US2806222A - Scarf - Google Patents

Scarf Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US2806222A
US2806222A US52760355A US2806222A US 2806222 A US2806222 A US 2806222A US 52760355 A US52760355 A US 52760355A US 2806222 A US2806222 A US 2806222A
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
illustrated
fig
device
material
tubular
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Inventor
Carpenter Polli
Original Assignee
Loop Fabrics Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A41WEARING APPAREL
    • A41DOUTERWEAR; PROTECTIVE GARMENTS; ACCESSORIES
    • A41D1/00Garments
    • A41D1/22Clothing specially adapted for women, not otherwise provided for
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A41WEARING APPAREL
    • A41DOUTERWEAR; PROTECTIVE GARMENTS; ACCESSORIES
    • A41D23/00Scarves; Head-scarves; Neckerchiefs
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A41WEARING APPAREL
    • A41DOUTERWEAR; PROTECTIVE GARMENTS; ACCESSORIES
    • A41D15/00Convertible garments
    • A41D15/007Convertible garments with bolero structure

Description

Sept. 17, 1957 P. CARPENTER SCARF' 3 SheetsSheet 1 Filed Aug. 10, 1955 @gvcra 67'. I

P. CARPENTER Sept. 17, 1957 SCARF 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Aug. 10, 1955 Sept. 17, 1957 P. CARPENTER SCARF 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Aug. 10, 1955 J64 vW5 United States Patent" SCARFI Polli'Carpenter, Chicago, 11]., assiglior to Loop Fabrics, Inc., a corporation of Illinois Application August 10, 1955, Serial No. 527,603

3 Claims. (Cl. 2-91) The invention relates generally to an article of wearing apparel, and more particularly to a combination article.

The invention has among its objects the production of a novel article of wearing apparel which is so designed that it may be worn in a plurality of ways, as for example, a head dress, scarf, neck piece, halter, or shrug.

Another object of the invention is the production of such an article which, while very simple in construction, is very attractive for the purposes intcnded, flexi=ble in use and relatively inexpensive to manufacture.

A further object of the invention is the production of such an article that may be made of either tubular material or from the usual yard material.

A further object of the invention is the utilization of a novel method of making the same whereby the seaming of the yard or tubular material is more or less invisible or unnoticeable.

A further object of the invention is the production of such a device which, if desired, may be provided-with a suitable ornamentation or the like;

Many other objects and advantages of the construction herein shown and described may be obvious to those skilled in the 'art from the disclosure herein given.

To this end my invention consists in the novel constructi-on,' arrangement .and c'ombina'tionof parts herein shown and described, and more particularlyfpointed out in theclaims'.

In the drawings, wherein like reference charactersindicate like or corresponding parts:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view'of 'an article embodying the present invention;

Fig.2 is a sectional view taken approximately on the line 2--2 of Fig. 1; j

Fig. 3 is a perspective view of tubular material prior to the stitching thereof to form the device illustrated in Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 is a front view of-the article" in a position it ranged in connectionwithu belt or the like, simulating a blouse effect;

Fig. 6 is similar to Fig.4, illustrating the article arranged as a shrug or the like, extending over the shoulders of the wearer and aroun'd the upper back 'por'tion;

Fig. 7 is a side view of the arrangement illustrated in illustrating the manner in "which the same may be "cut'in producing the device'therefro'm;

Fig. 11 is a perspective view-similar to Fig.1 of-a device-formedfrom material such as illustrated in Figi l 0;

2,865,222 Patented Sept. 17, 1957 Fig. 12 is a perspective view similar to Figs. 10 and 11 of a modified form of construction utilizing an ornamental band or flap integrally formed with the device; and

Fig. 13 is a partial side view of the device illustrated in Fig. 12 arranged as a head dress somewhat similar to that illustrated in Fig. 8.

The invention contemplates the utilization of an endles's loop or band of material formed from tubular or yard material, the device being so constructed that the finished face of the fabric extends on both the interior and exterior ofthe loop, with the circumferential length and axial width of the loop being such that the device may beworn'as any one of a series of apparel accessories. I am'aware that articles of wearing apparel have been designed as an endless band or loop, some of which have been utilized as a combination head and neck covering. Two'examples of such type of device are illustrated in the patents to'Go'lfier-i Nos. 2,413,319 and 2,421,934, issued December 31, 1946, and June 10, 1947, respectively. However, prior devices have been so designed that they did not-have the flexibility of the present invention, whereby the article may serve any one ofa plurality of functions and at the same time 'being'simpler in construction than prior structures, the simplicity of the device enabling its multi-purpose use as well as imparting a very attractive appearance when in use.

Referring to the drawings and particularly to Figs. 1, 2 and 3, the invention is illustrated as constructed from a single piece of tubular material such, for example, as tubular jersey. As illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2, the reference numeral 1 indicates an article of apparel having a circumference approximately four times its axial width, having an outer face 2 and an inner face 3, both of which comprise the finished face or surface of the material. Theconstruction illustrated in Fig. 1 may be formed from a length of tubularstock such as illustrated in Fig. 3, the outer face 2' of which constitutes the finished face of thefmaterial. One-half of the material is then folded inwardly as illustrated in Fig. 2, whereby the out edges 4*and 5 are brought adjacent one another, the extreme edge portions thereof being turned inwardly as indicated at 6, with such inturned portions stitched together by a suitable line of stitching 7 or the like, thus forming a relatively invisible or blind seam.

To achieve such an invisible or blind seam, the stitching may be done with the material in a more or less folded position asillustrated in Fig. 2 the article not being completely turned inside out, the free edges, however, being turned out and stitched by suitable means, such as on a machine, until an opening remains merely of an approximate size to receive the stitching mechanism of the sewing machine, following which the edges of the material defining such opening may be stitched together by hand from the exterior of the device. As will be apparent to those-skilled in the art, however, the stitching also could be accomplished by turning the tube, as illustrated in Fig. 3, inside out, flattening the tube, bringing the upper edges as viewed in Fig. 3 forward to the lower edges, the upper rear edge as viewed being brought to the lower rear edge (shown in dotted lines), with the inner face, as viewed in Fig. 3, of such edge portions abutted and stitched together. Such abutment and stitching is then continued around the edges formed by the upper and lowerfront edges, in effect forming a circular or loopshaped seam, which at such stage of the operation extends longitudinally along the inner and outer faces of a then more or less elongated tubular structure. As in the firstmethod ofstitching, an opening must be left in'the seam to permit the structure to be turned right side out therethrough, such operation bringing the seams into a peripheral relation as illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2. The

construction illustrated in Figs. and 11 could be stitched in the same manner as the tubular stock, following the completion of the diagonal stitching to initially form a tube, or in this case, a portion along the diagonal seam could be left unstitched, forming an opening, following which the second method above described could be utilized, eliminating, however, the gap or opening therein utilized to turn the material right side out,-and such operation may be performed through the unstitched portion of the diagonal seam, which may then, if desired, be hand stitched.

While the specific proportions of the article as to width, length, etc., may be varied somewhat without impairing the flexibility of the device, I have found that very satisfactory results may be obtained wherein the tubular blank, such as illustrated in Fig. 3, has an axial length of approximately oue-half the circumference of the tubular stock. In other words, very satisfactory results may be obtained by utilizing tubular material having a fifty-four inch circumference, the blanks being cut along intervals of twenty-seven inches or three quarters of a yard. When folded and stitched as illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2, the finished article formed from such stock will have a circumference of substantially fifty-four inches, while the axial length or width of the finished article will be approximately thirteen inches. With such proportions the device may be readily arranged to achieve various desired effects, as for example, those illustrated in Figs. 4 through 9 and 13.

In the arrangement illustrated in Fig. 4, wherein the outline of the wearer is indicated in broken lines, the device is shown as draped around the neck and over the shoulders of the wearer, with the main portion of the device extending along the front of the body to a point below the waist similar to a scarf or the like.

Fig. 5 illustrates the device as being draped over the shoulders of the wearer similar to that illustrated in Fig. 4, with the lower depending front portion of the device spread across the body of the wearer, in which position it may be held by a belt or the like, creating a blouselike appearance. 7

Figs. 6 and 7, illustrate the arrangement of the device as a shrug or the like, in which the device extends from behind the wearers neck over one shoulder and the upper part of the forearm, around behind the back of the wearer, up in front around the other shoulder and upper forearm to the back of the neck. In this arrangement, the device substantially completely loses its identity as a scarf or loop of material and simulates a shrug or the like. To put the device on in the manner illustrated in Figs. 6 and 7, the loop initially may be encircled about the body of the wearer below the arms, the portion R extending around the back, following which the excess material at the front is drawn over the head, draping the same about the shoulders and upper forearms as illustrated in Figs. 6 and 7.

In the arrangement illustrated in Fig. 8, a portion of the device is looped over the head of the wearer, following which the excess depending below the shoulders is twisted and looped over the head and draped around the neck.

In the arrangement illustrated in Fig. 9, the device is looped twice or doubled about the neck of the wearer, following which it is arranged as a neck or collar piece over the shoulders.

The device may also be worn in other manners not illustrated, one of which is as a halter or the like, in

which arrangement the device would initially be encircled about the body of the user as described in connection with the arrangement illustrated in Figs. 6 and 7, the material, however, being initially crossed in front of the body and brought over about the head, whereby the material encircles the neck of the wearer, crossing over at the front and extending under the arms and around the back.

From the above description, it will be apparent that the proportions of the device may be broadly described as being of a circumference or length to encircle the neck of the wearer and extend approximately to or below the waist, and having a width to extend over the shoulders and preferably down along a portion of the upper arms of the wearer.

While Figs. 1, 2 and 3 are directed to a construction utilizing tubular material, the device may also be readily formed from yard material such as that illustrated in Fig. 10, a device made from such material being illustrated in Fig. 11. Referring to Fig. 10, it will be noted that the yard material 8 may be cut along diagonal or bias lines 9, the length of the material between the lines 9 corresponding to the circumference of the tubular stock illustrated in Fig. 3. The material is then looped around to bring the bias edges 9 in abutting relation, following which the latter are turned inwardly at the unfinished face of the material and stitched together in a manner similar to the seam illustrated in Fig. 2, thus forming a tubular member similar to that illustrated in Fig.3, but having a seam extending diagonally across its circumference. The tubular structure thus formed is then folded and stitched in the same manner as heretofore described in connection with the tubular construction, an invisible or blind seam 11 being formed adjacent one edge of the finished device as illustrated in Fig. 11, the latter being partially broken away to show such line of stitching. While the yard material is employed in the construction illustrated in Fig. 11, as the material extends on the bias relative to the axis of the tubular structure, the latter is capable of some degree of stretching in a manner somewhat similar to that of the tubular jersey fabric illustrated in Figs. 1, 2 and 3. At the same time as the diagonal seam 12 formed by the edges 9 is relatively long, at no point extending on directly opposite portions of the inner and outer faces of the material, the stretch is not materially limited by the same and no bulkiness results therefrom. Obviously, if the seam extended in a straight line axially across the width of the material at both the inner and outer faces thereof, a noticeable ridge would result.

If desired, the device, whether of tubular or yard material, may be provided with an ornamental end section, as for example, such as illustrated in Fig. 12 wherein a radially extending flap or fold 13 may be provided by folding the material back upon itself and securing the same together, as for example by a line of stitching 14, such operations taking place following completion of the structures illustrated in Figs. 1 or 11. In use the construction illustrated in Fig. 12 may be worn as a head dress as illustrated in Fig. 13 wherein the device is arranged about the head and neck of the wearer in a manner somewhat simliar to that illustrated in Fig. 8, the device being arranged with the flap 13 centered at the top of the head as illustrated in Fig. 13. Likewise, when the construction of Fig. 13 is arranged as illustrated in the other figures described with respect to the construction illustrated in Fig. 1, the flap 13 may be so disposed as to be either not apparent or so positioned that it serves as ornamentation.

It will be appreciated from the above that the flexibility of the present invention results in a large part from the simplicity of its design and construction, wherein the relative proportions of the device are such as to enable its arrangement into the forms illustrated in the drawings. Consequently, while the proportions may be varied somewhat, if the circumference or width is insuificient it will not be possible to suitably arrange the device as illustrated in the drawings, while an excessive increase in the proportions will result in a loose fitting, unattractive device. For example, the devices illustrated in the patents heretofore referred to obviously could not function in the same manner as the present device as the shapes and proportions thereof do not permit all the arrangements herein illustrated.

'It will be appreciated that if desired novel effects may be derived by utilizing different colors for various portions of the device, as for example, in the tubular fan, by having the inner face dyed or formed one color and the outer face in another. Likewise, where formed from yard material difierent materials, etc., may be employed for the inner and outer sections, etc. Similarly other means such as a suitable adhesive might be employed in some cases in place of stitching.

It will be noted that I have provided a very attractive and flexible article of wearing apparel which may be arranged in numerous attractive displays, functioning as a head dress, scarf, shrug, etc., such flexibility in a large measure being achieved as a result of the inherent simplicity of the structure as distinguished from prior articles of a similar nature.

I have also provided a novel method of fabricating such a device wherein the entire surface of the same comprises a finished face of the material with no apparent seams therein.

Having thus described my invention, it is obvious that various immaterial modifications may be made in the same without departing from the spirit of my invention; hence, I do not wish to be understood as limiting myself to the exact form, construction, arrangement and combination of parts herein shown and described, or uses mentioned.

What I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. An article of wearing apparel formed from a strip of stretchable tubular material, the ends of which are secured together to form an elongated endless loop of material of substantially uniform width throughout its circumferential length, the said ends of the strip are secured together to form a continuous hollow body, said loop having a width of approximately one-quarter the circumference of the loop and being of a width to extend approximately from the neck of the wearer, over the shoulders and upper arms, and of a circumferential length to extend approximately around the neck and to the waist of the wearer.

2. As an article of wearing apparel as set forth in claim 1, wherein a portion of said loop is folded back upon itself, and a line of stitching secures said portions in folded relation to form a rectangular flap extending outwardly from the loop.

3. An article of wearing apparel as set forth in claim 1, wherein the material from which the endless loop of material is formed is cut on the bias.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,413,319 Golfieri Dec. 31, 1946 2,537,206 Caputo Jan. 9, 1951 2,575,791 Brown Nov. 20, 1951 2,669,721 Koch Feb. 23, 1954 FOREIGN PATENTS 1,039,957 France May 20, 1953

US2806222A 1955-08-10 1955-08-10 Scarf Expired - Lifetime US2806222A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US2806222A US2806222A (en) 1955-08-10 1955-08-10 Scarf

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US2806222A US2806222A (en) 1955-08-10 1955-08-10 Scarf

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US2806222A true US2806222A (en) 1957-09-17

Family

ID=24102158

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US2806222A Expired - Lifetime US2806222A (en) 1955-08-10 1955-08-10 Scarf

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US2806222A (en)

Cited By (31)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3229308A (en) * 1963-09-23 1966-01-18 Harold V Jensen Head band and an improved fabric jointure
US3327319A (en) * 1964-05-04 1967-06-27 Johnides George Continuous collar and sleeve structure
US4110846A (en) * 1977-05-20 1978-09-05 Robert Hernandez Combined scarf and hood
US4667345A (en) * 1985-03-04 1987-05-26 Ursula Jachowski Strapless outer garment for a woman
US4723325A (en) * 1986-12-19 1988-02-09 Perry Dorothy M Combination sweatband and facial towel
US5414869A (en) * 1993-11-26 1995-05-16 Thomson; Margaret I. Knotless scarf and method of making same
US5454121A (en) * 1994-02-17 1995-10-03 Mellinger; Orvetta G. Ring shaped scarf, bow and clip combination
US5621921A (en) * 1994-07-22 1997-04-22 Outland; Claudette Hat/collar
US5867835A (en) * 1993-06-07 1999-02-09 Dabbieri; Claudia Scarf with twist
US6145131A (en) * 1998-11-30 2000-11-14 Huff; Callie J. Knotless adjustable wrap
US6701532B1 (en) * 2003-01-16 2004-03-09 Top Trenz, Inc. Elastic fashion accessory band
US20060010569A1 (en) * 2004-06-30 2006-01-19 Tawfik Shelley J Cold weather protection garment
US20090013445A1 (en) * 2007-07-10 2009-01-15 Joyce Martin Joywrap
US20090260127A1 (en) * 2008-04-14 2009-10-22 Cynthia Marie Prezgar Garment
US20100229283A1 (en) * 2009-03-16 2010-09-16 Stephano Diaz Article of clothing
US20110209266A1 (en) * 2010-03-01 2011-09-01 Dena Dodd Perry Scarf with water-resistant side
US20120042432A1 (en) * 2010-08-23 2012-02-23 Tawfik Shelley J Cold weather protection garment
US20120291181A1 (en) * 2009-11-04 2012-11-22 Mohammad Mubde Absi Ready To Wear Headscarf
US20130042381A1 (en) * 2011-08-16 2013-02-21 Hipknotix, Llc. Convertible garment, method of making convertible garment, kit for making convertible garment, and bands for use therewith
US20130326792A1 (en) * 2012-06-08 2013-12-12 Thea Lynn Matos Infinity hijab headscarf
US8621668B1 (en) * 2012-05-17 2014-01-07 Splitzgear, L.L.C. Convertible garment
US20140157478A1 (en) * 2012-11-02 2014-06-12 Twin Envisions, LLC Convertible garment
US20150101720A1 (en) * 2011-09-02 2015-04-16 Uncaged, Llc Convertible clutch purse
US20150201687A1 (en) * 2014-01-23 2015-07-23 Sherry Graves Configurable garment and method thereof
USD741042S1 (en) 2013-05-06 2015-10-20 Tiffany Paul Scarf with neck pillow pocket
USD749294S1 (en) * 2014-09-26 2016-02-16 Janice Lee Stapleton LED infinity scarf with a battery pack and a pocket
USD751267S1 (en) * 2014-11-20 2016-03-15 Christina Sue Babcock Gessler Scarf
US20160174621A1 (en) * 2014-12-23 2016-06-23 G-III Apparel Group, Ltd. Convertible garment and method of converting same
USD766547S1 (en) * 2013-10-26 2016-09-20 Joanne Snodgrass Convertible shrug
USD770144S1 (en) 2015-06-18 2016-11-01 Pamela Lumpkin-Loving Hooded endless body scarf
US20170079346A1 (en) * 2015-09-21 2017-03-23 Sonia Chopra Reversible waterproof garment

Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2413319A (en) * 1945-07-21 1946-12-31 Golfieri Amelia Scarf-capuchin
US2537206A (en) * 1949-11-10 1951-01-09 Caputo Rose Garment
US2575791A (en) * 1950-12-29 1951-11-20 Phoebe M Brown Blouse type garment
FR1039957A (en) * 1951-07-18 1953-10-12 Convertible clothing item
US2669721A (en) * 1952-02-04 1954-02-23 Koch Max Fur stole convertible to a jacket

Patent Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2413319A (en) * 1945-07-21 1946-12-31 Golfieri Amelia Scarf-capuchin
US2537206A (en) * 1949-11-10 1951-01-09 Caputo Rose Garment
US2575791A (en) * 1950-12-29 1951-11-20 Phoebe M Brown Blouse type garment
FR1039957A (en) * 1951-07-18 1953-10-12 Convertible clothing item
US2669721A (en) * 1952-02-04 1954-02-23 Koch Max Fur stole convertible to a jacket

Cited By (36)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3229308A (en) * 1963-09-23 1966-01-18 Harold V Jensen Head band and an improved fabric jointure
US3327319A (en) * 1964-05-04 1967-06-27 Johnides George Continuous collar and sleeve structure
US4110846A (en) * 1977-05-20 1978-09-05 Robert Hernandez Combined scarf and hood
US4667345A (en) * 1985-03-04 1987-05-26 Ursula Jachowski Strapless outer garment for a woman
US4723325A (en) * 1986-12-19 1988-02-09 Perry Dorothy M Combination sweatband and facial towel
US5867835A (en) * 1993-06-07 1999-02-09 Dabbieri; Claudia Scarf with twist
US5414869A (en) * 1993-11-26 1995-05-16 Thomson; Margaret I. Knotless scarf and method of making same
US5454121A (en) * 1994-02-17 1995-10-03 Mellinger; Orvetta G. Ring shaped scarf, bow and clip combination
US5621921A (en) * 1994-07-22 1997-04-22 Outland; Claudette Hat/collar
US6145131A (en) * 1998-11-30 2000-11-14 Huff; Callie J. Knotless adjustable wrap
US6701532B1 (en) * 2003-01-16 2004-03-09 Top Trenz, Inc. Elastic fashion accessory band
US20060010569A1 (en) * 2004-06-30 2006-01-19 Tawfik Shelley J Cold weather protection garment
US7467423B1 (en) 2004-06-30 2008-12-23 Tawfik Shelley J Cold weather protection garment
US20090013445A1 (en) * 2007-07-10 2009-01-15 Joyce Martin Joywrap
US20090260127A1 (en) * 2008-04-14 2009-10-22 Cynthia Marie Prezgar Garment
US8321963B2 (en) * 2009-03-16 2012-12-04 Stephano Diaz Article of clothing
US20100229283A1 (en) * 2009-03-16 2010-09-16 Stephano Diaz Article of clothing
US20120291181A1 (en) * 2009-11-04 2012-11-22 Mohammad Mubde Absi Ready To Wear Headscarf
US8516619B2 (en) * 2009-11-04 2013-08-27 Mohammad Mubde Absi Ready to wear headscarf
US20110209266A1 (en) * 2010-03-01 2011-09-01 Dena Dodd Perry Scarf with water-resistant side
US20120042432A1 (en) * 2010-08-23 2012-02-23 Tawfik Shelley J Cold weather protection garment
US8225429B2 (en) * 2010-08-23 2012-07-24 Tawfik Shelley J Cold weather protection garment
US20130042381A1 (en) * 2011-08-16 2013-02-21 Hipknotix, Llc. Convertible garment, method of making convertible garment, kit for making convertible garment, and bands for use therewith
US20150101720A1 (en) * 2011-09-02 2015-04-16 Uncaged, Llc Convertible clutch purse
US8621668B1 (en) * 2012-05-17 2014-01-07 Splitzgear, L.L.C. Convertible garment
US20130326792A1 (en) * 2012-06-08 2013-12-12 Thea Lynn Matos Infinity hijab headscarf
US20140157478A1 (en) * 2012-11-02 2014-06-12 Twin Envisions, LLC Convertible garment
USD741042S1 (en) 2013-05-06 2015-10-20 Tiffany Paul Scarf with neck pillow pocket
USD766547S1 (en) * 2013-10-26 2016-09-20 Joanne Snodgrass Convertible shrug
US20150201687A1 (en) * 2014-01-23 2015-07-23 Sherry Graves Configurable garment and method thereof
USD749294S1 (en) * 2014-09-26 2016-02-16 Janice Lee Stapleton LED infinity scarf with a battery pack and a pocket
USD751267S1 (en) * 2014-11-20 2016-03-15 Christina Sue Babcock Gessler Scarf
US20160174621A1 (en) * 2014-12-23 2016-06-23 G-III Apparel Group, Ltd. Convertible garment and method of converting same
US9814276B2 (en) * 2014-12-23 2017-11-14 G-III Apparel Group, Ltd. Convertible garment and method of converting same
USD770144S1 (en) 2015-06-18 2016-11-01 Pamela Lumpkin-Loving Hooded endless body scarf
US20170079346A1 (en) * 2015-09-21 2017-03-23 Sonia Chopra Reversible waterproof garment

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US2870448A (en) Wearing apparel
US7181775B2 (en) Maternity garment
US4190908A (en) Convertible garment
US5136726A (en) Stretchable articles of apparel with detachable decorative elements
US3268913A (en) Adjustable sleep turban
US2086326A (en) Reversible handbag
US4377007A (en) Convertible length garment
US3013274A (en) Convertible towel costume
US3704469A (en) Wrap-around garment
US3237210A (en) Convertible wearing apparel
US3774241A (en) Loincloth and spreader therefor
US2804626A (en) Scarfs
US3381311A (en) Pajama leg construction
US4912780A (en) Combined shirt and religious garment
US2018782A (en) Undergarment
US3160892A (en) Convertible wearing apparel
US2513030A (en) Glove for jewelry display
US1731137A (en) Garment
US3261025A (en) Neck scare attachment
US3860967A (en) Collar and shirt collar protector
US20100192283A1 (en) Pants Having Hip-Up Function
US2369416A (en) Shirt
US2464331A (en) Novelty headdress
US4107873A (en) Stuffed reversible doll
US3099013A (en) Tuenabout dickey