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US2783970A - Apparatus for underwater oil well drilling - Google Patents

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US2783970A
US2783970A US46432454A US2783970A US 2783970 A US2783970 A US 2783970A US 46432454 A US46432454 A US 46432454A US 2783970 A US2783970 A US 2783970A
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oil
vessel
water
figure
cabins
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Samuel S Gillespie
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Samuel S Gillespie
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B7/00Special methods or apparatus for drilling
    • E21B7/12Underwater drilling
    • E21B7/124Underwater drilling with underwater tool drive prime mover, e.g. portable drilling rigs for use on underwater floors
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B43/00Methods or apparatus for obtaining oil, gas, water, soluble or meltable materials or a slurry of minerals from wells
    • E21B43/01Methods or apparatus for obtaining oil, gas, water, soluble or meltable materials or a slurry of minerals from wells specially adapted for obtaining from underwater installations
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B43/00Methods or apparatus for obtaining oil, gas, water, soluble or meltable materials or a slurry of minerals from wells
    • E21B43/01Methods or apparatus for obtaining oil, gas, water, soluble or meltable materials or a slurry of minerals from wells specially adapted for obtaining from underwater installations
    • E21B43/0122Collecting oil or the like from a submerged leakage
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T137/00Fluid handling
    • Y10T137/5762With leakage or drip collecting
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T137/00Fluid handling
    • Y10T137/6851With casing, support, protector or static constructional installations
    • Y10T137/6855Vehicle
    • Y10T137/6906Aerial or water-supported [e.g., airplane or ship, etc.]

Description

March 5, 1957 s. s. GILLESPIE 2,783,970

APPARATUS FOR UNDERWATER OIL WELL DRILLING Filed Oct. 25, 1954 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 I: II II i H INVENTOR.

March 5, 1957 S. S. GILLESPIE APPARATUS FOR UNDERWATER OIL WELL DRILLING Filed Oct. 25. 1954 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 qrff akv

IN VEN TOR.

ATTD RN EYS March 5, 1957 s. s. GILLESPIE 2,783,970

- APPARATUS FOR UNDERWATER OIL WELL DRILLING Filed Oct. '25, 1954 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 IN VEN TOR.

k, JAM/452 5. 4/1 4 5 P/E ATTDRN EYS March 5, 1957 s. s. GlLLESPlE 2,783,970

APPARATUS FOR UNDERWATER OIL WELL DRILLING Filed Oct. 25, 1954 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTOR.

ATTD RN EYE March 5, 1957 s. s. GILLESPIE 2,783,970

' APPARATUS FOR UNDERWATER OIL WELL DRILLING Filed Oct. 25, 1954 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 akin A'ITCI RN EYE United States Patent APPARATUS FOR UNDERWATER OIL WELL DRILLING Samuel S. Gillespie, Tucson, Ariz.

Application October 25, 1954, Serial No. 464,324

Claims. (Cl. 255-25) This invention relates to a drill assembly, and more particularly to a method of and apparatus for drilling for oil or the like in underwater locations.

The object of the invention is to provide a method of and apparatus for facilitating the drilling of underwater oil wells whereby the oil can be pumped up to a suitable reservoir or receiver that may be floating on the surface of the water.

Another object of the invention is to provide an oil well drilling and pumping arrangement wherein a submarine or submersible vessel is submerged to the bottom of the body of water and then tubular casings or pipes are driven into the soil after which drills are extended through the tubular casings until the oil is reached, and then the drills are removed and pumping equipment is brought into operation to pump up the oil from the wells and this oil is then directed into. suitable reservoirs or receivers for storage or the like.

Another object of the invention is to provide oil well pumping equipment which can be operated by conventional power sources, and wherein with the present invention it is not necessary for divers or other personnel to work in the water since all of the operations can be carried out from within the submerged vessel or pumping cabin, so that the yield from underwater oil wells will be greatly increased with the greatest amount of safety and with a minimum of cost and labor expenditure.

A further object of the invention is to provide a method of and apparatus for recovering oil from underwater which is extremely simple and inexpensive to manufacture or carry out.

Other objects and advantages will be apparent during the course of the following description.

In the accompanying drawings, forming a part of this application, and in which like numerals are used to designate like parts throughout the same:

Figure l is a side elevational view of the submerged vessel or submarine showing the submarine at the bottom of the body of water, and with parts broken away and in section, and illustrating the initial step wherein the pipe line or tubular member is being driven down into the soil at the bottom of the water.

Figure 2 is a bottom plan view of the vessel of Figure 1.

Figure 3 is a fragmentary side elevational view of the vessel, with parts broken away and in section, and showth p p n q pm n or p pingoil up from th well.

Figure 4 is a sectional view taken, ql the. line 4--4 of Figure l.

2,783,970 Patented Mar. 5, 1957 Figure 5 is a fragmentary side elevational view of the vessel showing the power and pumping cabin.

Figure 6 is a sectional view taken on the line 66 of Figure 5 and showing the drill extended from the vessel down through the power and pumping cabin.

Figure 7 is a side elevational View, with parts broken away and in section, showing the vessel moving upward from the bottom of the body of water after the power and pumping cabins have been detached and after the magnetic saddles have been disconnected.

Figure 8 is a side elevational view of the oil reservoir or receiver, with parts broken away and in section.

Figure 9 is a sectional view taken on the line 99 of Figure 8.

Figure 10 is an enlarged vertical sectional view showing a portion of the oil reservoir of Figure 8.

Figure 11 is a side elevational view illustrating the vessel placed at the bottom of the water.

Figure 12 is a side elevational view illustrating the means by which the oil passes upwardly through the water from the pumping cabins to the oil reservoir.

Figure 13 is a side elevational view of a modified arrangement wherein power for the submerged vessel may be supplied by means of a tender or auxiliary vessel.

Figure 14 is a view illustrating a further modification wherein instead of having the oil pass up through the body of water to the oil reservoir, conduits or pipe lines are provided for conveying the oil to the reservoir.

Fig. 15 is a sectional view on line 1515 of Fig. 9.

Referring in detail to the drawings, the numeral 10 designates a submarine or vessel which includes a hull body 11, and the vessel 10 is adapted to move along the surface of the water until the vicinity of the oil well is reached, and then the vessel 10 submerges to the bottom of the sea. Any suitable mechanism can be provided for permitting the vessel 10 to dive or submerge and move up to the surface of the water when desired. The vessel 10 is provided with a plurality of shelves 12 which may define compartments 13 that can be used as sleeping quarters, for personnel, and these compartments may also be used for storing supplies such as quantities of pipe lines which are needed to reach the submerged oil.

The vessel 10 may further include a propeller 14, Figure l, and a top deck 15. Extending upwardly from the top deck 15 and secured thereto is a pair of towers 16 which may be hollow. A motor or power source 17 may be provided in each tower 16, and the motors 17 may be used for operating a cable 18 which actuates a hammer or driver 19. The hammer 19 is adapted to be alternately picked up and dropped by gravity on the upper end of a tubular member or casing 20 which is adapted to be driven into the soil 23 below the bottom of the body of water 24. The numeral 25 (Figures 11-14) designates the water line or top of the body of water 24. The cable 18 is trained over a pulley 21 which may be detachably connected to an eyelet 22 that depends from the top of each tower 16.

A means is provided for supporting the vessel 10 when the vessel is at the bottom of the water, and this means comprises a plurality of saddles 26 which are adapted. to be detached. when desired from support mem- 3 bers 27 which are secured to the outer surface of the vessel It). The saddles 26 and support members 27 may be constructed of a magnetizable material and when the vessel 16 is submerging initially, the saddles 26 and support members 27 remain attracted to each other and connected together. Thus, the saddles L6 support the vessel 10 when the vessel is in the position shown in Figures 1, l3 and ll. However, when the vessel 10 departs from the scene of the oil wells, a suitable mechanism within the vessel 19 can be actuated to deenergize the magnetic saddles 26 so that the saddles 26 will remain at the bottom of the water to provide a support for the vessel in the event the vessel returns to the scene.

The vessel 10 further includes a pair of horizontally disposed decks 28 which has depending therefrom a skirt 29, Figure 6. Each of the shirts 29 includes an upper cylindrical portion 30 that has a flange 31 secured to the undersurface of the deck 2.8 in any suitable manner, as for example by means of securing elements 32. Each skirt 29 further includes a lower frusto-conical portion 33 that has a flange 34 secured to the vessel bottom by means of securing elements 35. Each deck 28 is provided with an opening 36 whereby the casing or pipe 20 can be extended down therethrough.

Detachably connected to the vessel 10 is a plurality of power and pumping cabins 37. Each of these cabins 37 has the same construction and each may include a hollow housing 38 which is provided with an opening 39 in its upper end that is adapted to register with the opening 36 in the deck 28. Extending upwardly from the top of the cabins 37 is a frusto-conical casing 40 which is adapted to snugly seat within the skirt 29. The lower end of the casing 49 may be secured to the top of the cabin 37 permanently by means of securing elements 41.

A set screw or bolt 42 may be extended through the skirt 29 and into engagement with the casing 40 for preventing accidental disconnection of these parts. Magnetic pads 43 serve to releasably connect the cabins 37 to the vessel 16, and the pads 43 can be deenergized when desired so that by deenergizing the pads 43 and which may include a base 59 that is secured to the bottom of the cabin 37 by securing elements 51. Packing material 49 may be positioned in a suitable recess in the base 50, and a cap 52 retains the packing material 49 in place. The tubular casing 20 extends down through the packing stand 48 and through the bottom of the cabin 37 and into the soil 23, the oil sand being indicated by the numeral 53, Figure 13. The seal tube 20 is driven into the ocean floor to the necessary depth to seal ott ocean water from entering the seal tube and water around the outside of the seal tube cannot enter the power and pump cabin since there is packing located in the packing stand. Drilling operations are carried on at the drill deck using normal procedures as would apply in the field at the surface. The tubular well casing or seal tube 26 may be driven into the soil a sufiicient distance to seal off the water. This operation avoids tearing up and destroying the packing which is arranged within the packing stand and insures that water will not work into the enclosed cabin and vessel.

Depending from the lower end of the cabins 37 are pointed cleats 54 which are adapted to engage the soil so as to help retain the cabins in their proper positions. Each of the casings or pipes 20 may have a cap 55 detachably mounted on its upper end so as to prevent damage to the casing from the hammer 19 and whereby water will not be able to rush up through the casing 26 and enter the vessel 10. The caps 55 can be removed when desired.

In Figure 6 the drilling operation is illustrated, and when the drilling operation is being carried out, a conventional motor 57 may be supported on the deck 28, and the motor 57 can be used for turning a rotary drill 56 which can be extended down through the casing 20. The drill 56 and motor 57 can be removed after the drilling operation has been carried out.

As shown in Figure 3, after the drilling operation has been completed, and the drill 56 removed, a pump 60 can be brought into operation, and the pump 60 is arranged in the cabin 37. If required, one or more persons provided with suitable diving equipment may go down into the water to aid in connecting or disconnecting the various pipes, pumps, cabins or the like. The pump 60 serves to pump up the oil through the pipe 20 and then through a fitting 61 and out through a conduit 62. From the conduit 62, the oil may pass up through the body of water 24 as shown in Figure 12 and be received in an oil reservoir or housing 58. The oil from the conduit 62 may pass upwardly through the water due to the difference in specific gravity between the oil and the water if desired. The reservoir 58 includes an oil storage chamber 59 which has its upper and lower ends open. Power for operating the pump 60 may be supplied by an engine 63. Guy wires 64 may be used for anchoring the oil reservoir 58 in place, and the guy wires 64 may have their lower ends connected to anchoring members 65 which are on the bottom of the sea. The reservoir 58 is constructed with partitions so as to provide or include personnel quarters 66, fresh water storage areas 67, and supply storage chambers 68. These parts are shown in detail in Figures 8, 9 and 10. A power plant 69 is provided and an elevator '78 can be used by personnel going up and down in the V pumped up does not become intermixed with the Water or come in contact with the water since it is conveyed upwardly by means'of the pipes 74. In Figure 13 there is shown a still further modification whereby an auxiliary vessel or tender 75 may be arranged above the vessel 10 for supplying energy or compressed air through conduits '76 and 77 to the submerged vessel 10. The vessel 10 may be provided with a compartment or cabin 78 which may provide sleeping quarters for personnel or the like.

From the foregoing it is apparent that there has been provided a method of and apparatus for recovering oil or other fluids from underwater locations. In use the vessel 10 can be navigated to the desired location and then the vessel 10 is submerged by any suitable mechanism. The vessel carries with it the cabins 37 and the saddles 26, and these members may be retained in position on the bottom of the vessel by means of magnetism. After the vessel 10 reaches the desired location as shown in Figure 1 for example or in Figure 11, the pipes 20 are driven down into the soil 23 and into the oil sand 53 by means of the hammer 19 which can be operated by the motor 17 in the tower 16. After the pipe 20 has been driven into the soil the desired distance, the drill 56 can be extended through the pipe 20 and the drill 56 can be operated by means of a motor 57. After this drilling is completed, the drill 56 is removed and then the pump 60 in the cabin 37 is brought into play so that the oil from the oil sand 53 will be pumped up through the pipe 20 and out through the conduit 62.

It is to be noted that the. cabins 37 can be detached from the vessel and the previously described plugs can be used for preventing flow of water into the cabin or vessel. Thus, the oilwill continue to be pumped up out through the conduit 62 even after the vessel departs.

Thus it will be seen that the present invention includes an underwater vessel such as a submarine that includes detachable compartments or cabins 37', fiexible detachable conduits, detaehable weight saddles 26, hoist towers 16, and the petroleum surface reservoir 58. With these parts, drilling and pumpingoperations can be carried on at the floor of the ocean and the petroleum can be stored and transferred at the ocean surface. The submarine can be equipped with power of conventional design, and the various parts are sealed against water pressure so as to permit drilling and pumping operations at the ocean bottom. The open top and bottom reservoir 58 which is located at the surface of the water permits the petroleum to be stored and transferred to ships as desired. When the casings 40 are pulled up tight in the skirts 29, water is prevented from entering either the submarine hull 11 or the power and pump cabin 37. The magnetic pads 43 permit easy detachment of the power and pump cabins at great depth to thereby eliminate the necessity of the diver going out in the water at great depths. The safety anchor bolts 42 hold the cabins tight against the vessel hull until these parts are to be separated.

After the underwater vessel and the cabins 37 are at the ocean floor and in the desired location and position, the tube is driven into the ocean floor to the necessary depth and the packing 48 prevents any water from entering the cabin. The cap 55 on the upper end of the tube 20 protects the top of the tube while the pile driver 19 is in operation and also this cap prevents water from rushing up the tube into the submarine. Existing or conventional well drilling equipment can be used in the submarine and after the well drilling operations have been completed, the plugs 44 and 46 are inserted, the safety anchor bolt 42 is removed or disengaged, and power is shut-off to the magnetic pads 26 and 43 so that the cabins 37 are freed. In the event that the joints between the cabins and the vessel remain tight, water under sufficient hydraulic pressure such as that provided by the submarine hydraulic pump can be furnished to force the separation.

By using or providing two hoist towers 16, two wells can be drilled at one time and these hoist towers are provided with pile driving equipment as well as the usual hoisting apparatus for handling well casing and drill rod. The moving parts can be operated by an electric motor. When the submarine settles into position at the floor of the ocean the weight of the submarine is carried on four or more weight saddles 26 which are held in position by magnetic pads 27. In the event that one or more of the weight saddles 26 at the floor of the ocean become stuck, the submarine will not be held fast since it can be released by cutting oh the electric power to the magnetic pads 27. A sufiicient supply of well casing and rod can be stored in the submarine so that the submarine can remain submerged for a greater length of time and there will be no loss of time during storms and the like as is the case when tenders are used. However, if tender service is available and desired it may be used for supplying power to the vessel 10.

The water surface petroleum reservoir for storing and transferring the oil is indicated by the numeral 58 in Figures 8, 9 and 10 and this may be made of a steel tank 59 that has its top and bottom open. The corridor 72 is provided whereby personnel can gain access to all parts of the device and fresh water can be stored in the compartment 67. The hull 73 provides the buoyancy to keep the reservoir afloat and the elevator 70 permits attendants to control the valves of the oil takeoff manifold 71.

In Figure 1.1 the submarine or ves el 1.0 s shown. at the. ocean floo imposition for well drilling operations and in this operation nosurface. tender is required. In Figure 12 the drilling operation has. been completed and the submarine. has departed leaving. the power and pump cabins, 3.7 on the ocean floor 23. It is noted that in Figure 12 the. oil reservoir is in position above the two cabins 37 and the oil discharge pipes 62 are. directed to the center area between the. two cabins 37 so that these pipes can discharge into open water and whereby. the oil will rise to the surface and be trapped by entering at the bottom of the reservoir 58. The reservoir 58 may be anchored as previously described. The reservoir 58 in Figure 12 may be positioned to compensate for water currents.

In Figure 13 the tender ship 75 is shown at the surface of the water with air and power lines 76 and 77 leading to the submarine 10 during drilling operations at the floor. In Figure 14 conduits 74 can be used for conveying the oil from the cabins 37 to the reservoir 58. Where desired or necessary connections can be made to the submarine and cabins before being submerged and the various parts can be held in position by magnetic pads which can be released when the vessel has submerged.

This arrangement insures that the diver will not have to go outside at extreme depths or pressures. With the present invention the amount of oil available can be increased and freedom of operations for recovering oil beyond national and international governmental control can be extended since operations can be extended or carried on beyond off-shore jurisdiction. The previously described construction permits drilling and pumping operations under water in closed vessels. The cabins can be circular in shape to increase the strength thereof. Suitable access doors or openings can be provided in the equipment whereby personnel and equipment can be moved from place to place as desired.

I claim:

1. In combination, a submergible vessel including a hull body, a pair of hollow towers extending upwardly from said body and secured thereto, horizontally disposed decks arranged in said body below said towers, there being registering openings in said decks and the bottom of said hull body, a skirt depending from said deck and including an upper cylindrical portion and a lower frustoconical shaped portion, a power and pump cabin having a conical shaped casing extending upwardly therefrom for snugly seating in said skirt, a securing element for connecting said skirt to said casing, magnetic pads detachably connecting said cabins to said body, cleats depending from said cabins, a packing stand supported within said cabin in the bottom thereof, said stand adapted to have drilling equipment initially extended thcrethrough and then pumping equipment extending therethrough, a power source positioned in said cabin, conduits leading from said cabin for the egress therethrough of oil, and a buoyant oil reservoir above said cabins.

2. The structure as defined in claim 1, said oil reservoir comprising a housing having its upper and lower ends open, a buoyant hull surrounding said housing, a power supply mechanism carried by said reservoir, there being a plurality of compartments in said reservoir.

3. The structure as defined in claim 2, wherein the oil from the conduit passes up through the body of water and enters the bottom of said housing.

4. The structure as defined in claim 2, wherein there is provided pipe lines for conveying the oil from the outlet conduits to the reservoir.

5. In combination, a submergible vessel including a hull body, towers extending upwardly from said body and secured thereto, decks arranged in said body below said towers, there being registering openings in said decks and the bottom of said hull body, a skirt depending from said deck and including an upper portion and a lower portion, a power and pump cabin having a casing exa Z a. tending upwardly therefrom for snugly seating in said skirt, a securing element for Connecting said skirt to said easing, magnetic pads detachably connecting said cabins to said body, cleats depending from said cabins, a packing stand supported within said cabin in the bottom thereof, said stand adapted to have drilling equipment initially extended therethrough and then pumping equipment extending therethrough, a power source positioned in said cabin, conduits leading from said cabin for the egress therethrough of oil, and a buoyant oil reservoir above 10 said cabins.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS FOREIGN PATENTS Great Britain Apr. 7, 1921

US2783970A 1954-10-25 1954-10-25 Apparatus for underwater oil well drilling Expired - Lifetime US2783970A (en)

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Cited By (35)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2854215A (en) * 1956-03-05 1958-09-30 Shell Dev Offshore oil well installation
US2906500A (en) * 1956-12-21 1959-09-29 Jersey Prod Res Co Completion of wells under water
US2946566A (en) * 1956-08-31 1960-07-26 Charles T Samuelson Subaqueous drilling apparatus
US3020956A (en) * 1959-01-28 1962-02-13 De Long Corp Apparatus and method for connecting an access caission to a submerged well casing
US3027951A (en) * 1962-04-03 Method and apparatus for locating submarine wells
US3063507A (en) * 1958-08-07 1962-11-13 Neill O Method and apparatus for offshore drilling
US3095048A (en) * 1959-02-02 1963-06-25 Neill O Submarine automatic oil well drilling machine
US3177954A (en) * 1956-09-17 1965-04-13 William W Rand Subaqueous drilling apparatus
US3202216A (en) * 1959-01-09 1965-08-24 Gray Tool Co Submergible apparatus for underwater operations
US3202217A (en) * 1961-09-15 1965-08-24 Gray Tool Co Submarine cellar for deep water drilling operations
US3221816A (en) * 1961-12-07 1965-12-07 Shell Oil Co Underwater oil gathering installation
US3252439A (en) * 1961-12-07 1966-05-24 Shell Oil Co Underwater oil gathering installation
US3261398A (en) * 1963-09-12 1966-07-19 Shell Oil Co Apparatus for producing underwater oil fields
US3292695A (en) * 1963-09-12 1966-12-20 Shell Oil Co Method and apparatus for producing underwater oil fields
US3327780A (en) * 1965-03-15 1967-06-27 Exxon Production Research Co Connection of underwater wells
US3389559A (en) * 1965-05-17 1968-06-25 Campbell F. Logan Fluid recovery system and method
US3412789A (en) * 1965-04-12 1968-11-26 Kobe Inc Method of and apparatus for running equipment into and out of offshore wells
US3417724A (en) * 1967-09-27 1968-12-24 Helen M. Edwards Vibratory sea anchor driver
US3421579A (en) * 1965-06-17 1969-01-14 Mobil Oil Corp Underwater completion
US3454083A (en) * 1967-06-29 1969-07-08 Mobil Oil Corp Fail-safe subsea fluid transportation system
US3456720A (en) * 1967-01-11 1969-07-22 John S Brewer Apparatus and method for drilling wells
US3500841A (en) * 1968-08-01 1970-03-17 Campbell F Logan Fluid recovery system and method
US3512583A (en) * 1968-02-28 1970-05-19 Transworld Drilling Co Service chamber for underwater well
US3517735A (en) * 1968-08-28 1970-06-30 Shell Oil Co Underwater production facility
US3527294A (en) * 1968-10-24 1970-09-08 Lockheed Aircraft Corp Underwater exploration and completion system
US3602320A (en) * 1968-10-16 1971-08-31 Amoco Prod Co Deep sea pile setting and coring vessel
US3621911A (en) * 1969-04-01 1971-11-23 Mobil Oil Corp Subsea production system
US3635347A (en) * 1969-08-15 1972-01-18 Edward J Rupnick Apparatus for controlling the dispersion of pollutants floating on a body of water
US3661204A (en) * 1967-09-11 1972-05-09 Gen Dynamics Corp Underwater drilling methods and apparatus
US3670814A (en) * 1970-01-02 1972-06-20 Exxon Production Research Co Underwater pollution control
US3866697A (en) * 1972-07-12 1975-02-18 Tetra Tech Drilling system
US3949564A (en) * 1973-11-01 1976-04-13 Ingenjorsfirma B. Nord Ab Floating platforms with a wharf belonging thereto
USRE28978E (en) * 1967-06-29 1976-09-28 Mobil Oil Corporation Fail-safe subsea fluid transportation system
US6666287B2 (en) * 2001-10-26 2003-12-23 Quinn Holtby Method and apparatus for enclosing an oil drilling rig
US20130131789A1 (en) * 2010-01-13 2013-05-23 Bery Intellectual Properties Szellemi Tulajdonjogo Hasznosito Es Kezelo Ko Device and method for blocking pipelines, especially under the sea

Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB160865A (en) * 1919-10-06 1921-04-07 James Forgie Improvements in and relating to submarine exploration
US2224624A (en) * 1938-05-09 1940-12-10 Socony Vacuum Oil Co Inc Apparatus for separating water from oil
US2503516A (en) * 1946-10-16 1950-04-11 Raymond D Shrewsbury Method of and apparatus for exploiting oil or other mineral deposits underlying submerged areas
US2534480A (en) * 1947-03-20 1950-12-19 Shannon Joseph Marine oil drilling machine
US2691272A (en) * 1950-09-23 1954-10-12 Townsend Rex Submersible oil well drilling rig

Patent Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB160865A (en) * 1919-10-06 1921-04-07 James Forgie Improvements in and relating to submarine exploration
US2224624A (en) * 1938-05-09 1940-12-10 Socony Vacuum Oil Co Inc Apparatus for separating water from oil
US2503516A (en) * 1946-10-16 1950-04-11 Raymond D Shrewsbury Method of and apparatus for exploiting oil or other mineral deposits underlying submerged areas
US2534480A (en) * 1947-03-20 1950-12-19 Shannon Joseph Marine oil drilling machine
US2691272A (en) * 1950-09-23 1954-10-12 Townsend Rex Submersible oil well drilling rig

Cited By (35)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3027951A (en) * 1962-04-03 Method and apparatus for locating submarine wells
US2854215A (en) * 1956-03-05 1958-09-30 Shell Dev Offshore oil well installation
US2946566A (en) * 1956-08-31 1960-07-26 Charles T Samuelson Subaqueous drilling apparatus
US3177954A (en) * 1956-09-17 1965-04-13 William W Rand Subaqueous drilling apparatus
US2906500A (en) * 1956-12-21 1959-09-29 Jersey Prod Res Co Completion of wells under water
US3063507A (en) * 1958-08-07 1962-11-13 Neill O Method and apparatus for offshore drilling
US3202216A (en) * 1959-01-09 1965-08-24 Gray Tool Co Submergible apparatus for underwater operations
US3020956A (en) * 1959-01-28 1962-02-13 De Long Corp Apparatus and method for connecting an access caission to a submerged well casing
US3095048A (en) * 1959-02-02 1963-06-25 Neill O Submarine automatic oil well drilling machine
US3202217A (en) * 1961-09-15 1965-08-24 Gray Tool Co Submarine cellar for deep water drilling operations
US3221816A (en) * 1961-12-07 1965-12-07 Shell Oil Co Underwater oil gathering installation
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