US1922381A - Accordion - Google Patents

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US1922381A
US1922381A US585869A US58586932A US1922381A US 1922381 A US1922381 A US 1922381A US 585869 A US585869 A US 585869A US 58586932 A US58586932 A US 58586932A US 1922381 A US1922381 A US 1922381A
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keys
keyboard
accordion
reeds
clapper
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US585869A
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Max B Luttbeg
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Max B Luttbeg
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10DSTRINGED MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; WIND MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACCORDIONS OR CONCERTINAS; PERCUSSION MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; AEOLIAN HARPS; SINGING-FLAME MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G10D11/00Accordions, concertinas or the like; Keyboards therefor

Description

Aug. 15, 1933. M. B. LUTTBEG 1,922,381
ACCQRDION Filed Jan. 11, 19:52 7 Sheefls-Sheet 1 FHQZ.
Aug. 15, 1933. M LUTTBEG 1,922,381
ACCORDION Filed Jan. 11, 1932 7 Sheets-Sheet 2 ACCORDION Filed Jan. 11, 1932 7 Sheets-Sheet 5 MM 3. 4 u 1% 17,
M. MMW
Aug. 15, 1933., M, B. LUTTBF'EIG 1,922,381
ACCORDION Filed Jan. 11, 1932 7 Sheets-Sheet 6 FIGB.
Luff'ey Aug. 15, 1933. M, LUTTBEG 1,922,381
ACCORDION Filed Jan. 11, 1932 7 Sheets-Sheet 7 Patented Aug. 15, 1933 ACCORDION Max B. ,Luttbeg, St. Louis, Mo. Application January 11, 1932. Serial No. 585,869
10 Claims.
This invention relates to musical instruments, and with regard to certain more specific features to musical instruments of a pneumatic, vibrating reed character, for example, accordions. This present invention constitutes an improvement over the accordion shown in my Patent 1,825,407, dated September 29, 1931.
Among the several objects of the invention may be noted the provision of an accordion of the class described, wherein the total range is divided into treble and bass sections, and wherein both treble and bass sections are provided with keys arranged for individual operation of single notes arranged in chromatic scale; an instrument of the class described wherein the treble keyboard is positioned at an optimum angle for ease of manipulation; an instrument wherein the single note keys of the bass section are arranged in keyboard which ispresented for optimum operation, such as the formation of chords and the like, for an ordinary human hand; an instrument of the class described which includes an improved form of mechanical linkage between keys and reed controlling clappers; the provision in an instrument of the class described of a supporting mechanism adapted to receive the left hand of the player, and hold such hand in position for optimum manipulation of the keyboard arranged for operation by such hands; and the provision of an instrument of the class described which is relatively simple in construction and operation. Other objects will be in part obvious and in part pointed out hereinafter.
The invention accordingly comprises the ele- 35 ments and combinations of elements, features of construction, and-arrangements of parts which will be exemplified in the structures hereinafter described, and the scope and the application of which will be indicated in the following claims.
In the accompanying drawings, in which are illustrated several of various possible embodiments of the invention,
Fig. 1 is a trimetric view of an accordion embodying the present invention;
Fig. 2 is a top plan view of the accordion of Fig. 1, shown in position on a player;
Fig. 3 is a plan view of a treble keyboard, certain parts being broken away;
Fig. 4 is a vertical cross-section taken substantially along line 4-4 of Figs. 3 and 9.
Fig. 5 is a vertical cross section taken substantially along line 5-5 of Fig. 3; I
Fig. 6 is a vertical cross section similar to Fig. 55 4, illustrating an alternative key linkage.
Fig. 7 is a plan view of a bass keyboard 01' the accordion of Fig. 1;
Fig. 8 is a plan view of the bass section of the accordion of Fig. 1, certain cover portions being removed; 0
Fig. 9 is a plan view similar to Fig. 8, certain additional portions being removed; and,
Fig, 10 is a vertical cross section taken substantially along line 1010 of Fig. 9.
Similar reference characters indicate corresponding parts throughout the several views of the drawings.
Referring now more particularly to Fig. 1, there is illustrated an accordion having a general outward appearance similar to the usual accordion. As is customary with accordions of this general classification, the range of notes is divided into two sections, comprising a treble section and a bass section. The notes of the treble section are manipulated by means of a piano keyboard 1. The notes of the bass section are manipulated by means of a second keyboard 3. A customary bellows 5 is provided. Suitable shoulder straps '7 and a hand strap 9 are also provided.
In prior forms of accordions, the hand strap 9 comprises a simple strap extending from top to 1 bottom of the accordion. In distinction, the present invention includes a loop 11 which is aifixed to the inner side of the strap 9 at substantially its central portion. The loop 11 preferably comprises soft leather or the like and is rivetedor otherwise aflixed to the strap 9. In playing, the left hand of the player is inserted through the loop 11. It will be seen that thus positioned, the hand of the player is held in its optimum location, that is, in the central portion of the vertical height of the accordion. With prior straps comprising only the strap 9, the hand of the player was free to travel throughout the whole vertical height of the accordion. This was disadvantageous, in that the operator could never be fully aware of the position of his hand, and thus was unable to allocate the keys of the bass keyboard 3. Also, since the left hand of the player is engaged in pumping the bellows 5, the loop 11 performs the valuable functions of maintaining the arm of the operator in advantageous position for securing the optimum effect of the pumping movement of his arm.
A primary advantage of the present invention is the manner, or angle, at which the treble keyboard 1 is positioned with respect to the remainder of the accordion. Referring to Fig; 2, it will be seen that in the present invention the keyboard 1 is positioned such that it lies flat 0 against the body of the player. Not only is this the case, but it is also positioned at an angle which conforms most easily to the natural arm and hand position of the player. The effect of positioning the treble keyboard 1 as shown in Fig. 2 is to permit the player to maintain his right arm in a normal, unstrained position. Accordingly, the accordion may be played over long periods of time without inducing fatigue.
With prior forms of accordions, the keyboard analogous to the keyboard 1 was positioned at a much lesser angle to the center line of the accordion (indicated by numeral 13); that is, the angle was more acute with respect to said line 13. With such prior constructions, this acute angle was unavoidable, as it was the maximum angle for which effective key-connecting means could be designed. As a result of the undue acuteness of the angle of the keyboard, the right hand of the player was forced to an uncomfortable position when playing, with the further result that the player quickly became fatigued.
By a particular construction and arrangement of means for operating the notes presently to be described, the present invention permits the keyboard 1 to be mounted at a much greater angle to the center line 3, so that it is brought into a natural, non-fatigue-inducing position for the player.
The construction by which this desirable result is brought about is illustrated in Figs. 3, 4 and 5. Referring to Fig. 3, it will be seen that the keyboard 1 comprises a base or mounting board 15 upon which are positioned white keys 17 and black keys 19 as is customary in piano accordions. The keys 17 and 19 will be seen more particularly in Figs. 4 and 5. They comprise wood or like strips or the like 21 and 22, respectively, having suitable facings 23 and 24 secured thereto, the facings 23 and 24 constituting the portiqn of the keys that are visible on the operating keyboard 1. The back portion of the base board 15 is constructed with a mounting means comprising a comb arrangement indicated at numeral 25. Between the adjacent teeth of the comb 25 are positioned the keys 21 and 22. A pin 27, which extends the length of the keyboard 1, provides an axis about which the keys 21 rotate. To the front of the base board 15 is affixed a stop strip 29. The stop strip 29 engages the front ends of the keys 21 and limits the depression of the keys in playing.
Indicated at numeral 31 is a clapper board, which is secured in appropriate position with respect to the keyboard 1. On the underside of the clapper board 31, that is, the side facing the bellows 5, are mounted, in two parallel rows 33 and 35, the reeds which comprise the tone producing means of the accordion. The present invention is not concerned with the structure of the reeds; suffices to say that they are of a structure common in the art. Series of holes 37 and 39 in the clapper board 31 provide for communication between the reeds 33 and 35 and the playing mechanism. The number of rows 33, 35 may be increased if desired, to increase the volume.
The row of reeds 33 and holes 37 together comprises the tone producing elements for the white keys 17 of the keyboard 1. Fig. 4 shows particularly the mechanism by which playing of the white keys is effected. Mounted in the rear portion of the key 21, which is a white key, to the rear of the fulcrum or pin 27, is an arm 41. The arm 41 in effect continues the key 21 substantially until it meets the clapper board 31. Numeral 43 indicates a clapper of customary construction, that is, having a chamois or felt or like surface for engaging the clapper boards 31 in an air tight manner. The arm 41 has a portion 45 bent therefrom so that, when the clapper 43 is in its normal position, the projection 45 is parallel to the clapper board 31. Thisprojection 45 engages the upper surface of the clapper 43, and is secured thereto by suitable means 47 customary in the art.
A spring 49, which is preferably of a coil type, is secured to the under side of the front of key 21. This spring 49 urges the key 21 to a normal position with the clapper 43 clamped against its appropriate holes 37 in an air tight manner. The engagement of the clapper 43 with the clapper boards 31 thus limits upward movement of the key 21. When the key 21 is depressed against the reaction of the spring 49, it rotates on the pin 27 and lifts the clapper 43 from the clapper board 31. In this manner air under pressure is permitted to flow to or from the bellows 5 and produce the appropriate tone with the respective reed 33 being played.
All of the white keys 17 of the keyboard 1 are connected to their respective clappers 43 in the manner illustrated in Fig. 4, with the arm 41 being laterally displaced wherever necessary to correspond to the relative positioning of keys and clappers. Such a lateral displacement is illustrated by numeral 51 in Fig. 3.
It will accordingly be seen that the mechanism by which the white keys operate their respective clappers is a direct lifting action. The black keys, in contradistinction, operated by means of a lever arrangement illustrated more particularly in Fig. 5. The back row of reeds 35 comprises the series of the reeds operated individually by the black keys 19. Clappers 43, similar to the clappers in the front row, are provided for each of the openings 39 associated with the respective reeds 35 of the back row. Rearwardly of the row 35, on the front side of the clapper board 31, is provided a mounting bridge 53. Mounted on the bridge 53 are a number of bell crank levers 55, the general shape of which will be apparent by some inspection of Figs. 3 and 5. The levers 55 each have a front extension 57 which engages the clappers 43 and is secured thereto by suitable means 47. A portion 59 of the levers 55 lies flat on the strip 53. A portion 61 of the levers 55 projects upwardly from the mounting 53. The portions 59 are held in proper positions on the mounting 53 by means of screws 63 and a strip 65.
Afiixed to the upper end of the extension 61 is a connecting means, comprising a block 67 of wood or similar material. The extension 61 is received into a bore in the block 67 with a tight fit, and preferably additionally secured by means of glue or the like.
A pin 69 is provided for connecting the keys 22 to the connecting means or block 67. The pin 69 passes freely through a suitably positioned hole 71 in the base board 15. The pin 69 is threaded through and looped around a hole 73 and the key 22, and is thus movably secured thereto. The lower end of the pin 69 normally enters a hole 75 in the block 67. The hole 75 provides a loose, lost motion fit for the end of the pin 69.
A coil spring 77 is arranged to bear upon the lever 55 in such a manner as to hold the clapper 33 against the clapper board 31. The same spring 77 normally provides the tension which holds the key 22 in its upper non-playing position.
A back board 29 is provided at the rear end of the base board 15 at right angles thereto. Each key 22 is provided with a member 81 which projects rearwardly therefrom and engages the top edges of the back board 29 to prevent the key 22 from rotating too far in an upward direction. The projection 81 and back board 29 thus comprise upward stop means for the keys 22.
The action of the black keys 22 is as follows:
When the key is depressed by the finger, the motion thereof is transmitted by the pin 69 to the connecting block 67, which in turn rotates the bell crank lever around the portion 59 thereof, to raise the clapper 43 and thus permit the production of a tone from the respective reed 35. Angular motion or play of the pin 69 is provided for by the lost motion engagement of said pin 69 in hole of the block 67.
The connecting means or block 67 is a particular advantage of the present invention, inasmuch as it permits of assembly of the accordion in manufacture with a maximum ease and simplicity. J It will be seen that the ball crank levers may be placed in appropriate position before the keyboard 1 is attached to the accordion, and that the pins 69 may then be dropped into their respective holes 75 in the block 67 with the levers 55' thus already in position. This may be done without special tools or the like, which have been necessary in prior similar forms of connections.
It is thus seen that the back row of reeds 35 are operated by the black keys 19 through a bell crank lever mechanism, in contradistinction to the direct control or operation of the front row of reeds 33 by the white keys 17. In effect, the keyboard 1 bridges over the operating mechanism for the back row of reeds. It is this arrangement generally which permits the keyboard 1 to be mounted at the optimum playing angle heretofore indicated. In prior forms of accordions all of the keys operate their respective reeds through mechanisms similar to that of the white keys hereinbefore described, and thus it was necessary that the back row of reeds 35 also be positioned forwardly of the upper end of the keyboard 1, and that the angle of the keyboard 1 be such that operation of the clappers of such a rear row would be possible. With the present invention, the bridging of the keyboard 1 over one of the rows of reed makes it unnecessary to maintain the disadvantageous angle of the keyboard 1 as indicated.
While the present invention has been described with the white keys operating the front row of reeds, and the black keys operating the back row. of reeds, it is to be understood that the re.- verse may also be used; that is, the white keys may operate the back row of reeds through the bell crank levers 55 andthe black keys, respectively, may directly operate the front row of reeds. It is also to be understood that the rows 33 and 35 need not necessarily be associated only with black or white keys, respectively. The division of reeds with respect to keys is immaterial to the present invention, it only being necessary that some of the keys operate one of the rows and others of the keys operate the other row. For example, the front row could be operated by partly black and partly white keys, while the rear row would then be operated by the remaining block and white keys. The essential feature is that the keyboard bridge the back row of reeds,
so that its angle may be increased with respect to the center line of the accordion, and that suitable mechanism be then provided for an indirect operation of the back row of keys.
In Fig. 6 is illustrated an alternative operating means for the back row of reeds. In this embodiment, the bell crank lever is replaced by a simple lever 79, the series of which levers 79 are held in position in a comb block 80 and rotate about a common pin 82. An arm 84 projects forwardly from the lever 79 and engages the clapper 43. Mounted rearwardly on the lever 79 is a connecting block 86, having a hole 88 therein, the hole 88 receiving the lower end of the pin 69 in a lost motion engagement. A coil spring or the like 90 nominally holds the clapper 43 against the clapper board and also holds the key 22 in its,
upper playing position. It will be seen that the Fig. 6 embodiment of the invention presents most of the advantages of the heretofore-described embodiment and can be used interchangeably therewith.
The bass section of the accordion, that is, the side played by the left hand, is shown more particularly in Figs. 1, 2, 7, 8, 9 and 10. It comprises a box 83, to which is secured the bellows 5 and which has arranged thereon, a sloping panel or base 85. Centrally disposed in the panel 85 is the bass keyboard 3. The general arrangement of the keys on the bass keyboard 3 will be seen more particularly in Fig. 7. Referring to Fig. 7, it will be seen that there are provided white keys 87 and black keys 89, corresponding in lateral arrangement to the keys of a piano, and to the keys of the treble keyboard of the accordion. However, instead of the front edges of the keys 8'7 and 89 being arranged in a straight line, as in a piano, and as in the treble section of the accordion, the keys 8'7 and 89 present two separate and distinct arcs at their front edges indicated respectively by dotted lines 91 and 93. The keys 87 and 89 are hinged or pivoted along their back or straight-line edges, as will be pointed out more fully hereinafter.
The arrangement of the curved lines 91 and 93 comprises a particular feature of the present invention. In general, they both present a curvature about a general center represented by the position of the wrist of the player when the accordion is operated. This is advantageous, as it brings all of the keys within approximately the same radius, from the non-moving wrist of the operator. That is, the operator has all the keys substantially at constant flngers length, and he is thus able to find the keys more readily than were they arranged with a straightline front. Inasmuch as the bass keyboard of the accordion is seldom visible when it is being played, this arrangement in curved form presents a great advantage inasmuch as the players is able to memorize the location of the respective keys more readily.
It will be noted that the curves 91 and 93 are not parallel. The separation between the curves 91 and 93 and the central portion thereof is greater at the outer ends thereof. This arrangement is intentional. and gives rise to the following advantages: The usual bass score of an accordion number comprises a series of chords, the chords developing from one to another, while the melody is carried on the treble side of the accordion. With certain chords, for example, the fundamental E flat major, the position of the central fingers of the hand is such that, on an ordinary keyboard, they must be placed between adjacent black keys, that is, instead of pressing or depressing the white keys on its free or outer portion thereof, where accurate manipulation may be effected, the finger must be pressed on the key in a more rearward portion thereof, such as between a pair of adjacent black keys. With the shortening of the keyboard incident to its formation on the accordion as herein described,
the space between the black keys becomes rather small, and such between-key playing becomes diflicult.
The divergence, or separation, of the curves 91 and'93 overcome such a disadvantage in the a straight line connecting such black keys will- ;lust touch, or more frequently not touch at all,
the intermediate black keys. Thus the interme-' diate fingers are free to play upon the unobstructed portions of the white keys. When the curves 91 and 93 are parallel, this advantage is in part secured, but for optimum purposes, it is desirable that the separation thereof be greater at the center than at the ends. Thus, it will be seen that with the curved keyboard as shown in Fig. 7, playing of difllcult chords is greatly simplified.
The structure of the base keyboard and its attendant tone-producing apparatus will be apparent from consideration of Figs. 8, 9 and 10. It will be seen that a base board 95 is provided. Along one end of the base board 95 are formed a series of projections 97 in the form of a comb. The comb 97 is in some respects similar to the analogous structure on the treble keyboard on the accordion. The individual keys 87 and 89 are mounted between the projections of the comb 97 and are pivoted on a pin 99, which extends the length of the keyboard. The individual keys, as is the case in the treble keyboard, are outwardly suitably covered by celluloid or like portions to present the desired appearance.
Like the treble section of the accordion, the bass section has a clapper board 101, along which are mounted, on the side facing the bellows 5, two rows of reeds represented by numerals 103 and 105. The reeds 103, hereinafter termed the front row, communicate with the interior of the box 83 by a series of holes 107. A similar set of holes 109 is provided for the back row of reeds 105. Over each set of holes is provided a clapper 111, similar to the clappers of the treble part of the accordion.
Supported on the clapper board 101 by means of end pieces 113 and 115, respectively, are a pair of bridges, 117 and 119, respectively. The bridges 117 and 119 extend for the length of the reed playing section of the bass keyboard.
Mounted on the bridge 117 are a series of bell crank levers 121, having forwardly extending arms 123 which are secured to the clappers 111, and upwardly extending arms 125. A portion 127 of the lever 121 rests upon, and is held in position upon the top of bridge 117, by means of clips 129.
Mounted on top of the vertical arm 125 of the lever 121 is a connecting block 131, which is like maintains the clapper 111 in closed position over the openings 107.
Secured to each of the keys 87 and 89 is an actuating pin 135. The pin 135 is looped about a hole 137 in the respective keys in much the same manner that the pin 69 is employed in the treble section keys. The rearward end of the pin 135 loosely engages a hole 139 in the block 131, and thus provides a lost motion engagement between the key and the clapper. The spring 133 in addition to serving as a means for holding the clapper 111 normally shut, and also provides the return resiliency which causes the keys to return to their normal non-tone-producing position.
The arrangement of parts connected with the back row of reeds 105 and mounted on the bridge 119 is quite similar .to the arrangement just described. Necessarily the pins 135 are somewhat longer, but this does not affect their operation.
Each key 87 or 88 is provided with a projecting pin 141. The pins 141 extend in substan tially the same general direction as the keys themselves, that is, away from the pivot pin 99. In the bass board or panel 85 is provided a curved slot 143. which provides room for the pins 135 and 141 to project through said bass board 85. The pins 141 normally engage the under side of the bass board 95 as illustrated in Fig. 10 for the purpose of limiting the upward movement of the keys.
I prefer to arrange the clappers 111 in two rows in the bass section such that all of the low notes, both black and white, operate keys of the front row while the higher notes operate the reeds of the back row. It will of course be obvious, however, that this arrangement could be modified, for example, embodying the arrangement of the treble section of the accordion.
The keys 87 and 89 of the bass keyboard, being arranged in the sequence customary in pianos and the like, present a chromatic series of notes from which any desired chord may be compounded in the manner customary with piano playing. The keys are relatively narrow but a considerable space is left between adjacent keys. The effect of this spacing is to permit of individual keys being played without the finger overlapping adjacent keys while the entire range of notes is brought within a shorter playing range. Thus the bass keyboard is substantially within the range of a human hand, and it is thus playable when the accordion is being pumped and the left hand of the player is incapable of vertical movement. Each key on the bass keyboard, as is likewise true of the treble keyboard, controls a single tone. Or it may control a pair of tones spaced an octave apart, this being considered to be a single tone within the meaning of the invention. The bass keyboard may under some instances be entirely below the treble keyboard in tone range, or it may overlap the treble keyboard.
It is to be understood that wherever black and white keys are referred to that these color terms are used in a relative, distinguishing sense only, and that the precise colors are of no consequence.
In view of the above, it will be seen that the (iii several objects of the invention are achieved and other advantageous results attained.
As many changes could be made in carrying out the above constructions without departing from the scope of the invention, it is intended that all matter contained in the above description or shown in the accompanying drawings shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.
I claim:
1. In an accordian, a treble section including a tone-controlling keyboard simulating the keyboard of a piano, a pair of rows of tone-producing reeds, and reed-operating mechanisms connecting said keys and said reeds individually, one of said rows of reeds being positioned forwardly of said keyboard and the other of said rows of reeds being positioned substantially beneath said keyboard.
2. In an accordion, a treble section including a tone-controlling keyboard simulating the keyboard of a piano, a pair of rows of tone-producing reeds, one of said rows of reeds being positioned forwardly of said keyboard and the other of said rows of reeds being positioned substantially beneath said keyboard, direct-action means individually connecting some of the keys of said keyboard with said front row of reeds, and indirect-action means connecting other keys of said keyboard with said other row of reeds.
3. In an accordion, a treble section including a tone-controlling keyboard simulating the keyboard of a piano, a pair of rows of tone-producing reeds, one of said rows of reeds being positioned forwardly of said keyboard and the other of said rows of reeds being positioned substantially beneath said keyboard, direct-action means individually connecting some of the keys of said keyboard with said front row of reeds, and indirectaction means connecting other'keys of said keyboard with said other row of reeds, said directaction means comprising a pin extending from the end of each of the appropriate keys and a clapper on the end of said pin adapted to'cooperate with a reed to control the production of tones therefrom, and said indirect-action means comprising a pin engaging each of the appropriate keys at one end, and engaging one arm of a bell crank lever at its other end, the other arm of said bell crank lever being affixed to a clapper adapted to cooperate with a reed to control the production of tones therefrom.
4. In an accordion, means for connecting the keys of an operating keyboard to a clapper-operating mechanism comprising a block affixed to said mechanism, and a pin aiiixed at one end to said key, said block having a hole therein receiving the other end of said pin in a lost-motion engagement.
5. In an accordion, a series of reeds, an operating keyboard and a series of mechanisms for individually controlling said reeds, said mechanisms including bell crank levers, and means for operatively connecting individual keys to individual bell crank levers comprising blocks immovably mounted on free arms of said bell crank levers, and pins secured at one end to said keys, individually, and received at the other end in holes in said blocks, the engagement between pin ends and blocks being such that a lost-motion connection is effected.
6. In an accordion, a series of reeds, an operating keyboard and a series of mechanisms for dividually controlling said reeds, said mechanisms including bell crank levers, and means for operatively connecting individual keys to individual bell crank levers comprising blocks immovably mounted on free arms of said bell crank levers, and pins secured at one end to said keys, individually, and received at the other end in holes in said blocks, the engagement between pin ends and blocks being such that a lost-motion connection is efiected, said holes in said blocks being substantially at right angles to said free bell crank arms.
7. In an accordion, a bass section, and a keyboard simulating the keyboard of a piano, the individual keys of said keyboard controlling the bass tones of said accordion in chromatic tonal sequence, said keys being pivoted at one side of said keyboard, the opposite side of said keyboard, comprising the free, playing ends of said keys, being curved in a concave manner.
8. In an accordion, a bass section, and a keyboard simulating the keyboard of a piano, the individual keys of said keyboard controlling the bass tones of said accordion in chromatic tonal sequence, said keys being pivoted at one side of said keyboard, the opposite side of said keyboard, comprising the free, playing ends of said keys, being curved in a concave manner, said keyboard in width not being substantially greater than the span of a human hand.
9. In an accordion, a bass section, and a keyboard simulating the keyboard of a piano, including both black and white keys, the individual keys of said keyboard controlling the bass tones of said accordion in chromatic tonal se- 15 quence, said keys being pivoted at one side of said keyboard, the opposite side of said keyboard, comprising the free, playing ends of said white keys, being curved in a concave manner, the front edges of said black keys being also curved in a concave manner, the two curves representing the front edges of the white keys and the front edges of the black keys, respectively, being closer together at the ends than in the central edges of said black keys being also curved in a 1 concave manner, the two curves representing the front edges of the white keys and the front edges of the black keys, respectively, being closer together at the ends than in the central portion thereof, said keyboard in width not being substantially greater than the span of a human hand.
MAX B. LUTTBEG.
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Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2681587A (en) * 1951-01-19 1954-06-22 Hohner Ag Matth Accordion
DE10206592A1 (en) * 2001-03-13 2002-10-24 Monika Loso Musical instrument for left-handed musicians with keyboard and all associated components positioned mirror-fashion inside instrument
US20190035368A1 (en) * 2017-07-26 2019-01-31 Hohner Musikinstrumente Gmbh Handpull Musical Instrument
DE102020216588B3 (en) 2020-12-29 2021-10-07 Carboneon Gmbh Hand traction instrument

Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2681587A (en) * 1951-01-19 1954-06-22 Hohner Ag Matth Accordion
DE10206592A1 (en) * 2001-03-13 2002-10-24 Monika Loso Musical instrument for left-handed musicians with keyboard and all associated components positioned mirror-fashion inside instrument
US20190035368A1 (en) * 2017-07-26 2019-01-31 Hohner Musikinstrumente Gmbh Handpull Musical Instrument
US10733967B2 (en) * 2017-07-26 2020-08-04 Hohner Musikinstrumente Gmbh Handpull musical instrument
DE102020216588B3 (en) 2020-12-29 2021-10-07 Carboneon Gmbh Hand traction instrument

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