US2858248A - Laminated flexible sheet material - Google Patents

Laminated flexible sheet material Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US2858248A
US2858248A US36581253A US2858248A US 2858248 A US2858248 A US 2858248A US 36581253 A US36581253 A US 36581253A US 2858248 A US2858248 A US 2858248A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
film
leather
adhesive
flexible
metal
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Inventor
Iii John V Hastings
Andrew A Schoenberg
Original Assignee
Iii John V Hastings
Andrew A Schoenberg
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Iii John V Hastings, Andrew A Schoenberg filed Critical Iii John V Hastings
Priority to US36581253 priority Critical patent/US2858248A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US2858248A publication Critical patent/US2858248A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B15/00Layered products comprising a layer of metal
    • B32B15/04Layered products comprising a layer of metal comprising metal as the main or only constituent of a layer, which is next to another layer of the same or of a different material
    • B32B15/08Layered products comprising a layer of metal comprising metal as the main or only constituent of a layer, which is next to another layer of the same or of a different material of synthetic resin
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D06TREATMENT OF TEXTILES OR THE LIKE; LAUNDERING; FLEXIBLE MATERIALS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • D06QDECORATING TEXTILES
    • D06Q1/00Decorating textiles
    • D06Q1/04Decorating textiles by metallising
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/26Web or sheet containing structurally defined element or component, the element or component having a specified physical dimension
    • Y10T428/263Coating layer not in excess of 5 mils thick or equivalent
    • Y10T428/264Up to 3 mils
    • Y10T428/2651 mil or less
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/31504Composite [nonstructural laminate]
    • Y10T428/31678Of metal
    • Y10T428/31681Next to polyester, polyamide or polyimide [e.g., alkyd, glue, or nylon, etc.]
    • Y10T428/31685Natural source polyamide [e.g., casein, gelatin, etc.]

Description

Oct. 28, 1958 J. v. HASTINGS m ETAL 2,858,248
LAMINATED FLEXIBLE SHEET MATERIAL Filed July. 3, 1953 Andrew/I Selma/wary,
M P r PM attorneys United States Patent John V. Hastings III, Gladwyne, and Andrew A.
Schoenberg, Philadelphia, Pa.
Application July 3, 1953, Serial No. 365,812 4 Claims. (Cl. 154-47) This invention relates to laminated flexible sheet material, and more particularly concerns a flexible sheet such as leather, cloth, paper or the like covered with a uniform adherent metalized film. More specifically the invention concerns a flexible base material covered with an adherent internally metalized polyester film.
This application is a continuation-in-part of our copending applications Serial No. 140,197, filed January 24, 1950, now U. S. Patent No. 2,644,262, and Serial No. 334,491, filed February 2, 1953, now U. S. Patent No. 2,721,817.
It is conventional in the art to coat leather with gold, but the gold wears off in time, particularly when the leather is subjected to fiexure, rubbing or more severe use. Efforts have been made to overcome this difiiculty by coating the exposed surface of the gold with a clear protective coat, but such protective coats have not had the toughness required to resist rubbing, scufling and other wear. Similarly, cellophane has been applied to flexible base materials, but the cellophane tends to separate from the base when the combination is bent or flexed. Moreover it is diflicult to adhere gold or other metal permanently to cellophane and to adhere the combination of cellophane and gold permanently to a piece of leather or the like. Moisture further complicates the above problems.
It is accordingly an object of this invention to prepare a laminated flexible sheet material the laminations of which are uniformly and permanently adhered together. Another object of this invention is to provide a flexible sheet material with a decorative metaiized coating. Still another object is to provide a flexible sheet with a colored coating. Another object of this invention is to provide a flexible laminated sheet for coating cloth, leather, paper and the like with a metalized coating which is resistant to scuffiing and wear. Still another object is to provide leather articles such as shoes, handbags and the like having a metalized decorative coating which is resistant to rubbing, scufling and wear. Other objects and advantages of this invention, including the relative simplicity and economy of manufacture of the same, will further appear hereinafter and in the drawings whereof:
Fig. 1 represents a view in perspective of a laminated flexible sheet material embodying this invention, portions of thelaminations being separated for purposes of illustration;
Fig. 2 represents a view in perspective similar to Fig. 1 showing a modified laminated flexible sheet material;
Fig. 3 represents a sectional view of a laminated article having a lacquer coating, showing how the lacquer tends to break when the article is bent or curved; and
Fig. 4 is a sectional view similar to Fig. 3 showing the laminated flexible sheet material of Fig. 1 when similarly bent or curved.
Turning now to the specific embodiments of the in vention selected for illustration in the drawings, Fig. 1 shows a piece of leather having an adhesive coating 11 uniformly and continuously adhered to one surface thereof. The number 12 designates a metal film vacuummetalized to an external polyester film 13. The metal 12 is uniformly and continuously adhered to the adhesive layer 11. Chemically, the polyester film consists essentially of polyethylene terephthalate.
The sheet material 10 may be any flexible base material such as leather, cloth, fabric, etc. The adhesive is preferably the specific adhesive butadiene acrylonitrile. The layer 12 maybe any metal capable of application by conventional vacuum metalizing process to the film 13.
The film 13 is a tough very thin transparent flexible polyester film known in the art as Mylar. The polyester film preferably has a thickness of .00025 inch or .25 mil but its thickness may vary between .1 and .5 mil in accordance with this invention. Thicknesses outside this range are not at present preferred, in that thicker films are noticeable when the laminated sheet is bent through 180 while thinner films present handling prob lems. The polyester film has a minimum tensile strength of about 1700'lbs. per square inch and a minimum tensile modulus of about 45,000 lbs. per square inch. The polyester film of one quarter mil thickness: has a minimum elongation of about 25% while a similar film of one half mil thickness has a minimum elongation of about 35%. A one quarter mil thick sheet has: a tear strength as determined on a single sheet tear tester of 2.5 grams minimum, while a one half mil thick sheet has a tear strength 6 grams minimum. The tear strength tests are discussed by D. W. Flierl in an article entitled Method of Rating Film Durability, Modern Packaging, November 1951. The impact strength of a one quater mil thick polyester film is 10 kg. cm. minimum while the impact strength of a one half mil thick polyester film is 25 kg. cm. minimum. The impact strength tests are described in the aforementioned paper. The polyester film has maximum shrinkage of 5%, as determined by first measuring the length and width of the film test specimens at room temperature, placing the specimens in an oven at C. for thirty minutes, suspended so as to allow free contraction, cooling the specimens to room temperature. and measuring length and width. It willjbe appreciated that the polyester film is extremely thin and the film thickness figures are subject to the approximately 20% variation more or less. It will also be apparent that the polyester film is very durable, water repellent and chemically resistant. It is characterized by its high tensile strength and high impact strength even at low temperatures. The film shows good dimensional stability up to 150 C. r
The article shown in Fig. 1 may be manufactured by conventional high vacuum metalization of the polyester film followed by the application of adhesive to the metal and then applying a resulting laminated film to leather or another flexible base material.
The metalizing step is preferably carried 'out by passing the polyester film continuously over a source of aluminum vapor in an evacuated chamber while maintaining a high vacuum in the chamber. The aluminum is thus condensed and solidified on the polyester film in such manner that an exceedingly adherent film of microscopic thickness is applied. Preferably the metal film is just thick enough that the light transmission of the film is on the order of a few percent, preferably not more than 2% The metalized face of the polyester film is then coated with adhesive utilizing any conventional coating technique such as spray coating, roller coating, etc. under conventional conditions of temperature and pressure.
Preferably several thin coatings of such adhesive are applied, allowing or causing each to dry before the application of the next coating.
The resulting laminated sheet may readily be applied.
to a piece of material such as cloth, paper, leather or the like. For application to leather, the leather is preferably degreased utilizing naphtha degreasing solvents for example, and the laminated film is placed against the leather surface with the adhesive in contact with the leather. The resulting materials are placed in a hot larni-- nating press and subjected to any desired pressure or temperature.
The product has a bright shiny finish whether the base be leather, cloth or other flexible material. surface is substantially inert to the action of water, acetone, trichlorethylene, perchlorethylene, petroleum solvents and other commonly used solvents or chemicals, and even the milder acids and alkalies.
Fig. 3 shows a piece of leather affixed by means of adhesive 21 to a metal film 22 which is covered with transparent lacquer 23. The laminated structure of 3 has a curved cross section as would be produced by stretching the laminated sheet over a shoe last, for example. It will be observed that the convex lacquer coating tends to break at 24 as a result of the bending operation due to the brittleness and lack of strength of the lacquer and its poor adhesion to the metal.
Fig. 4 shows the laminated sheet of Fig. 1 in a curved form similar to Fig. 3. this laminated sheet is stretched tight over a convex surface such as a shoe last the metallic finish does not break up; on the contrary the polyester film is tensioned and stretched and the exposed surface becomes even more bright and mirror-like.
When the laminated film shown in Figs. 1 and 4 is applied to leather it adheres tenaciously to the leather even when the leather is flexed or bent. In fact, no perceptible wrinkle is produced on the leather when bent through 180 as compared to leather having no laminated polyester sheet thereon. The tenacious adhesion is the result of the coaction of the fused metal-polyester film bond and the butadiene acrylonitrile bond between the metal and leather.
Butadiene acrylonitrile adhesive may 'be coated on the metal and the coating dried to produce a laminated film which may be stored, shipped, etc. before application to a base material such as leather or the like. Its adhesiveness may readily be activated after storage by heat. It is highly flexible when embodied into the final product even after substantial periods of time.
Turning now to Fig. 2 of the drawings, a laminated structure is shown wherein color is incorporated into the coating. The number designates a leather or other flexible base, 31 is an adhesive such as butadiene acrylo- I nitrile, 32 is a metal film such as aluminum, 33 is a film of adhesive lacquer into which a color dye has been uniformly incorporated, and 34 is a polyester film as here-- tofore described.
The laminated article shown in Fig. 2 may be manut factured by applying an adhesive lacquer to the polyester film after the lacquer has been mixed with a suitable dye. Adhesive nitrocellulose lacquer containing a plasticizer is suitable. Some other adhesive lacquers are also suitable. The mixed dye and lacquer coat is applied to the polyester film at room temperature and pressure by conventional means such as a roller coater for example. The lacquer is heated and dried. The metal is applied to the resulting lacquer film by high vacuum metalizing as heretofore described, preferably utilizing metals such as aluminum for example. A thin layer of butadiene acrylonitrile or other adhesive is then applied to the metalized face, one or more additional adhesive layers may be applied, and the adhesive side of the resulting article is adhered to the leather or other flexible material in a hot laminating-press as heretofore described.
The product shown in Fig. 2 is advantageous in that the color of the decorative product does not depend upon the color of the metal since a wide variety of dyes may be incorporated into the lacquer. It has the advantages Its exposed It will be observed that when of the product shown in Fig. 4 and heretofore described, when it is stretched over a last or otherwise brought to a convex form.
It will be appreciated that, although vacuum metaliz-- ing is highly preferred, thin metal films may be prepared in other ways, such as electrolytic deposition or reduction of a metallic salt solution.
While two embodiments of the invention have been selected for illustration in the drawings, it will readily be apparent that the form of the device may be con sidcrably varied, and that equivalent structures and materials may be employed for accomplishing the same results. Such changes, including reversals of parts and the use of certain features of the invention independently of other features, are within the spirit and scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.
Having thus described our invention, we claim:
1. A metallized, decorative sheet comprising a flexible leather base material, an adhesive layer aflixed to one face of said flexible base material, and a thin continuous, wear resistant polyethylene terephthalate film having a thin metal layer on one face thereof, said metal also being uniformly and continuously bonded to said adhesive layer, the polyethylene terephthalate film having a thickness or" about .1 to .5 mil, a minimum tensile strength of about 1700 pounds per square inch, a minimum tensile modulus of about 45,000 pounds per square inch, and a minimum elongation of about 25 2. The coated sheet defined in claim 1 wherein the thickness of the metal film is about the minimum thickness reducing its light transmission to about 2 /2%.
3. A metallized, decorative sheet comprising a flexible leather base material, an inner adhesive layer affixed to said base material, a thin flexible metal layer aflixed to said adhesive, an outer layer of adhesive material containing uniformly distributed coloring substance affixed to said metal, and a thin strong continuous, wear resistant polyethylene terephthalate film affixed to the outer adhesive layer, the polyethylene terephthalate film having a thickness of about .1 to .5 mil, a minimum tensile strength of about 1700 pounds per square inch, a minimum tensile modulus of about 45,000 pounds per square inch, and a minimum elongation of about 25%.
4. A metallized, decorative sheet comprising a flexible leather base material, an adhesive layer affixed to one face of said flexible base material, a thin continuous, wear resistant polyethylene terephthalate film, a lacquer containing coloring material affixed to said polyethylene terephthalate film and a thin, continuous metal layer affixed to the lacquer, said metal also being affixed to said adhesive, the polyethylene terephthalate film having a thickness of about .1 to .5 mil, a minimum tensile strength of about 1700 pounds per square inch, a minimum tensile modulus of about 45,000 pounds per square inch, and a minimum elongation of about 25%.
References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,802,066 Rado Apr. 21, 1931 2,013,119 Warth Sept. 3, 1935 2,039,372 Wickmann May 5, 1936 2,087,389 Stark July 20, 1937 2,125,341 Hall et al Aug. 2, 1938 2,328,066 Drew Aug. 31, 1943 2,384,500 Stoll Sept. 11, 1945 2,497,376 Swallow et al. Feb. 14, 1950 2,575,265 Fiedler et al Nov. 13, 1951 2,644,262 Schoenberg et al. July 7, 1953 2,702,580 Bateman Feb. 22, 1955 2,714,569 Prindle et al. Aug. 2, 1955 2,740,732 Peck et al. Apr. 3, 1956 FOREIGN PATENTS 668,267 Great Britain Mar. 12, 1952

Claims (1)

1. A METALLIZED, DECORATIVE SHEET COMPRISING A FLEXIBLE LEATHER BASE MATERIAL, AN ADHESIVE LAYER AFFIXED TO ONE FACE OF SAID FLEXIBLE BASE MATERIAL, AND A THIN CONTINUOUS WEAR RESISTANT POLYETHYLENE TEREPHTHALATE FILM HAVING A THIN METAL LAYER ON ONE FACE THEREOF, SAID METAL ALSO BEING UNIFORMLY AND CONTINUOSLY BONDED TO SAID ADHESIVE LAYER, THE POLYETHYLENE TEREPHTHALATE FILM HAVING A THICKNESS OF ABOUT .1 TO .5 MIL, A MINIMUM TENSILE STRENGTH OF ABOUT 1700 POUNDS PER SQUARE INCH, A MINIMUM TENSILE MODULUS OF ABOUT 45,000 POUNDS PER SQUARE INCH, AND A MINIMUM ELONGATION OF ABOUT 25%.
US36581253 1953-07-03 1953-07-03 Laminated flexible sheet material Expired - Lifetime US2858248A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US36581253 US2858248A (en) 1953-07-03 1953-07-03 Laminated flexible sheet material

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US36581253 US2858248A (en) 1953-07-03 1953-07-03 Laminated flexible sheet material

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US2858248A true US2858248A (en) 1958-10-28

Family

ID=23440472

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US36581253 Expired - Lifetime US2858248A (en) 1953-07-03 1953-07-03 Laminated flexible sheet material

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US2858248A (en)

Cited By (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3039904A (en) * 1959-01-06 1962-06-19 Sun Chemical Corp Reflective fabric and its manufacture
US3052589A (en) * 1958-09-16 1962-09-04 W J Ruscoe Company Method of making a plastic covered sheet and products made therefrom
US3075864A (en) * 1957-10-03 1963-01-29 Rap Ind Inc Overwrap material and method of making same
US3143652A (en) * 1960-05-31 1964-08-04 Gen Electric X-ray collimator comprising a plurality of spaced plastic lamina with X-ray absorbent material coated thereon
US3198163A (en) * 1963-02-13 1965-08-03 Cadillac Products Indicator device
US3267968A (en) * 1963-03-19 1966-08-23 William A Foll Laminated glassine paper coil form
DE1242548B (en) * 1960-12-29 1967-06-22 Gentex Corp Heat reflecting flexible material with metal layers bonded to a fabric backing
US3549466A (en) * 1966-08-17 1970-12-22 Triplex Safety Glass Co Laminated transparent assemblies with preformed metal foil edge sealing means
US3871896A (en) * 1971-10-11 1975-03-18 Kansai Paint Co Ltd Precoated metal sheets and manufacture thereof
US3886986A (en) * 1972-10-24 1975-06-03 Polaroid Corp Leather laminate for camera housing
EP0181296A2 (en) * 1984-11-05 1986-05-14 FISI FIBRE SINTETICHE S.p.A. A process for the production of padding layers, and padding made by such process
US20060119077A1 (en) * 2002-08-13 2006-06-08 Stefan Rott Multilayer film for constructing skis
US20080185877A1 (en) * 2005-02-10 2008-08-07 Wilhelm Karmann Gmbh Composite Material for a Folding Vehicle Roof and Method for Production of a Composite Material

Citations (14)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1802066A (en) * 1927-05-24 1931-04-21 Rado Leopold Material facing for embellishing articles
US2013119A (en) * 1934-01-09 1935-09-03 Crown Cork & Seal Co Container closure
US2039372A (en) * 1936-05-05 Insulator
US2087389A (en) * 1935-10-12 1937-07-20 Gen Ribbon Mills Inc Woven fabric
US2125341A (en) * 1934-10-10 1938-08-02 Du Pont Coated fabric and process of making same
US2328066A (en) * 1940-05-03 1943-08-31 Minnesota Mining & Mfg Coating hydrophilic cellulosic films
US2384500A (en) * 1942-07-08 1945-09-11 Crown Cork & Seal Co Apparatus and method of coating
US2497376A (en) * 1946-03-30 1950-02-14 Ici Ltd Process of producing films
US2575265A (en) * 1949-12-17 1951-11-13 Goodrich Co B F Adhesive composition and method of making
GB668267A (en) * 1945-03-30 1952-03-12 Chavannes Marc A Improvements in or relating to wrapping or protecting material and method of making the same
US2644262A (en) * 1950-01-24 1953-07-07 Andrew A Schoenberg Applying decorative design to leather
US2702580A (en) * 1954-04-06 1955-02-22 Du Pont Metallic finish laminated sheet material and process of making same
US2714569A (en) * 1952-01-18 1955-08-02 Dobeckmun Co Laminated thread
US2740732A (en) * 1951-07-16 1956-04-03 Sprague Electric Co Process of bonding a metal film to a thermoplastic sheet and resulting product

Patent Citations (14)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2039372A (en) * 1936-05-05 Insulator
US1802066A (en) * 1927-05-24 1931-04-21 Rado Leopold Material facing for embellishing articles
US2013119A (en) * 1934-01-09 1935-09-03 Crown Cork & Seal Co Container closure
US2125341A (en) * 1934-10-10 1938-08-02 Du Pont Coated fabric and process of making same
US2087389A (en) * 1935-10-12 1937-07-20 Gen Ribbon Mills Inc Woven fabric
US2328066A (en) * 1940-05-03 1943-08-31 Minnesota Mining & Mfg Coating hydrophilic cellulosic films
US2384500A (en) * 1942-07-08 1945-09-11 Crown Cork & Seal Co Apparatus and method of coating
GB668267A (en) * 1945-03-30 1952-03-12 Chavannes Marc A Improvements in or relating to wrapping or protecting material and method of making the same
US2497376A (en) * 1946-03-30 1950-02-14 Ici Ltd Process of producing films
US2575265A (en) * 1949-12-17 1951-11-13 Goodrich Co B F Adhesive composition and method of making
US2644262A (en) * 1950-01-24 1953-07-07 Andrew A Schoenberg Applying decorative design to leather
US2740732A (en) * 1951-07-16 1956-04-03 Sprague Electric Co Process of bonding a metal film to a thermoplastic sheet and resulting product
US2714569A (en) * 1952-01-18 1955-08-02 Dobeckmun Co Laminated thread
US2702580A (en) * 1954-04-06 1955-02-22 Du Pont Metallic finish laminated sheet material and process of making same

Cited By (15)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3075864A (en) * 1957-10-03 1963-01-29 Rap Ind Inc Overwrap material and method of making same
US3052589A (en) * 1958-09-16 1962-09-04 W J Ruscoe Company Method of making a plastic covered sheet and products made therefrom
US3039904A (en) * 1959-01-06 1962-06-19 Sun Chemical Corp Reflective fabric and its manufacture
US3143652A (en) * 1960-05-31 1964-08-04 Gen Electric X-ray collimator comprising a plurality of spaced plastic lamina with X-ray absorbent material coated thereon
DE1242548B (en) * 1960-12-29 1967-06-22 Gentex Corp Heat reflecting flexible material with metal layers bonded to a fabric backing
US3198163A (en) * 1963-02-13 1965-08-03 Cadillac Products Indicator device
US3267968A (en) * 1963-03-19 1966-08-23 William A Foll Laminated glassine paper coil form
US3549466A (en) * 1966-08-17 1970-12-22 Triplex Safety Glass Co Laminated transparent assemblies with preformed metal foil edge sealing means
US3871896A (en) * 1971-10-11 1975-03-18 Kansai Paint Co Ltd Precoated metal sheets and manufacture thereof
US3886986A (en) * 1972-10-24 1975-06-03 Polaroid Corp Leather laminate for camera housing
EP0181296A2 (en) * 1984-11-05 1986-05-14 FISI FIBRE SINTETICHE S.p.A. A process for the production of padding layers, and padding made by such process
EP0181296A3 (en) * 1984-11-05 1989-06-07 Fisi Fibre Sintetiche S.P.A. A process for the production of padding layers, and padding made by such process
US20060119077A1 (en) * 2002-08-13 2006-06-08 Stefan Rott Multilayer film for constructing skis
US7393001B2 (en) * 2002-08-13 2008-07-01 Leonhard Kurz Gmbh & Co., Kg Multilayer film for constructing skis
US20080185877A1 (en) * 2005-02-10 2008-08-07 Wilhelm Karmann Gmbh Composite Material for a Folding Vehicle Roof and Method for Production of a Composite Material

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US2858248A (en) Laminated flexible sheet material
US2703772A (en) Transfer method for manufacturing infrared reflecting fabric
US3235395A (en) Transfers for metallic coatings
US2702580A (en) Metallic finish laminated sheet material and process of making same
US3152950A (en) Protective reflective film
US4911811A (en) Method of making coated articles with metallic appearance
US3589962A (en) Metallization of fabrics
US4218501A (en) Electrostatic flock-coated metal sheet with excellent corrosion resistance and fabricability
US4931366A (en) Coated article with metallic appearance
US6235409B1 (en) Aluminum laminate
US2974055A (en) Lustrous fabrics and methods of producing same
DK152519B (en) Procedure for manufacturing a laminate of paper with a coat and metal layer
US4535024A (en) Gloss black metalized product and method of preparation
US5711993A (en) Radiation cured island coating system
US2992125A (en) Sheet material having a decorative appearance
US2984599A (en) Process for bonding teflon sheet to prepared surfaces
US3039904A (en) Reflective fabric and its manufacture
US2865787A (en) Process for producing color effects on textile and other sheet-like material and products therefrom
US6238776B1 (en) Radiation cured island coating system
CA2027750C (en) Molded synthetic resin articles having thin metal film and production process thereof
US2776225A (en) Process for the production of a highly reflectant, heat resistant wrinkle finish on a base
US2963805A (en) Porcelain enameled foil labels
US3052589A (en) Method of making a plastic covered sheet and products made therefrom
JP2574707B2 (en) Fastener having a metal thin film on the surface
US3900658A (en) Polyfluorocarbon article and method for making the same