US2803272A - End dog and multiple saw sawmill - Google Patents

End dog and multiple saw sawmill Download PDF

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US2803272A
US2803272A US393901A US39390153A US2803272A US 2803272 A US2803272 A US 2803272A US 393901 A US393901 A US 393901A US 39390153 A US39390153 A US 39390153A US 2803272 A US2803272 A US 2803272A
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log
frame
carriage
center
saw
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US393901A
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Jr John D Crosby
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Yates Dowell A
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B27WORKING OR PRESERVING WOOD OR SIMILAR MATERIAL; NAILING OR STAPLING MACHINES IN GENERAL
    • B27BSAWS FOR WOOD OR SIMILAR MATERIAL; COMPONENTS OR ACCESSORIES THEREFOR
    • B27B29/00Gripping, clamping, or holding devices for the trunk or log in saw mills or sawing machines; Travelling trunk or log carriages
    • B27B29/08Trunk or log carriages with gripping means designed to pass the saw blade(s), especially for band saws; Arrangement of gripping accessories thereon; Turning devices thereon
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T83/00Cutting
    • Y10T83/647With means to convey work relative to tool station
    • Y10T83/6476Including means to move work from one tool station to another
    • Y10T83/6483Tool stations staggered relative to one another
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T83/00Cutting
    • Y10T83/647With means to convey work relative to tool station
    • Y10T83/6492Plural passes of diminishing work piece through tool station
    • Y10T83/6499Work rectilinearly reciprocated through tool station
    • Y10T83/6508With means to cause movement of work transversely toward plane of cut
    • Y10T83/6515By means to define increment of movement toward plane of cut
    • Y10T83/6536By carriage

Description

Aug. 20, 1957 J. D. CROSBY, JR
END DOG AND MULTIPLE SAW SAWMILL 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Nov. 23. 1953 Inventor Attorney Aug. 20, 1957 J. D. CROSBY, JR
END DOG AND MULTIPLE SAW SAWMILL 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed NOV. 25. 1953 I Inventor Attorney 1957 J. D. CROSBY, JR 2,803,272
' END DOG AND MULTIPLE sAw SAWMILL Af/orney n ed S a Pa en END DOG AND MULTIPLE SAW SAWMILL John D. Crosby, Jr., Bay Minette, Ala., assignor of ten percent to A. Yates Dowell, Washington, D. C.
Application November 23, 1953, Serial No. 393,901 6 Claims. (Cl. 14337) This present invention relates to the processing of timber and more particularly to a sawmill for supporting a log centrally at both of its ends and while the log is so supported the entire sawing operation is performed.
Heretofore, sawmills have been operated in which a more or less conventional carriage moved the log past a single saw blade and only one edge of the log could be sawed at a time requiring four passes and a quarterturn between each pass of the log to produce a square timber while the sawyers were required to ride the carriage back and forth with the logs for securing the log to the carriage and turning the log at the required time. This procedure required an excessive amount of time with the tedious work of riding the cars at high speeds and acceleration resulting in detrimental effects upon the workmen. Further, the mechanism for performing the turning of the log was very complicated and required substantial force applied to the log with some danger of damaging a surface of the finished lumber and thereby reducing its value.
7 An object of the present invention is to overcome the defects of the conventional practice and to provide a sawmill which can be operated with a minimum of skilled labor and amount of manual labor.
Another object of the invention is to provide a structure for supporting a log so that a single step of securing the log to the carriage is the only requirement for semiskilled labor.
Another object of the invention. is to provide a sawmill structure which can be assembled from standard parts with the resulting saving in initial and upkeep costs. Another object is to provide means for shaping a blank where one operator has. full control of the shaping operation.
A further object of the invention is to increase the efficiency of the combination of labor and capital in the production of lumber.
Briefly stated, the invention includes an overhead track on which a carriage is mounted for movement from a loading position through the shaping or sawing position and capable of receiving a log from the loading position and discharging the sawed log upon completion of the shaping operation thereon. Adjacent the loading station are a first pair of saws spaced apart to simultaneously saw both sides of a log and a second pair of saws located in the path of movement of the log for thereafter making a further cut in the portion of the log remaining between the first two saws. Each pair of saws is adjustable with at least one pair being adjustable by power means.
For supporting a log, the carriage is provided with a pair of downwardly extending brackets with at least one bracket movable, toward and from the other. Each bracket is provided with a center similar to the types used on lathes and supports a log by engaging each end thereof and means are provided for rotating one center and thereby the log a quarter of a turn for producing a right angle cut on the other opposed sides. An auxiliary supporting roller hydraulically movable from operative 2 03,272 Patented Aug. 20, 1957 to inoperative position and vice versa, is provided between the pairs of saws to prevent undesired bending and vibration of the partially sawed log.
A loading and elevating structure is provided for receiving one log at a time and raising such log to the centers on the brackets so that the brackets may be moved toward each other projecting the centers into the log ends thereby supporting the same for the sawing operation. Suitable compressed air and hydraulic cylin- 0 ders are provided for controlling the various operations and the sawyer controls the entire sawmill except for the loading elevating structure, which is controlled by a workman who also sees that the log is properly located on the centers.
Further objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following description taken in conjunction with the drawings, wherein:
Figure 1 is a plan view of the sawmill with parts broken away and parts omitted showing the relation of the saw blades and their supporting frames to the overhead tracks, traveling carriage and the loading elevating structure;
Fig. 2, a side elevation with part broken away and parts omitted showing the elevator in log receiving position, the carriage in position for receiving a log, and the conveyor structure for removing the sawed lumber;
Fig. 3, sheet 1, a side elevation of the elevating and loading frame; 7
Fig. 4, a plan view of the elevating frame;
Fig. 5, sheet 2, a fragmentary section taken substantially on line 55 of Fig. 1; and
Fig. 6, a diagrammatic view showing the air controls for clamping and rotating the log on the carriage; and
Fig. 7, a diagrammatic view showing the hydraulic system for moving the carriage, adjusting the saws toward and away from each other, elevating the log, and moving the supporting roller in position for the last pass of 'th lumber.
Referring more particularly to the drawings wherein like referenced numerals refer to like parts throughout, a carriage 10 supported by wheels 12 is mounted for movement on tracks 13, 13' supported by I-beam members 14 which are mounted on supporting posts 15, 15'/-16, 16 and a plurality of other posts not shown, so that the carriage is movable in an elevated plane. To the right of the posts 16, 16' bed frames 17, 17' are mounted, which frames are partially supported by the posts 16, 16' and other supporting means such as legs 18 and 19. Upon the bed frames 17, 17 are mounted adjustable sawcarrying slide frames 20, 20 and 21, 21 which frames are movable a limited amount toward and from the center line of the sawmill and of the carriage. The movable saw-carrying frames 20 and 21 at the front of the mill are similar to movable frames 20' and 21 at the back of the mill. A log loading and elevating frame 22 is positioned beneath the overhead tracks 13 and to the left of the saw-carrying slide frames 20, 20, 21, 21' in a position for loading the log onto the log-carrying centers of the carriage.
ing axles 30 and spaced therebelow is a longitudinally extending shaft 31 which is secured to cross members 33, 34 fixedly mounted on the under sides of the frame members 11, 11 and fixed to the longitudinal shaft by suitable means such as U-bolts or bearing caps 35, 35 and/or by welding, the right end of the shaft being supportedby a downwardly extending arm 36 fixed to the leading cioss" member 26 and the lower end of arm 36 includes a U- shaped clamp such as a bearing cap 37 for supporting such leading end. A Z-shaped bracket 38 having its inter mediate portion horizontal with a longitudinal bore in the horizontal portion thereof is slidably mounted with its bore surrounding the leading end of shaft 31 and has an upwardly extending arm 39 projecting above the frame 11 and a downwardly extending arm 40 rotatably supporting a center 41 at the lower end thereof. Such center may be of conventional design and is shown as including three circumferentially spaced chisel projections for engaging the center of the end of a log. The Z-shaped bracket 33 is prevented from swinging movement about longitudinal shaft 31 by angle members 42, 42' mounted on the upper surfaces of transverse frame members 25 and 26 and such angle may carry rectangular shaped guide bars 43, 43 extending between the transverse frame members 25 and 26 and slidably engage the upwardly extending arm 39 of the Z-shaped bracket thereby preventing swinging movement of the bracket 38 about shaft 31. The bracket 38 may be moved from its full line position to its dotted line position (Fig. 2) by means of a pneumatic cylinder 44 pivotally secured at one end to an upwardly extending lug 45 projecting from transverse frame member 24 with a brace 46 secured to another transverse frame member such as 33. The piston rod 47 is provided with a yoke at its outer end which embraces the upstanding arm 39 of the Z-shaped bracket 38 and is pivotally secured thereto by a pin 48. The Z-shaped bracket 38 can thereby be moved longitudinally on the carriage by the application of air pressure to the ends of the cylinder 44 by conventional air hoses as hereafter described.
A second Z-shaped bracket 49 includes a central portion with a bore slidably received on the trailing end of longitudinal shaft 31 and the upstanding arm 50 thereof extends between transverse angle members 27 and 28 and is secured thereto by set screws 51, 51 or other suitable means mounted on transverse angle members 27 and 28, thereby preventing swinging movement of the Z-shaped bracket 49. The downwardly extending arm 52 is provided with a tubular bearing 53 in which is mounted a rotatable center 54, similar to center 41, for engaging the trailing end of the log. An extension 55 of the horizontal portion of the bracket 49 is of L-shape and lies in a substantially horizontal plane for pivotally supporting one end of a pneumatic cylinder 56 (Fig. 1). In the vertical plane of the centers 41 and 54 is a shaft 57 (Fig. 2) connected to the trailing end of center 54 by means of a universal joint 58 and such shaft 57 is rotatably mounted in a bearing 59 (Fig. l) on the L-shaped extension 55. Such shaft 57 includes a crank arm 60 fixed thereto and which is pivotally connected at its free end to the piston rod 61 whereby the pneumatic cylinder 56 may rotate the shaft 57 and thereby the center 54 a fixed amount which is preferably 90. Such rotation may be limited by providing suitable stops 62, 63 for limiting the rotation of the center 54, and if desired, such stops may be made adjustable by any suitable means such as a screw or the like. A fixed stop built up to the proper ext nt by welding has been found to be satisfactory.
For propelling the carriage, an elongated cylinder 63 (Figs. 1 and 7) is fixed at its left to a support, (not shown) and the projecting piston rod 64 is pivotally connected to a downwardly extending arm 65 mounted on the leading end of the carriage. It will be evident that the cylinder 63 and the piston rod therein are of suflicient length to move the carriage the desired distance by means of fluid pressure such as hydraulic pressure.
It will be evident that the carriage may be controlled in its movement by the control of the hydraulic cylinder 63 and the securing of the log between the centers may be accomplished by means of the pneumatic cylinder 44 which moves the Z -shaped bracket 38. The log may be rotated a fixed amount by means of the pneumatic cylinder 56. The carriage may be reversed end for end if desired, and a safety feature is provided in the form of track embracing guides 66 and 66' fixed to the carriage partially surrounding the tracks to avoid danger of the carriage jumping the track. The supply of air to cylinders 44 and 56 may be provided by means of air hoses which may be supported by means of a spring suspended at a relatively high location in the building or other structure and positioned rearwardly of the carriage to permit the latter to move from one end of the tracks 13 past the sawing station and to the discharge position for the finished lumber and such arrangement is not shown in detail to avoid unnecessarily complicating the drawings.
Log loading and elevating structure Referring to Figs. 1 to 4 of the drawing, a pair of up standing Y-shaped members 67, 67A are arranged in spaced relation between the supporting posts 15 and 16 and below the tracks for receiving logs thereon and upstanding abutment posts 68, 68A projecting from the ground to above the Y-shaped member 67 prevent logs fromrolling olf rearwardly from the Y-shaped members. Upwardly extending braces 69, 69A serve to reinforce the upwardly and forwardly extending leg of the Y-log supports 67, 67A respectively and upon the upper end of such braces 69, 69A are mounted socket or angle members 60, 60A, upon which angle members one end of rails 71, 71A are mounted, the other ends of such rails extending to a supply of logs so that logs 72, may roll and/or slide on such rails to the Y-supports 67, 67A.
Between the Y-supports 67 and 67A is mounted a trapezoidal shaped frame 73 which is pivoted at its smaller or rear end to an upstanding frame 74 which is braced by struts 75 and the trapezoidal frame being pivotally mounted by any suitable means such as lugs and pins 76 of well known design. The forward ends of the side frame members are arranged in substantially parallel relation and support inverted A-shaped cradles 77, 77A, which cradles are substantially in registry with the upstanding arms of the Y-shaped frames 67, 67A whereby a log may roll down rails 71, 71A and into the Y-supports and inverted A-shaped cradles. The frame 73 is raised from its full line to its dotted line position by means of a hydraulic cylinder 78 which is pivotally connected at one end to the lower extremity of struts 75 with a piston rod 79 thereof being pivotally connected to a transverse member 86 extending between the nonparallel sides of the trapezoidal frame 73 whereby the trapezoidal frame 73 with the inverted A-shaped cradles may be moved from the full line to the dotted line positions shown in Fig. 2. To prevent excessive movement of frame 73 suitable stops 81, 81A may be provided on the Y-shaped log supporting members for limiting the downward movement and other suitable stops may be provided to limit the upward movement to prevent the inverted A-cradles from lying in the path of movement of the log supporting centers 41 and 54. The hydraulic cylinder 78 is controlled by means, of a four-way valve 82 located adjacent the post 16, for operation by a workman whose duty is to see that a log is properly located on the inverted A-shaped cradle 77, 77A to raise such log so that it lies between the centers 41 and 54, and to manually move the log on the horizontal bar 83 of the inverted A-shaped cradles so that at least one center 54 or 41 is accurately located with the center of the log. At this time, the sawyer who has control of all the other operations of the mill may move the carriage to cause center 54 to engage the trailing end of the log, thereafter the center of the leading end of the log is properly positioned with relation to the center 41 at which time the sawyer moves the movable log supporting bracket 38 into engagement with the leading end of the log, thereby securing the log on the carriage ready for the sawing operation, elevating frame 22 being pivotally mounted at one side and having the power operating cylinder 78 exerting its force substantially midway between the ends of the frame and the frame being relatively flat, provides some flexibility of the frame and in positioning the log between the centers 41 and 5 the elevator may be raised to approximately position the log at the correct elevation and at that time the operator may grasp one end of the log and accurately position. such one end in proper relation to its center and the center is then moved against the log so as to retain the log on the center after which the other end of the log is similarly positioned and by the operation of the cylinder 44 the centers are moved together gripping the log therebetween. The flexibility of the elevating frame is illustrated in phantom lines showing exaggerated positions of the log closely adjacent downwardly depending brackets 40 and 52. It will also be evident that the logs can be rolled or slid across bars 33 of the inverted A-shaped cradles since the log is normally of smaller transverse dimension than the spacing between the legs of the A-shaped cradle.
Saw carrying slides and discharge conveyor A first pair of saw blades 84 and 84' are mounted on conventional arbors 85, 85' which arbors are rotatably mounted in bearings 86, 86 mounted on the slide frames 20, 20' respectively which slide frames are mounted for movement toward and from one another by a slidable mounting with relation to the bed frames 17, 17, respectively. For guiding the frames for rectilinear movement parallel with the arbors, guide bars 87, 87 are mounted on the underside of frame 20 and guide bars 88, 88' cooperating therewith are mounted on the upper side of bed frame 17 (see Fig. 5.) Similar bars are provided on the other slide frames for accurately guiding such other frames.
For moving the saw blades 84 and 84' toward and away from one another, hydraulic cylinders 89, 89' are mounted for reaction between the bed frame 17, 17' and the slide frames 20 and 20' respectively and referring to Fig. 5, one arrangement for accomplishing this connection is shown to include an L-shaped bracket 90 having its longer leg fixed to the outer portion of bed frame 17 and extending therefrom inwardly toward the saw blade and then projecting upwardly at which point a piston rod 91 is pivotally connected to the L-shaped bracket 90 and the cylinder 89 is pivotally connected to the slide frame 20 whereby the application of fluid pressure in the cylinder 89 will cause the slide frame 20 to move in the required direction. The two hydraulic cylinders 89 and 89 are connected in parallel and operated by a single control valve 92 of the 4-way type (upper center of Figure l) and suitable stops are provided for limiting the movement of the frames 20 and 20' in both directions and such stops may take any desired form such as a pair of upstanding yokes fixed to the bed frame 17 and a cooperating projection on the frame 20 for cooperation with each of said yokes and each of the yokes may be provided with an adjusting screw for accurately controlling the extent of movement of the frame 20 in its sliding movement. Similarly, the frame 20' may be provided with stops limiting its movement and by the hydraulic control the sawyer can vary the width of the outside boards in accordance with the dimension of the log being sawed.
Although saw frames 21 and 21' are mounted for sliding movement, it has been found that a fixed adjustment for the slide frame is satisfactory and such fixed adjustment may be accomplished by means of straps 93 (Figure 1) located above the slide frame 21 and below a cross member in bed frame 17 with connecting bolts 94 arranged to have their lower ends closer to the saw blades 95, 95' for preventing outward sliding movement of the slide frames 21 and 21' and such straps 93 and bolts 94 permit adjustment as necessary. It will be evident that hydraulic cylinders could be used for moving the slides 21 and 21' similar to the hydraulic cylinders shown for slides 20 and 25, if desired, and suitable stops can also be provided.
The saws 95, 95' are mounted upon mandrels or arbors 96, 96 which are rotatably mounted in bearings 97, 97' and the mandrels 96 and 96 carry belt pulleys 98, 98 of substantial Width which are driven by means of belts 99, 99' from a suitable source of power and the pulleys 98 being substantially wider than the belts 99 permit sliding movement of the slide frames without affecting the driving relation. Similarly, mandrels and 85 are provided with a drive pulley 100 and 100' which are driven by belts 101, 101' from a suitable source of power.
When a log supported on centers 41 and 54 is passed between the saw blades 84, 84 and 95, 95', a first cut is made by the saws 84, 84 removing the slabs or outside portions of the log and the saws 95 and 95 cut boards of a width equal to the lateral spacing of saws 84, 95, and 84, 95 and upon completing the pass, beyond the left edge of saws 84, 84' the outer slabs are completely severed from the log and upon completing the pass beyond the left edge of saws 95 and 95', the boards formed by the cuts of the two pairs of saws are completely severed. The fiat center section of the log from top to bottom remains supported on the center 41 and 54 and such center portion of the log is returned to the position of the carriage shown in full line where such center section is rotated through and then such center section is passed between the saws 84, 84' and 95, thereby cutting the remaining slabs and boards from the side of the center section which had previously been at the top and bottom of the log.
For removing the slabs and the board cut from the log, suitable conveying structure is provided and such conveying structure is shown at the rear of the-mill in Fig. 1 and is shown in partial elevation with parts omitted in Fig. 2. The forward set of conveyors has been omitted in Fig. 1 so that the structure therebeneath could be more clearly shown. For uniform numbering the conveyor at the rear side of the mill will be designated with the prime added thereto.
A plurality of idle rollers 102' are rotatably mounted on side frame members 103', 104' mounted on slide frame 20' and similar rollers 102 are mounted on slide frame 20. The supports for such rollers may take various form including individual upstanding lugs if desired.
Similarly rollers 105' are mounted for rotation on side frame members 106', 107' which members are mounted on slide 21 whereby the rollers move with the slides similar to the movement of the rollers 102 with the slide 20'. It will be evident that similar rollers 102 and 105 are mounted respectively on supporting frame members upon slides 20 and 21 respectively.
A guard 108 is provided adjacent each saw blade to prevent any danger of the board dropping between the saw and the rollers and such guard is inclined to assist in directing the board to the rollers 102, 102, 105, 105. Extending from the right end of the saws 95, 95' is a more or less conventional belt conveyor 109 for carrying the lumber after it is fed thereto by the rollers or after the last center piece supported directly by the centers 41 and 54 is dropped from the carriage upon separation of the Z-shaped bracket 40 from bracket 52. Adjacent the conveyor 109 are mounted rollers 110, 111 and another guide roller 112 is mounted in framer 20 and a lower guide roller 113 is mounted in suitable position for guiding a drive belt 114 which passes around guide rollers 110, 111, 112, and 113, and such drive belt engages the underside of idle conveyor rollers 105 and 102, such belt 114 being driven by the arcuate contact with conveyor 109 in the direction indicated by the arrows thereby causing the rollers 102 and 105 to feed lumber thereon toward conveyor 109 for discharge.
Intermediate log support During the first pass of the log between the saws the 7 strength of the entire log serves to prevent undue bending thereof and the sawing operation can be performed satisfactorily without supporting the log intermediate its ends. However, during the second pass of the log the flat center portion is of a thickness equal to the spacing between the saw blades 95 and 95'. When the saws 95 and 95' are cutting the center portion of the relatively flat blank, that portion of the log is supported solely by a rectangular section having the dimensions corresponding to the spacing of saw blades 95 and 95 and therefore such portion of the blank is relatively weak and substantial bending and vibration takes place. To overcome this problem a supporting roller 115 is rotatively mounted in a vertical strut member 116 which is pivotally mounted at its lower end by suitable lugs and pivot pin to a cross-channel frame member 117 extending between the inner portions of bed frames 17 and 17' and the mounting is such that the roller 115 will contact the lower surface of the flattened blank when the strut and roller supported thereon are in the full line position shown in Figs. 1 and 2, while such strut may be moved to the dotted line position shown in Fig. 1 to permit the free passa e of the log or blank during the first pass thereof. arm 118 secured to the strut is pivoted to a piston rod 119 of a hydraulic cylinder 120 which has its outer end pivotally mounted to a cross-frame member 121 whereby the roller 115 can be moved from its operative full line position to its inoperative position by means of hydraulic cylinder 12% under the control of the sawyer. To prevent excessive movement of the roller and strut 115, a cross-frame member in the form of an I-beam 121 may be provided which is suitably supported from the main frames 17 and 17' and, if desired, suitable adjustments may be provided to limit the movement and vertical adjustment of the roller. It has been found necessary to remove part of the web of the I-beam 121 for passage of arm 118 to the lowered position of roller 115. The stops may be built up by welding if desired.
Hydraulic and pneumatic control From the above description it will be evident that the logs are fed from a supply on supporting rails 71, 71A to the inverted A cradles on the loading and elevating frame 73 and such logs are guided thereto by means of the .--shaped log supports 67, 67A. Assuming the carriage 1b to be in approximately the position shown, a workman positioned adjacent the post 16 controls the raising of elevating and loading frame 73 by means of valve 32 which controls the supply of hydraulic fluid to hydraulic cylinder '78, whereby the log may be accurately raised so that the centers thereof are approximately at the height of the centers 41 and 54 of the carriage, whereupon the same workman with one hand may engage the log to center one end properly thereof in the center 54, for example, and the sawyer located adjacent post 16 may move the carriage so that center 54 will engage the log and thereafter the workman may accurately position the leading end of the log and the sawyer at that time will cause the Z-shaped bracket 38 to be moved toward fixed bracket 52 thereby clamping the log on the centers 41 and 54. The elevating and loading frame 73 is somewhat flexible so that the workman may bear down on one end and thereby raise the other end of the frame or vice versa for accurately positioning the log with relation to the centers. The horizontal bar 83 of the inverted A cradles permits some rolling of the log to assist further in positioning the log forwardly or rear wardly so the workman need only guide the log without requiring any appreciable physical exertion. A fourway valve 122 (Figs. 1 and 6) controls pneumatic cylinder 44 for gripping the log and the four-way valve 123 controls hydraulic cylinder 63 for moving the carriage forwardly and rearwardly.
Assuming the log is loaded on the centers 54 and 41 with the saws running, the sawyer operates valve 123 (Figs. land 7.) causing the piston .rod 64 to project out of hydraulic cylinder 63 and move the carriage 10 with the log past the saws 84, 84 and 95, at which time the slabs are separated by the first pairs of saws and boards are formed by saws 95 and 95 while the center portion of the log becomes a relatively flat blank and the slabs and boards are carried from the saws by the rollers 102, 102, 105, 135, which are continuously rotated by means of the belt 114 driven by the continuously operating discharge conveyor 109.
The carriage is then returned to its full line position under the control of the sawyer by controlling valve 123 and after the flat blank has cleared the saws, the sawyer operates a valve 124 (Figs. 1 and 6), which actuates pneumatic cylinder 56 and rotates the flat blank through 99 and the carriage is then operated by means of valve 123 and hydraulic cylinder 63 to carry the now horizontally positioned flat blank past the saw blades. At this time the sawyer also actuates valve 124A (Figs. 1 and 7) which controls hydraulic cylinder to move the guide roller 115 to its full line position and the upper surface of roller 115' is substantially at the height of the lower surface or" the horizontally positioned flat blank and engages such flat blank at a point adjacent the cutting region of saws 95, 95, where the downward reaction on the flat blank is greatest for supporting the flat blank and particularly the center section thereof. This avoids objectionable bending and vibration due to the small size of the square center section of the log. Such center sections have been approximately 4 inch by 4 inch beams and at the center of the unsupported flat blank the bending moment becomes excessive. However, with the roller 115 in position, the objectionable vibration and bending has been avoided. It will be noted that pneumatic cylinder 44 is continuously supplied with air pressure so that the log is continuously under the axial pressure produced between centers 54 and 41, thereby avoiding any danger of the log or blank dropping from the supports.
After the carriage has moved the horizontally positioned flat blank past both pairs of saws, the control valve 122 is actuated to operate pneumatic cylinder 44 and separate center 41 from center 54, thereby permitting the sawed center section to drop and it will be evident that the slabs and boards which have been sawed are carried by the rollers 162, 102', 105, 105' to conveyor 109 to the place of grading or storage of the lumber or to a vehicle for carrying such lumber to a location for grading and/or storing. The carriage is then returned to its position for receiving another log and the valve 124 may either be left in its present position or restored to its initial position thereby rotating the center 54 as desired.
In the event that it is desired to vary the thickness of the board cut between saw 84 and saw 95 or between saw 84 and saw 95, the valve 92 may be actuated to energize hydraulic cylinders 89 and 89' in the desired direction to increase or decrease the thickness of the boards. It will be observed that hydraulic cylinders 89 and 89 are simultaneously supplied with hydraulic fluid through conduits 125 and 126. It will be evident that suitable stops may be provided to limit the movement of the slide frames 20 and 20 and such stops may be adjustable. Further, in some situations it may be desirable to control the hydraulic cylinders 39 and 89' individually, thereby sawing a thick board on one side and a thin board on the other.
Compressed air is furnished to a supply line 127 (Fig. 6) from a pressure tank 123 supplied by a motor compressor unit 129 of conventional construction, and the exhaust air may be removed to any desired location by an exhaust conduit 13%) or such exhaust duct may be omitted and the air discharged at the valves 122 and 124 directly into the atmosphere.
The hydraulic system includes a hydraulic pump 131 (Fig. 7) which may supply hydraulic fluid to a pressure tank 132 which may have compressed air in the upper portion thereof or the hydraulic fluid may be fed directly from the pump 131 to a supply conduit 133, which is provided with suitable branch lines to the various valves 92, 123, 124A, controlled by the sawyer and to valve 82 controlled by the workman loading the carriage. Suitable return conduits from the various hydraulic valves are in communication with return duct 134 from which duct the hydraulic fluid is collected in a pump 135 which is connected to the inlet of hydraulic pump 131.
It will be evident that the conduits for the hydraulic fluid are made flexible where necessary and the hydraulic system will include conventional safety precautions such as by-pass means for preventing excessive pressures in the system. The supply of air to the cylinders 44 and 56 has been accomplished by means of flexible hoses suspended from a point substantially above the carriage and to the rear thereof by means of a long coil spring to permit the necessary movement of the carriage without interference and since the control cylinders on the carriage are pneumatically actuated, there is no danger of loss of hydraulic fluid and the weight of the supply lines is appreciably less with air than with hydraulic fluid. Also, the pneumatic pressure is continuous regardless of any slight variations in the length of the log or in the penetrating action of the centers, since such pneumatic pressure will take up anyvariation.
Although the structure has been described as being for one length of logs, it will be observed that the trailing Z-shaped bracket 49 can be adjusted along the trailing end of shaft 31 by changing the location of angle members 27, 28 by removing bolts 29 and providing additional holes in the side frame members 11 of the carriage 10. The L-shaped support 55' secured to the Z-shaped bracket 49 will move therewith during such adjustment. In some installations it may be that the movement of Z- shaped bracket 38 would take care of the necessary variation in log lengths and the Z-shaped bracket 49 may be fixed. In such situations, the pneumatic cylinder 56 may react between the frame 11 and the arm 60 of the shaft 57 for producing the quarter turn rotation of the center 54.
From the above description it will be evident that a highly advantageous sawmill has been provided in which the log is suspended from brackets and the force of gravity will normally maintain such brackets in their correct vertical aligned position and therefore very little strain is produced in the brackets and the supporting frame and such brackets can be relatively thin so that the sawmill may be used for cutting relatively thin lumber.
It will be evident that suitable saw guides may be mounted on the saw supporting slides 20, 20, 21, 21' to guide the work-engaging edge of the saw, whereby bending of the saw blades is avoided. This saw guide structure is conventional and the details thereof are omitted to avoid unnecessary prolixity.
It will be obvious to those skilled in the art, that various changes may be made in the invention without departing from the spirit and scope thereof, and therefore, the invention is not limited by that which is shown in the drawings and described in the specification, but only as indicated in the appended claims.
What is claimed is:
1. A saw mill comprising a bed frame structure having an elongated recess centrally thereof for receiving circular saw blades, a first pair of frames arranged in opposed relation on said bed with each frame extending outwardly from the elongated recess and mounted for sliding movement toward and away from each other, substantially aligned arbors rotatably mounted on said frames, a first pair of saw blades within said recess mounted on said arbors and movable with said frames, whereby the spacing of said saw blades may be varied by movement of said slide frames, means mounted on said bed and operatively connected to said frames for causing said frames to move toward and away from each other, a second pair of frames mounted on said bed longitudinally of said first pair; of frames and mounted for sliding movement toward and away from each other, a second pair of arbors and saw blades mounted on said second pair of frames for adjustment toward and from each other, an overhead track supported above said saw blades and extending in the direction of said recess, a carriage mounted on said track for movement from a position clear of said saw blades on the side of said first pair away from said second pair to a position beyond the cutting edge of said second pair away from said first pair of saw blades, a longitudinally extending shaft mounted on said carriage below the same and securely connected thereto, a first bracket slidably mounted on said shaft for movement relative to said carriage in the direction of movement of said carriage and having a lower extremity below said carriage and means for causing movement of said bracket in both directions, a log engaging center on the lower extremity of said first bracket for supporting one end of a log, a second bracket mounted on said shaft adjacent the other end thereof and having a lower extremity for adjustable movement along said shaft for accommodating logs of varying length, a rotatable center on said lower extremity of said second bracket at the height of said first center with means for positively engaging a log for turning movement about said centers, a shaft connected to said second center lying substantially in the vertical plane of said centers and having a laterally extending arm, means mounted on said second bracket and connected to said arm for rotating said shaft a quarter of a turn, means for moving said carriage in both directions, an elevating frame pivotally mounted on a fixed support for movement from a position receiving a log to a position in which a log supported thereon has its centers in alignment with said centers of said bracket, means for moving said frame from its log receiving position to its position for placing a log on said centers, a guide roller mounted on said bed between said first and second pairs of saws and movable from a position below the path of a log to a position in which it will support a partially sawed log, and means for moving said roller to either position and means for controlling each of said means.
2. The invention according to claim 1 in which each of the said means is fluid operated.
3. The invention according to claim 1 in which the means mounted on the carriage are gas operated and the other means are all hydraulic operated.
4. A sawmill comprising a bed, means to mount a saw on said bed, a track positioned above said bed, a carriage mounted for movement along said track and past said saw, a pair of arbors mounted in spaced relation and suspended from said carriage for receiving a log to be sawed therebetween, means operated on a stationary portion of the sawmill for moving one arbor toward the other to support a log between said arbors, means to move said carriage past said saw so as to carry a log supported by said arbors entirely past the cutting edge of the saw, means operable from a fixed position on the sawmill for rotating the arbor a definite angle to obtain a second cut on a log, a log elevator comprising a load- 1ng frame positioned beneath the carriage for carrying a log from a position below and clear of said arbors to a position to be supported by said arbors, said loading frame having horizontally disposed log supporting edges positioned in spaced relation lengthwise of said sawmill and on which a log may roll and having projections to prevent a log from rolling off of said edges whereby the log can be adjusted laterally in a horizontal plane to obtain vertical alignment of each end of the log with respect to said arbors, means mounting said loading frame for vertical movement, power means acting on a point intermediate its length to raise said elevator, said frame being flexible to an extent permitting an operator to manually engage the log while said log is supported on said frame adjacent one end and with a small force flex the frame and thereby position the corresponding end of the log adjacent one arbor so that the one arbor may be pressed against the adjacent end of the log and thereafter the other end of the log can be accurately positioned with respect to the other arbor and the arbors moved together to maintain the log in the most advantageous position for cutting by the saw.
5. An elevator for raising logs to be positioned in accurate location to centering arbors, said elevator including a generally horizontally disposed slightly flexible frame pivoted adjacent one side and having its other side movable vertically, power means to apply lifting force to said frame at a single intermediate point whereby one end or the other end of said other side of said frame may be raised while the other end is lowered by a manually applied force adjacent an end whereby a log can be accurately centered on said arbors, and means limiting excessive sideward movement of a log on said frame while permitting some limited sideward movement of the log while supported on said frame whereby a person with a small force can accurately locate the log in a vertical plane.
6. A sawmill comprising a pair of closely spaced saws for simultaneously cutting an elongated relatively weak timber in which the force of the sawing becomes sufficiently great to cause bending with possible breakage of the timber, means to carry the logs past said saws by engaging the ends of the log, and narrow roller means positioned in a plane between said saws while being of sufficient size to support the timber being sawed within the confines of the space between said saws whereby 12 timbers of small width and small depth can be cut and means to move said supporting roller into and out of operative position as'the sawing progresses from the first cut on the timberto the later cuts.
References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 192,498 Frazier June 26, 1877 235,824 Story Dec. 21, 1880 476,820 Reid June 14, 1892 707,184 Thomas Aug. 19, 1902 721,680 Dunagan Mar. 3, 1903 778,258 Martin Dec. 27, 1904 1,093,680 Beck et al. Apr. 21, 1914 1,146,655 Rodes July 13, 1915 1,180,842 Goetz Apr. 25, 1916 1,393,529 Haley Oct. 11, 1921 1,523,786 Merritt Jan. 20, 1925 1,903,732 Walter et a1 Apr. 11, 1933 2,441,925 Wege May 18, 1948 2,468,036 Charters Apr. 26, 1949 2,523,563 Foreman Sept. 26, 1950 2,528,865 Dale Nov. 7, 1950 2,591,568 Lorimer Apr. 1, 1952 2,651,335 Stagg Sept. 8, 1953 2,664,926 Fuglie Jan. 5, 1954 2,669,262 Stevens Feb. 16, 1954 2,673,581 Dornath et al. Mar. 30, 1954
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Cited By (14)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2893453A (en) * 1955-03-16 1959-07-07 Soderhamns Verkst Er A B Log handling arrangement for debarking machines
US3129733A (en) * 1962-02-05 1964-04-21 Terrell Mach Co Machine for forming a cylindrical billet with a plane surface substantially parallelto the billet axis
US3180377A (en) * 1963-03-06 1965-04-27 Pinder Edison Transportable sawmill
US3190323A (en) * 1963-03-28 1965-06-22 Johansson Nils Thure Georg Mechanism for aligning timber for sawing
US3224475A (en) * 1963-07-15 1965-12-21 Fehr Arthur Stud mill
US3747455A (en) * 1971-06-14 1973-07-24 Hartzell Industries Sawmill
US3779117A (en) * 1971-07-08 1973-12-18 R Roberson Slab and cant mill
US3786712A (en) * 1969-01-29 1974-01-22 Greenleaf Holdings Ltd Sawmill log indexing device
US3872758A (en) * 1971-06-14 1975-03-25 Hertzell Ind Inc Sawmill
US3889566A (en) * 1973-01-10 1975-06-17 Hartzell Industries Sawmill
US4117755A (en) * 1977-01-13 1978-10-03 Weyerhaeuser Company Log transport and sawing system
US4177704A (en) * 1976-11-26 1979-12-11 Rae Randle Portable saw mill
FR2494169A1 (en) * 1980-11-14 1982-05-21 Vigneau Jacques Installation for wood sawing - has longitudinal on which are mounted fixed and movable jaws with rams to block movement to hold wood
AU2013204618B2 (en) * 2007-08-02 2015-11-05 Millennium Pharmaceuticals, Inc Process for the synthesis of E1 activating enzyme inhibitors

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US235824A (en) * 1880-12-21 Gang-saw mill
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US1393529A (en) * 1921-03-31 1921-10-11 Arthur L Haley Method of sawing taper logs
US1523786A (en) * 1921-07-09 1925-01-20 Louis G Merritt Centering device for veneer lathes
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US2441925A (en) * 1944-11-09 1948-05-18 Oilgear Co Centering device
US2468036A (en) * 1945-10-02 1949-04-26 Crown Zellerbach Corp Mechanical off-bearing flared rolls
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US2528965A (en) * 1945-04-21 1950-11-07 Cottrell C B & Sons Co Doctor mechanism for rotary intaglio printing presses
US2591568A (en) * 1949-01-22 1952-04-01 James H Lorimer Machine for cutting ties or the like
US2651335A (en) * 1952-03-31 1953-09-08 Stagg Irving Log sawmill for small dimension timber
US2664926A (en) * 1949-08-03 1954-01-05 Winona Tool Mfg Company Automatic lumber-releasing traveling gang saw sawmill
US2669262A (en) * 1949-06-27 1954-02-16 Whitney W Stevens Multiple saw equipment for traveling-saw sawmills
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* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US192498A (en) * 1877-06-26 Improvement in machines for trimming lumber
US235824A (en) * 1880-12-21 Gang-saw mill
US476820A (en) * 1892-06-14 Radial-center sawing-machine
US707184A (en) * 1902-04-07 1902-08-19 Union Iron Works Twin-saw slabbing-machine.
US721680A (en) * 1902-09-22 1903-03-03 Thomas M Dunagan Jr Wood-sawing machine.
US778258A (en) * 1903-12-18 1904-12-27 Frederick P Morrill Machine for making railroad cross-ties.
US1093680A (en) * 1912-06-27 1914-04-21 Joseph W Beck Machine for making railway-ties.
US1146655A (en) * 1914-08-25 1915-07-13 Tyree Rodes Method for sawing tapered logs.
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US1393529A (en) * 1921-03-31 1921-10-11 Arthur L Haley Method of sawing taper logs
US1523786A (en) * 1921-07-09 1925-01-20 Louis G Merritt Centering device for veneer lathes
US1903732A (en) * 1930-08-09 1933-04-11 Alvey Ferguson Co Conveyer
US2441925A (en) * 1944-11-09 1948-05-18 Oilgear Co Centering device
US2523563A (en) * 1944-11-27 1950-09-26 Foreman William Blades Lathe loading and log centering machine
US2528965A (en) * 1945-04-21 1950-11-07 Cottrell C B & Sons Co Doctor mechanism for rotary intaglio printing presses
US2468036A (en) * 1945-10-02 1949-04-26 Crown Zellerbach Corp Mechanical off-bearing flared rolls
US2591568A (en) * 1949-01-22 1952-04-01 James H Lorimer Machine for cutting ties or the like
US2669262A (en) * 1949-06-27 1954-02-16 Whitney W Stevens Multiple saw equipment for traveling-saw sawmills
US2664926A (en) * 1949-08-03 1954-01-05 Winona Tool Mfg Company Automatic lumber-releasing traveling gang saw sawmill
US2651335A (en) * 1952-03-31 1953-09-08 Stagg Irving Log sawmill for small dimension timber
US2673581A (en) * 1952-08-04 1954-03-30 Enno J Dornath Sawmill of the circular saw reciprocating carriage type

Cited By (14)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2893453A (en) * 1955-03-16 1959-07-07 Soderhamns Verkst Er A B Log handling arrangement for debarking machines
US3129733A (en) * 1962-02-05 1964-04-21 Terrell Mach Co Machine for forming a cylindrical billet with a plane surface substantially parallelto the billet axis
US3180377A (en) * 1963-03-06 1965-04-27 Pinder Edison Transportable sawmill
US3190323A (en) * 1963-03-28 1965-06-22 Johansson Nils Thure Georg Mechanism for aligning timber for sawing
US3224475A (en) * 1963-07-15 1965-12-21 Fehr Arthur Stud mill
US3786712A (en) * 1969-01-29 1974-01-22 Greenleaf Holdings Ltd Sawmill log indexing device
US3747455A (en) * 1971-06-14 1973-07-24 Hartzell Industries Sawmill
US3872758A (en) * 1971-06-14 1975-03-25 Hertzell Ind Inc Sawmill
US3779117A (en) * 1971-07-08 1973-12-18 R Roberson Slab and cant mill
US3889566A (en) * 1973-01-10 1975-06-17 Hartzell Industries Sawmill
US4177704A (en) * 1976-11-26 1979-12-11 Rae Randle Portable saw mill
US4117755A (en) * 1977-01-13 1978-10-03 Weyerhaeuser Company Log transport and sawing system
FR2494169A1 (en) * 1980-11-14 1982-05-21 Vigneau Jacques Installation for wood sawing - has longitudinal on which are mounted fixed and movable jaws with rams to block movement to hold wood
AU2013204618B2 (en) * 2007-08-02 2015-11-05 Millennium Pharmaceuticals, Inc Process for the synthesis of E1 activating enzyme inhibitors

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