US2743206A - Textile print wash blanket - Google Patents

Textile print wash blanket Download PDF

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Publication number
US2743206A
US2743206A US140850A US14085050A US2743206A US 2743206 A US2743206 A US 2743206A US 140850 A US140850 A US 140850A US 14085050 A US14085050 A US 14085050A US 2743206 A US2743206 A US 2743206A
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United States
Prior art keywords
textile
printing
blanket
web
material
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Expired - Lifetime
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US140850A
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Verduin John
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W R Grace and Co
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W R Grace and Co
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Priority to US140850A priority Critical patent/US2743206A/en
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B41PRINTING; LINING MACHINES; TYPEWRITERS; STAMPS
    • B41NPRINTING PLATES OR FOILS; MATERIALS FOR SURFACES USED IN PRINTING MACHINES FOR PRINTING, INKING, DAMPING, OR THE LIKE; PREPARING SUCH SURFACES FOR USE AND CONSERVING THEM
    • B41N10/00Blankets or like coverings; Coverings for wipers for intaglio printing
    • B41N10/02Blanket structure
    • B41N10/04Blanket structure multi-layer
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10S428/909Resilient layer, e.g. printer's blanket
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T442/00Fabric [woven, knitted, or nonwoven textile or cloth, etc.]
    • Y10T442/30Woven fabric [i.e., woven strand or strip material]
    • Y10T442/3472Woven fabric including an additional woven fabric layer
    • Y10T442/3528Three or more fabric layers

Description

April 24, 1956 .1. VERDUIN 2,743,206

TEXTILE PRINT WASH BLANKET Filed Jan. 27, 1950 gjwv ewboz/ John Us ralu/im/ 2,743,206 TEXTILE PRINT WASH BLANKET John Verduin, Hawthorne, N. 1., assignor to W. Grace & Co., New York, N. Y., a corporation of Connecticut Application January 27, 1950, Serial No. 140,850 1 Claim. (Cl. 154-54.5)

This invention relates to an improved process of and apparatus for textile web printing and, in particular, to

textile printing wherein an anti-smut web is run adjacent the textile web during printing.

An anti-smut web, sometimes referred to in textile printing as a back grey, is employed adjacent the textile web for the purpose of controlling excess ink which may pass through the textile during impression or which may pass around the textile material at the selvage edge. The back grey, usually a woven, highly absorbent cloth, is run from a supply'reel to a rewind reel and is used and re-used after the ink dries thereon until it is substantially filled with color, at which stage it can'no longer serve a useful purpose as an absorbing medium. At this point the grey must be washed and dried, and after repeated washing and drying it becomesprogressivelymore difficult to return the material to a serviceable condition; and it therefore becomes expedient to stitch new material to the expiring end of the'old grey and thread a new grey into the machine. These practices are well known in the art of textile printing and need not be further elaborated upon.

Under the grey, the impression cylinder may be covered with a yielding, non-absorbent blanket which may envelop the cylinder as an integral part thereof, or may be fed as a web to the cylinder beneath the grey and the textile web respectively. Blankets for textile printing are usually made of rubber or a suitable syntheticsubstitute or a combination of rubber and cloth and they may have an embossed surface to provide depressed areas for the accumulation of excess ink or color, or for anink absorbing talc in instances where such material is used to prevent smudging. I

The back grey has been a partucularlyunsatisfactory expedient because of its high cost and non-uniform absorbing quality after repetitive use. To alleviate this condition various substitutes have been proposed as, for example, the application of ink absorbing tale to the surface of the blanket as mentioned above prior to printing and the removal of the powder after printing according to the technique of Ross described in U. S. Patent No. 2,434,013. In this case the blanket is made endless, the powder serving to absorb the excess coloring material which is subsequently washed oif the blanket. A further substitute method, according to the technique of Ebersol in Patent No. 1,639,218, resides in the use of a non-absorbent grey of metallic gauze wherein it is intended that all excess color shall be carried on the surface of the gauze.

The object of the present invention is to improve and simplify the technique of textile anti-smut printing. Accordingly, I make use of the physical properties of a partially absorbent woven material such as nylon or orlon for an improved grey, but run the grey as an integral surfacing of an endless, deformable blanket trained at one end of its loop between the impression printing cylinder and the fabric being printed. The other end of the loop is directed through a Washer and drier so that the grey reaches the printing position always in a clean,

ceiver 22.

'ice

renewed material. To attain the maximum efiiciency, the nature and bonding of the components of the woven grey is precisely regulated so that the maximum surface area of the cloth is presented whereby sufficient ink or color may be carried thereon consistent with the optimum gageof thread necessary to elfect sharp printing without a wafile pattern result. Asa point of greater utility, the nylon or other semi-absorbent material may face both sides of the blanket in order that either side of the blanket,

may be utilized and so that the web may be'reversed after a period of wear has reduced the anti-smut surface below a prescribed ink retaining level.

The polyamides referred to herein are those describedin U. S. Patents 2,071,250, 2,130,523 and 2,130,948 and are commercially known as nylon.

Details of my'invention will best be understood by reference to the drawing forming part of this specification, in which- Figure l is a diagrammatic side elevation View showing a textile printing apparatus with which the method of my invention may be practiced, and

.Figure 2 is a fragmentary cross-sectional view of the combined blanket and anti-smut web used with the textile printing machine of Figure 1. 1

Referring to Figure 1, the textile printing machine 10 at the right hand side of the view includes an impression cylinder 11 of usual proportion with which are associated a series of radially spaced color printing stations 12 arranged around the lower portion thereof. Suitable framework, trunnions, drive and auxiliaries are applied to form a textile printing press of an. order which is well known in the art of textile printing. An endless combination blanket and anti-smut grey 13 is trained directly to the impression cylinder for that portion of the'cylinder peripheryxlocated between printing stations, to serve, in part, as a supporting medium for the web of unprinted textile material 14, the latter of which is directed to th press from a supply roll 15.

The web of unprinted material 14 leading from supplyroll 15 is first directed up to the bight of a pair of intermittently operating power driven feed rolls 16, from whence it drops tothe long end of a J shaped collector box 17. supported with reel 15 on framework 18 and" designed to contain an intermediate supply of textile to. be printed and to thus provide for changeover from an expiring supply reel to a new reel Without interrupting printing. Upon being drawn out from the short end of J collector box 17, web 14 traverses a pair of tensioning and directioning rollers 19, adjustably fixed to frame 18, and then extends upwardly to a series of three spaced rollers 20 which regulate the web tension preparatory to its being directed via guide rolls 21 to the impression cyl-L' inder 11. After printing the web runs upwardly from the press to a suitable drying tower, not shown, and is thereafter redirected downwardly at the left via suitable rolls 21 to a gathering roller 21" before reaching the re- The combination blanket and anti-smut grey 13, as has been indicated, is an endless, looped web element which travels with the rigid impression cylinder 11 between the cylinder and textile web on one end of its loop. As it leaves cylinder 11, element 13 is directed upwardly and to the left across the top of the printing machine framework over a series of spaced guide rollers 23. At the end of its leftward travel, element 13 is directioned downwardly, passing under the large roller 24 constituting an element of a washing machine 25 in which are suitable. scrubbing and cleaning devices arranged to rid the surface of any ink or other coloring material which may have been absorbed or otherwise carried thereby from printing. Washer 25 contains suitable apparatus and fluid as are required to perform the necessary cleaning operation.

Leaving roller 24, web. element 13 is subsequently trained upwardly and to the right over a plurality of larger heated drying drums 26 in contact with the ink absorbing face thereof, and under a series of smaller intermediate heated drying drums 27. in contact with the web face which applies against the impression cylinder; theipurposeof the drying drums-being to drive otf'moisture or liquid retained on the surfaces after the web passes out of washer 25. From the final drying drum 26 at the right hand end of the series, element 13 is, trained under and over a staggered group of guide rollers 23' to a position above the impression cylinder 11 from whence it maybe directed downwardly to the. cylinder for the printing operation.

An important feature of my invention resides in the arrangement of the combination blanket and anti-smut web 13 as illustrated in detail in Figure 2. Herein is shown a flexible, deformable, fluid impervious base material 30, such as synthetic rubber, within which are embedded a plurality of layers of textile material 30r, the latter of which will impart qualities of strength and sta-. bility to the web. Facing both sides of the web 13 and, bonded therewith are additional layers of textile woven material 31 to serve as a carrier for excess ink which may pass through the textile during printing. I prefer to use cloth woven from threads of a super polyamide like nylon for layers 31 of the order or" 210 denier in which the warp consists of- 60 ends double and the filling 42 ends double, weighing approximately 6.40 oz. per square yard. As a substitute for nylon, the cloth may be made from a polyacrylonitrile fiber such as Orlon. It will be noted that the threads forming the textile layers 31 are embedded very slightly in the synthetic rubber base 30 to the extent of approximately only of the weave. In this manner, a major portion of the thread surface remains apart from the material in which it is embedded, thus presenting as large a cloth area as is possible upon which ink or coloring material may be absorbed and otherwise accumulate as the blanket passes under the textile web 14 during printing; while at the same time providing an adequate bond where by there will be no separation of the cloth from the base during printing or cleaning. I employ nylon or orlon or a similar plastic thread by reason of the property of semi-absorption of ink vehicle or washing fluid as compared with cotton or other standard back grey constituent.

. Due to this limited absorption quality, it may be made integral with the yielding blanket and from a practical standpoint may be readily cleaned and dried before it is returned to the impression cylinder for subsequent print- It is important that the overall thickness of the combination blanket, anti-smut element be carefully maintained and that it be consistently uniform in texture. Registration of the several color impressions would otherwise be affected if non-uniformity. were present and a poor grade of printing would result. It is, likewise, important that the deformable base material have the property of healing or reforming after impression in order that the printing conditions for the repetitive cycles remain constant.

In practice, the anti-smut blanket passes around the impression cylinder at one end of the loop serving both as a deformable backing for the usual irregularities of textile printing and carrying with it the web of material to be printed upon. Any. ink passing through or around the textile is either absorbed by or carried on the surface of cloth facing 31. Being an endless blanket, this process may be operated continuously during the entire run of textile fabric printed, and, since the blanket is completely renewed during the washing and drying operation, the pos sibility for smudging or off-set from the blanket to the under side of the textile being printed is eliminated.

I claim:

A web-like material for use as a combined blanket and anti-smut gray in textile printing comprising, in combination, a flexible, fluid impervious base material, and at least two reinforcing textile layers completely imbedded within opposite surfaces of the base material, and a semi-absorbent textile layer facing the base material on at least one surface of the latter,said last-mentioned layer consisting of a super polyamide having 210 denier and having a warp of ends double and fill of 42 ends double of' a fineness suflicient to avoid a pattern on a printed textile, said secondmentioned textile layer being adhered to the base to an extent of approximately 10 percent of the surface area of the threads, leaving a major portion thereof for the mechanical retention of vehicle and color during the printing process.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 33,510 Baker Oct. 22, 1861 189,868 McBurney Apr. 24, 1877 2,080,133 Jenkins May 11, 1937 2,130,948 Carothers Sept. 20, 1938 2,175,051 Bromley Oct. 3, 1939 2,222,143 Farnsworth et al Nov. 19,, 1940 2,252,554 Carothers Aug. 12 1941 FOREIGN PATENTS 416,373 Great Britain of 19.34 481,587 Great Britain Mar. 11, 1938 OTHER REFERENCES Plastics by J. H. DuBois, American Technical Society, publishers, 1943, pp. 138, 139 and 140.

Nylon, A Versatile New Produce of Chemical Research; published by DuPont, Wilmington, Delaware (1940).

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Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2963393A (en) * 1956-06-25 1960-12-06 Grace W R & Co Resilient lapping element especially adapted for use in textile printing
US4489650A (en) * 1977-03-24 1984-12-25 International Business Machines Corporation Type belt printer with antifriction means
US5501149A (en) * 1994-12-02 1996-03-26 Kimberly-Clark Corporation Dual substrate, single-pass printing process
US5562037A (en) * 1994-12-02 1996-10-08 Kimberly-Clark Corporation Single substrate, repeat-pass printing process
US5612118A (en) * 1994-12-20 1997-03-18 Kimberly-Clark Corporation Elongate, semi-tone printing process and substrates printed thereby
US20080132872A1 (en) * 2006-12-04 2008-06-05 The Procter & Gamble Company Absorbent articles comprising graphics
US20110172629A1 (en) * 2005-12-16 2011-07-14 Donald Carroll Roe Disposable Absorbent Article Having Side Panels with Structurally, Functionally and Visually Different Regions
US10307302B2 (en) 2017-09-27 2019-06-04 The Procter & Gamble Company Method of constructing absorbent articles comprising graphics

Citations (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US33510A (en) * 1861-10-22 Improvement in woven endless belts
US189868A (en) * 1877-04-24 Improvement in blankets for calico-printing
GB416373A (en) * 1932-12-10 1934-09-10 John Sylvester Wheelwright Improvements in or relating to stencil-printing apparatus
US2080133A (en) * 1936-05-26 1937-05-11 Rock Hill Printing & Finishing Textile printing machine
GB481587A (en) * 1936-06-11 1938-03-11 Dewey And Almy Chem Comp Improvements in or relating to printers' blankets
US2130948A (en) * 1937-04-09 1938-09-20 Du Pont Synthetic fiber
US2175051A (en) * 1939-04-13 1939-10-03 Bancroft & Sons Co J Method of and apparatus for printing cloth
US2222143A (en) * 1940-07-18 1940-11-19 Apponaug Company Back grey for textile printing
US2252554A (en) * 1938-09-19 1941-08-12 Wilmington Trust Company Polymeric material

Patent Citations (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US33510A (en) * 1861-10-22 Improvement in woven endless belts
US189868A (en) * 1877-04-24 Improvement in blankets for calico-printing
GB416373A (en) * 1932-12-10 1934-09-10 John Sylvester Wheelwright Improvements in or relating to stencil-printing apparatus
US2080133A (en) * 1936-05-26 1937-05-11 Rock Hill Printing & Finishing Textile printing machine
GB481587A (en) * 1936-06-11 1938-03-11 Dewey And Almy Chem Comp Improvements in or relating to printers' blankets
US2130948A (en) * 1937-04-09 1938-09-20 Du Pont Synthetic fiber
US2252554A (en) * 1938-09-19 1941-08-12 Wilmington Trust Company Polymeric material
US2175051A (en) * 1939-04-13 1939-10-03 Bancroft & Sons Co J Method of and apparatus for printing cloth
US2222143A (en) * 1940-07-18 1940-11-19 Apponaug Company Back grey for textile printing

Cited By (31)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE1108650B (en) * 1956-06-25 1961-06-15 Grace W R & Co Unterlegtuch for textile printing, and process for its preparation
US2963393A (en) * 1956-06-25 1960-12-06 Grace W R & Co Resilient lapping element especially adapted for use in textile printing
US4489650A (en) * 1977-03-24 1984-12-25 International Business Machines Corporation Type belt printer with antifriction means
US5597642A (en) * 1994-12-02 1997-01-28 Kimberly-Clark Corporation Dual substrate, single-pass printing process and substrates printed thereby
US5501149A (en) * 1994-12-02 1996-03-26 Kimberly-Clark Corporation Dual substrate, single-pass printing process
US5562037A (en) * 1994-12-02 1996-10-08 Kimberly-Clark Corporation Single substrate, repeat-pass printing process
US5566616A (en) * 1994-12-02 1996-10-22 Kimberly-Clark Corporation Substrate printed by a single substrate, repeat-pass printing process
US6231715B1 (en) 1994-12-20 2001-05-15 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Elongate, semi-tone printing process
US5612118A (en) * 1994-12-20 1997-03-18 Kimberly-Clark Corporation Elongate, semi-tone printing process and substrates printed thereby
US9662250B2 (en) 2005-12-16 2017-05-30 The Procter & Gamble Company Disposable absorbent article having side panels with structurally, functionally and visually different regions
US8697938B2 (en) 2005-12-16 2014-04-15 The Procter & Gamble Company Disposable absorbent article having side panels with structurally, functionally and visually different regions
US20110172629A1 (en) * 2005-12-16 2011-07-14 Donald Carroll Roe Disposable Absorbent Article Having Side Panels with Structurally, Functionally and Visually Different Regions
US8697937B2 (en) 2005-12-16 2014-04-15 The Procter & Gamble Company Disposable absorbent article having side panels with structurally, functionally and visually different regions
US8558053B2 (en) 2005-12-16 2013-10-15 The Procter & Gamble Company Disposable absorbent article having side panels with structurally, functionally and visually different regions
US20110208152A1 (en) * 2006-12-04 2011-08-25 Michael Dale Trennepohl Absorbent Articles Comprising Graphics
US20110203102A1 (en) * 2006-12-04 2011-08-25 Michael Dale Trennepohl Absorbent Articles Comprising Graphics
US20110203727A1 (en) * 2006-12-04 2011-08-25 Michael Dale Trennepohl Absorbent Articles Comprising Graphics
US20110209333A1 (en) * 2006-12-04 2011-09-01 Michael Dale Trennepohl Absorbent Articles Comprising Graphics
US20110209824A1 (en) * 2006-12-04 2011-09-01 Michael Dale Trennepohl Absorbent Articles Comprising Graphics
US20110208150A1 (en) * 2006-12-04 2011-08-25 Michael Dale Trennepohl Absorbent Articles Comprising Graphics
US20110203728A1 (en) * 2006-12-04 2011-08-25 Michael Dale Trennepohl Absorbent Articles Comprising Graphics
US7896858B2 (en) 2006-12-04 2011-03-01 The Procter & Gamble Company Absorbent articles comprising graphics
US9498391B2 (en) 2006-12-04 2016-11-22 The Procter & Gamble Company Method of constructing absorbent articles comprising graphics
US9498390B2 (en) 2006-12-04 2016-11-22 The Procter & Gamble Company Method of constructing absorbent articles comprising graphics
US9498389B2 (en) 2006-12-04 2016-11-22 The Procter & Gamble Company Method of constructing absorbent articles comprising graphics
US9510979B2 (en) 2006-12-04 2016-12-06 The Procter & Gamble Company Method of constructing absorbent articles comprising graphics
US9517168B2 (en) 2006-12-04 2016-12-13 The Procter & Gamble Company Method of constructing absorbent articles comprising graphics
US9522089B2 (en) 2006-12-04 2016-12-20 The Procter & Gamble Company Method of constructing absorbent articles comprising graphics
US20080132872A1 (en) * 2006-12-04 2008-06-05 The Procter & Gamble Company Absorbent articles comprising graphics
US9913761B2 (en) 2006-12-04 2018-03-13 The Procter & Gamble Company Method of constructing absorbent articles comprising graphics
US10307302B2 (en) 2017-09-27 2019-06-04 The Procter & Gamble Company Method of constructing absorbent articles comprising graphics

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