end of which is slidably mounted through an aperture in the horizontal lonv tgitudinally extending bar 132 which is ixed at each end in a support 1 33 which extends down to the bottom wall 14.A The rear end of each of the rods 136 is bent transversely to therl'od asv at 13'4- and is normally heldy against the back. face of the bar- 132. A Stop. bar 136 is tixedly mounted on the rear face of the bar 132 to limit the rearwardly travel of the rods 130.

Each of the rods 4130 is provided with a transverse pin as 13,8 which is adapted to operatively engage on the rearward face thereof the upper ends of a pair of wires las 1,40l and,v 142. Each rod is further provided with la. second transverse pin as 144which is adapted to operatively engage on the rearward face thereof the upper end 0f. a Wire .146. The Wires 1.40, 1421, and I1.46.V extend down.- wardly and are. xedly connected by any Suitable means to the horizontal Shafts 148., 1.50, and 152, respectively, which shafts are disposed in a side by side parallel arrangement with the ends thereof being rotatably mounted in suitable supports as. 15.3. The shafts 148. and y152 are the type usually foundv in conventional left hand accordion sections. Each of the shafts are provided with forwardly extending wires for operating a separate chord reed valve and since all suchwires are ,the same, only one complete arrangement is shown and illustrated.

As shown in Figs. 2 andV 5, the shaft 148 is provided with an upwardly and forwardly extending wire 154, the front end of which is bent and underlies and contacts the. Wire end 158er at 156- The Wire end 15.8, is integral with a downwardly extending wireI `161i the lower end 162 of which is fixed around the horizontal wire 154. The front end of the wire 164 isY bent downwardly as at 166 and lies in the groove 168 in the longitudinally extending Vblock 170 and is held in place by the screw 172 which permits the end 166 to pivot in the groove 168. The shafts 150 and 152 are similarlyV provided with the wires 174 and 176, respectively, which function in the same manner as wire 154.

As shown Yin Figs. 2 and 5, the organ is provided with the usual twelve chord valves 178 which operate. the usual chordV reed block generally designatedV by the numeral 179 and which is disposed in the air box and' con-` nected by the apertures 179z with the chord valves 178.

The wires 164 extend rearwardly of the organ and eachr are connected to their respective chord valve A178 by any suitable means, as by the beeswax 180. The rear end of the wires 164 is bent up and overlies the bent end 182 of a wire 184 which is connected to one of the bass reed control shafts as 186. The ends of the shafts 186 are suitably pivotally mounted in the supports 188. The wires 184 also engage the underside of a wire bent end 190 which is fixed to the respective bass reed valve 194 by any suitable means as by the beeswax 192. The wire 190 extends forwardly and the front end 196 is bent and is pivotally mounted in the groove 198 in the block 170. The wire end 196 is operatively held in place by any suitable means, asby the screw 200. The aforegoing control wire structure for operating the chord and bass valves together or separately is 'of the usual type found in accordion left hand sections.

Since each of `the bass buttons in row 73 operates the same, only the structure for one is illustrated in Figs. 2, 4, and 5. Each of the buttons 73 is connected to an inwardly and upwardly extending arm 202 which is integral with a horizontal control rod or lever 204 which is slidably mounted through a support bar 206 having the ends thereof fixed in place by the support blocks 208. The ends of the rods 204 are bent as at 210 and normally abut therear side of the bar 206. Each of the rods 204 is provided with a transverse pin as 212 which abuts the downwardly extending wire 214 which is fixedly -mounted in its respective bass control shaft 186. It will be seen, that when -a bass button is operated, the wire 214 connected therewith will be moved rearwardly and the respective shaft 186 will be rotated and the respective wire 184 will be lifted to open its bass valve 194 and its interconnected chord valve 178. When a chord button is operated in either row 70 or 72, only the respective three interconnected chord shafts as, 148, 150 and 152 will be operated to operate only three chord valves 178.

As shown in Figs. 5, 6, and 8, a plurality of spring plates 216 are iixedly mounted on the lower ends thereof on a shaft 218, the ends of which are rotatably mounted in the supports 220 by any suitable means. The spring plates 216 are adapted to be bent backwardly as shown in Fig. 8 when the bass buttons are pushed inwardly. When three or more bass buttons are pushed inwardly, the ends thereof 210 will bend their respective spring plates backwardly to develop sumcient tension or torque to rotate the shaft 218 for a purpose more fully expiained hereinafter.

The shaft 218 is fixedly connected by any suitable means to the forwardly extending rod 222, the forward end of which is adapted to engage the underside of the arm 224 on the vertical shaft 226. The shaft 226 extends downwardly through the aperture 227 in the bottom wall l14 and functions to shut oi the bass reed block as explained hereinafter. v

As shown in Figs. 2 and 6, the usual bass reed block 228 is mounted in an air tight bass block compartment 230 having the side walls 231 and 232, an end wall 233, bottom wall 235, top wall 236, and a detachable end plate 234. The plate 234 may be suitably afxed to the compartment 230 by any suitable means as by the screws 239. The compartment 230 is provided with the apertures 238 through the upper or top wall 236 to permit communication of the bass reed block with the bass valves 194 through the apertures 241 in the bottom wall 14. The bass reed block 228 is held in place on the bottom wall 14 as follows. One end of the `reed block 228 is provided with a horizontal rod 240 which is adapted to be slidably mounted through an aperture 242 in the compartment end wall 233 and then through the eyelet end 244 of a crew 246 which is fixedly mounted in the bottom Wall '14. The other end of the reed block 228 is provided with a flange, as best seen in Figs. 6 and 7, as

249, in which is Aformed an elongated horizontal slot 248 which opens to the end of the ange. A screw 2501 having a iiat extension 252 is adapted to pass throughA the slot 248 and up through the aperture 253 in the compartment wall 236 and into the bottom wall 14. It will be seen that the compartment 230 and the reed block 228 may be easily and quickly detachably mounted on the bottom surface of the bottom wall '14 by turning the flat screw extension 252 parallel with the slot 248 into the dotted position shown by the numeral 255. The right end of the reed block 228, as viewed in Fig. 6 may then be dropped and the other end slipped to the right and the rod 240 detached from the eyelet 244. When the screw extension 252 is turned to lie over the flange 248, the reed block 228 will be locked in place.

The lower end of the vertical shaft 226 is fixedly mounted in the sleeve 254, as by a press fit, which sleeve is integral with the plate 256 which is provided with an aperture for pivotally receiving the pin 257. The pin 257 is fixedly mounted on the plate 258, the inner end of which is pivotedly mounted as at 260 between the brackets 262 on the outer face of the removable cover plate 234. The cover plate 234 is provided with an upper aperture therethrough as 264 and a lower aperture 266 which is smaller than the upper aperture 264. The upper aperture 264 is adapted to be closed by the. valve plate 268 which is xedly mounted on the plate 258 by means of the rigid arm 270. The lower aperture 266 is adapted to be closed by the valve plate 272 which is fixedly mounted on the lower side of the plate 258 by means of the rigid arm 273 which extends through the aperture 266.

As shown in Figs. 6 and 10, a manual means for cutting off the bass reed block 228 is provided which comprises the arm 275 which is suitably pivotally mounted as at 276, and which is adapted to be swung upwardly to engage the lower end ofthe plate 258 and pivot it to close the valve plates 268 and 272. Fixedly mounted to the rear end of the arm 275 is a downwardly extending rod 278, the lower end of which is hingedly connected, as at 280, to the rear end of the foot pedal 282. The front end of the foot pedal 282 is suitably hingedly connected to a Ilat horizontal member 284, as at 286, and is normally biased upwardly by a spring as 288. It will be seen, that by pivoting the foot pedal 282, the rod 278 will move the arm 275 upwardly, thereby swinging the plate 258 to effect the closing of valves 268 and 272 to shut off the bass reed block 228. Similarly, when more than one spring plate 216 is bent back by the bass rods 204, the shaft 218 will be rotated, thereby lifting up the rod 222, which in turn lifts the shaft 226, and which in turn rotates the plate 258 to effect a closing of the valves 268 and 272. It will be seen that the foot pedal 282 will operate independently of the spring plate control, and vice versa, to close the valves 268 and 272, as desired.

It will be understood, that the reed valves 178 and 194 are each held down normally by the usual hold down springs as 290 and 292, respectively, as shown in Fig. 5, and this is a conventional construction in accordion structures of this type. In the normal position, the springs 290 and 292 hold the valves down, and all the aforedescribed wires and control shafts and buttons will assume the positions shown but will be movable in the usual manner with the stmcture shown to operate the reed valves as desired, and with the springs 290 and 292 exerting a return pressure on the various controls and wires.

It will be seen, that with the present invention, there is provided an accordion organ which is provided with a left hand rhythm section which fingers the same as a piano. The twelve piano keys respond as bass notes when a single one of the keys 104 or 106 is pressed, and a minor or major chord will be played when either the respective lever 74 or 76 is pressed. The levers 74 and 76 are closely disposed to the piano keys 104 and 106, and both the basses and chords may be easily played by 7 onerhand, 'This novel structure permits a nunprotesy sional to easily play all the bass notes and the corrQSponding chords. If a professional player wishes to play chordslother than those obtainable with the levers 74 and 76, he may automatically do so by merely pressing action bends back the corresponding spring plates 216 thereby creating enough tension on the shaft 218 to rotate it and close the valves 268 and 272. The bass reed block compartment will then be closed and the bass reed block is inactive. Such action is automatic, but the player mayV manually perform the same action, by merely working the foot pedal 282 to close the valves 268 and 272,

thereby allowing only the higher range reed block to Y respond. It will be understood, that the reeds in all of l the reed blocks are of the usual one tongue type, since in Fig. 5, C, E, B-fiat, E-flat, A-at, C-sharp, F-sharp,

B, E, A, D, and G.

The 12 automatic piano style keys 104 and 106 eliminate jumping the hand kfrom a bass note to the higher note keys to make up chords, or vice versa. Forexample, when the bass'C key is pressed, a low C bass responds. When the G and E bass keys are added to the C key, the low C bass automatically changes with the G and E to a higher Vkey range producing a C chord. When any two bass keys are released, the remaining single bass key automatically jumps back to a low bass note, eliminating the need for jumping the hand back and forth, which makes professional rhythm playing easier and faster than on a piano, and, whereby, the operator can play all basses and all chords. This professional automatic system is a l12 piano key complete rhythm section. i

Following is a ydescription of the nonprofessional system which is believed to be the easiest possiblefor people who can play something on the right hand of a piano and who wish they could play something using both hands. vThe thumb may be used toV play the basses and the second iinger to play the levers 74 and 76. vEach of theselevers plays a fixed chord. Each of the piano style keys 104 and 106 plays a bass note. For example, if

the C bass piano key is pressed, the C major chord levery is disposed directly over theC bass key and the C minor lchord lever is disposedy directly over the C major lever, for easy use thereof. Both of the systems may be used together in a mixed system. The structure of the inventionv will respond automatically on any key or lever instantly and it is lalso easy for a beginner to learn to play.

-While it will be apparent that the preferred embodiments of the invention hereindisclosed are well calculated to lfulill the objects above stated, -it will be appreciated that-theinvention is ksusceptible to -modiiicatiom variation and change Without departing from the'proper scope or fairmeaning ofthe subjoined claims.

`What I claim is:

l. ln `an organ of the class described, a baseV plate; a right lhand treble section-keyboard mounted on said base plate for playing by the right hand of an operator; asleft hand rhythm section mounted on said base plate tothe left `side of the treble section for playing by the i left hand of an operator; said organ including la set of bass reads arrangedchromatically from C to B; said left hand rhythm section including only twelve piano type keys; means connecting said twelve pianotype keys with said .setiofbass reeds vfor operation thereof; said organ including aset of chordreeds to produce majorchords and a .set of chord reeds to produce minor chords; said left hand rhythm sectionl-including onlyafrstlrow of kthree or four bass keys or piano keys 104 and 106, which the rear thereof nd. immediately flielreabsve: means connecting said rsttvwelve levers with saidchord' reeds for producing major chords for operation thereof; said left hand rhythm section including only a second rop/fof twelve levers disposed adjacent said piano keys and to the rear thereof and immediately above said iirst row of levers; means connecting said second twelve levers with said chord reeds for producing minor chords for operation thereof; and,`said levers being operative to play the chords ci the notes corresponding to the notes played by the respective adjacently disposed piano keys, whereby, a bass note can be played with the thumb of the left hand and a major or minor corresponding chord can be played withthe irst finger of the left hand.

2. in. an organ of the class described,v a left hand rhythm sectioncomprising: :ibase plate; a vertical wall disposed'to the reartoi said base plate; only twelve piano type keys operatively mounted on said base plate; an air box on said organ; a set of bass reeds operatively mounted in said 'air box; valves connected to `said bass reeds for controlling the same; means connecting the bass reed valves and said piano keys for operation thereof; said piano keys representing singlebass notes arranged chromatically from left to right vplayable by the thumb of the operator; a set of chord reeds operatively mounted in the air box; valves connected to said chord reeds for controlling the same; a first rovi of twelve levers only mounted on said wall above said piano keys adjacent thereto and in substantially stepped alignment therewith and being operable to play the major chord of its adjacent piano key; a Ysecond row of twelve levers only mounied on said wall above said'first row of levers, in substantial stepped alignment therewith and with the piano keys, and being operable to play the minor chord of its adjacent piano key; means operatively connecting the chord reed valves Vand the chord levers; means operatively connecting the bass reedy valves and the chord reed valves; and, means connected to said air box for producing a iiow of air through the bass and chord reeds when they are operated including a suction air motor andan auxiliary bellows.

3v. ln an organ of the class described, a base plate; a right hand treble section keyboard mounted on said base plate for playing by the right hand of an operator; a left hand rhythm section mounted on said base plate to the left side of the treblerscction for playing by the left hand of an operator; said organ including a set of bass reeds arranged chromatically from C'to B; said left hand rhythm section including twelve piano type keys;

L means Vconnecting said twelve'piano type keys With said set of bass reds for operation thereof; said organ including a set of chord reeds to produce' major chords and a setof chord reeds to produce minorrchords; said left `hand rhythm section including a iirst row of twelve levers disposed adjacent said piano keys and` to Vthe rear thereof and immediately thereabove; means connecting said first twelve levers withV said chord reeds for producing major chords for operation thereof; said `left hand rhythm section including a second row of twelve levers disposed adjacent said piano keys and to the rear thereof and immediately above 'said first row of levers; means connecting said second twelve levers with rsaid chord reeds for producing minor chords for operation thereof; and,V said levers being operative to play the chords of theinotes corresponding to the notes played by the respective adjacently disposed piano keys; whereby, aba-ss note can be played with the thumb of the'left hand and a maior or minor corresponding chord vcan be played with the iirst `iinger of the left hand; and, means connectingl to the bass'reeds for disabling the same, whereby, a player may'make up any desired chordY bly playing a plurality of the piano keys in the left hand rhythm section.

4'. The structure dened in claim 3, wherein: said means for disabling the bass reeds includes means operatively connected to said piano keys and operable by at least three of said piano keys, whereby, when at least three of the piano keys are pressed the player may play any desired chord by playing any desired three piano keys.

5. The structure defined in claim 3, wherein: said means for disabling the bass reeds includes a foot pedal connected to said bass reeds and operable by the foot of the player, whereby, the player may play any desired chord by playing at least three piano keys.

6. In an organ of the class described, a left hand rhythm section comprising: a base plate; a vertical wall disposed to the rear of said base plate; twelve piano type keys operatively mounted on said base plate; an air box on said organ; a set of bass reeds operatively mounted in said air box; valves connected to said bass reeds for controlling thel same; means connecting the bass reed valves and said piano keys for operation thereof; said piano keys representing single bass notes arranged chromatically from left to right playable by the thumb of the operator; a set for chord reeds operatively mounted in the air box; valves connected to said chord reeds for controlling the same; a rst row of twelve levers mounted on said wall above said piano keys adjacent thereto and in substantially stepped alignment therewith and being operable to play the major chord of its adjacent piano key; a second row of twelve levers mounted on said wall above said first row of levers, in substantial stepped alignment therewith and with the piano keys, and being operable to play the minor chord of its adjacent piano key; means operatively connecting the chord reed valves and the chord levers; means operatively connecting the bass reed valves and the chord reed valves; means connected to said air box for producing a flow of air through the bass and chord reeds when they are operated including a suction air motor and an auxiliary bellows; a detachably mounted compartment enclosing said bass reeds; valve means in said compartment for making said compartment airtight to prevent the liow of air through said bass reeds; and, means connected to said valve means for selectively operating said valve means to close said com partment and disable said bass reeds.

7. The structure as deiined in claim 6, wherein: said means for selectively operating said valve means includes a rotatably mounted shaft; means connecting said shaft and said valve means in said compartment; a plurality of spring plates mounted on said shaft; each of said spring plates being operable to be tensioned by the means connecting one of the bass playing piano keys and its respective bass reed valve; said spring plates being operable to rotate said shaft when at least three of them are tensioned so as to operate the valve means in said comparta ment and -disable the bass reeds to permit the player to play chords on the piano keys.

8. The structure as defined in claim 6, wherein: said means for selectively operating said valve means includes a rod connected thereto; and, a foot pedal hingedly connected to said rod.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 678,329 Bennett July 9, 1901 1,883,115 Bonilla Oct. 18, 1932 2,084,266 George et al. June 15, 1937 2,111,953 Turturro Mar. 22, 1938 2,185,932 Skinner Jan. 2, 1940 y FOREIGN PATENTS 667,567 Germany Nov. 14, 1938

US590007A 1956-06-07 1956-06-07 Reed organ Expired - Lifetime US2932233A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US590007A US2932233A (en) 1956-06-07 1956-06-07 Reed organ

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US590007A US2932233A (en) 1956-06-07 1956-06-07 Reed organ

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US2932233A true US2932233A (en) 1960-04-12

Family

ID=24360500

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US590007A Expired - Lifetime US2932233A (en) 1956-06-07 1956-06-07 Reed organ

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US2932233A (en)

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3063327A (en) * 1960-03-03 1962-11-13 Eli D Czarnecki Chord organ
US3248970A (en) * 1962-12-17 1966-05-03 Ferro Mfg Corp Top lift assembly

Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US678329A (en) * 1895-09-13 1901-07-09 Robert J Bennett Reed-organ.
US1883115A (en) * 1929-12-16 1932-10-18 Saturnino Tofe Y Bonilla Auxiliary keyboard
US2084266A (en) * 1936-04-23 1937-06-15 Richard Ullman Musical instrument
US2111953A (en) * 1937-04-28 1938-03-22 Turturro Nicola Accordion
DE667567C (en) * 1935-07-29 1938-11-14 Karl Neschuta Keyboard instrument with an accompanying chord keyboard
US2185932A (en) * 1938-06-13 1940-01-02 Skinner Henry John Prowse Musical instrument

Patent Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US678329A (en) * 1895-09-13 1901-07-09 Robert J Bennett Reed-organ.
US1883115A (en) * 1929-12-16 1932-10-18 Saturnino Tofe Y Bonilla Auxiliary keyboard
DE667567C (en) * 1935-07-29 1938-11-14 Karl Neschuta Keyboard instrument with an accompanying chord keyboard
US2084266A (en) * 1936-04-23 1937-06-15 Richard Ullman Musical instrument
US2111953A (en) * 1937-04-28 1938-03-22 Turturro Nicola Accordion
US2185932A (en) * 1938-06-13 1940-01-02 Skinner Henry John Prowse Musical instrument

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3063327A (en) * 1960-03-03 1962-11-13 Eli D Czarnecki Chord organ
US3248970A (en) * 1962-12-17 1966-05-03 Ferro Mfg Corp Top lift assembly

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
Carse Musical wind instruments
JP3204652B2 (en) Rhythm game device and operation device
Dolge Pianos and their makers: a comprehensive history of the development of the piano from the monochord to the concert grand player piano
AU2004245773B2 (en) Multi-sound effect system including dynamic controller for an amplified guitar
KR100414509B1 (en) Rhythm game apparatus, rhythm game method and readable recording medium, and operating apparatus
US2973682A (en) String tension controlling means for lute-type instrument
US4305320A (en) Selector switch
US3743751A (en) Combined musical instrument and drum sound effects unit
US5490711A (en) Musical rocking chair
US3688631A (en) Pitch-changing tuning device for string instruments
US3342094A (en) Musical instrument keyboard
WO2002019316A1 (en) Keyboard for musical instrument
US4054079A (en) Keyboard and notation system
US2045172A (en) Musical instrument
Hopkins et al. The Organ: its history and construction
US3562399A (en) Electronic musical instrument with manual rod controlled special effects as vibrato and the like
US4106387A (en) Stringed musical instrument
FI79761B (en) Maskineri foer blaosinstrument.
US334484A (en) Key-board
US3757024A (en) Musical instrument
US3381565A (en) Foot-operated chord organ
US3888154A (en) End blown free air-reed flute
US3585893A (en) Foot operated electronic musical instrument
US3631755A (en) Bass trombone valve mechanism
US2223009A (en) Instruction device for musical instruments