US2749894A - Carburetor gas saver - Google Patents

Carburetor gas saver Download PDF

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Publication number
US2749894A
US2749894A US319967A US31996752A US2749894A US 2749894 A US2749894 A US 2749894A US 319967 A US319967 A US 319967A US 31996752 A US31996752 A US 31996752A US 2749894 A US2749894 A US 2749894A
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United States
Prior art keywords
carburetor
valving
low speed
fuel
attachment
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Expired - Lifetime
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US319967A
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Sariti Walter
Miller George
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SARLER Corp
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SARLER CORP
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Priority to US319967A priority Critical patent/US2749894A/en
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02MSUPPLYING COMBUSTION ENGINES IN GENERAL WITH COMBUSTIBLE MIXTURES OR CONSTITUENTS THEREOF
    • F02M3/00Idling devices for carburettors
    • F02M3/02Preventing flow of idling fuel
    • F02M3/04Preventing flow of idling fuel under conditions where engine is driven instead of driving, e.g. driven by vehicle running down hill
    • F02M3/045Control of valves situated in the idling nozzle system, or the passage system, by electrical means or by a combination of electrical means with fluidic or mechanical means
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S261/00Gas and liquid contact apparatus
    • Y10S261/19Degassers

Description

june l2, i956 W. SARITI ET AL 2,749,894
CARBURETOR GAS SAVER Filed Nov. 12, 1952 s sheets-sheet 1 June 12, 1956 vv. SARITI ET AL 2,749,394
CARBURETOR GAS SAVER Filed NOV. l2, 1952 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 MAGNETIC 7 i?? ffy if! X65 z if? NON-MAGNETIC.
IN V EN TOR!)` @bip/ew M s wm 4 h 7 q c: S 2 m e h S O L Am TS ES ...LA TIHG Mm Sm w www C 2 5 6 w 5 @u 2 n l n/m V .l m e d mm J n Hmmm N VN T0 www @mi eannnnnron ons salvan Walter Sariti and George Mittler, Scranton, Pa., assignors to Sai-ler Qorporation, a corporation ot Pennsyivama Application November 12, 1952, Serial No. 319,967
1 Claim. (Ci. 12S-97) This invention relates generally to fuel supply for automotive vehicles and more particularly to improvement in carburetor gas savers.
`When, for example, an automobile is decelerating while the operator has his foot removed from the accelerator, this permits a spring to close the main throttle valve 15. The high vacuum developed by the engine 16 results in an excess amount of fuel being sucked into the engine through the idle port 17 and the low speed port 18. The burning of this fuel is a waste and results in higher fuel consumption and loss of economy.
While it has heretofore been proposed to cut off fuel supply under such conditions this has not been commercially used, because the complicated mechanisms were expensive, difficult to install and did not provide satisfactory operation.
lt is therefore among the objects f the present invention to provide novel and useful structure for cutting off fuel supply to idle and low speed ports of a carburetor Whenever the engine is being operated at higher than idle speed with the throttle valve closed.
Another object herein lies in the provision of a simple low cost attachment which may be easily attached to existent carburetors for obtaining prompt and effective fuel cut off under predetermined conditions of engine operation.
Another object herein lies in the provision of a system of carburetors in which carburetor operation is controlled in a predetermined manner by the operating conditions of the engine.
These objects and other incidental ends and advantages will more fully appear in the progress of this disclosure and be pointed out in the appended claim.
in the drawings, in which similar reference characters indicate corresponding parts of each embodiment:
Figure l is a vertical sectional view of a conventional type carburetor with a first embodiment of the present carburetor gas saving attachment in place.
Figure 2 is a fragmentary elevational view as seen from the right of Figure 1.
Figure 3 is an enlarged sectional View as seen from the plane 3 3 on Figure 2.
Figure 4 is a sectional view corresponding to Figure 3 but showing a second embodiment of the invention in a closed position.
Figure 5 is a fragmentary sectional View corresponding to Figure 4 but showing the second embodiment in an open position.
Figure 6 is an enlarged vertical sectional View corresponding generally to Figure l but showing a third embodiment of the invention.
Figure 7 is a schematic view.
ln accordance with the invention a conventional type of carburetor 19 may have a choke valve 20, a throttle valve 15, an idle port 17, a low speed port 18 and may be secured by the mounting flange 21 to the intake manifold 22 of the engine 16. Additional high speed ports and atent lO fice venturis (not shown) may be provided, as is well known in the art to which this invention pertains.
Fuel is normally disposed in the bowl 23 at a suitable level so that it will not be discharged by gravity. The low speed port 18 is located at an edge of the throttle valve 15 when the same is in a closed positiontand we have found that even when the idle adjusting screw 24 is completely closed that an undesirably excessive amount of fuel is drawn into the intake manifold 22 through the low speed port 1S. In accordance with the present invention therefore at a predetermined condition of engine operation we cut off the fuel supply through both the idle port 17 and the low speed port 13.
When the throttle valve 15 is slightly open fuel is drawn from the bowl 23 through the angular passage 25, the low speed metering pin 26, through the upward passage 27 across the horizontal passage 2d, through the upper downward passage 29, through the low speed jet 18, the lower downward passage 3) and the idle jet 17. The amount of fuel drawn from the jets 18 and 17 and the interrelationship of these amounts will vary with the throttle valve setting.
The attachment generally indicated by reference character 40 comprises broadly a hollow body 41, having an inner bore 42 and an outer bore 43; a passage engaging neck 44 with an attachment portion 45; an inlet 46; a filter 47; a valving element 48; an armature 49 with a way 50; resilient means 51; a key 52; and a solenoid 53 with conductors A-A.
The body 41 is preferably composed of a non-magnetic material such as brass, zinc or synthetic resin and the bores 42 and 43 afford a sliding t for the valving element 43 which may be integral with the armature 49 composed of magnetic material. The neck 44 makes a liquidtight t with the low speed port 18, while the attachment portion 45 is preferably a threaded area on the neck which is adapted to engage the corresponding threads on the outer portion of the port 18, which in the normal carburetor is closed by a low speed port plug (not shown). This construction makes the installation of the present attachment 40 a simple matter, the low speed port plug merely being removed and the neck 44 inserted and tightened into place. The neck 44 has an upper opening54, an inner end opening 55 and a lower opening 56. Openings 54 and 56 when the attachment is installed juxtapose the lower end of the upper passage 29 and the upper end of the lower passage 30.
The valving element 48 has a central longitudinal channel 57 with an inner end 55, an upper channel 59 and a lower channel 6u. In the open fuel position of the valving element 48, the channels 59 and 6i) are in alignment with the openings 54 and 56 respectively, while the air inlet 46 is closed.
The key 52 acting with the way 50 prevents rotational displacement of the valving element and upon energize.- tion of the valving element and upon energization of the solenoid 53, the armature is drawn outwardly against the resilient means 51 seated in the bead 61, which disaligns the channels 59 and 6d to close the openings 54 and 56, thus completely cutting off the ilow of fuel into the intake manifold 22 through the ports 17 and 18. At the same time, the vent channel 62 is brought into communication with the air inlet 46, so that the negative pressure in the intake manifold 22 may be relieved. Air entering through the inlet 46 is cleaned by the filter 47.
It is highly desirable that the valving element move to its closed position promptly in synchronism with the predetermined value of vacuum in the intake manifold. The present system contemplates the accomplishment of this in a number of alternative manners.
In the usual carburetor operation as soon as the motor reaches a certain speed, fuel is no longer drawn through LJ the low speed and idle ports, so they may be closed. As seen on Figure 7 the control is obtained when a critical value of generation voltage is reached. Here the generator 66 is connected by conductor 67 to a relay 63 which may be part of the normal voltage regulator circuit through to the battery 69. When the relay closes, current goes via conductor 70 to the solenoid 53, the circuit being completed through leads B-B to the leads AA. Thus even with the throttle valve closed if engine speed is high, the valving element 48 will close. By virtue of the fact that the valving element 43 closes oniy Vupon energization of solenoid 53, if there is power failsuffix. This embodiment differs trom the rst embodiment principally in that when deenergized it is closed.
Turning now `to Figure 6, where a third embodiment of the invention is shown, here again to avoid needless rep- 'etition certain of the parts corresponding to the rst embodiment are given the same reference characters with the addition of a prefix 2.
Among the dierences between the third embodiment and the iirst embodiment are these:
First, by virtue of the fact that the attachment 240 is connected to the carburetor 219 by ileXible, semi-stiff tubing including the upper tube 277 and the lower tube 278, the attachment 24@ may be conveniently positioned with respect to the carburetor 219. The inner end 279 of the upper tube 277 is preferably threaded into the upper end 2% of the elongated vertically arranged bore which forms the passage 22S-230 into which a plug 29% is inserted. The lower end 25T of the upper tube 277 is connected to the hollow body 241. The inner end 282 of the lower tube 27S is connected to the low speed port 218, while the outer end 283 of the lower tube is connected by the elbow coupling 234 to the lower end of the body 241. Another advantage of this mounting arrangement of the attachment 240 is that it enables a single form of attachment 240 to be easily connected to many different kinds of carburetors with just a few dierent tubes and couplings.
Secondly, since the valving element 24S moves to close in the same direction as the fuel flow 285, a light spring 251 permits the valving element to properly close the 4 cone portion 286 against the seat 287. The body 241, being composed of a non-magnetic material, allows the solenoid 53 to actuate the armature 249, a ring of magnetic material in the valving element 24S. The upper end of the body 241 is closed by a threaded plug 24M.
Operation of the third embodiment of Figure 6 is similar in many respects to the prior described embodiment, and is identical as far as the means to control the energization and deenergization of the solenoid 253. When deenergized the valving element moves to its open position under the action of the spring 251.
It may thus be seen that we have disclosed novel and useful carburetor systems and attachments which are adapted to provide reduced fuel consumption with consequent economies.
We wish it to be understood that we do not desire t0 be limited to the exact details shown and described in this specication, for obvious modications will occur to a person skilled in the art to which the present invention pertains.
We claim:
A carburetor gas saving attachment for use with a conventional carburetor having a low speed port, said attachment comprising a body having a neck engageable with said low speed port, a valving element disposed within `said neck, said valving element being operated by an electrically energized solenoid; said valving element including a first channel alignable with a passage in said carburetor to permit fuel to flow therethrough, and a second channel alignable with an opening in said body to permit ambient air to flow through said low speed port; said channels being so arranged that movement of `said valving element, in a first direction serves to align said rst-mentioned channel to allow fuel to ow therethrough for low speed engine operation, and in an alternate position to equalize intake manifold pressure with the ambient air.
References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,036,205 Ericson Apr. 7, 1936 2,415,336 Carlson Feb. 4, 1947 2,443,562 Hieger et al June 15, 1948 2,499,263 Troy Feb. 28, 1950 FORETGN PATENTS 261,022 Great Britain Oct- 13, 1927
US319967A 1952-11-12 1952-11-12 Carburetor gas saver Expired - Lifetime US2749894A (en)

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Cited By (17)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2809623A (en) * 1956-10-01 1957-10-15 Fred V Hall Control device for carburetor-type internal combustion engines
US2856167A (en) * 1956-04-05 1958-10-14 Holley Carburetor Co Electrically actuated fuel shut-off apparatus
US2879756A (en) * 1955-12-02 1959-03-31 Holley Carburetor Co Fuel shut-off apparatus
US2895561A (en) * 1957-01-17 1959-07-21 Holley Carburetor Co Torque responsive fuel cut-off means
US2933168A (en) * 1957-08-23 1960-04-19 William E Leibing Deceleration controlled fuel shut-off means
US2939444A (en) * 1956-03-07 1960-06-07 William E Leibing Fuel control mechanism
US2943615A (en) * 1955-03-23 1960-07-05 Daimler Benz Ag Air inlet control mechanism for an internal combustion engine
US2955615A (en) * 1956-07-23 1960-10-11 Miller Harold Carburetor gas saving device
US2957463A (en) * 1956-10-19 1960-10-25 Thompson Ramo Wooldridge Inc Fuel cut-off for carburetor equipped engine
US2962269A (en) * 1958-04-10 1960-11-29 Ephraim H Stanton Needle valve assembly and associated carburetor assembly
US3024777A (en) * 1958-09-11 1962-03-13 Bendix Corp Engine preheater
US3042387A (en) * 1959-12-01 1962-07-03 Kenneth P King Fuel shut off device or degasser
US3174469A (en) * 1960-04-09 1965-03-23 Cvjetko Galic Carburetor arrangement
US4198356A (en) * 1978-05-29 1980-04-15 Toyota Jidosha Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Control system for secondary transfer port in dual carburetor
US4226218A (en) * 1978-09-05 1980-10-07 Lutz Russell L Carburetor idle jet control
US4373502A (en) * 1980-10-16 1983-02-15 Miletech, Inc. Fuel control system
US4754743A (en) * 1985-10-09 1988-07-05 Elec & Eltek Energy Resources Technology Limited Mixture control system for internal combustion engines

Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB261022A (en) * 1925-11-07 1927-10-13 Magnetos R B Soc D Improvements in carburetters for internal combustion engines
US2036205A (en) * 1932-01-12 1936-04-07 Carter Carburetor Corp Carburetor
US2415336A (en) * 1944-08-07 1947-02-04 Carter Carburetor Corp Carburetor degasser
US2443562A (en) * 1945-09-28 1948-06-15 George M Holley Decelerator
US2499263A (en) * 1948-03-29 1950-02-28 Leonard S Troy Electric governor and idle control

Patent Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB261022A (en) * 1925-11-07 1927-10-13 Magnetos R B Soc D Improvements in carburetters for internal combustion engines
US2036205A (en) * 1932-01-12 1936-04-07 Carter Carburetor Corp Carburetor
US2415336A (en) * 1944-08-07 1947-02-04 Carter Carburetor Corp Carburetor degasser
US2443562A (en) * 1945-09-28 1948-06-15 George M Holley Decelerator
US2499263A (en) * 1948-03-29 1950-02-28 Leonard S Troy Electric governor and idle control

Cited By (17)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2943615A (en) * 1955-03-23 1960-07-05 Daimler Benz Ag Air inlet control mechanism for an internal combustion engine
US2879756A (en) * 1955-12-02 1959-03-31 Holley Carburetor Co Fuel shut-off apparatus
US2939444A (en) * 1956-03-07 1960-06-07 William E Leibing Fuel control mechanism
US2856167A (en) * 1956-04-05 1958-10-14 Holley Carburetor Co Electrically actuated fuel shut-off apparatus
US2955615A (en) * 1956-07-23 1960-10-11 Miller Harold Carburetor gas saving device
US2809623A (en) * 1956-10-01 1957-10-15 Fred V Hall Control device for carburetor-type internal combustion engines
US2957463A (en) * 1956-10-19 1960-10-25 Thompson Ramo Wooldridge Inc Fuel cut-off for carburetor equipped engine
US2895561A (en) * 1957-01-17 1959-07-21 Holley Carburetor Co Torque responsive fuel cut-off means
US2933168A (en) * 1957-08-23 1960-04-19 William E Leibing Deceleration controlled fuel shut-off means
US2962269A (en) * 1958-04-10 1960-11-29 Ephraim H Stanton Needle valve assembly and associated carburetor assembly
US3024777A (en) * 1958-09-11 1962-03-13 Bendix Corp Engine preheater
US3042387A (en) * 1959-12-01 1962-07-03 Kenneth P King Fuel shut off device or degasser
US3174469A (en) * 1960-04-09 1965-03-23 Cvjetko Galic Carburetor arrangement
US4198356A (en) * 1978-05-29 1980-04-15 Toyota Jidosha Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Control system for secondary transfer port in dual carburetor
US4226218A (en) * 1978-09-05 1980-10-07 Lutz Russell L Carburetor idle jet control
US4373502A (en) * 1980-10-16 1983-02-15 Miletech, Inc. Fuel control system
US4754743A (en) * 1985-10-09 1988-07-05 Elec & Eltek Energy Resources Technology Limited Mixture control system for internal combustion engines

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