US2844848A - Building construction - Google Patents

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US2844848A
US2844848A US544753A US54475355A US2844848A US 2844848 A US2844848 A US 2844848A US 544753 A US544753 A US 544753A US 54475355 A US54475355 A US 54475355A US 2844848 A US2844848 A US 2844848A
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panel
panels
margin
unit
locking
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US544753A
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Kibbey W Couse
Robert D Keehn
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COUSE Manufacturing Inc
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COUSE Manufacturing Inc
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04HBUILDINGS OR LIKE STRUCTURES FOR PARTICULAR PURPOSES; SWIMMING OR SPLASH BATHS OR POOLS; MASTS; FENCING; TENTS OR CANOPIES, IN GENERAL
    • E04H9/00Buildings, or groups of buildings, or shelters adapted to withstand or provide protection against abnormal external influences, e.g. war-like action, earthquake, extreme climate
    • E04H9/16Buildings, or groups of buildings, or shelters adapted to withstand or provide protection against abnormal external influences, e.g. war-like action, earthquake, extreme climate against adverse conditions, e.g. extreme climate, pests
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04BGENERAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTIONS; WALLS, e.g. PARTITIONS; ROOFS; FLOORS; CEILINGS; INSULATION OR OTHER PROTECTION OF BUILDINGS
    • E04B1/00Constructions in general; Structures which are not restricted either to walls, e.g. partitions, or floors or ceilings or roofs
    • E04B1/02Structures consisting primarily of load-supporting, block-shaped, or slab-shaped elements
    • E04B1/14Structures consisting primarily of load-supporting, block-shaped, or slab-shaped elements the elements being composed of two or more materials
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04BGENERAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTIONS; WALLS, e.g. PARTITIONS; ROOFS; FLOORS; CEILINGS; INSULATION OR OTHER PROTECTION OF BUILDINGS
    • E04B1/00Constructions in general; Structures which are not restricted either to walls, e.g. partitions, or floors or ceilings or roofs
    • E04B1/62Insulation or other protection; Elements or use of specified material therefor
    • E04B1/74Heat, sound or noise insulation, absorption, or reflection . Other building methods affording favourable thermal or acoustical conditions, e.g. accumulating of heat within walls
    • E04B1/76Heat, sound or noise insulation, absorption, or reflection . Other building methods affording favourable thermal or acoustical conditions, e.g. accumulating of heat within walls specifically with respect to heat only
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04BGENERAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTIONS; WALLS, e.g. PARTITIONS; ROOFS; FLOORS; CEILINGS; INSULATION OR OTHER PROTECTION OF BUILDINGS
    • E04B1/00Constructions in general; Structures which are not restricted either to walls, e.g. partitions, or floors or ceilings or roofs
    • E04B1/62Insulation or other protection; Elements or use of specified material therefor
    • E04B1/74Heat, sound or noise insulation, absorption, or reflection . Other building methods affording favourable thermal or acoustical conditions, e.g. accumulating of heat within walls
    • E04B1/76Heat, sound or noise insulation, absorption, or reflection . Other building methods affording favourable thermal or acoustical conditions, e.g. accumulating of heat within walls specifically with respect to heat only
    • E04B2001/7679Means preventing cold bridging at the junction of an exterior wall with an interior wall or a floor

Description

Jufly 29, 1958 K. w. cousE. EI'AL 2, 8

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION Filed Nov. 5, 1955 S'Sheets-Sheet l July 29, 19 58 K. w. couss ETAL 2,84 48 BUILDING CONSTRUCTION 9 Sheets-Shee t 2 Y Filed Nov. 3, 1955 July 29, 1958 K. w. cdus; E-rm, 2,844,848 BUILDING CONSTRUCTION Filed Nov. 3, 1955 9 Sheets-Sheet 3 July 29, 1958 K. w, cous ET 2,844,848

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION I Filed Nov. 5, 1955 9 Sheets-Sheet 4 4 July 29, 1958 K. w. cbusE ,ETAL 2,844,848

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BUILDING CONSTRUCTION Jl lly 29, 1958 9 Sheets-Sheet '7 Fiied Nov. 3, 1955 MU H I'll/6.

4 gwg l 6 wwggx v $1 4 w 0 nm$nmm w w w July 29, 1958 K. w. COUSE ETAL 2,84

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION 9 Sheets-Sheet 8 Filed Nov. s, 1955 K. w. COUSE ETAL 2,844,848

. BUILDING CONSTRUCTION July 29, 1958 '9 Sheets-Sheet 9 Filed Nov. 3. 1955 W. mq .1 5.1.2. Y

United States PatcntO 2,s44,s4s BUILDING CONSTRUCTION Application November 3, 1955, Serial No. 544,753 6 Claims. (c1. -2

Keehn, Hill- Inc.,

This invention relates to building construction and, more particularly, to the quick and convenient assembly of parts of buildings of good insulating material so that they are especially adapted for use in the Arctic and other extremely cold regions.

It is the practice in the Arctic regions to erect a metal framework for buildings, such erection necessitating the use of special tools and skilled personnel. It is necessary to provide a foundation other than the ground, and the various parts which go into the construction are not especially adapted to the environment of the structure where it is erected. Also, these parts are not easily transportable by plane or capable of being conveniently parachuted without damage. In doing work in the Arctic regions, it is practically impossible to erect a building structure without first donning heavy gloves or mittens. Wearing such mittens, it is impossible to make fine adjustments in connection with the assembly of steel parts. Also, handling any metal with bare hands in severely cold weather is not only uncomfortable but dangerous, because any moisture will freeze the hands to the metal. In accordance with our invention, we propose to avoid the aforesaid difficulties and disadvantages.

An object of our invention is to produce rectangular panels of considerable width and length, made up of layers of material superimposed one upon the other in such a manner that the final product is monolithic, of any suitable width and length, as well as being capable of separation into smaller units or combination with other similar units.

Another object of our invention is to create elongated rectangular extruded units of predetermined length and shape for use in connection with panels such as are discussed in the preceding paragraph, in order to join panel to panel, to provide for walls at angles to one another, to provide for suitable attaching means between such walls and roof and floor panels and, where it is necessary, to provide for strengthening r'bs within the structure.

A further object of our invention is to provide extruded or otherwise constructed binding units of predetermined length, having a dumbell-like'cross section, for the purpose of locking and reinforcement in connection with the joining of various rectagular panels. I

A still further object of our invention is to produce building units of the character discussed in such a manner that they are interchangeable, that is, the need of different right and left units is avoided by producing such which may be reversibly placed.

These and other objects and advantages will become apparent from the following detailed description when taken with the accompanying drawings. It will be understood that the drawings are for purposes of illustration and do not define the scope or limits of the invention, reference being had for the latter purpose to the appended claims. I In the drawings, wherein like reference characters denote like parts in the several views: Figure 1 is a pictorial view in perspective showing 2,844,848 Patented July 29, 1958 ice various structures and parts thereof used in the course of erection in accordance with our invention.

Figure 2 is a fragmentary sectional perspective view showing a structure embodying our invention which has just been begun, that is, where the first step has been taken in creating a panel therefor.

Figure 3 is a view similar to the panel after another step has been completed.

Figure 4 is a view similar to Figure 2, but showing the panel after a third step has been-completed.

Figure 5 is a view similar to'Figure 2, but showing the panel after a fourth step has been completed.

Figure 6 is a view similar to Figure 2, but showing the panel after a fifth step has been completed.

Figure 7 is a vertical sectional view through-parts of two panels constructed in accordance with our invention, showing the panels separated but near to one another as if they were about to be joined.

Figure 8 is a view similar to Figure 7, but showing the two panels joined.

Figure 9 is an elevational view, partly in section and partly broken away, showing the sides of panels such as those shown in Figure 7.

Figure 10 is a plan of the upper panel of Figure 9.

Figure 11 is a plan of the lower panel shown in Figure 9, the dowel pin connections being different from those of Figure 10.

Figure 12 is a fragmentary perspective sectional View of one edge portion of a panel and an adjacent marginal locking strip shaped for attachment thereto.

Figure 13 is a'view similarto Figure 12, but showing such a locking strip actually fitted over the edgelportion of the panel, the outside fiber glass cloth sheets not having been actually sealed to the flanges of said locking strip.

Figure 14 is a fragmentary horizontal sectional view of a structure having intersecting walls, in order toillustrate how panels embodying our invention may be connected at such an intersection.

Figure 15 is a view similar the connection between an or interior wall.

Figure 16 is a view similar to Figure 14, but showing the construction at the corner of a building embodying our invention.

Figure 17 is a view similar to Figure 15 but showing reversed only the locking joint unit of Figure 15, inorder to illustrate the fact that such special units may be used either right or left. 1

Figure 18 is a perspective view adjacent a corner, with parts broken away, showing a building structure erected according to our invention, with special locking units and angular members used in the production and assembly of roof, walls and floor.

Figure 19 is a fragmentary horizontal sectional view of a floor, showing the means for interlocking the marginal units and floor proper Figure 2 but showing to Figure '14, but showing outer wall and a partition to produce a rigid structure. Figure 20 is a vertical sectional view taken throughithe floor, wall, and a locking units of Figure 1.8, approximately on the. line XX-XX thereof, in order to-show how to use the dumbbell locking units at right angles to each other. I Figure 21 is a fragmentary perspective view with parts in vertical section, parts in horizontal section, and parts broken away, in order to in its lower area further illustrate the structure shown ,in Figure 15 with a plain or free wall disposed thereabove.

Figure 22 is a fragmentary vertical sectional yiew on the line XXIL-XXII of Figure 18, but showing a modified form of side wall, as well as a modified placement of the floor members. 1

. Figure 23 is a fragmentary elevational view of-one'end and 19, showing how such a unit is beveled and grooved in order to permit cross locking of the floor structure;

Figure 24 is a fragmentary horizontal sectional view of one of the corners of the floor structure below the-interlocking dumbbell connectors, as on the line XXIV-XXIV of Figure 18.

Figure 25 is an edge elevational view of parts of two panels positioned as in Figure 7, but showing such with marginal locking units attached.

Figure 26 is a view similar to Figure 25 but showing the two panels after being joined as in Figure 8, with a locking dumbbell unit and caulking in place.

Figure 27 is a fragmentary view of one of the panels as in Figure 25, but showing broken away.

Figure 28 is a fragmentary inside or panel-engageable elevational view of a margin piece.

Figure 29 is a cross-sectional view of one of said margin pieces such as shown in Figure 28.

Figure 30 is an enlarged sectional view of a portion of a panel as shown in Figure 6, but employing two layers of metal foil or shielding between the medial layers which separate the sets of structural elements.

Figure 32 is a fragmentary sectional view Figure 34 is a transverse sectional view on the line of Figure 33, in the direction of the arrows.

Figure 35 is a fragmentary vertical perspective view, with parts in section, to show a modified form of margin piece, with caulking means applied externally of the panel.

Figure 36 is a fragmentary perspective view of an end of a wall portion or panel, showing a funnel extending therefrom as a means for a groove between the margin pieces.

Figure 37 is a fragmentary perspective view of one end a dumbbell locking unit, modified to have a handhold or tool-receiving lip which may be integral therewith.

a fragmentary elevational view of the edge of a structure, at the junction between two panels, with a part broken away, showing a dumbbell locking unit with its end projecting therefrom and apertured so that it may be more easily removed.

Figure 39 is a fragmentary perspective view of one form of caulking member which may be used in structures embodying our invention.

Figure 40 is a fragmentary perspective view of a dumbbell connecting unit which may be used in accordance with our invention.

Figure 41 is a fragmentary perspective view of the dividing skin used as separating means when assembling boards or building elements in accordance with our invention.

Figure 42 is a fragmentary perspective view of one of the building elements or boards employed to construct panels in accordance with our invention.

Figure 43 is a fragmentary perspective view to show how one of the caulking grooves or cavities may be .used to carry wiring and/or piping.

Figure 44 is a fragmentary perspective view illustrating how one of the locking marginal units may be employed to support a canvas area.

Referring-to the drawings in detail, and first considering Figure 1, there is shown in perspective some of the things which may be built in accordance with our invenmen wearing heavy gloves or mittens,

exposing the hands to severe climatic represented by the scene. In the Figures 2 and the aforesaid margin pieces 63 of relatively rigid, hard and tough material. In Figure 2, there is illusas shown in Figure 3, are placed" structural elements or boards" 53, also shown separate in Figure 42. Said boards are formed of porous material, examples of such being cellular cellulose acetate and other foamed Crete,

Figure 41, which may or may not be impregnated with such plastic. The fibrous glass cloth 51, the boards 53 and fibrous glass separating skins or cloth 54 constitute the'first layer of the finished panel.

A second layer of fibrous glass cloth 55 is placedupon the primary structure, illustrated in Figure 3, to form 60 in Figure 7. These offset edges dowels 61 of plastic, wood or other also indicated in Figure 7 and in may be provided with suitable material, as

Figures 8, 9, l0 and 11. These dowels are positioned in spaced relationship along the edges of the panel, being preferably at the inset or short edge as indicated in Figures 7, 8 and the upper part of Figure 9, so as not to extend beyond the outer edge of the panel and be exposed to injury. However, as an alternative, they may be placed centrally of the panel edge as viewed in the lower part of Figure 9 and in Figure 11, in which event they might extend beyond the outer edge of the panel, as shown in the lower part of Figure 9.

The abutting edge of the next panel is provided with holes to receive the dowels, as indicated in Figures 9 and 10. The panels may be constructed of any desired thickness, width and length, using the desired number of board layers, only two being here illustrated. The

individual boards are desirably about one inch thick and four inches wide, the length being subject to the requirements of the structure, said boards being readily cut into desired lengths by means of an ordinary wood saw. However, the panel at either end of its length will normally have a stepped or offset portion illustrated in Figures 7, 8 and 9.

The width margins of the panels are preferably cut out or notched, as indicated at 62 in Figures 12 and 13, to receive the flanges 64 of an elongated margin piece or edge connector 63. These flanges serve to firmly at-, tach the margin piece, shown in place in Figures 9, 10, ll, 25, 26 and 27, and separate in Figures 28 and 29, to the end of the panel, as the fibrous glass skin and plastic binding material are lapped thereover after the edge member has been moved into assembled relationship as viewed in Figure 13. The margin pieces 63, which may be formed by extruding hard plastic, examples being Lucite and Bakelite, are, as indicated in Figure 12, generally rectangular in cross-section, Each length normally corresponds to the length of the board panel. Its width is desirably approximately one inch, exclusive of its flanges 64, and its height about two inches. The margin piece 63 is provided with a slot 65 communicating with an enlarged, generally cylindrical pocket 66 therebeneath. The slot 65 and the pocket 66 extend from end to end of the margin piece 63. The ends of the piece 63 are notched to correspond with the olfset of the panel, as indicated in Figure 9. The margin piece 63 is also desirably provided with small semi-cylindrical notches 67 on its outer or edge face. The purpose of these notches 67, and the notches 65 and pockets 66, will now be explained.

When it is desired to attach one panel to another by the margin pieces 63, these pieces are abutted and a locking unit 68, shown separate in Figure 40, is used to connect the two pieces 63 together, as will be seen in. Figures 14, 15 and 16. These locking units 68 are shaped in section as elongated dumbbells. They are at least as long as the panel and longer when extending longitudinally between panels also connected by dowels as viewed, for example, in Figures 7, 9 and 33. Figure 21 shows such panels so connected, but the dowels being interior are not visible. A locking unit 68, shown separate in Figure 40, has one of its ends inserted into the slot 65 and pocket 66 of each of the abutting members 63. It is then driven or drawn in so that it at least extends from end to end of each panel. Each locking unit 63 is preferably made of hard plastic material, examples being Lucite and Bakelite, although non-rusting metal may be used, and when inserted, constitutes an eflicient lock or reinforcing member for the panels which it connects. Should the panels desired to be joined be composed of four or more units, that is, two or more panels to each unit, the locking unit 68 is made long enough to extend from end to end, or from top to bottom, of the structure, that is, along two or more panels instead of only one. The semi-cylindrical notches 67, which then register, may caulking material 74, shown separate in Figure 39,

be filled with suitable desirably fibrous similarly formed and which may be conventional, and this, together with the locking unit 68, produces a weather-tight joint of great strength and durability. 4

Figure 14 shows a structure in which two walls intersect one another or four Walls meet, such as in the making of four rooms. In accordance with this figure, we have four vertical panels 75, 76, 77 and 78, formed as described in connection with Figures 2 to 6, inclusive, the adjacent ends of which have margin pieces 63, applied as described in connection with Figures 12 and 13, respectively connected to corresponding margin pieces 63 outstanding from a special cross-shaped structural support member or unit 69. This unit 69 may be formed of material like that of the boards 53, its arms being tipped by margin pieces 63, which are in turn connected to the respective walls or panels 75, 76, 77 and 78, by the dumbbell'shaped connectors 68 with or without caulking material 74.

Figure 15 shows a structure similar to Figure 14, except that there are only three panels, 79, 81 and 82, connected similarly to the structure of Figure 14, but by a specially shaped structural support member or unit 70. The unit 70, desirably also formed of material like that of the boards 53, differs from the specially shaped unit 69 of Figure 14, in that it is T-shaped in section, but the construction is otherwise similar. Figure 17 illustrates how the T-shaped unit 70 may be employed for connecting three walls in which a wall, such as 79 shown in Figure 15, extends from the opposite side, that is, to the left rather than to the right. In other words, the same unit 70 may also be used for connecting three walls, such as 81, 82, and another wall extending in the direction opposite to that of the wall 79. t

Figure 16 shows a construction in which a special L- shaped or angled structural support member or unit 71, desirably also formed of material like that of the boards 53, connects two side walls 83 and 84. These slide walls 83 and 84 may be connected exactly like the walls 79 and 81, respectively, that is, provided with margin pieces 63 connected to corresponding margin pieces 63 on the L-shaped member 71, as by means of the dumbbell-shaped connecting devices 68, with or without the insertion of caulking material 74.

Figure 18, supplemented by Figures 19, 20, 22, 23 and 24, shows the employment of a specially shaped structural support member or unit 72, desirably also formed of porous material like that of the boards 53, between a roof portion 85 and a side wall portion 86. In this case the unit 72 is like the unit 71, except that the angle between the arms thereof, instead of being as in the unit 71, is an obtuse angle corresponding with the angle made by the roof and side wall. However, the sloping arm thereof is provided with a margin locking piece 63 connectedto a corresponding margin piece 63 on the member 85 by a dumbbell-shaped connector 68, with or without caulking material 74.

In the embodiment of Figure 18, the wall 86 is shown thicker than the root 85, so the margin piece 63 at the bottom of the special unit 72 is wider than the margin piece 63 adjacent the roof. However, it is otherwise connected to the wall portion '86 therebelow by means of a dumbbell-shaped member 68, with or without caulking material 74. Also shown in Figure 18 is one of the special corner units 71, which unites the adjacent walls 86 and 87 as by means of cone sponding dumbbell-shaped connectors, which in this instance are shown as extending beyond the tops of the broken-away wall portions.

Figure 18 also shows how the side walls are connected to the floor portion 88. In said floor portion, the boards 53 of porous material extend upright, that is, on their edges rather than lying on their sides as shown in Figures 3 to 6, inclusive, thereby giving correspondingly greater strength. However, the end members are correspondingly reduced in height, as indicated at 53a and 53b, so as to receive inthis case an upper margin piece 63, which connects with a corresponding margin piece 63 immediately thereabove by means of a dumbbell-shaped locking member 68.

As will be seen near the right hand edge portion of the structure shown in Figure 18, there is an aperture 89, also shown in Figure 19, for receiving a dumbbell-shaped connecting member which extends between the floor 88 and the bottom of the wall portion 86, but which here cannot extend to the exterior face of the structure because of the presence of a similar member extending across its end. When it is desired to erect vertical margin pieces 63 on horizontal margin pieces 63, as indicated in Figure 18 at 73, the abutting ends of the pieces 63 are mitered, as also shown in Figure 20 at 91, and the vertical lockof the horizontal locking unit 68.

In order to place the locking dumbbell units 68, each must be of such a length that when it is inserted flush with the outer surface of its receiving part, its following 'end lies in, the other end of the dumbbell unit is short of the path required for the next dumbbell unit to be inserted. This is clearly shown at 89 in Figures 18 and 19. A structure erected according to these Figures may have walls and roof about two inches thick, partitions, if used, of the same thickness, a floor four inches in thickness, and margin pieces 62 on three or on all four edges of panels, rather than dowels on an edge or edges, as in Figures 7 to 11, inclusive. However, other thicknesses may be created at will, the number of special pieces and the form and method of using them varied, as well as the position of the notches 67.

Figure 21 shows how a free side wall 92 may be placed above the wall portions 81 and 82. In this case, the dumbbell connectors 68 between the special unit 70 at the corners, shown in Figures 15 and 17, as well as between the outer ends of the panels beyond the corners and the panels beyond them, are extended vertically and continuously between the lower panels 82 and 81 and the upper panel 92. These connectors 68 thus serve as connecting and reinforcing means in addition to the edge connectors 63 and the dowels (not shown) which connect the lower edge of the panel 92 to the upper edges of the panels 81 and 82.

Figure 22 shows a connection similar to that between the wall 86 and the floor 88 of Figure 18, except that in this case the boards 53c of porous material extend at right angles rather than parallel to the edge connector 630 which, therefore, 'has to be let into the end portions of said boards at right angles thereto, rather than longitudinally thereof. A further distinction lies in the fact that the side wall 86c is in this instance only formed of only one layer of boards 53d rather than two layers.

Figure 23 shows how the end of a margin piece 63, mitered at 93, may be slotted transversely as at 98, as well as notched on its face as indicated at 96 and 97, so as to allow for reception of the dumbbell-shaped connector 68 of the correspondingly-mitered portion of a connecting margin piece (not shown). This slotting corresponds with the aperture 89 shown in Figure 18, said aperture being, if desired, supplemented by apertures 94 and 95, corresponding with the notches 96 and 97 in Figure 23. The slot 98 in Figure 23 broadens into a nearly cylindrical aperture, as appears at 89 in Fig. 18.

Figure 30 shows a construction similar to Figure 6 except that two layers 55 of fibrous glass cloth are disposed between the upper and lower series of boards 57 and 53 of porous material. Figure 31 shows an additional embodiment which corresponds to that of Figure 30 except that between the two intermediate layers 55 is a sheet of metal shielding, such as bright aluminum foil or thin plate 99. Such material provides additional means for conserving heat in a building by reflecting it back and thereby correspondingly minimizing loss.

Figures 32, 33 and 34 illustrate the connections of mg unit 68 forced down to abut against the upper edge adjoining panels by means of dowels 61a, but involves a modification as compared with the showing in Figure 9 and the upper part of Figure 10. These figures amplify the showing of the lower part of Figure 10 and Figure 11, in that the dowels 61a are shown disposed on the central planes of the panels, rather than there being two sets of dowels with each set disposed centrally of a series of boards 53 and 57 respectively. In this instance, because there are fewer dowels, it is proposed to make them correspondingly larger, rather than as in Figures 10 and 11.

Figure 35 shows a modification of the marginal locking pieces, here designated 63a, in which the grooves or notches 672 on either side of the pockets which receive the dumbbell locking members 68 open to the exterior surfaces, rather than being contained between said surfaces. In this case, therefore, the caulking material 74c, if used, is on the exposed surfaces of the walls, rather than being contained between said surfaces.

Figure 36 shows a further embodiment in which the caulking material 74) is formed of a substance which is placed in position by being extruded through a funnelshaped device 100, rather than being laid along the grooves or notches 67 as in the preceding embodiments. Figure 37 shows a modification of the dumbbell-shaped locking member 68g by the provision of a handhold or lip 101, engageable by the hand or a tool or wire, to facilitate placing or permit easy extraction. Figure 38 shows a modified form of dumbbell locking member 6811, in which an end portion thereof is provided with an aperture 102 to receive a hook or other tool 103 for removing it from position or otherwise conveniently handling it.

Figure 43 shows the employment of one set of grooves or notches 67 in corresponding marginal locking units 63 for holding, instead of caulking, a pipe 104 or one carrying power or other wires 105. Figure 44 shows the employment of the pocket 66, which normally receives one of the dumbbell locking members 68 for, in this instance, holding a bead or enlargement 106 on the upper end of a sheet of canvas 107, which may serve as an awning or for any desired purpose.

From the foregoing, it will be seen that the entire structure made in accordance with our invention consists of a number of panel pieces, marginal members, connecting or locking members, and a few special joint units. Although the structure is shown and described as formed primarily of plastic or non-metallic material, it will be understood that it may be constructed of other materials and modified in form.

Having now described our invention in detail in accordance with the patent statutes, those skilled in the art will have no difiiculty in making changes and modifications in the individual parts or their relative assembly in order to meet specific requirements or conditions. Such changes and modifications may be made without departing from the scope and spirit of the invention, as set forth in the following claims.

We claim:

1. A composite panel comprising a rectangular body portion formed of heat-insulating material and having fragile edges, and a relatively hard, tough and rigid margin piece extending throughout the length of each of opposite edges of said body portion and rigidly secured thereto, the exposed edge surface of each margin piece being provided with a slot communicating with an enlarged pocket, said slot and pocket extending from end to end of the margin piece and being adapted to receive an end of a dumbbell-shaped connecting unit for connecting the margin pieces to other similar margin pieces.

2. A composite panel comprising a rectangular body portion formed of heat insulating material and having fragile edges, two opposite margins of said panel being notched, and a relatively hard, tough, and rigid margin piece extending throughout the length of each of opposite edges of said margin portion and having flanges extending into said notched portions and rigidly connected to said body portion, the exposed edge surface of each margin piece being provided with a slot communicating with an enlarged, generally cylindrical pocket, said slot and pocket extending from end to end of the margin piece, and there being at least one notch extending longitudinally of said exposed surface of each margin piece at one side of said slot to receive caulking material, said slot and pocket being adapted to receive an end of a dumbbell-shaped connecting unit to connect the margin pieces to other similar margin pieces.

3. The invention as defined in claim 2 in which each margin piece is formed of an extruded synthetic plastic composition, and, exclusive of the flanges, is generally rectangular in cross section.

4. In a building construction, a panel as defined in claim 1, and an elongated rigid structural support member formed of heat insulating material having a margin piece identical with the first-mentioned margin piece extending throughout the length thereof and rigidly secured thereto, and a dumbbell-shaped unit the ends of which are fitted respectively into the pockets of said margin pieces with the portions of said unit between said ends extending through said slots in the margin pieces thereby rigidly connecting said margin pieces and consequently connecting said panel to said support member.

5. In a building construction a panel as defined in claim 4 said exposed edge of each margin piece having at least one notch extending longitudinally throughout the length thereof, and the addition of caulking material filling said notches.

6. An elongated margin piece to be secured to the edge of a panel for connection to an adjacent panel in building construction, comprising an elongated extruded synthetic plastic composition member generally rectangular in cross section and having a pair of flanges extending from one side thereof for connection with a building panel, said member also having a slot extending longitudinally of its opposite side and comunicating with an enlarged, generally cylindrical pocket, and said member also having at least one small notch at one side of said slot extending longitudinally of the second-mentioned side of said member, said slot and pocket being adapted to receive an end of a dumbbell-shaped connecting unit for connecting said member to another similar member.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 716,865 Choquet et al. Dec. 30, 1902 1,073,723 White Sept. 23, 1913 2,094,635 Brooks Oct. 5, 1937 2,242,614 Miesen May 20, 1941 2,323,936 Roberts July 13, 1943 2,335,220 Edwards Nov. 23, 1943 2,379,179 Petersen June 26, 1945 2,658,378 Fiordelisi Nov. 10, 1953 2,664,740 Cochrane Jan. 5, 1954 2,718,034 Brown Sept. 20, 1955 2,731,682 Evans Jan. 24, 1956 FOREIGN PATENTS 413,634 France Aug. 13, 1910

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Cited By (21)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3236014A (en) * 1961-10-02 1966-02-22 Edgar Norman Panel assembly joint
US3287869A (en) * 1963-06-21 1966-11-29 Featherston A Kilgore Removable partition walls
US3373538A (en) * 1965-02-17 1968-03-19 Sklo Union Narodni Podnik Structural element
US3392497A (en) * 1966-10-21 1968-07-16 Delron Company Inc Modular enclosure with clamp joined panels
US3563582A (en) * 1968-08-05 1971-02-16 Grace W R & Co Spline joint
US3736715A (en) * 1971-09-15 1973-06-05 Nomeco Building Specialties In Prefabricated walls
US3888055A (en) * 1973-09-25 1975-06-10 Roberto A Gallo Crypt wall construction having removable fronts secured by concealed fasteners and method of construction
US4004387A (en) * 1975-08-20 1977-01-25 Ellingson Jerome B Panels and the method of same for house construction
US4071990A (en) * 1975-01-29 1978-02-07 Fritz Traber Demountable frame and panel
US4461131A (en) * 1982-05-21 1984-07-24 Aar Corporation Panel interconnection system
US4615155A (en) * 1985-07-08 1986-10-07 Chamberlain Sam R Modular building construction
US4625476A (en) * 1983-12-27 1986-12-02 Nihon Shuno System Kabushiki Kaisha Partition wall
US4777774A (en) * 1987-06-09 1988-10-18 Smalley Iii Arthur L Building construction utilizing plastic components
US5018895A (en) * 1989-10-12 1991-05-28 Meier Jr Joseph A Film stacker clip
US5086601A (en) * 1989-01-24 1992-02-11 Andersen Corporation Joint structure
WO1995019478A1 (en) * 1994-01-18 1995-07-20 Jan Holm Hansen Sandwich element for light constructions, in particular for building purposes, and method for manufacturing same
US6421972B1 (en) 2000-04-27 2002-07-23 I Mozaic Trust Modular wall component with insulative thermal break
US20050279039A1 (en) * 2002-07-03 2005-12-22 Konopka Peter J Earth coupled geo-thermal energy free building
US20070044425A1 (en) * 2005-09-01 2007-03-01 Ubilla Jose R Construction element
US20070132278A1 (en) * 2005-12-12 2007-06-14 Paul Lester Vehicle panels and their method of construction
US20100011699A1 (en) * 2008-07-15 2010-01-21 EnviroTek Systems, LP Insulated component wall finishing system

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FR413634A (en) * 1910-03-15 1910-08-13 Drinnaco Valentini Construction molded blocks
US1073723A (en) * 1913-09-23 James Collord White Building-block.
US2094635A (en) * 1937-04-30 1937-10-05 Ludowici Celadon Company Insulating wall construction
US2242614A (en) * 1936-03-21 1941-05-20 Miesen Erich Device for connecting parts of portable buildings
US2323936A (en) * 1937-07-15 1943-07-13 Rubatex Products Inc Insulating construction element
US2335220A (en) * 1941-04-21 1943-11-23 Walter M Ericson Building insulation
US2379179A (en) * 1943-04-12 1945-06-26 Sheetlock Company Joining and cornering strips
US2658378A (en) * 1950-10-10 1953-11-10 Fiordelisi Ernesto Concrete block construction
US2664740A (en) * 1951-05-07 1954-01-05 Ralph H Cochrane Panel wall joint
US2718034A (en) * 1951-11-13 1955-09-20 Brown Richard Hail Standardized building frame member
US2731682A (en) * 1953-10-27 1956-01-24 Jamison Cold Storage Door Comp Refrigerator door and method of making the same

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US1073723A (en) * 1913-09-23 James Collord White Building-block.
US716865A (en) * 1902-05-14 1902-12-30 Henri Choquet Interlocking bricks.
FR413634A (en) * 1910-03-15 1910-08-13 Drinnaco Valentini Construction molded blocks
US2242614A (en) * 1936-03-21 1941-05-20 Miesen Erich Device for connecting parts of portable buildings
US2094635A (en) * 1937-04-30 1937-10-05 Ludowici Celadon Company Insulating wall construction
US2323936A (en) * 1937-07-15 1943-07-13 Rubatex Products Inc Insulating construction element
US2335220A (en) * 1941-04-21 1943-11-23 Walter M Ericson Building insulation
US2379179A (en) * 1943-04-12 1945-06-26 Sheetlock Company Joining and cornering strips
US2658378A (en) * 1950-10-10 1953-11-10 Fiordelisi Ernesto Concrete block construction
US2664740A (en) * 1951-05-07 1954-01-05 Ralph H Cochrane Panel wall joint
US2718034A (en) * 1951-11-13 1955-09-20 Brown Richard Hail Standardized building frame member
US2731682A (en) * 1953-10-27 1956-01-24 Jamison Cold Storage Door Comp Refrigerator door and method of making the same

Cited By (23)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3236014A (en) * 1961-10-02 1966-02-22 Edgar Norman Panel assembly joint
US3287869A (en) * 1963-06-21 1966-11-29 Featherston A Kilgore Removable partition walls
US3373538A (en) * 1965-02-17 1968-03-19 Sklo Union Narodni Podnik Structural element
US3392497A (en) * 1966-10-21 1968-07-16 Delron Company Inc Modular enclosure with clamp joined panels
US3563582A (en) * 1968-08-05 1971-02-16 Grace W R & Co Spline joint
US3736715A (en) * 1971-09-15 1973-06-05 Nomeco Building Specialties In Prefabricated walls
US3888055A (en) * 1973-09-25 1975-06-10 Roberto A Gallo Crypt wall construction having removable fronts secured by concealed fasteners and method of construction
US4071990A (en) * 1975-01-29 1978-02-07 Fritz Traber Demountable frame and panel
US4004387A (en) * 1975-08-20 1977-01-25 Ellingson Jerome B Panels and the method of same for house construction
US4461131A (en) * 1982-05-21 1984-07-24 Aar Corporation Panel interconnection system
US4625476A (en) * 1983-12-27 1986-12-02 Nihon Shuno System Kabushiki Kaisha Partition wall
US4615155A (en) * 1985-07-08 1986-10-07 Chamberlain Sam R Modular building construction
US4777774A (en) * 1987-06-09 1988-10-18 Smalley Iii Arthur L Building construction utilizing plastic components
US5086601A (en) * 1989-01-24 1992-02-11 Andersen Corporation Joint structure
US5018895A (en) * 1989-10-12 1991-05-28 Meier Jr Joseph A Film stacker clip
WO1995019478A1 (en) * 1994-01-18 1995-07-20 Jan Holm Hansen Sandwich element for light constructions, in particular for building purposes, and method for manufacturing same
US6421972B1 (en) 2000-04-27 2002-07-23 I Mozaic Trust Modular wall component with insulative thermal break
US6857237B1 (en) * 2000-04-27 2005-02-22 I Mozaic Trust Modular wall component with insulative thermal break
US20050279039A1 (en) * 2002-07-03 2005-12-22 Konopka Peter J Earth coupled geo-thermal energy free building
US20070044425A1 (en) * 2005-09-01 2007-03-01 Ubilla Jose R Construction element
US7908811B2 (en) * 2005-09-01 2011-03-22 Jose Rojas Ubilla Construction element
US20070132278A1 (en) * 2005-12-12 2007-06-14 Paul Lester Vehicle panels and their method of construction
US20100011699A1 (en) * 2008-07-15 2010-01-21 EnviroTek Systems, LP Insulated component wall finishing system

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