US2743927A - Convertible bowling pin spotting machine - Google Patents

Convertible bowling pin spotting machine Download PDF

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US2743927A
US2743927A US142183A US14218350A US2743927A US 2743927 A US2743927 A US 2743927A US 142183 A US142183 A US 142183A US 14218350 A US14218350 A US 14218350A US 2743927 A US2743927 A US 2743927A
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pin
bowling
pins
machine
alley
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US142183A
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Patterson Morehead
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AMF Inc
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AMF Inc
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63DBOWLING GAMES, e.g. SKITTLES, BOCCE OR BOWLS; INSTALLATIONS THEREFOR; BAGATELLE OR SIMILAR GAMES; BILLIARDS
    • A63D5/00Accessories for bowling-alleys or table alleys
    • A63D5/08Arrangements for setting-up or taking away pins

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  • This invention relates to bowling pin spotting machines, and more particularly to improvements in such machines which make it possible for a bowling pin spotting machine to handle and spot more than one type of bowling pin, such as tenpins, duckpins and the like, in order to meet the requirementsof bowlers as desired.
  • the invention also includes improvements for adapting a bowling pin spotting machine to handle balls of different sizes required in playing the game in accordance with the type of pin being handled by the machine.
  • the game played may be Tenpins or Kingpins in which large pins-approximately fifteen inches in length are spotted and respotted upon the bowling alley for playing each frame of the game. It so happens that occasionally players or bowlers may desire to play the game of Duckpins in which much smaller pins, say approximately nine and one-half (9 /2) inches long instead of the larger tenpins, are used.
  • the present invention constitutes a solution of the problem of spotting and respotting different types of bowling pins, such as tenpins and duckpins, with the same machine by providing it with selective adjustments whereby it can be rapidly and readily converted from handling and spotting tenpins, to perform the same operations equally well with duckpins and vice versa.
  • the invention also includes improved means for adapting the machine to handle the proper ball required for playing the game, that is, when the game of tenpins is being played, the machine is adjusted to handle large balls which are approximately nine (9) inches in diameter 2,743,927 Patented May 1, 1956 7 for a bowling alley proprietor to satisfy the demands of his customers and insure the fullest operation of all of his alleys at all times.
  • pin handling, spotting and respotting mechanisms which can be adjusted selectively in order to make these mechanisms readily available for handling and spotting different types of bowling pins such as tenpins, duckpins or candle-pins, in order that a bowling alley on which the machine is located, can be used for playing the game of Tenpins, or Duckpins, or Candle-pins in accordance withv the wishes of a bowler.
  • Fig. 1 is a sectional side elevation disclosing a bowling pin spotting machine embodying the invention taken on line 1-1 of Figure 3 illustrating a pin magazine in conjunction with a pin spotting table, and means for sweeping the pins from an alley bed into a pit from which the pins are conveyed into the pin magazine;
  • Fig. 2 is a partial plan view of the pin spotting table and its guiding mechanism
  • Fig. 3 is a sectional front elevation of a bowling pin spotting machine embodying the invention, taken on line 33 of Figure v1;
  • Fig. 4 is a sectional side elevation of the ball elevating and return mechanism, taken on line 4-4 of Figure 3;
  • Fig. 5 is a sectional side elevation of the ball elevating bucket
  • Fig. 6 is a partial front elevation of the triangularizing pin magazine, illustrating a pin station in conjunction with its pin locating and supportng mechanism;
  • Fig. 7 is a partial sectional side elevation of the upper portion of the triangularizing pin magazine, illustrating the selective adjusting mechanisms for accommodating tenpins as well as other types of pins, such as duckpins;
  • Fig. 8 is a sectional side elevation of one of the pin conveying and elevating flights, illustrating its adaptability in handling different kinds of bowling pins, such as duckpins, and tenpins;
  • Fig. 9 is a plan view of the same, taken on line 9-9 of Figure 8;
  • Fig. 10 is a rear view of the pin spotting machine selected for purposes of illustration showing the drive for the selective adjusting mechanism
  • Fig.'1l is a wiring diagram illustrating a suitable elec- 'trical control mechanism to effect a change-over from one type of bowling pins, such as tenpins to another type of bowling pins, such as duckpins, or vice versa, as desired.
  • the convertible bowling pin spotting machine selected for purposes of illustration may be of the same general type as disclosed in copending Wells application, S. N. 16,725, filed March 24, 1949, for Bowling Pin Spotting Machine, now Patent 2,707,636, granted May 3, 1955. While reference is made to said Wells patent as illustrating a machine readily convertible in accordance with the invention, it is within the contemplation of the invention to adapt it for use with other bowling pin spotting machines which can be made convertible for the same purposes.
  • the convertible bowling pin spotting machine embodying the invention includes a pin magazine M, a pin spotting and respotting table T,
  • an alley sweep S and a pit sweep PS Within the magazine M are arranged a pin conveyor C, an adjustable triangularizing pin rack R, a ball lift L and a ball elevator E.
  • Magazine M consists of an upright generally rectangular housing or frame 29 which at each of its four corners carries a suitably mounted stud 22.
  • Loosely mounted on each stud 22 is a pair of spaced sprockets 24 on which run two spaced endless chains 26 connected transversely along their lengths by suitably spaced bar; 28, and driven by spaced sprockets 30 mounted on shaft 32 projecting from the housing of a conventional gear reduction motor 9 34 suitably mounted within the housing 20.
  • a number of pivotally mounted cradles or flights 36 is equidistantly spaced along chains 26.
  • Each flight 36 is provided with a pair of guide shoes 38 at the free end of which is mounted a guide roller 40 adapted to engage and run on several tracks employed for positioning the several flights properly when passing through the various sections of magazine M, as will be described hereinafter.
  • Flights 36 convey bowling pins from a lower pin receiving chamber F (Figs. 1 and 3) into which pins are pushed from pit P by pit sweep PS, to triangularizing or rack section R. While passing through lower chamber F, flights 36, together with chains 26 and cross bars 28, form a more or less horizontal moving band conveyor or traveling floor on which pinsare deposited by pit sweep PS.
  • Chamber F is also provided with a stationary top wall 31 and an adjustable rear wall 33.
  • the latter is mounted on a pair of threaded lugs 35, each of which ongages with a threaded spindle 37 supported by suitable bearings attached to the top wall 31 and to the rear wall of housing 20.
  • chains 26 move around the right-hand lower corner of the housing 26 and move vertically upward, as viewed in Figure 3, each flight 36 remains in its horizontal position. When therefore a pin is resting on a flight 36, it is carried upwardly in a horizontal position to the triangularizing rack R.
  • the necessary change in position or orienting of pins may be effected in the same manner as disclosed in the above referred to Wells application where the pin conveyor C is caused to move through a horizontal, substantially U-shaped loop channel U, illustrated in Fig. 3. While passing through the lower portion of channel U, flights 36 assume a vertical position, so that a pin engaged by a flight is rolled or pushed in a barrel-like fashion substantially horizontally over two suitably spaced guide rails 42 and 44 (Figs. 1 and 3) bridging the rear portion of a vertical chute 46. The latter is provided with a pair of spaced suitably curved pin reversing plates 48. The bottom of chute 46 has an opening 50 leading to the ascending section of pin conveyor C.
  • Guide rail 44 is secured stationarily to suitable ribs or walls within housing 28; guide rail 42 is fastened to the upper portion of an adjustable rear wall 52 of chute 46. Rear wall 52 is fastened to a pair of lugs 81, each of which is secured to a threaded sleeve 54. Each sleeve 54 engage a threaded spindle 56 supported by suitable hearings in the rear wall of housing 20. Secured to guide rail 4 is a baflle plate 58 which projects downwardly into chute 46.
  • Pins resting in a horizontal position on flights 36 after leaving channel U are then carried upwardly through a vertical channel 60, the sides of which are formed by a side wall of rack section housing 62 and a side wall of housing 20.
  • the front of this vertical channel is formed by a suitable cover plate 64 ( Figures 1 and 3).
  • the rear of the channel is provided with a rear guide bar 66 which by means of suitable lugs 68, is attached to an adjnstably mounted rear plate 70 of the triangularizing rack section R.
  • Rear plate 79, by means of a lag 72 attached thereto ( Figure 3) also carries a rear guide bar 74 extending into the upper portion of channel U.
  • the lower portion of the latter is provided with a rear guide bar 76 attached by means of lug 78 to the adjustably mounted rear wall 52 of chute 46.
  • a substantially vertical rear guide bar 80 is also provided. This bar is suitably attached to lugs 81 mentioned heretofore, a d also to 2.
  • lug S2 fastened to the lower end of rear wall 52 of chute 46. All rear guide bars '66, 74, 76 and 30 at their leading ends are provided with a curved portion to facilitate alignment of pins which have moved farther to the rear on their respective flights than desired.
  • the triangularizing rack section R to which pins are delivered by the conveyor C consists chiefly of a pair of spaced vertically arranged pin supporting front plates 84 and a pair of spaced vertically arranged pin supporting rear plates 86 and a rear plate 70 ( Figures 1, 3, 6 and 7). Plates 84 and 36, which are supported in spaced arrange ment, are provided with ten pin locating and supporting stations 1 to 10 which form the same pattern and correcommon feed channel.
  • Plates 84" and 86 are provided with four feed channels, namely channels 88, 90, 92' and 94 ( Figure 3) each of which has an opening 89, 91, 93 and 95, respectively, leading to the top edges of plates 84 and 86.
  • channels 88, 90 and 92 are substantially parallel and inclined from the vertical in order that each of the several stations may occupy a predetermined position in the desired triangular pin spot pattern of alley A.
  • Other suitable channel arrangements could be used if desired.
  • the channels are designed in such a manner that feed channel 88 connects and serves pin stations 1, 3, 6 and feed channel 90 serves pin stations 2, Sand 9; channel 92 serves pin stations 4 and 8, and channel 94 serves pin station 7.
  • feed channel 88 connects and serves pin stations 1
  • 3, 6 and feed channel 90 serves pin stations 2, Sand 9
  • channel 92 serves pin stations 4 and 8
  • channel 94 serves pin station 7.
  • Each pair of plates 84 and 86 is spaced far enough apart to allow the mounting therebetweenof suitable pin arresting mechanism.
  • One pin arresting mechanism is provided for each of the tenpin stations.
  • the pin arresting mecha nism extends between each pair of plates into the respective stations and feed channels.
  • Each pair of plates 84 and 86 is so joined and constructed that in operation the two plates act as a single plate with a vertical channel to accommodate the pin arresting mechanism.
  • Front plates 84 are attached ma suitable 'mannerto the side walls of rack housing 62. Fastened to rear plates 86, preferably adjacent each of the four corners thereof, is a threaded lug 96. Each lug 96 is mounted on a threaded horizontal spindle 98 supported for rotation in suitable bearings carried by plates 84 and the rear wall of magazine housing 20. Rear plate 70 of the rack section R is also secured to threaded sleeves or'lugs 96, so that upon movement of lugs 96 on spindles 98, the distance between the rear plate 70 and plates 86 always remains the same, while the spacing or distance between rear plates 86 and stationary front plates 84.may be varied in accordance with the type of bowling pin to be used in the machine. 7
  • Each pin arresting mechanism provided at each of the ten stations 1-10 consists of'a pair of pin supporting lugs 100, 102, employed for the purpose of providing a rest or support for the head and bottom portions respectively of a pin and thereby maintaining it in substantially hori-v zontal position in rack R. As shown in Figures 3, 6 and 7, each pin is so supported in rack R that it alwaysisin a substantially horizontal position. The adjustments forming a part of this invention insure that regardless of the type of pin handled, this same pin positioning is maintained. Y
  • each lug 100 is equipped with a suitable tension spring 110 which normally keeps it in a substantially vertical position but yields to permit forward tilting as a pin is moved thereover when a set of horizontal pins is extracted from rack R. Backward tilting of lug 100 is prevented ,by an inclined surface 112 ( Figure 7) on its lower hinge portion, thus assuring that lug 100 is always kept in an upright position except during pin extracting operation.
  • Each lug 100 is biased by a spring 110 into an upright 6 spective channel.
  • Rear pin supporting lugs-102 at stations 3, 5, 6, 8, 9 and 10 are not hingedly mounted, but form an integral part of their respective arms 106 which are identical with the arms carrying the front lugs 100 mentioned above.
  • the arms 106, equipped with the rear pin supporting lugs 102, are also pivoted to a stud 1'08 held by plates 86 and are mounted in such a way as to be able to swing freely between spaced plates 86.
  • Lugs 102 at stations 1, 2, 4 and 7, are fixedly mounted on plates 86 at the bottom of channels 88, 90, 92 and 94.
  • Each station 1, 2, '3, 4, 5 and 6 is provided with a trip or-control arm 116, each of which is secured to a horizontal shaft 118 journalled in suitable hearings in front plates 84 and freely and slidably supported in bearings of plates 86.
  • Each shaft 118 also carries two lock arms 120 mounted in such a position and manner as to be able to swing freely between spaced plates 84 and 86 when shaft 118 is actuated.
  • Lock arm 120 between plates 84 is rigidly attached to shaft 118.
  • the other lock arm 120 between plates 86 is slidably attached to shaft 118,
  • Front lugs 100 at stations 1,2, 4 and 7, which are at the bottom of channels 88,- 90, 92 and 94, respectively, are not pivoted to 'arms -106,but-to bars 114 secured between the front plates 84 at the .bottomofeach refrom front plates 84, the arms 120 between plates 86 follow the lateral movement of plates 86, while still being engaged with and controlled by their respective shafts 118.
  • this end of each shaft 118 maybe made square or each arm 120 may be provided wit-ha key slidably engaging in a key way in its respective shaft 118 as desired.
  • Each control arm 116 is provided with a suitable tension spring 117 which, when arm 116 is not in contact with a bowling pin, urges the free end of arm 116 into the channel leading to a station controlled by a particular arm 116. To check the posi-.
  • Each station 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 is provided with one control arm 116.
  • Stations 8, 9 and 10 employ two control arms each.
  • Station 7 has none.
  • the two control arms at stations 8, 9 and 10 are of the same general type and'construction as those at stations 1-6 inclusive, except that they are shorter and are mounted opposite each other so that they protrude into the station from both sides.
  • Each shaft 118, to which one of these control arms is attached, also carries two lock arms 120 of the same construction and mounting as the lock arms at stations 1-6 inclusive.
  • this control arm 116 depressing of this control arm 116 causes the two lock 7 arms mounted on the same shaft 118 to swing upwardly, thereby causing the upper free end of each of the lock arms 120 to engage with the lower edge of the pin supporting lug arm 106 and move it from its normally inclined position into a horizontal position so that.
  • the pin supporting lug, carried by each arm 106 is placed in its proper position in the station above, so that the next pindropping into feed channel 88, will come to rest at pin supporting lugs 100, 102 at station 3.
  • the pin being arrested at station 3 depresses the control arm 116 at this station which in turn causes the pin supporting lug arms 106 at the station 6 located above station 3 to assume a horizontal position and the next pin dropping into feed channel 88 is arrested at station 6.
  • All pins are carried upward by flights 36 of pin conveyor C which, upon reaching the top edge of pin rack housing 62, turns and moves in a horizontal direction, thereby causing fiights 36 to assume a substantial vertical position and push or roll pins engaged thereby along the top edges of plates 84 and 86.
  • the flights 36 during their vertical and horizontal movements are always held in proper position by means of suitable guide rails 126 engaging with rollers 40 carried by guide shoes 33 of flights 36.
  • Stations 1 to 10 in the pin rack R are arranged in the same manner and conform with the same pattern in which pins are spotted on a bowling alley bed, i. e. station 1 corresponds with pin 1 on the alley; stations 2 and 3 correspond with pins 2 and 3, etc.
  • pin conveyor C After passing over the top of pin rack R, pin conveyor C makes a turn and moves vertically downward as indicated by arrow in I Figure 3.
  • flights 36 in pin receiving position when they arrive at the bottom of housing 2'1) flights 36, upon leaving the top portion of housing 20, are moved or swung about their pivots from a vertical hanging position to a position where, in conjunction with bars 28 and chains 26, they form an almost flat conveyor band.
  • a pin spotting mechanism or table designated generally T ( Figure 1).
  • This mechanism is used for the purpose of transferring triangularly arranged pins from triangularizing ruck R to alley A and spotting pins transferred thereon in playing position on alley A.
  • table T consists of a suitable housing 132 in which are rigidly mounted ten triangularly arranged pin transfer and spotting units designated generally 134.
  • the triangular arrangement of units 134 corresponds with the triangular arrangement of pins in rack R and the spotted positions to be occupied by pins on alley A.
  • Each unit 134 in the embodiment selected for purposes of illustration includes a housing or cylinder 135 in which are pivotally mounted a plurality of gripper arms 136. As shown in Figure 1, there are two pairs of opposed gripper arms 136 in each unit 134. A spring 137 connected to each pair of opposed gripper arms tends to urge them into open or non-gripping relationship.
  • each gripper arm At one end of each gripper arm is mounted a cam follower 139 adapted to be engaged at the proper time by a cone shaped gripper actuating member or cam 138 secured to one end of rod 140 (Figure 1) suitabiy supported for axial movement in a sleeve or hub 142 mounted on or formed integrally with cover plate 144 which may be an integral part of cylinder 135.
  • the other end of rod 140 is supported in a bushing or sleeve 146 secured to plate 148 which at several suitable points engages with a number of threaded spindles 150, the ends of which are supported in bearings of suitable ribs or plates which may be an integral part of table housing 132.
  • Rod 149 also carries a spring 152 which is confined between a collar 154 secured thereto and sleeve 146.
  • a collar 156 at the end of rod 140 acts as a retainer for rod 1.40.
  • This arrangement provides a resilient co-action between cam 138 and plate 148, thereby insuring a firm, yet resilient grip of grippers 136 on a bowling pin. It also allows for variation in the size of the necks of pins when being extracted from the pin rack R by said gripper arms. In this manner, proper handling and spotting of difierent types of pins, such as tenpins and duckpins, is insured.
  • each of the several spindles is a sprocket 158, each connected by a chain 160 to a sprocket 162 mounted on a shaft 164 protruding from a suitable reversible gear reduction motor 166 suitably secured to a stationary rib or plate 168 within the housing 132.
  • a suitable reversible gear reduction motor 166 suitably secured to a stationary rib or plate 168 within the housing 132.
  • Table T at each side, is provided with two studs 170, 172, both protruding from housing 132.
  • Each stud 170 carries a roller 174 running in a cam track 176 ( Figure 1) formed in a vertical cam plate 178.
  • the two cam plates 178 are mounted upright adjacent the two sides of table T and are secured to U-shaped channels 180 attached to the inside upper portion of the kickbacks of bowling alley A.
  • Each stud 172 carries a cam roller 182 engaging and running in a cam track 184 also formed in vertical cam plate 178.
  • Each stud 170 also engages with a slot 186 in the free end of a table actuating arm 188. These arms are loosely mounted on studs 190 held by suitable blocks 192 secured to the top surface of channels 180.
  • Each arm 188 is provided with a gear sector 194 ( Figure 1) which engages with gear 196 mounted on a shaft 198 projecting from a suitable reversible gear reduction motor 200.
  • Each of these motors is mounted on block 192 fixed to a channel 180.
  • the rotation of shafts 198 either clockwise or counter-clockwise by their respective motors causes gear sectors 194 and arms 188 to move unwardly or downwardly and move table T away from or towards the pin supporting bed of alley A. Since the triangularized pins in pin rack section R are arranged in a horizontal position, but have to be placed on the alley in a vertical or upright position, table T in effecting the necessary transfer is turned ninety degrees in moving from rack R to alley A.
  • table T rises from its lowermost pin spotting position to a suitable dwell position duction motor 242.
  • a ball lift L ( Figures 1, 3 and 4) of suitable design.
  • the ball lift shown consists of a rack 204 pivotally attached to a pair of lugs 206 ( Figure 3) mounted on a suitable frame or rib within magazine M.
  • Rack 204 is so constructed as to provide an inclined transverse runway which leads into a delivery cradle 208 secured substantially at right angles to rack 204. Therefore, a ball rolling onto any portion of rack 204 will gravitate to the junction of cradle 208 and rack 204.
  • the latter as well as cradle 208 are so constructed as to permit the use of full size bowling balls as well as the smaller balls used in bowling games such as Duckpins.
  • Rack 204 is also provided with an arm 210, to the free end of which is attached one end of a tension spring 212, the other end of the latter being secured to a suitable anchor 214 attached to the back wall of magazine housing 20.
  • the ball lift L is held at the bottom of the pit P by the lower edge of a vertically movable back stop or pit cushion 216 secured to a pair of supporting brackets 218- ( Figures 3 and 4).
  • a roller 220 At the upper corner of each bracket 218 is pivoted a roller 220 engaging with a vertical cam track or guide channel 222 suitably secured to frame plates within the magazine housing 20.
  • the lower corner of each bracket 218 is attached to a stud 224 forming an integral part of an endless chain 226.
  • Each stud 224 carries a roller 228 engaging in a vertical track 230.
  • Both c'hains 226 are led over idler sprockets 232 and are driven or reciprocated by a pair of double sprockets 234, which in turn through chains 236, are connected to a pair of sprockets 238 mounted on a horizontal drive shaft 240 projecting from a suitable reversible gear re-
  • the machine is timed in such a manner that as soon as a ball comes to rest in rack 204, motor 242 starts and drives the chains 226 in a counter-clockwise direction, as viewed in Figure 4, thereby effecting at raising of cush- :ion 216 in the direction of arrow Z.
  • the raising of cushion 216 effects the release of ball lift L, and due to the action of spring 212, ball lift L moves upwardly to a position indicated in dotted lines in Figure 4.
  • rocking movement of ball lift L causes the ball to roll onto cradle 208 and into a bucket 244 of the ball ele- .Vator E ( Figure 5).
  • the lower portion of bucket 244 is provided with suitable lugs 246 which are pivotally attached to a pair of spaced endless chains 248;
  • the upper portion of each side of bucket 244 carries a guide roller 250 engaging a vertical guide track 252.
  • Each chain 248 is led over an idler sprocket 254 and driven by means of a sprocket 256, each of which is attached to a short shaft 258 mounted in suitable bearings in a frame plate.
  • Secured to each shaft 256 is another sprocket 260 which by means of chain 262, is driven from a sprocket 264. Both sprockets 264 are mounted on a horizontal drive shaft 266 protruding from a suitable gear reduction motor 268 ( Figures 3 and 4).
  • the machine operates in a manner generally similar to the machine disclosed in the above referred to Wells application Serial Number 16,725.
  • a suitable sweep S ( Figure -1) pushes the I fallen pins into the pit P.
  • pit sweep PS pushes the pins to the rear of the pit and into the lower chamber F onto its moving floor formed by the flights 36 and bars 28 of the pin conveyor C.
  • the latter is provided with a hinged bridge section 278 ( Figure 4) which is lifted upwardly in the direction of the arrow by the upwardly moving cushion 216.
  • Pit sweep PS may be of the same construction and operation as that disclosed in Wells application Serial Number 16,725.
  • 'It consists of a transverse sweep board 282 ( Figure 1) attached to a horizontal gear rack 2 84 which engages with and is reciprocated by gear 286 mounted on a shaft 288 protruding from a reversible gear reduction motor 290conveniently mounted beneath the alley bed A.
  • the latter is provided with a suitable electrical control system which is substantially of the same design and construction as that disclosed in Wells application Serial Number 16,725.
  • a suitable electrical control system which is substantially of the same design and construction as that disclosed in Wells application Serial Number 16,725.
  • the machine disclosed in the above mentioned application is constructed for the use of normal tenpins only
  • the machine illustrated in the present application is so designed as to permit not only the use of tenpins, but alsoother types of pins, such as duckpins. These changes are effected by pressing a control button which will effect a conversion from a tenpin bowling pinspotting machine to a duckpin bowling pin spotting machine if duckpins are to be For purposes of illustration, it is.
  • flights 36 ( Figures 8 and 9) of pin conveyor C are so designed'that tenpins TP or .duckpins DP are supported 'or conveyed thereby in a centralized position.
  • Each flight 36 is provided with a cut-out 37 which permits the various rear guide bars 66, 74, 76, S0, and 67, to be moved thereinto whenduckpins are conveyed, and properly and uniformly orient and centralize said duckpins on said flights.
  • all of these rear guide bars are located adjacent to the rear edges of the moving flights and also assist in retaining a proper and uniform position of pins on the flights.
  • the curved portion 39 of flights 36 prevents pinsfrom moving in an undesirable forward direction while being conveyed from the chamber F to the top edges of rack R. Therefore when arriving at said top edges of rack R, all pins are rolled onto and along plates 84, 86 in the same horizontal osition, and plates 84 and 86 are spaced in such a manner that the edge of each plate contacts a portion of the belly of the tenpin of the same diameter,
  • Plates 84 1 1 and 86 are so spaced that the edge of each'plate supports a portion of the belly of the duckpin of the same diameter.
  • the latter also runs on an idler sprocket 298 ( Figure l) and on two sprockets 300 mounted on spindles 56 extending through the rear wall of magazine M.
  • spindles 56 engage with threaded lugs 54 to which are secured lugs 81 which carry rear wall 52 and vertical rear guide rail 80.
  • Rear wall 52 by means of lug 73, supports rear guide rail 76.
  • Chain 296 also runs on two sprockets 302 mounted on spindles 37 protruding through the rear wall of magazine M. As mentioned heretofore, spindles 37 engage threaded lugs 35 on which is mounted the rear wall 33 of the lower chamber F. Chain 296 is driven by means of sprocket 304 which may be driven clockwise or counterclockwise by a shaft 306 protruding from the housing of a reversible gear reduction motor 308 mounted on a suitable stand 310 within the housing of maga zine M.
  • cams 312 and 314 are mounted on a shaft 3T6 protruding from the housing of a suitable gear reduction motor 318 which in turn is controlled by a suitable electrical control system (not shown) in order to properly time the various other mechanisms in the machine.
  • the electrical control system may be similar to that shown and described in copending Wells application Serial Number 16,725. Since the control system forms no specific part of this invention, further showing and description thereof are deemed unnecessary.
  • a control of the type shown in Figure 11 is provided. if it is desired to set the machine for tenpin operation, the attendant pushes a button 320 of a two-button walkin g beam switch 322 which permits current to flow through a normally closed switch 324, a closed contact 326 on button 328 of walking beam switch 322 to double throw switch 330 which is actuated by tenpin control cam 312, thus providing the necessary control means for table motors 200 in moving table T in spotting and respotting tenpins.
  • the machine is so designed that while it is handling and spotting tenpins, all rear guide rails 80, 76, 74, 66 and 67, as well as rear plates 33, 52 and 70, are in their outermost positions.
  • plate 70 When plate 70 is so positioned, it holds a normally closed switch 334 open as shown in Figure 7.
  • Switches 324 and 334 are normally closed switches, the latter being mounted on the inside of the rear wall of magazine M and actuated or held open when rear plate 70 is in its outermost or tenpin position.
  • Switch 324 is mounted on the rear side of stationary front plates 84 and is depressed and opened when movable plates 86 move forward to innermost or duckpin position.
  • Table T may also be moved by mechanism similar to that shown and described in said copending Wells application to and from alley A after the throwing of a first ball of a frame in order to lift and respot any standing pins on said alley pending the delivery of the next ball of the same frame.
  • button 320 is depressed again. This permits current to flow through the now closed switch 334, now closed contact 346, through motor 308 and now closed contacts 348, which starts the reversible gear reduction motor 308 in a counterclockwise direction as viewed in Figure 10.
  • the chain 296 and all sprockets connected therewith, except sprockets 298 and 304, are also moved in a counterclockwise direction, which causes spindles 98,
  • a convertible bowling pin spotting machine for spotting and respotting a selected type of bowling pin in playing arrangement on the playing bed of a bowling alley, comprising conveying mechanism for conveying a given type of bowling pin from the pit or a bowling alley, adjustable means operatively associated with said conveying mechanism for adapting said mechanism for conveying a different type of bowling pin, operating means for said last-named means, a pin distributing device, a pin triangularizing mechanism operatively associated with said distributing device for receiving pins-therefrom, adjusting means for adapting said triangularizing mechanism to handle said different type of pin, operating means for said last-named means, means for delivering said given type of pin from said conveying mechanism to said device, mechanism for adjusting said delivering means to deliver said difierent type of bowling pin, operating means for said adjusting mechanism, and cornmon actuating means for substantially simultaneously actuating all of said operating means to adapt said conveying mechanism, said delivering means and said triangularizing mechanism to handle said
  • said common actuating means includes an electrical control circuit, and selectively operated means in said circuit for limiting the operation of said operating means for said adjustable means in conformity with the selected type of bowling pin to be handled in said machine.
  • bowling pin distributing means adapted to receive pins from said conveyor, means associated with said distributing means for holding said pins distributed thereby in substantially triangular arrangement and placing said pins in substantially triangular arrangement onthe playing bed of the bowling alley, selective devices operatively associated with each of said means for adapting said means to handle a selected one of a plurality of types of bowling pins, operating means for each of said selective devices and common operating means for substantially simultaneously operating said operating means to convert the machine from handling one distinct type of pins into a machine capable of handling a different type of bowling pin.
  • the bowling pin spotting machine defined in claim 3 including operating mechanism for moving said means for holding and placing one type of pins on the playing bed of an alley toand from said alley, and selective means operative in response to the operation of said common operating means for limiting the movement of said lastnamed means towards said alley for placing a different type of bowling pin to be spotted thereby on said playing bed of said alley.
  • a bowling pin spotting machine for use with a bowling alley, the combination with a pin spotter movable to and from'said alley for depositing a selected type of bowling pin thereon, means for moving said spotter to and from said alley for placing pins thereon, a pin delivery station, conveying means for conveying said selected type of bowling pins to said station for delivery to said spotter, said conveying means including a distributor for distributing and arranging said bowling pins in an arrangement corresponding substantially with the positions said pins are to occupy on said alley, means for adjusting said spotter and conveying means, and said distributor to handle a distinctly diiferent type of bowling pin, means for operating said spotter to deposit said pins on said alley, selective mechanisms for operating said adjusting means for converting said machine to handle and deposit said distinctly different type of bowling pin on said alley, and for controlling the extent of movement of said spotter by its moving means, a common operating station, and means at said station for substantially simultaneously operating all of said spot
  • a bowling pin spotting machine having interconnected coacting pin handling devices, and pin spotting devices, mechanism for operating said deviees'to handle a selected type of pin, and effect the delivery of said selected type of pin to said spotting devices for placement thereby on the pin supporting bed of a bowling alley, interconnected adjusting means operatively associated with said pin handling devices and said spotting devices for adapting said devices to handle a different type of bowling pin, means for actuating said adjusting means, an operating station for said last-named means, and selectively operated mechanism at said station for actuating said last-named means and thereby adapting said devices to handle and place a different type of bowling pin on said bed of said alley.
  • a pin elevator operative to spot a selected type of pin on a bowling alley
  • a pin distributing mechanism triangularizing mechanism adjustable to handle different types of pins associated with said distributor and provided with a plurality of pin holders for receiving a selected type of bowling pins from said distributor and for supporting said selected type of bowling pins in substantially triangular pin playing arrangement
  • adjusting means for each of said holders for adapting said holders to receive and support a different type of bowling pin
  • motion transmitting means for substantially simultaneously operating said adjusting means for all of said holders, adjustable pin guiding elements coacting with said elevator, motion transmitting means for changing the operative positions of said elements to conform with the size of said different type of pin, and selectively operable means for operating said motion transmitting means of all of said adjusting means of said holders and said motion transmitting means of said elements for converting said machine from one capable of handling said selected type of pin
  • a convertible bowling pin spotting machine comprising a pin spotter, means for moving said spotter to and from a bowling alley to spot and respot a selected type of bowling pin thereon, a plurality of spotter units mounted in said spotter in an arrangement conforming to the spotted pin playing disposition for spotting said selected type of bowling pin on the pin supporting bed of a bowling alley, devices for arranging said selected type of bowling pins for handling by said units, a conveyor for delivering a plurality of said selected type of bowling pins to said devices, separate adjusting means operatively associated with said spotter, said devices and said conveyor for adapting said spotter units, said conveyor and said devices for handling a different type of bowling pin, actuating mechanisms for said adjusting means interconnected for substantially simultaneous operation, and selectively operable means for operating said actuating mechanism to convert said spotter units, said devices and said conveyor to handle and spot said diiferent type of bowling pin on said bed of said alley.
  • a bowling pin spotting machine adapted normally to place a selected type of bowling pin on the playing bed of a bowling alley, comprising a convertible pin receiving mechanism having adjustable means and operating means therefor for adapting said mechanism to handle different types of pins, a pin spotter, including a plurality of pin holders adapted to hold said selected type of pin mounted on said spotter in positions corresponding to a predetermined pin playing arrangement, mechanism for effecting the transfer of said selected type of bowling pins from said receiving mechanism to said holders on said spotter, including adjustable means and operating means therefor for adapting said mechanism to handle different types of pins, adjusting devices for converting each of said holders to handle a different type of pin, operating means for said devices, control means for substantially simultaneously operating all of said operating means to adapt said holders to hold said different type of pin for transfer to said alley bed, and to adapt said mechanisms to handle said different type of bowling pin.
  • the machine defined in claim 9 including means for moving said spotter between predetermined limits of movement to and from a pin receiving position relative to said pin receiving means and the pin supporting bed of a bowling alley for transferring and spotting said selected type of bowling pins on said alley bed, and said control means including means for changing said limits of movement of said spotter when said machine is handling said different type of bowling pin.
  • a bowling pin spotting machine normally operative to place a selected type of bowling pin on the playing bed of a bowling alley, associated mechanisms for conveying, arranging and spotting a selected type of bowling pin, a separate adjusting means for each of said mechanisms for adapting said mechanisms to handle a distinctly different type of bowling pin, interconnected operating means 16 for substantially simultaneously operating said separate adjusting means, an operating station for said operating means, and selectively operable mechanism at said station for actuating said operating means to adapt said mechanisms for handling said distinctly different type of bowling References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 809,890 Backus Jan. 9, 1906 1,290,063 Broome Jan. 7, 1919 1,449,012 Lorenz et al. Mar. 20, 1923 1,557,177 Lorenz et al. Oct. 13, 1925 1,573,643 Proch Feb. 16, 1926 2,388,708 Bates Nov. 13, 1945

Description

y 1, 1956 v M. PATTERSON 2,743,927
7 CONVERTIBLE BOWLING PIN SPOTTING MACHINE Filed Feb. 3, 1950 e Sheets-Sheet 1 22 36 28 38 v INVENTOR 38 3 I MOREHEAD PATTERSON Maw y 1, 1956 M. PATTERSON I 2,743,927
CONVERTIBLE BOWLING PIN SPOTTING MACHINE Filed Feb. 3, 1950 I e Sheets-Sheet :s
May 1, 1956 M. PATTERSON CONVERTIBLE BOWLING PIN SPOTTING MACHINE 6 Sheets-Sheet "4 Filed Feb. 3, 1950 T INVENTOR MOREHEAD PATTERSON May 1956 M. PATTERSON 2,743,927
CONVERTIBLE BOWLING PIN SPOTTING MACHINE Fil ed Feb. 5, 1950 6 Sheets-Sheet 5 9 I TP N 726 v '9 INVENTOR f4 7 MOREHEAD PATTERSON ATTORNEY y 1, 1956 M. PATTERSON CONVERTIBLE BOWLING PIN SPOTTING MACHINE 6 Sheets-Sheet 6 Filed Feb. 3, 1950 INVENTOR MOREHEAD PATTERSON mom ATTORNEY United States Patent CONVERTIBLE BOWLING PIN SPOTTING v MACHINE Morehead Patterson, New York, N. Y., assignor to American Machine & Foundry Company, a corporation of New Jersey Application February 3, 1950, Serial No. 142,183
11 Claims. (Cl. 273-43 This invention relates to bowling pin spotting machines, and more particularly to improvements in such machines which make it possible for a bowling pin spotting machine to handle and spot more than one type of bowling pin, such as tenpins, duckpins and the like, in order to meet the requirementsof bowlers as desired. The invention also includes improvements for adapting a bowling pin spotting machine to handle balls of different sizes required in playing the game in accordance with the type of pin being handled by the machine.
In bowling alleys as a general rule, the game played may be Tenpins or Kingpins in which large pins-approximately fifteen inches in length are spotted and respotted upon the bowling alley for playing each frame of the game. It so happens that occasionally players or bowlers may desire to play the game of Duckpins in which much smaller pins, say approximately nine and one-half (9 /2) inches long instead of the larger tenpins, are used.
In bowling alleys where pins are set manually, the change from one type and size of pin, say tenpins, to duckpins and vice versa, presents no problem. All that is necessary is for a bowling alley proprietor to have available sets of each type of pin. When a customer asks to play a certain type of game, thelproprietor need only instruct his pin boy to set up the type of pin requested by the customer. i
A much difierent situation and serious problem is present when a bowling establishment is equipped with pin spotting machines. This is because pin spotting machines heretofore known in the art are designed to handle a single type of bowling pin only and all the operations of the machine are directed towards the proper handling, distribution, spotting and/or respotting of the one type of pin on a bowling alley during the play of a game. Therefore, if a bowler makes known to the proprietor of a bowling alley in which the game of Tenpins is rolled that he wishes to play Duckpins, the proprietor is confronted with loss of his business and patronage unless he is able to grant this request. In fact, in machines developed thus far in the art, as far as is known to applicant, a proprietor in all probability would be unable to satisfy his customer because of difficulties incident to manual spotting and respotting of pins of a size which cannot be handled in his machines.
The present invention constitutes a solution of the problem of spotting and respotting different types of bowling pins, such as tenpins and duckpins, with the same machine by providing it with selective adjustments whereby it can be rapidly and readily converted from handling and spotting tenpins, to perform the same operations equally well with duckpins and vice versa. The invention also includes improved means for adapting the machine to handle the proper ball required for playing the game, that is, when the game of tenpins is being played, the machine is adjusted to handle large balls which are approximately nine (9) inches in diameter 2,743,927 Patented May 1, 1956 7 for a bowling alley proprietor to satisfy the demands of his customers and insure the fullest operation of all of his alleys at all times.
It is an object of this invention therefore to provide a novel bowling pin spotting machine which can be readily converted to handle and spot diiferent types of howling pins such as tenpins, duckpins or candle-pins, and also handle the different sizes of balls required by the rules of each game played.
It .is a further object of this invention to provide a novel bowling pin spotting machine having selectively operated adjusting mechanism which allows it to be converted from a tenpin handling machine to a machine which can handle other types of bowling pins, such as duckpins, and which can also be converted back again to handle tenpins.
It is a further object of my invention to provide a novel bowling pin spotting machine having pin handling, spotting and respotting mechanisms which can be adjusted selectively in order to make these mechanisms readily available for handling and spotting different types of bowling pins such as tenpins, duckpins or candle-pins, in order that a bowling alley on which the machine is located, can be used for playing the game of Tenpins, or Duckpins, or Candle-pins in accordance withv the wishes of a bowler.
With these and other objects not specifically mentioned in view, the invention consists in certain combinations and constructions which will be hereinafter fully described,
and then set forth in the claims hereunto appended.
In the accompanying drawings which form a part of this specification, and in which like characters of reference indicate the same or like parts:
Fig. 1 is a sectional side elevation disclosing a bowling pin spotting machine embodying the invention taken on line 1-1 of Figure 3 illustrating a pin magazine in conjunction with a pin spotting table, and means for sweeping the pins from an alley bed into a pit from which the pins are conveyed into the pin magazine;
Fig. 2 is a partial plan view of the pin spotting table and its guiding mechanism;
Fig. 3 is a sectional front elevation of a bowling pin spotting machine embodying the invention, taken on line 33 of Figure v1;
Fig. 4 is a sectional side elevation of the ball elevating and return mechanism, taken on line 4-4 of Figure 3;
Fig. 5 is a sectional side elevation of the ball elevating bucket;
Fig. 6 is a partial front elevation of the triangularizing pin magazine, illustrating a pin station in conjunction with its pin locating and supportng mechanism;
Fig. 7 is a partial sectional side elevation of the upper portion of the triangularizing pin magazine, illustrating the selective adjusting mechanisms for accommodating tenpins as well as other types of pins, such as duckpins;
Fig. 8 is a sectional side elevation of one of the pin conveying and elevating flights, illustrating its adaptability in handling different kinds of bowling pins, such as duckpins, and tenpins;
Fig. 9 is a plan view of the same, taken on line 9-9 of Figure 8;
Fig. 10 is a rear view of the pin spotting machine selected for purposes of illustration showing the drive for the selective adjusting mechanism, and
Fig.'1l is a wiring diagram illustrating a suitable elec- 'trical control mechanism to effect a change-over from one type of bowling pins, such as tenpins to another type of bowling pins, such as duckpins, or vice versa, as desired.
The convertible bowling pin spotting machine selected for purposes of illustration may be of the same general type as disclosed in copending Wells application, S. N. 16,725, filed March 24, 1949, for Bowling Pin Spotting Machine, now Patent 2,707,636, granted May 3, 1955. While reference is made to said Wells patent as illustrating a machine readily convertible in accordance with the invention, it is within the contemplation of the invention to adapt it for use with other bowling pin spotting machines which can be made convertible for the same purposes.
Referring to the drawings, and more especially to Figures 1 to 9 inclusive, the convertible bowling pin spotting machine embodying the invention and illustrated, includes a pin magazine M, a pin spotting and respotting table T,
an alley sweep S and a pit sweep PS. Within the magazine M are arranged a pin conveyor C, an adjustable triangularizing pin rack R, a ball lift L and a ball elevator E.
Magazine M consists of an upright generally rectangular housing or frame 29 which at each of its four corners carries a suitably mounted stud 22. Loosely mounted on each stud 22 is a pair of spaced sprockets 24 on which run two spaced endless chains 26 connected transversely along their lengths by suitably spaced bar; 28, and driven by spaced sprockets 30 mounted on shaft 32 projecting from the housing of a conventional gear reduction motor 9 34 suitably mounted within the housing 20.
A number of pivotally mounted cradles or flights 36 is equidistantly spaced along chains 26. Each flight 36 is provided with a pair of guide shoes 38 at the free end of which is mounted a guide roller 40 adapted to engage and run on several tracks employed for positioning the several flights properly when passing through the various sections of magazine M, as will be described hereinafter. Flights 36 convey bowling pins from a lower pin receiving chamber F (Figs. 1 and 3) into which pins are pushed from pit P by pit sweep PS, to triangularizing or rack section R. While passing through lower chamber F, flights 36, together with chains 26 and cross bars 28, form a more or less horizontal moving band conveyor or traveling floor on which pinsare deposited by pit sweep PS. Chamber F is also provided with a stationary top wall 31 and an adjustable rear wall 33. The latter is mounted on a pair of threaded lugs 35, each of which ongages with a threaded spindle 37 supported by suitable bearings attached to the top wall 31 and to the rear wall of housing 20. As chains 26 move around the right-hand lower corner of the housing 26 and move vertically upward, as viewed in Figure 3, each flight 36 remains in its horizontal position. When therefore a pin is resting on a flight 36, it is carried upwardly in a horizontal position to the triangularizing rack R.
Since it is necessary that all pins delivered into the triangularizing rack R project therefrom with their heads in a forward direction towards the approaching transfer or spotting and respotting table T, all pins conveyed by flights 36 must also lie with their heads or handle ends forward. If a pin comes to rest on a flight 36 in a buttend forward direction, such pin must be oriented or have its position changed to a head-forward direction before reaching triangularizing rack section R.
The necessary change in position or orienting of pins may be effected in the same manner as disclosed in the above referred to Wells application where the pin conveyor C is caused to move through a horizontal, substantially U-shaped loop channel U, illustrated in Fig. 3. While passing through the lower portion of channel U, flights 36 assume a vertical position, so that a pin engaged by a flight is rolled or pushed in a barrel-like fashion substantially horizontally over two suitably spaced guide rails 42 and 44 (Figs. 1 and 3) bridging the rear portion of a vertical chute 46. The latter is provided with a pair of spaced suitably curved pin reversing plates 48. The bottom of chute 46 has an opening 50 leading to the ascending section of pin conveyor C. Guide rail 44 is secured stationarily to suitable ribs or walls within housing 28; guide rail 42 is fastened to the upper portion of an adjustable rear wall 52 of chute 46. Rear wall 52 is fastened to a pair of lugs 81, each of which is secured to a threaded sleeve 54. Each sleeve 54 engage a threaded spindle 56 supported by suitable hearings in the rear wall of housing 20. Secured to guide rail 4 is a baflle plate 58 which projects downwardly into chute 46.
All pins, which are lifted from lower chamber F by flights 36 and conveyed upwardly in a head forward position, are easily and safely rolled or pushed over the rails 42 and 44, as illustrated in Figure 1. If, however, a pin resting upon a flight 36 is moved into channel U in a butt-end forward position, as viewed in Figure 1, it will, upon reaching guide rails 42 and 44, tumble over the edge of guide rail 44 because of the location of the center of gravity of the bowling pin. The butt-end of such falling pin will strike pin orienting or reversing plates 48 and be turned thereby into head forward position, the spacing between plates 48 permitting the head end of the pin to fall forward while the butt end, being larger, is guided by the top edges of plates 48 towards the rear, as illustrated in dot and dash lines in Figure l. The now properly oriented pin falls through opening 50 of chute 46 onto one of the ascending flights 36. In case one of the ascending flights already carries a pin, the oriented pin is simply pushed aside by the ascending pin and remains in chute 46 adjacent opening 50 until an empty flight approaches opening 50 whereupon the oriented pin drops onto it. After being moved through the lower portion of channel U, pins engaged by flights 36 are guided through the upper portion of the channel and, as each flight 36 leaves this channel, it again assumes a horizontal position and supports the pin which it has been pushing through said channel. The horizontal positioning of flights 36 after leaving channel U is obtained as the result of cam followers 40 on arms 33 engaging the vertical section of cam 126, as viewed at the right in Figure 3.
Pins resting in a horizontal position on flights 36 after leaving channel U, are then carried upwardly through a vertical channel 60, the sides of which are formed by a side wall of rack section housing 62 and a side wall of housing 20. The front of this vertical channel is formed by a suitable cover plate 64 (Figures 1 and 3). The rear of the channel is provided with a rear guide bar 66 which by means of suitable lugs 68, is attached to an adjnstably mounted rear plate 70 of the triangularizing rack section R. Rear plate 79, by means of a lag 72 attached thereto (Figure 3), also carries a rear guide bar 74 extending into the upper portion of channel U. The lower portion of the latter is provided with a rear guide bar 76 attached by means of lug 78 to the adjustably mounted rear wall 52 of chute 46. To assist in aligning pins on conveyor flights 36 before reaching channel U, a substantially vertical rear guide bar 80 is also provided. This bar is suitably attached to lugs 81 mentioned heretofore, a d also to 2. lug S2, fastened to the lower end of rear wall 52 of chute 46. All rear guide bars '66, 74, 76 and 30 at their leading ends are provided with a curved portion to facilitate alignment of pins which have moved farther to the rear on their respective flights than desired.
The triangularizing rack section R to which pins are delivered by the conveyor C consists chiefly of a pair of spaced vertically arranged pin supporting front plates 84 and a pair of spaced vertically arranged pin supporting rear plates 86 and a rear plate 70 (Figures 1, 3, 6 and 7). Plates 84 and 36, which are supported in spaced arrange ment, are provided with ten pin locating and supporting stations 1 to 10 which form the same pattern and correcommon feed channel.
s pond with the ten pin position spots on the bowling'alley bed A. In order to facilitate the delivery of pins to the pin locating stations, pins are delivered thereto from a Plates 84" and 86 are provided with four feed channels, namely channels 88, 90, 92' and 94 (Figure 3) each of which has an opening 89, 91, 93 and 95, respectively, leading to the top edges of plates 84 and 86. In the illustrated embodiment, channels 88, 90 and 92 are substantially parallel and inclined from the vertical in order that each of the several stations may occupy a predetermined position in the desired triangular pin spot pattern of alley A. Other suitable channel arrangements could be used if desired.
The channels are designed in such a manner that feed channel 88 connects and serves pin stations 1, 3, 6 and feed channel 90 serves pin stations 2, Sand 9; channel 92 serves pin stations 4 and 8, and channel 94 serves pin station 7. Each pair of plates 84 and 86 is spaced far enough apart to allow the mounting therebetweenof suitable pin arresting mechanism. One pin arresting mechanism is provided for each of the tenpin stations.
As shown in Figures 1, 3 and 6, the pin arresting mecha nism extends between each pair of plates into the respective stations and feed channels. Each pair of plates 84 and 86 is so joined and constructed that in operation the two plates act as a single plate with a vertical channel to accommodate the pin arresting mechanism.
Front plates 84 are attached ma suitable 'mannerto the side walls of rack housing 62. Fastened to rear plates 86, preferably adjacent each of the four corners thereof, is a threaded lug 96. Each lug 96 is mounted on a threaded horizontal spindle 98 supported for rotation in suitable bearings carried by plates 84 and the rear wall of magazine housing 20. Rear plate 70 of the rack section R is also secured to threaded sleeves or'lugs 96, so that upon movement of lugs 96 on spindles 98, the distance between the rear plate 70 and plates 86 always remains the same, while the spacing or distance between rear plates 86 and stationary front plates 84.may be varied in accordance with the type of bowling pin to be used in the machine. 7
Each pin arresting mechanism provided at each of the ten stations 1-10 consists of'a pair of pin supporting lugs 100, 102, employed for the purpose of providing a rest or support for the head and bottom portions respectively of a pin and thereby maintaining it in substantially hori-v zontal position in rack R. As shown in Figures 3, 6 and 7, each pin is so supported in rack R that it alwaysisin a substantially horizontal position. The adjustments forming a part of this invention insure that regardless of the type of pin handled, this same pin positioning is maintained. Y
The front or pin head supportinglugs 100 are mounted hingedly on a pivot 104 on an arm 106 loosely mounted on a stud 108 held by plates 84.v Arm 106 is mounted for free swinging movement between the closely spaced plates 84. In addition to being mounted hingedly, each lug 100 is equipped with a suitable tension spring 110 which normally keeps it in a substantially vertical position but yields to permit forward tilting as a pin is moved thereover when a set of horizontal pins is extracted from rack R. Backward tilting of lug 100 is prevented ,by an inclined surface 112 (Figure 7) on its lower hinge portion, thus assuring that lug 100 is always kept in an upright position except during pin extracting operation.
Each lug 100 is biased by a spring 110 into an upright 6 spective channel. Rear pin supporting lugs-102 at stations 3, 5, 6, 8, 9 and 10 are not hingedly mounted, but form an integral part of their respective arms 106 which are identical with the arms carrying the front lugs 100 mentioned above. The arms 106, equipped with the rear pin supporting lugs 102, are also pivoted to a stud 1'08 held by plates 86 and are mounted in such a way as to be able to swing freely between spaced plates 86. Lugs 102 at stations 1, 2, 4 and 7, are fixedly mounted on plates 86 at the bottom of channels 88, 90, 92 and 94. Each station 1, 2, '3, 4, 5 and 6 is provided with a trip or-control arm 116, each of which is secured to a horizontal shaft 118 journalled in suitable hearings in front plates 84 and freely and slidably supported in bearings of plates 86. Each shaft 118 also carries two lock arms 120 mounted in such a position and manner as to be able to swing freely between spaced plates 84 and 86 when shaft 118 is actuated. Lock arm 120 between plates 84 is rigidly attached to shaft 118. The other lock arm 120 between plates 86 is slidably attached to shaft 118,
. so that when plates 86 are adjusted towards or away position, in which surface 112 rests against a comple- 1 mentary surface on arm 106. Thus when a pin is moved to the right out of the magazine M for placement on an alley, as viewed in Figure 7, lug 100 swings" forwardly aboutits'pivot 104 as the pin is removed. I
Front lugs 100 at stations 1,2, 4 and 7, which are at the bottom of channels 88,- 90, 92 and 94, respectively, are not pivoted to 'arms -106,but-to bars 114 secured between the front plates 84 at the .bottomofeach refrom front plates 84, the arms 120 between plates 86 follow the lateral movement of plates 86, while still being engaged with and controlled by their respective shafts 118. To facilitate the lateral movement of each arm 120 on its respective shaft 118, this end of each shaft 118 maybe made square or each arm 120 may be provided wit-ha key slidably engaging in a key way in its respective shaft 118 as desired. Each control arm 116 is provided with a suitable tension spring 117 which, when arm 116 is not in contact with a bowling pin, urges the free end of arm 116 into the channel leading to a station controlled by a particular arm 116. To check the posi-.
tion of arms 116 and 120 urged inwardly under the pressure of springs 117, suitable stop pins 121 in plates 84 and 86 are provided. Each station 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 is provided with one control arm 116. Stations 8, 9 and 10 employ two control arms each. Station 7 has none. The two control arms at stations 8, 9 and 10 are of the same general type and'construction as those at stations 1-6 inclusive, except that they are shorter and are mounted opposite each other so that they protrude into the station from both sides. Each shaft 118, to which one of these control arms is attached, also carries two lock arms 120 of the same construction and mounting as the lock arms at stations 1-6 inclusive.
When triangularizing pin rack R is empty, all control arms 116 project into the pin stations on channels 88, 90 and 92. As the first pin is rolled along the top edges of plates 84 and 86, it will, upon reaching the opening 89 of channel 88 due to its own weight, drop therethrough into feed channel 88 and come to rest at station 1, where it is held in proper horizontal position by the pin supporting lugs 100, 102 of this particular station. On its way'to station 1, the falling pin, of course passes stations 10, 6 and 3, thereby temporarily depressing the'control arms 116 at those stations. Upon reaching station 1, however, this pin depresses and comes to rest on the control arm at station 1, which control arm will remain depressed so long as this pin remains at this station. The
depressing of this control arm 116 causes the two lock 7 arms mounted on the same shaft 118 to swing upwardly, thereby causing the upper free end of each of the lock arms 120 to engage with the lower edge of the pin supporting lug arm 106 and move it from its normally inclined position into a horizontal position so that. the pin supporting lug, carried by each arm 106, is placed in its proper position in the station above, so that the next pindropping into feed channel 88, will come to rest at pin supporting lugs 100, 102 at station 3. The pin being arrested at station 3, of course, depresses the control arm 116 at this station which in turn causes the pin supporting lug arms 106 at the station 6 located above station 3 to assume a horizontal position and the next pin dropping into feed channel 88 is arrested at station 6. .The pin coming to rest at station 6 then depresses the control arm at this station which causes the pin supporting lug arms of station 10 to move into pin receiving position and the next pin dropping through opening 89 of plates '54, 36, is arrested at station 10. The latter, as mentioned heretofore, is equipped with two control arms 116, each of which on its own shaft 118, carries a pair of lock arms 120, which, when arms 116 are depressed by a pin in station 10, bear with their upper free ends against pivotally mounted bridge or check lugs 122 and move them to such a position as to close the opening 89 of ch15; tel form a bridge across the top of channel 88 in line with the top edges of plates 84 and 86. Therefore, the next pin is moved along over the said top edges of plates 34, 86, and bridge lugs 122 until it arrives at opening 91 of channel 90. Check or bridge lugs 122 are loosely mounted on studs 124 so as to permit them to su ting freely in the space between plates 84 and 86. Only openings 89, and 93 in rack R are provided with check or bridge lugs 122. Since station 7 is the last station to receive a pi check lugs are unnecessary. Stations 2, and 9 connectcd by feed channel 96 and stations 4 and 8 connected by feed channel 92, are filled with pins in the same manner as the stations 1, 3, 6 and it) mentioned above. All pins are carried upward by flights 36 of pin conveyor C which, upon reaching the top edge of pin rack housing 62, turns and moves in a horizontal direction, thereby causing fiights 36 to assume a substantial vertical position and push or roll pins engaged thereby along the top edges of plates 84 and 86. The flights 36 during their vertical and horizontal movements are always held in proper position by means of suitable guide rails 126 engaging with rollers 40 carried by guide shoes 33 of flights 36.
Stations 1 to 10 in the pin rack R are arranged in the same manner and conform with the same pattern in which pins are spotted on a bowling alley bed, i. e. station 1 corresponds with pin 1 on the alley; stations 2 and 3 correspond with pins 2 and 3, etc. After passing over the top of pin rack R, pin conveyor C makes a turn and moves vertically downward as indicated by arrow in I Figure 3. To save space and position flights 36 in pin receiving position when they arrive at the bottom of housing 2'1), flights 36, upon leaving the top portion of housing 20, are moved or swung about their pivots from a vertical hanging position to a position where, in conjunction with bars 28 and chains 26, they form an almost flat conveyor band. The position of flights or cradles 36 is changed by means of stud 12?! secured to the rear wall. of housing and protruding into the path of the cradles at the upper left turning corner of the conveyor chains 26 as viewed in Figure 3. After flights 36 have been turned, rollers 40 on guide shoes 38 of each {light engage with a vertical section of guide rails 126. Another stud 131": secured to the rear wall of housing 2% and protruding into the path of cradles 36 at the lower left turning corner of conveyor chains 26, as viewed in Figure 3, assists in guid ing the cradles into proper position before moving in a substantially horizontal arrangement through the pin receiving chamber F.
Forming a part of the bowling pin spotting machine described herewith, and embodying the invention is a pin spotting mechanism or table designated generally T (Figure 1). This mechanism is used for the purpose of transferring triangularly arranged pins from triangularizing ruck R to alley A and spotting pins transferred thereon in playing position on alley A. As shown in Figure 1, table T consists of a suitable housing 132 in which are rigidly mounted ten triangularly arranged pin transfer and spotting units designated generally 134. The triangular arrangement of units 134 corresponds with the triangular arrangement of pins in rack R and the spotted positions to be occupied by pins on alley A.
In view of the fact that the several units 134 are identical in construction and operation, a description of one unit is deemed sufficient for all. Each unit 134 in the embodiment selected for purposes of illustration, includes a housing or cylinder 135 in which are pivotally mounted a plurality of gripper arms 136. As shown in Figure 1, there are two pairs of opposed gripper arms 136 in each unit 134. A spring 137 connected to each pair of opposed gripper arms tends to urge them into open or non-gripping relationship. At one end of each gripper arm is mounted a cam follower 139 adapted to be engaged at the proper time by a cone shaped gripper actuating member or cam 138 secured to one end of rod 140 (Figure 1) suitabiy supported for axial movement in a sleeve or hub 142 mounted on or formed integrally with cover plate 144 which may be an integral part of cylinder 135. The other end of rod 140 is supported in a bushing or sleeve 146 secured to plate 148 which at several suitable points engages with a number of threaded spindles 150, the ends of which are supported in bearings of suitable ribs or plates which may be an integral part of table housing 132. Rod 149 also carries a spring 152 which is confined between a collar 154 secured thereto and sleeve 146. A collar 156 at the end of rod 140 acts as a retainer for rod 1.40. This arrangement provides a resilient co-action between cam 138 and plate 148, thereby insuring a firm, yet resilient grip of grippers 136 on a bowling pin. It also allows for variation in the size of the necks of pins when being extracted from the pin rack R by said gripper arms. In this manner, proper handling and spotting of difierent types of pins, such as tenpins and duckpins, is insured.
Mounted on one end of each of the several spindles is a sprocket 158, each connected by a chain 160 to a sprocket 162 mounted on a shaft 164 protruding from a suitable reversible gear reduction motor 166 suitably secured to a stationary rib or plate 168 within the housing 132. It will be readily understood that the turning of spindles 150 by motor 166 causes plate 148 to move towards or away from cylinder cover plates 144. This operation moves each cone-shaped gripper operating member 138 on rod 140 in each unit 134 towards or away from the ends of its respective gripper arms 136, thereby effecting a gripping or releasing action of gripper arms 136 in each unit 134.
Table T, at each side, is provided with two studs 170, 172, both protruding from housing 132. Each stud 170 carries a roller 174 running in a cam track 176 (Figure 1) formed in a vertical cam plate 178. The two cam plates 178 are mounted upright adjacent the two sides of table T and are secured to U-shaped channels 180 attached to the inside upper portion of the kickbacks of bowling alley A. Each stud 172 carries a cam roller 182 engaging and running in a cam track 184 also formed in vertical cam plate 178. Each stud 170 also engages with a slot 186 in the free end of a table actuating arm 188. These arms are loosely mounted on studs 190 held by suitable blocks 192 secured to the top surface of channels 180.
Each arm 188 is provided with a gear sector 194 (Figure 1) which engages with gear 196 mounted on a shaft 198 projecting from a suitable reversible gear reduction motor 200. Each of these motors is mounted on block 192 fixed to a channel 180. The rotation of shafts 198 either clockwise or counter-clockwise by their respective motors causes gear sectors 194 and arms 188 to move unwardly or downwardly and move table T away from or towards the pin supporting bed of alley A. Since the triangularized pins in pin rack section R are arranged in a horizontal position, but have to be placed on the alley in a vertical or upright position, table T in effecting the necessary transfer is turned ninety degrees in moving from rack R to alley A. This is achieved by guide rollers 1'74 and 182 following tracks 176 and 184 during the upward and downward movement of table T. After a set of tenpins is extracted from rack R and transferred from the latter to alley A, table T rises from its lowermost pin spotting position to a suitable dwell position duction motor 242.
9 above the alley where it remains until the player has thrown a hall.
After a. ball is thrown by the player, it rolls from an inclined platform 202 in pit P into a ball lift L (Figures 1, 3 and 4) of suitable design. The ball lift shown consists of a rack 204 pivotally attached to a pair of lugs 206 (Figure 3) mounted on a suitable frame or rib within magazine M. Rack 204 is so constructed as to provide an inclined transverse runway which leads into a delivery cradle 208 secured substantially at right angles to rack 204. Therefore, a ball rolling onto any portion of rack 204 will gravitate to the junction of cradle 208 and rack 204. The latter as well as cradle 208 are so constructed as to permit the use of full size bowling balls as well as the smaller balls used in bowling games such as Duckpins. Rack 204 is also provided with an arm 210, to the free end of which is attached one end of a tension spring 212, the other end of the latter being secured to a suitable anchor 214 attached to the back wall of magazine housing 20. The ball lift L is held at the bottom of the pit P by the lower edge of a vertically movable back stop or pit cushion 216 secured to a pair of supporting brackets 218- (Figures 3 and 4). At the upper corner of each bracket 218 is pivoted a roller 220 engaging with a vertical cam track or guide channel 222 suitably secured to frame plates within the magazine housing 20. The lower corner of each bracket 218 is attached to a stud 224 forming an integral part of an endless chain 226. Each stud 224 carries a roller 228 engaging in a vertical track 230.
Both c'hains 226 are led over idler sprockets 232 and are driven or reciprocated by a pair of double sprockets 234, which in turn through chains 236, are connected to a pair of sprockets 238 mounted on a horizontal drive shaft 240 projecting from a suitable reversible gear re- The machine is timed in such a manner that as soon as a ball comes to rest in rack 204, motor 242 starts and drives the chains 226 in a counter-clockwise direction, as viewed in Figure 4, thereby effecting at raising of cush- :ion 216 in the direction of arrow Z. The raising of cushion 216 effects the release of ball lift L, and due to the action of spring 212, ball lift L moves upwardly to a position indicated in dotted lines in Figure 4. The
rocking movement of ball lift L causes the ball to roll onto cradle 208 and into a bucket 244 of the ball ele- .Vator E (Figure 5). The lower portion of bucket 244 is provided with suitable lugs 246 which are pivotally attached to a pair of spaced endless chains 248; The upper portion of each side of bucket 244 carries a guide roller 250 engaging a vertical guide track 252. Each chain 248 is led over an idler sprocket 254 and driven by means of a sprocket 256, each of which is attached to a short shaft 258 mounted in suitable bearings in a frame plate. Secured to each shaft 256 is another sprocket 260 which by means of chain 262, is driven from a sprocket 264. Both sprockets 264 are mounted on a horizontal drive shaft 266 protruding from a suitable gear reduction motor 268 (Figures 3 and 4).
As a ball rolls from the cradle 208 into the ball ele' vator bucket 244 (Figure 5), it trips a switch 270 mounted adjacent the free end portion of said cradle. The tripping of switch 270 by the ball starts the elevator motor 268. This causes endless chains 262 to move in a counter-clockwise direction, as viewed in Figure 4 which in .turn effects an upward movement of the elevator bucket .244 to which the ball was delivered. The upper ends of guide rails 252 are provided with curved sections 272. Therefore, when guide rollers 250 enter these sections, the elevator bucket 244 is caused to tilt forwardly as illustrated in dotted lines in Figure 4. The forward tilting of bucket 244 at this point causes the ball to roll out of bucket 244 and onto return runway 274 for return to the player. Chains 248 continue moving, and the new empty'bucket 244 is returned to itsball receiving. position in a somewhat tilted or inclined position.
Shortly 'beforobucket 244 reaches its starting position, a lug 275- .(Figure 4) on one of the chains 248, trips a switch 276 which causes elevator motor 268 to stop, and elevator bucket 244 stands in readiness to receive the next ball in the following cycle of the machine.
The machine operates in a manner generally similar to the machine disclosed in the above referred to Wells application Serial Number 16,725. After a ball is thrown by the player, a suitable sweep S (Figure -1) pushes the I fallen pins into the pit P. The ball rolls immediately into the ball lift rack 204 and cushion 216 starts to move upward, which also eifects the raising of ball lift rack 204, as described above. As soon as cushion 216 moves upward, pit sweep PS pushes the pins to the rear of the pit and into the lower chamber F onto its moving floor formed by the flights 36 and bars 28 of the pin conveyor C. To prevent interference of the upwardly moving cushion 216 with the return runway 274, the latter is provided with a hinged bridge section 278 (Figure 4) which is lifted upwardly in the direction of the arrow by the upwardly moving cushion 216.
In case a ball elevated by the ball elevator reaches runway 274, before/cushion 216 moves down again, the ball is simply held in the pocket formed by the inclined end 280 of return runway 27 4 and bridge 278. Pit sweep PS may be of the same construction and operation as that disclosed in Wells application Serial Number 16,725. 'It consists of a transverse sweep board 282 (Figure 1) attached to a horizontal gear rack 2 84 which engages with and is reciprocated by gear 286 mounted on a shaft 288 protruding from a reversible gear reduction motor 290conveniently mounted beneath the alley bed A.
In order to properly control the action, as well as the timing of the various mechanisms during a cycle of the machine, the latter is provided with a suitable electrical control system which is substantially of the same design and construction as that disclosed in Wells application Serial Number 16,725. However, while the machine disclosed in the above mentioned application is constructed for the use of normal tenpins only, the machine illustrated in the present application is so designed as to permit not only the use of tenpins, but alsoother types of pins, such as duckpins. These changes are effected by pressing a control button which will effect a conversion from a tenpin bowling pinspotting machine to a duckpin bowling pin spotting machine if duckpins are to be For purposes of illustration, it is.
used, or vice versa. assumed that the machine is to be converted from handling tenpins to duckpins. 1
To provide a means which is suitable for conveying both types of pins, flights 36 (Figures 8 and 9) of pin conveyor C are so designed'that tenpins TP or .duckpins DP are supported 'or conveyed thereby in a centralized position. Each flight 36 is provided with a cut-out 37 which permits the various rear guide bars 66, 74, 76, S0, and 67, to be moved thereinto whenduckpins are conveyed, and properly and uniformly orient and centralize said duckpins on said flights. When tenpins are conveyed, all of these rear guide bars are located adjacent to the rear edges of the moving flights and also assist in retaining a proper and uniform position of pins on the flights. The curved portion 39 of flights 36 prevents pinsfrom moving in an undesirable forward direction while being conveyed from the chamber F to the top edges of rack R. Therefore when arriving at said top edges of rack R, all pins are rolled onto and along plates 84, 86 in the same horizontal osition, and plates 84 and 86 are spaced in such a manner that the edge of each plate contacts a portion of the belly of the tenpin of the same diameter,
justing the machine to accommodate smaller pins such as duckpins. the same'principle is employed. Plates 84 1 1 and 86 are so spaced that the edge of each'plate supports a portion of the belly of the duckpin of the same diameter. A horizontal rear guide rail 67, attached by means of lugs 69 to rear plate 70 of pin rack R, assists the pins in keeping in line on plates 84, 86, and prevents rearward movement thereon.
in converting the machine from a tenpin to a duckpin machine, rail 67, as well as rear plate 7 0, move the same distance as the plates 86 to keep the bottoms of the horizontally arranged duckpins aligned in the same manner. As mentioned heretofore, plates 86 are secured to a number of threaded lugs 96 which in turn engage with horizontal spindles 98. Guide rail 67 is mounted on lugs 69 attached to rear plate 70. Each spindle 98 extends through the rear wall of the magazine housing 20 and carries a sprocket 294 on which runs an endless chain 296. The latter also runs on an idler sprocket 298 (Figure l) and on two sprockets 300 mounted on spindles 56 extending through the rear wall of magazine M. As mentioned heretofore, spindles 56 engage with threaded lugs 54 to which are secured lugs 81 which carry rear wall 52 and vertical rear guide rail 80. Rear wall 52 by means of lug 73, supports rear guide rail 76.
Chain 296 also runs on two sprockets 302 mounted on spindles 37 protruding through the rear wall of magazine M. As mentioned heretofore, spindles 37 engage threaded lugs 35 on which is mounted the rear wall 33 of the lower chamber F. Chain 296 is driven by means of sprocket 304 which may be driven clockwise or counterclockwise by a shaft 306 protruding from the housing of a reversible gear reduction motor 308 mounted on a suitable stand 310 within the housing of maga zine M.
Since the duckpins DP are considerably shorter than tenpins, the former do not project quite as far outwardly from pin rack R and are not quite as high as tenpins when placed on the bed of alley A. Therefore when the machine is adjusted to handle and spot duckpins, table T must move closer to rack R when extracting duckpins, and nearer alley A when spotting such pins. In adjusting the machine to obtain these results, reversible reduction motors 200, which actuate the table, are controlled by either a tenpin control cam 312 or a duckpin control cam 314 (Figure 11). Both cams 312 and 314 are mounted on a shaft 3T6 protruding from the housing of a suitable gear reduction motor 318 which in turn is controlled by a suitable electrical control system (not shown) in order to properly time the various other mechanisms in the machine. The electrical control system may be similar to that shown and described in copending Wells application Serial Number 16,725. Since the control system forms no specific part of this invention, further showing and description thereof are deemed unnecessary.
ln order to convert the machine for handling and spotting different types of pins, such as tenpins or duckpins, a control of the type shown in Figure 11 is provided. if it is desired to set the machine for tenpin operation, the attendant pushes a button 320 of a two-button walkin g beam switch 322 which permits current to flow through a normally closed switch 324, a closed contact 326 on button 328 of walking beam switch 322 to double throw switch 330 which is actuated by tenpin control cam 312, thus providing the necessary control means for table motors 200 in moving table T in spotting and respotting tenpins. The machine is so designed that while it is handling and spotting tenpins, all rear guide rails 80, 76, 74, 66 and 67, as well as rear plates 33, 52 and 70, are in their outermost positions. When plate 70 is so positioned, it holds a normally closed switch 334 open as shown in Figure 7. Switches 324 and 334 are normally closed switches, the latter being mounted on the inside of the rear wall of magazine M and actuated or held open when rear plate 70 is in its outermost or tenpin position. Switch 324 is mounted on the rear side of stationary front plates 84 and is depressed and opened when movable plates 86 move forward to innermost or duckpin position. All operations of the various mechanisms are controlled and timed through the electrical control system of the machine as shown in Wells application Serial Number 16,725, with the exception of the ball elevator which, according to the present invention, is set in motion when a ball leaves cradle 208 of ball lift L, and depresses a normally open switch 270 which causes the same to close and energize relay 332 which causes a closing of its contacts 332a and 3321). Closed contact 332a serves as a hold-in for relay 332. Closed contact 332b in conjunction with normally closed switch 276, permits current to flow through and start elevator motor 268. When lug 275 on chain 248 engages normally closed switch 276, the latter is opened momentarily causing an interruption of flow of current through the hold-in contact 332a. This effects a dccncrgization of relay 332 and consequently an opening of contacts 332b, which results in the stopping of ball elevator motor 268.
When changing the machine from tenpin to duckpin operation, the attendant depresses button 328. This permits current to flow through normally closed switch 324, through now closed contacts 336 through motor 308 and now closed contact 338 which effects a starting of motor 308 in a clockwise direction. The starting of motor 308 moves also chain 296 and all sprockets connected therewith, except sprockets 298 and 304, in clockwise direction as viewed in Figure 10. This causes the turning of spindles 98, 56 and 37, and a forward movementof rear plates 70, 33 and 52, as well as the forward movement of all rear guide rails 80, 76, 74, 66 and 67. When the plate 86 has moved forward to its desired adjusted position, it contacts switch 324 and causes the same to open, breaking the circuit and stopping motor 308. As rear plate 70 moves away from switch 334, the latter closes and current is permitted to flow through now closed contact 340 and a double throw switch 344 to table motors 200. Double throw switch 344 is actuated by duckpin cam 314, as described heretofore, and motors 200 are now actuated to move table T nearer magazine M and the pin supporting bed of alley A, than when the machine is set to handle tenpins in order to suit the duckpin operations. Table T may also be moved by mechanism similar to that shown and described in said copending Wells application to and from alley A after the throwing of a first ball of a frame in order to lift and respot any standing pins on said alley pending the delivery of the next ball of the same frame.
In changing the machine from duckpin back to tenpin operation, button 320 is depressed again. This permits current to flow through the now closed switch 334, now closed contact 346, through motor 308 and now closed contacts 348, which starts the reversible gear reduction motor 308 in a counterclockwise direction as viewed in Figure 10. The chain 296 and all sprockets connected therewith, except sprockets 298 and 304, are also moved in a counterclockwise direction, which causes spindles 98,
56 and 37 to move all rear plates and rear guide rails to their outermost or tenpin positions. As rear plate 70 contacts and opens switch 334, motor 308 stops. Switch 324 at this time is closed, permitting current to fiow to the double throw switch 330 which is actuated by the tenpin table control cam 312, and the machine is again ready for tenpin operation.
The invention above described may be varied in construction within the scope of the claims, for the particular device, selected to illustrate the invention, is but one of many possible concrete embodiments of the same. It is not, therefore, to be restricted to the precise details of the structure shown and described.
What I claim is:
1. A convertible bowling pin spotting machine for spotting and respotting a selected type of bowling pin in playing arrangement on the playing bed of a bowling alley, comprising conveying mechanism for conveying a given type of bowling pin from the pit or a bowling alley, adjustable means operatively associated with said conveying mechanism for adapting said mechanism for conveying a different type of bowling pin, operating means for said last-named means, a pin distributing device, a pin triangularizing mechanism operatively associated with said distributing device for receiving pins-therefrom, adjusting means for adapting said triangularizing mechanism to handle said different type of pin, operating means for said last-named means, means for delivering said given type of pin from said conveying mechanism to said device, mechanism for adjusting said delivering means to deliver said difierent type of bowling pin, operating means for said adjusting mechanism, and cornmon actuating means for substantially simultaneously actuating all of said operating means to adapt said conveying mechanism, said delivering means and said triangularizing mechanism to handle said different type of bowling pin.
2. The machine defined in claim 1 wherein said common actuating means includes an electrical control circuit, and selectively operated means in said circuit for limiting the operation of said operating means for said adjustable means in conformity with the selected type of bowling pin to be handled in said machine.
3. In a convertible bowling pin spotting machine, a
.conveyor for removing bowling pins from the pit of a bowling alley, bowling pin distributing means adapted to receive pins from said conveyor, means associated with said distributing means for holding said pins distributed thereby in substantially triangular arrangement and placing said pins in substantially triangular arrangement onthe playing bed of the bowling alley, selective devices operatively associated with each of said means for adapting said means to handle a selected one of a plurality of types of bowling pins, operating means for each of said selective devices and common operating means for substantially simultaneously operating said operating means to convert the machine from handling one distinct type of pins into a machine capable of handling a different type of bowling pin.
4. The bowling pin spotting machine defined in claim 3 including operating mechanism for moving said means for holding and placing one type of pins on the playing bed of an alley toand from said alley, and selective means operative in response to the operation of said common operating means for limiting the movement of said lastnamed means towards said alley for placing a different type of bowling pin to be spotted thereby on said playing bed of said alley.
5. In a bowling pin spotting machine for use with a bowling alley, the combination with a pin spotter movable to and from'said alley for depositing a selected type of bowling pin thereon, means for moving said spotter to and from said alley for placing pins thereon, a pin delivery station, conveying means for conveying said selected type of bowling pins to said station for delivery to said spotter, said conveying means including a distributor for distributing and arranging said bowling pins in an arrangement corresponding substantially with the positions said pins are to occupy on said alley, means for adjusting said spotter and conveying means, and said distributor to handle a distinctly diiferent type of bowling pin, means for operating said spotter to deposit said pins on said alley, selective mechanisms for operating said adjusting means for converting said machine to handle and deposit said distinctly different type of bowling pin on said alley, and for controlling the extent of movement of said spotter by its moving means, a common operating station, and means at said station for substantially simultaneously operating all of said mechanisms and controlling said spotter moving and operating means.
6. A bowling pin spotting machine having interconnected coacting pin handling devices, and pin spotting devices, mechanism for operating said deviees'to handle a selected type of pin, and effect the delivery of said selected type of pin to said spotting devices for placement thereby on the pin supporting bed of a bowling alley, interconnected adjusting means operatively associated with said pin handling devices and said spotting devices for adapting said devices to handle a different type of bowling pin, means for actuating said adjusting means, an operating station for said last-named means, and selectively operated mechanism at said station for actuating said last-named means and thereby adapting said devices to handle and place a different type of bowling pin on said bed of said alley. Y
7. In a bowling pin spotting machine operative to spot a selected type of pin on a bowling alley, a pin elevator, a pin distributing mechanism, triangularizing mechanism adjustable to handle different types of pins associated with said distributor and provided with a plurality of pin holders for receiving a selected type of bowling pins from said distributor and for supporting said selected type of bowling pins in substantially triangular pin playing arrangement, adjusting means for each of said holders for adapting said holders to receive and support a different type of bowling pin, means for delivering said triangularized selected type of pin to the playing deck of a bowling alley, motion transmitting means for substantially simultaneously operating said adjusting means for all of said holders, adjustable pin guiding elements coacting with said elevator, motion transmitting means for changing the operative positions of said elements to conform with the size of said different type of pin, and selectively operable means for operating said motion transmitting means of all of said adjusting means of said holders and said motion transmitting means of said elements for converting said machine from one capable of handling said selected type of pin into a machine capable of handling and spotting said different type of bowling pin.
8. A convertible bowling pin spotting machine comprising a pin spotter, means for moving said spotter to and from a bowling alley to spot and respot a selected type of bowling pin thereon, a plurality of spotter units mounted in said spotter in an arrangement conforming to the spotted pin playing disposition for spotting said selected type of bowling pin on the pin supporting bed of a bowling alley, devices for arranging said selected type of bowling pins for handling by said units, a conveyor for delivering a plurality of said selected type of bowling pins to said devices, separate adjusting means operatively associated with said spotter, said devices and said conveyor for adapting said spotter units, said conveyor and said devices for handling a different type of bowling pin, actuating mechanisms for said adjusting means interconnected for substantially simultaneous operation, and selectively operable means for operating said actuating mechanism to convert said spotter units, said devices and said conveyor to handle and spot said diiferent type of bowling pin on said bed of said alley.
9. A bowling pin spotting machine adapted normally to place a selected type of bowling pin on the playing bed of a bowling alley, comprising a convertible pin receiving mechanism having adjustable means and operating means therefor for adapting said mechanism to handle different types of pins, a pin spotter, including a plurality of pin holders adapted to hold said selected type of pin mounted on said spotter in positions corresponding to a predetermined pin playing arrangement, mechanism for effecting the transfer of said selected type of bowling pins from said receiving mechanism to said holders on said spotter, including adjustable means and operating means therefor for adapting said mechanism to handle different types of pins, adjusting devices for converting each of said holders to handle a different type of pin, operating means for said devices, control means for substantially simultaneously operating all of said operating means to adapt said holders to hold said different type of pin for transfer to said alley bed, and to adapt said mechanisms to handle said different type of bowling pin.
10. The machine defined in claim 9 including means for moving said spotter between predetermined limits of movement to and from a pin receiving position relative to said pin receiving means and the pin supporting bed of a bowling alley for transferring and spotting said selected type of bowling pins on said alley bed, and said control means including means for changing said limits of movement of said spotter when said machine is handling said different type of bowling pin.
11. In a bowling pin spotting machine normally operative to place a selected type of bowling pin on the playing bed of a bowling alley, associated mechanisms for conveying, arranging and spotting a selected type of bowling pin, a separate adjusting means for each of said mechanisms for adapting said mechanisms to handle a distinctly different type of bowling pin, interconnected operating means 16 for substantially simultaneously operating said separate adjusting means, an operating station for said operating means, and selectively operable mechanism at said station for actuating said operating means to adapt said mechanisms for handling said distinctly different type of bowling References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 809,890 Backus Jan. 9, 1906 1,290,063 Broome Jan. 7, 1919 1,449,012 Lorenz et al. Mar. 20, 1923 1,557,177 Lorenz et al. Oct. 13, 1925 1,573,643 Proch Feb. 16, 1926 2,388,708 Bates Nov. 13, 1945
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Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2791426A (en) * 1956-02-02 1957-05-07 Janes Joseph Pin-setting machine
US2973963A (en) * 1950-02-03 1961-03-07 American Mach & Foundry Convertible bowling pin spotting machine
DE2245953A1 (en) * 1971-09-22 1973-03-29 Seranina Ag Patentverwert PROCEDURE FOR OPERATING A CONICAL SYSTEM AND CONICAL SYSTEM FOR PERFORMING THE PROCEDURE
US4073379A (en) * 1974-06-27 1978-02-14 Patentverwertungs Und Finanzierungsgesellschaft, Serania Ag Bowling pin elevator for a bowling installation

Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US809890A (en) * 1905-04-06 1906-01-09 John C Backus Means for setting and spotting tenpins.
US1290063A (en) * 1917-07-17 1919-01-07 Lewis H Broome Pin-setter for bowling-alleys.
US1449012A (en) * 1921-06-09 1923-03-20 Lorenz Charles Automatic pin-spotting mechanism
US1557177A (en) * 1925-03-18 1925-10-13 Lorenz Charles Automatic pin setter
US1573643A (en) * 1925-03-11 1926-02-16 Joseph F Proch Bowling machine
US2388708A (en) * 1940-03-19 1945-11-13 American Mach & Foundry Pin setting mechanism for bowling alleys

Patent Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US809890A (en) * 1905-04-06 1906-01-09 John C Backus Means for setting and spotting tenpins.
US1290063A (en) * 1917-07-17 1919-01-07 Lewis H Broome Pin-setter for bowling-alleys.
US1449012A (en) * 1921-06-09 1923-03-20 Lorenz Charles Automatic pin-spotting mechanism
US1573643A (en) * 1925-03-11 1926-02-16 Joseph F Proch Bowling machine
US1557177A (en) * 1925-03-18 1925-10-13 Lorenz Charles Automatic pin setter
US2388708A (en) * 1940-03-19 1945-11-13 American Mach & Foundry Pin setting mechanism for bowling alleys

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2973963A (en) * 1950-02-03 1961-03-07 American Mach & Foundry Convertible bowling pin spotting machine
US2791426A (en) * 1956-02-02 1957-05-07 Janes Joseph Pin-setting machine
DE2245953A1 (en) * 1971-09-22 1973-03-29 Seranina Ag Patentverwert PROCEDURE FOR OPERATING A CONICAL SYSTEM AND CONICAL SYSTEM FOR PERFORMING THE PROCEDURE
US4073379A (en) * 1974-06-27 1978-02-14 Patentverwertungs Und Finanzierungsgesellschaft, Serania Ag Bowling pin elevator for a bowling installation

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