US2742932A - libby - Google Patents

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US2742932A
US2742932A US2742932DA US2742932A US 2742932 A US2742932 A US 2742932A US 2742932D A US2742932D A US 2742932DA US 2742932 A US2742932 A US 2742932A
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loop
shed
yarn
weft
finger
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D03WEAVING
    • D03DWOVEN FABRICS; METHODS OF WEAVING; LOOMS
    • D03D35/00Smallware looms, i.e. looms for weaving ribbons or other narrow fabrics

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  • This invention relates to narrow web looms of the type wherein the picks consist of loops of weft yarn projected alternately from opposite sides of the warp, the shed being changed every time a loop of weft is laid therein.
  • the extremity of each loop pnojectedthnough a shed is caught at the opposite side of the warp and projected through the end of the loop next previously projected in the same direction.
  • a weft yarn breaks at any point, it revels easily, especially if it is a smooth yarn like rayon.
  • one or more separate salvage yarns have been knitted in with the extremitics of the weft loops, an example of this being shown and described in my Patent No. 2,492,051.
  • a loom is provided with means whereby on each side of the warp, a salvage yarn is provided, a loop of which is thrust through the extremity of the weft loop projected from the other side. Then the next Weft loop in course of being projected to the other side is first thrust through the selvage loop. This sequence is repeated each time a new weft loop is projected from the other side.
  • a similar sequence of steps takes place at the other side of the warp so that in both selvages, each Weft loop from the other side is locked by a selvage loop on the near side which selvagc loop is in turn locked by the next weft loop projected from the near side to the other side of the warp.
  • each of the loops mentioned be held open to receive the next loop which is to be thrust there through until the latter has actually entered the former, particularly in looms which are designed to operate at high speeds. Provisions is made for this requirement in the loom hereinafter described.
  • Figure l is a plan view of narrow web loom mechanisms for forming locked sclvages as described
  • Figure 2 is a section on line 22 of Figure 1;
  • Figure 3 is a section on line 33 of Figure 1;
  • Figure 4 is a diagrammatic plan view showing some of the thread-handling members at one stage of a cycle of operation
  • FIGS 5, 6 and 7 are similar views showing the parts at later stages in the cycle
  • Figure 8 is a section on the line 88 of Figure 4.
  • Figure 9 is a section on the line 9-9 of Figure Figure 10 is a section on the line 10-10 of Figure 9;
  • Figure ll is a section on the line 11-11 of Figure 6;
  • Figure 12 is a diagrammatic showing of the resulting fabric.
  • the drawings illustrate part of a narrow-web loom comprising the mechanism for laying the weft yarns in the shed and locking the loops with selvage yarns.
  • a fragment of the fabric which is being woven is shown, as well as the two weft ill) yarns and one of the sel-vage yarns, but the warp yarns forming the sheds are not shown, to avoid confusion of detail.
  • wefl laying fingers 22 and 24 which are pivoted at 26 and '28, respectively, for alternate reciprocation through the shed to lay loops of weft yarn therein.
  • weft-laying fingers they are connected by respective links 30 and 32 to a longitudinally reciprocated bar 34 which extends transvcrselyof the loom in a guide slot in the top of the frame 20.
  • the bar 34 is connected by a pitman 36 ( Figure 2) to a crank wheel 38 mounted on a vertical shaft 40.
  • eccentrics 42 and 44 are also mounted on the shaft 40 for the actuation of other reciprocab'le members in timed relation with the movements of the fingers 22 and 24.
  • the eccentric 42 has the usual eccentric strap and rod 46 connected to a crank arm 48 pivoted at 50.
  • a radial arm 52 from the pivot 50 rocks with the arm 48.
  • Mounted on the end of the arm 52 is an arcuate needle 54 arranged so that the arc of its curvature is concentric with the axis of the pivot 50.
  • One end of the needle 54 is mounted on the arm '52.
  • the other end is pointed and has an eye for thread near the point.
  • the rock-arm 52 is operatively connected by suitable linkage including a rod 56 to a similar rock-arm 58 on the other side of the shed.
  • An arcua'te needle 60 similar to the needle 54, is mounted on the arm 58.
  • the connecting linkage is such that the needles 54 and 60 rock about their pivots in opposite phase, the pointed ends moving in arcuate paths which are almost tangent to the edges of the fabric at the fell thereof.
  • the eccentric 44 has a strap and red 62 connected to an arm '64 rockable about a pivot 66.
  • a hook 68 rocks with the arm 64 about this pivot and is operatively connected to a similar hook lo on the other side of the shot-l by linkage including a rod '72.
  • a pair of thread guide members 74 and 76 are mounted on opposite sides of the shed.
  • Each of these guides is an upright lever pivoted as at 78 near the lower end so that the upper end which has an eye therein is rocked forward and rearward to take up slack in the salvage yarns S, S at the right moments, as hereinafter described, these yarns being drawn from suitable sources (not shown) through tension devices 79, one of which is shown in Figure 4.
  • the levers 74 and 76 may be rocked by any convenient means such as earns 80 and 82 mounted on a countershaft 84. The latter is connected to the vertical shaft 40 bevel gears 86 so that these shafts rotate in unison.
  • Power for driving these shafts may be had by gear wheels 88 which connect the shaft 84 with a power shaft 90 carrying a pulley 92 for a belt.
  • the power shaft 90 is also connected by gearing 94 to a shaft 96 on which is mounted a revolving reed 98. This too must move in timed relation to all the other moving parts.
  • each of the fingers 22 and 24 which projects through the shed intermittently is arcuate, the curvature being concentric with the pivot about which the finger rocks.
  • a groove or channel 100 (Figure 11) in which a weft yarn freely slides to an eye in the tip of the finger.
  • Weft yarn W is introduced into the shed from the left by the finger 22.
  • the other weft yarn W is introduced from the right by the finger 24.
  • Figure 4 shows the finger 22 projected all the way through the shed with a loop of weft yarn W.
  • the finger has a terminal nose 102 extending at an angle from the arcuate portion to hold the loop of yarn W open for the insertion therethrough of a loop of selvage yarn S by the needle 60 to the right of the shed ( Figures 4 and 8).
  • the pointed end of the needle 60 has carried the end of the loop of selvage yarn beyond the point of the hook 70, the latter is rocked to catch the loop of selvage yarn as illustrated in Figures 5 and 9.
  • Each of the hooks S8 and 70 is formed with a deep channel 104 in the outer or convex edge of its bent portion which forms the hook.
  • the channel 104 is large enough in cross-section to receive the end portion of one of the fingers 22 and 24.
  • the needle After the hook 70 has entered the loop of sel vage yarn S carried by the needle 60, the needle is withdrawn, leaving the loop on the hook.
  • the finger 22 also returns to the left.
  • the shed changes and the finger 24 is projected through the new shed.
  • As it starts through the shed its end portion rides in the channel 104 of the hook 70 and thus inserts a loop of the weft yarn W through the loop of selvage yarn thenheld by the hook 70.
  • the hook As soon as the end of the finger 24 has passed through the loop on the hook 70, the hook is swung back to disengage itself from the selvage yarn.
  • the slack take-up lever 76 thereupon swings forward to take up the slack in the loop of selvage yarn S which now passes around the finger 24 and the loop of weft yarn W carried thereby. Meanwhile the finger 24 is rapidly projected through the shed and retracted therefrom, its loop of weft yarn W being caught on the left-hand side of the shed by the needle 54.
  • the motion a of the take-up lever toward the front of the machine pulls the loop of selvage yarn taut about the loop of weft yarn W which has just been laid in the shed ( Figure 7).
  • the finger 22 is then projected through the next shed from the left to the position shown in Figure 4, thus completing a cycle of operations at the right of the shed. Similar cycles take place to the left of the shed when the finger 24 carries loops of the weft yarn W beyond the left side of the shed to be caught by the needle 54 which carries another selvage yarn S (not shown except in Figure 12).
  • each loop of weft yarn projected through the shed is caught by a loop of selvage yarn at the further side of the shed, the selvage loop then being caught by the loop of the other weft yarn which is projected from the near side of the shed.
  • each said needle comprising an arcuate shank with a pointed end and an eye near said end, a horizontal arm to which the other end of said shank is secured, and pivot means for reciprocating said arm about a vertical axis concentric with the curvature of said shank.
  • each said hook having trough-like cross-section at the end-portion thereof adapted to hold separated the sides of a loop of yarn caught on the hook.
  • each said finger having an elongated end portion adapted to extend from one side of the shed to the other, said end portion being arcuate with a thread channel in its convex side.

Description

April 24, 1956 c. F. LlBBY LOOM FOR NARROW WEBS WITH LOCKED SELVAGEIS 2 Sheets-Sheer 1 Filed Dec. 9, 1954 April 24, 1956 c. F. LIBBY 2,742,932
LOOM FOR NARROW WEBS WITH LOCKED SEILVAGES Filed Dec. 9, 1954 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 United States Patent LOOM FOR NARROW WEBS WITH LOCKED 'SELVAGES Carl F. Libby, litaeughton, Mass, assignor to John D.
Riordan, Hoplrington, and Gertrude C. Libby, Stoughton, Mass, as trustees Application December 9, 1954, Serial No. 474,087
6 Claims. (Cl. 139-124) This invention relates to narrow web looms of the type wherein the picks consist of loops of weft yarn projected alternately from opposite sides of the warp, the shed being changed every time a loop of weft is laid therein. in 'l'ooins of this kind, the extremity of each loop pnojectedthnough a shed is caught at the opposite side of the warp and projected through the end of the loop next previously projected in the same direction. In the resulting web, if a weft yarn breaks at any point, it revels easily, especially if it is a smooth yarn like rayon. In order to look the selvagcs so as to make ravelling more diflicult and less liable to result from the breaking of one of the weft yarns, one or more separate salvage yarns have been knitted in with the extremitics of the weft loops, an example of this being shown and described in my Patent No. 2,492,051.
According to the present invention, a loom is provided with means whereby on each side of the warp, a salvage yarn is provided, a loop of which is thrust through the extremity of the weft loop projected from the other side. Then the next Weft loop in course of being projected to the other side is first thrust through the selvage loop. This sequence is repeated each time a new weft loop is projected from the other side. A similar sequence of steps takes place at the other side of the warp so that in both selvages, each Weft loop from the other side is locked by a selvage loop on the near side which selvagc loop is in turn locked by the next weft loop projected from the near side to the other side of the warp. For successful operation of the loom it is essential that each of the loops mentioned be held open to receive the next loop which is to be thrust there through until the latter has actually entered the former, particularly in looms which are designed to operate at high speeds. Provisions is made for this requirement in the loom hereinafter described.
In the drawings,
Figure l is a plan view of narrow web loom mechanisms for forming locked sclvages as described;
Figure 2 is a section on line 22 of Figure 1;
Figure 3 is a section on line 33 of Figure 1;
Figure 4 is a diagrammatic plan view showing some of the thread-handling members at one stage of a cycle of operation;
Figures 5, 6 and 7 are similar views showing the parts at later stages in the cycle;
Figure 8 is a section on the line 88 of Figure 4;
Figure 9 is a section on the line 9-9 of Figure Figure 10 is a section on the line 10-10 of Figure 9;
Figure ll is a section on the line 11-11 of Figure 6; and
Figure 12 is a diagrammatic showing of the resulting fabric.
The drawings illustrate part of a narrow-web loom comprising the mechanism for laying the weft yarns in the shed and locking the loops with selvage yarns. In some of the figures of the drawing a fragment of the fabric which is being woven is shown, as well as the two weft ill) yarns and one of the sel-vage yarns, but the warp yarns forming the sheds are not shown, to avoid confusion of detail.
As shown, on a main frame are mounted two wefl laying fingers 22 and 24 which are pivoted at 26 and '28, respectively, for alternate reciprocation through the shed to lay loops of weft yarn therein. For the actuation of these weft-laying fingers, they are connected by respective links 30 and 32 to a longitudinally reciprocated bar 34 which extends transvcrselyof the loom in a guide slot in the top of the frame 20. The bar 34 is connected by a pitman 36 (Figure 2) to a crank wheel 38 mounted on a vertical shaft 40. Also mounted on the shaft 40 are two eccentrics 42 and 44 for the actuation of other reciprocab'le members in timed relation with the movements of the fingers 22 and 24. The eccentric 42 has the usual eccentric strap and rod 46 connected to a crank arm 48 pivoted at 50. A radial arm 52 from the pivot 50 rocks with the arm 48. Mounted on the end of the arm 52 is an arcuate needle 54 arranged so that the arc of its curvature is concentric with the axis of the pivot 50. One end of the needle 54 is mounted on the arm '52. The other end is pointed and has an eye for thread near the point. The rock-arm 52 is operatively connected by suitable linkageincluding a rod 56 to a similar rock-arm 58 on the other side of the shed. An arcua'te needle 60, similar to the needle 54, is mounted on the arm 58. The connecting linkage is such that the needles 54 and 60 rock about their pivots in opposite phase, the pointed ends moving in arcuate paths which are almost tangent to the edges of the fabric at the fell thereof.
The eccentric 44 has a strap and red 62 connected to an arm '64 rockable about a pivot 66. A hook 68 rocks with the arm 64 about this pivot and is operatively connected to a similar hook lo on the other side of the shot-l by linkage including a rod '72. On each side of the shed, therefore, is a finger, a needle and a hook, all these members being driven by connections with the shaft 40 so that they all move in timed relation as hereinafter described.
A pair of thread guide members 74 and 76 are mounted on opposite sides of the shed. Each of these guides is an upright lever pivoted as at 78 near the lower end so that the upper end which has an eye therein is rocked forward and rearward to take up slack in the salvage yarns S, S at the right moments, as hereinafter described, these yarns being drawn from suitable sources (not shown) through tension devices 79, one of which is shown in Figure 4. The levers 74 and 76 may be rocked by any convenient means such as earns 80 and 82 mounted on a countershaft 84. The latter is connected to the vertical shaft 40 bevel gears 86 so that these shafts rotate in unison. Power for driving these shafts may be had by gear wheels 88 which connect the shaft 84 with a power shaft 90 carrying a pulley 92 for a belt. The power shaft 90 is also connected by gearing 94 to a shaft 96 on which is mounted a revolving reed 98. This too must move in timed relation to all the other moving parts.
The interaction of the fingers, needles, hooks and tension members is illustrated in Figures 4 to 11. The portion of each of the fingers 22 and 24 which projects through the shed intermittently is arcuate, the curvature being concentric with the pivot about which the finger rocks. On the convex edge of this portion of each finger is a groove or channel 100 (Figure 11) in which a weft yarn freely slides to an eye in the tip of the finger. One Weft yarn W is introduced into the shed from the left by the finger 22. The other weft yarn W is introduced from the right by the finger 24. Figure 4 shows the finger 22 projected all the way through the shed with a loop of weft yarn W. The finger has a terminal nose 102 extending at an angle from the arcuate portion to hold the loop of yarn W open for the insertion therethrough of a loop of selvage yarn S by the needle 60 to the right of the shed (Figures 4 and 8). When the pointed end of the needle 60 has carried the end of the loop of selvage yarn beyond the point of the hook 70, the latter is rocked to catch the loop of selvage yarn as illustrated in Figures 5 and 9. Each of the hooks S8 and 70 is formed with a deep channel 104 in the outer or convex edge of its bent portion which forms the hook. The channel 104 is large enough in cross-section to receive the end portion of one of the fingers 22 and 24. After the hook 70 has entered the loop of sel vage yarn S carried by the needle 60, the needle is withdrawn, leaving the loop on the hook. The finger 22 also returns to the left. When it is clear of the shed, the shed changes and the finger 24 is projected through the new shed. As it starts through the shed its end portion rides in the channel 104 of the hook 70 and thus inserts a loop of the weft yarn W through the loop of selvage yarn thenheld by the hook 70. As soon as the end of the finger 24 has passed through the loop on the hook 70, the hook is swung back to disengage itself from the selvage yarn. The slack take-up lever 76 thereupon swings forward to take up the slack in the loop of selvage yarn S which now passes around the finger 24 and the loop of weft yarn W carried thereby. Meanwhile the finger 24 is rapidly projected through the shed and retracted therefrom, its loop of weft yarn W being caught on the left-hand side of the shed by the needle 54. When the finger 24 is clear of the shed, the motion a of the take-up lever toward the front of the machine pulls the loop of selvage yarn taut about the loop of weft yarn W which has just been laid in the shed (Figure 7). The finger 22 is then projected through the next shed from the left to the position shown in Figure 4, thus completing a cycle of operations at the right of the shed. Similar cycles take place to the left of the shed when the finger 24 carries loops of the weft yarn W beyond the left side of the shed to be caught by the needle 54 which carries another selvage yarn S (not shown except in Figure 12).
In the resultant fabric, each loop of weft yarn projected through the shed is caught by a loop of selvage yarn at the further side of the shed, the selvage loop then being caught by the loop of the other weft yarn which is projected from the near side of the shed.
I claim:
1. In a narrow web loom having shed-forming means, two weft fingers reciprocable to project alternate loops of two weft yarns from opposite sides of the shed, a needle for a selvage yarn mounted on each side of said shed for reciprocatory movement in timed relation to the move ments of the finger on the other side of the shed to project a loop of selvage yarn through the extremity of the weft loop projected through the shed by said finger, a hook mounted near and associated with each of said needles and rcciprocable in timed relation with its corresponding needle to catch therefrom the loop of selvage yarn after it has been thrust through said weft loop and to hold said loop of selvage yarn open for the projection of the adjacent weft finger therethrough, and connected means for driving said fingers, needles and books.
2. Apparatus as in claim I. and a rccipiocable guide for each selvage yarn operated in timed relation to the movements of the corresponding hook to take up the slack in the loop of selvage yarn released by said hook.
3. Apparatus as in claim 1, each said needle comprising an arcuate shank with a pointed end and an eye near said end, a horizontal arm to which the other end of said shank is secured, and pivot means for reciprocating said arm about a vertical axis concentric with the curvature of said shank.
4. Apparatus as in claim 1, each said hook having trough-like cross-section at the end-portion thereof adapted to hold separated the sides of a loop of yarn caught on the hook.
5. Apparatus as in claim 1, each said finger having an elongated end portion adapted to extend from one side of the shed to the other, said end portion being arcuate with a thread channel in its convex side.
6. Apparatus as in claim 1, and means for tightening each loop of selvage yarn about one of said weft loops, said last-named means comprising a tension device for each said selvage yarn, and a reciprocable take-up lever having an eye through which the selvage yarn passes from its tension device to the corresponding needle.
No references cited.
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Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2891583A (en) * 1955-02-07 1959-06-23 Cuckson Textiles Proprietary L Shuttleless looms
US2935094A (en) * 1955-09-29 1960-05-03 Imatex Ind Machine Tessili S R Device for driving the curved needle in looms, especially in tape looms
US2986171A (en) * 1957-10-21 1961-05-30 Bridgeport Fabrics Inc Narrow fabric manufacture
US3000403A (en) * 1960-01-13 1961-09-19 Bridgeport Fabrics Inc Weaving machine
US3058496A (en) * 1957-03-02 1962-10-16 Dewas Raymond Selvage forming apparatus
US3288172A (en) * 1965-02-18 1966-11-29 Joh D Riordan Loop catching mechanism in narrow web loom

Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2891583A (en) * 1955-02-07 1959-06-23 Cuckson Textiles Proprietary L Shuttleless looms
US2935094A (en) * 1955-09-29 1960-05-03 Imatex Ind Machine Tessili S R Device for driving the curved needle in looms, especially in tape looms
US3058496A (en) * 1957-03-02 1962-10-16 Dewas Raymond Selvage forming apparatus
US2986171A (en) * 1957-10-21 1961-05-30 Bridgeport Fabrics Inc Narrow fabric manufacture
US3000403A (en) * 1960-01-13 1961-09-19 Bridgeport Fabrics Inc Weaving machine
US3288172A (en) * 1965-02-18 1966-11-29 Joh D Riordan Loop catching mechanism in narrow web loom

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