US2693687A - Knitting - Google Patents

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US2693687A
US2693687A US89725A US8972549A US2693687A US 2693687 A US2693687 A US 2693687A US 89725 A US89725 A US 89725A US 8972549 A US8972549 A US 8972549A US 2693687 A US2693687 A US 2693687A
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yarn
wrap
needles
knitting
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Levin Nathan
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04BKNITTING
    • D04B9/00Circular knitting machines with independently-movable needles
    • D04B9/26Circular knitting machines with independently-movable needles for producing patterned fabrics
    • D04B9/28Circular knitting machines with independently-movable needles for producing patterned fabrics with colour patterns
    • D04B9/30Circular knitting machines with independently-movable needles for producing patterned fabrics with colour patterns by striping
    • D04B9/32Circular knitting machines with independently-movable needles for producing patterned fabrics with colour patterns by striping by wrap striping

Description

N. LEVIN KNITTING Nov. 9,' 1954 2 Sheets-Sheet l Filed April 26. 1949 w @MMM INVENTOR.
Nov. 9, 1954 KNITTING Filed April 26, 1949 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR.
@wa/@pia N. LEvlN 2,693,687
United States Patent Olilice 2,693,687 Patented Nov. 9, 1954 KNITTING Nathan Levin, Trenton, N. J. Application April 26, 1949, Serial No, 89,725
9 Claims. (Cl. 66-135) The present invention relates to the art of knitting and more particularly to wrap yarn decorated seamless tubular fabrics and to a machine and method for making the same.
It is an object of the present invention to provide a seamless tubular rib fabric of body yarn decorated with walewise extending wrap yarns in which the wrap yarns form stitches of only wrap yarn incorporated in the plain wales of the fabric as successive stitches of series of chain stitches, the body yarn being tucked where the wrap yarn stitches are incorporated.
It is a further object of the present invention to provide a seamless tubular rib fabric of body yarn decorated with walewise extending wrap yarns in which the wrap yarns form stitches which are incorporated in the plain wales of the fabric and which extend outwardly from the fabric as projecting decorative loops of wrap yarn.
It is a still further object of the present invention to provide a seamless tubular rib fabric of body yarn decorated with a pair of walewise extending wrap yarns of different colors for each plain wale of the fabric, in which one of the wrap yarns in each Wale forms plated loops of wrap yarn on body yarn and in which the other of the wrap yarns in the same wale forms loops of only wrap yarn interposed between walewise successive body yarn stitches. v
It will be understood that each of the fabric constructions above set forth may be employed in the plain wales of plain Jersey fabric, as distinguished fromrib fabric.
It is also an object of the present invention to provide a machine and method of operating the same to produce each of the above fabric constructions. The machine of the present invention is adapted to be made selectively operable to make each of the said fabrics by means of suitable selecting mechanisms which are capable of being made operable as required. It is within the scope of the present invention to produce each of the fabrics upon its own machine, rather than upon a single machine, following the method of operating the machine as herein set forth.
It is also an object of the present invention to provide a single circular knitting machine capable of being operated in a plurality of ways and upon which a plurality of different stitch constructions of walewise extending wrap yarns incorporated in seamless tubular fabrics may be made.
These and other objects of the present invention will be apparent from the following description of the fabrics, the methods of making the same and the machine upon which the methods are carried out, taken in connection with the accompanying drawings illustrating the invention.
appended claims defining the improvements in the art of knitting set forth in this application.
Figure l is a view of a stocking having a top made of the fabric of the present invention,
Figure 2 is an enlarged diagrammatic View of a section of rib fabric in which wrap yarn stitches are incorporated in place of body yarn stitches of an outside plain wale,
Figure 3 is an enlarged diagrammatic View of a section of rib fabric in which wrap yarn stitches are incorporated in an outside plain Wale in which the continuity of the knitting has been interrupted,
Figure 4 is an enlarged diagrammatic view of a section of rib fabric in which a pair of wrap yarns are incorporated in an outside plain wale in which wrap yarn stitches The scope of the present invention is set forth in the are plated on some and take the place of other of the body yarn stitches,
Figure 5 is a diagrammatic view of thel needles of a knitting machine showing their paths of travel in the making of the fabrics of the present invention,
Figure 6v is a sectional View taken through the needle cylinder, needle dial and finger cylinder of a circular independent needle finger wrapping rib knitting machine, showing cylinder and dial needles and a pair of lingers associated with a cylinder needle, and
Figure 7 is a view similar to Figure 6 with the dial needles in withdrawn position and the pair of lingers in reversed position.
The present application is a continuation in part of parent application, Serial No. 756,694, filed June 24, 1947, United States Patent No. 2,515,720, and divisional ap-l plication, Serial No. 79,181, filed March 2, 1949, United States Patent No. 2,615,319.
The United States Patents Nos. 1,907,185 and 1,936,024 disclose a rib fabric, method and machine for making the same in which the fabric has inside rib and outside plain wales of body yarn stitches and wrap yarns individual to the plain wales. The wrap yarns are formed into stitches interposed between pairs of walewise successive plain body yarn stitches. The wrap yarn stitches substantially cover the intervening body yarn stitches in the patterned area. The body yarn stitches in the said patents are all knit at the main body yarn feed station on the cylinder and dial needles while the wrap yarn stitches are knit at an auxiliary knitting station on only selected cylinder needles at a point where the dial needles are in withdrawn inactive position holding their loops. The dial needles and the remaining cylinder needles do not knit at the auxiliary knitting station.
One of the fabrics shown in the present invention, Figure 2, is an improvement over that shown in the said patents in that the intervening body yarn stitches, as such, are eliminated between the alternate wrap yarn stitches, thus improving the patterning effect of the wrap yarn stitches. The body yarn is knit on all of the cylinder and dial needles at the main body yarn feed station for regular fabric and the wrap yarns are knit on their selected cylinder needles at the auxiliary knitting station for ornamentation, however, during such ornamentation, the seu lected cylinder needles are actuated to tuck the body yarn at the main feed station instead of knitting the same, so that these selected needles at the auxiliary station knit their wrap yarns through previously formed loops and through tucked stitches of the body yarn, with the result that the wrap stitches appear as continuous successive chain stitches.
This improved construction is shown in Figure 2 wherein a portion of seamless tubular rib fabric has inside rib wales 10 and 11 and an outside plain wale 12, knit of body yarn 13 and of walewise extending wrap yarn 14 individual to the plain wale 12. It will be understood that wrap yarns may be individually associated with each of the outside plain wales of the seamless tubular ribs fabric. The seamless tubular rib fabric may be made upon a single body yarn feed rib machine in which case the successive body fabric courses shown in Figure 2 will be knit of the same body yarn, however the invention is not limited to a single body yarn feed machine and the fabric may be made upon a multiple body yarn feed machine. In either type of machine, for each body yarn feed there is an auxiliary knitting station for knitting only wrap yarns on their cylinder needles.
The courses 15, 16 and 20 are of regular inside rib and outside plain body yarn stitches, with the wrap yarn 14 floating rearwardly of the fabric. In the courses 17, 18, and 19, the body yarn forms regular inside rib stitches and is tucked as at 21 in the outside wale along with a plain loop. In the course 17, the wrap yarn 14 has been formed into an outside plain stitch 22 drawn through an outside stitch of body yarn formed in course 16 and through the tuck 21 formed in course 17. In the course 18, the wrap yarn 14 has been formed into an outside plain stitch 23 drawn through wrap yarn stitch 22 formed in course 17 and through the tuck 21 formed in course 18. Similarly, in course 19, the wrap yarn 14 has been formed into an outside plain stitch 24 drawn through wrap yarn stitch 23. formed in. course 18 and through the tuck 21 formed in course 19. In the course 20 the pattern is discontinued and the outside plain body yarn stitch is drawn through the Wrap stitch 24 in the normal manner. It will be understood, as in all Wrap decorated fabrics, that each Wrap yarn may be knit at desired courses in its own Wale and that the Wrap yarn floats rearwardly of the fabric between said courses. wrap yarn stitch is drawn through a loop of a preceding course and through a tucked portion of therbody yarn formed in the same course in which each such Wrap yarn stitch is drawn.
Another stitch construction is shown in Figure 4 wherein a portion of Vseamless tubular rib fabric has inside rib Wales 25 and 26 and an outside plain Wale 27, knit of body yarn 2S and of Walewise extending wrap yarns 29 and 30,. of different colors, individual to the plain wale 27. are associated with plain Wale 27 and that each of the other plain wales of the seamless tubular rib fabric may have a pair of wrap yarns individually associated therewith. The courses 31, 32 and 36 are of regular inside rib and outside plain body yarn stitches, with the Wrap yarns 29 and 30 oating rearwardly of the fabric. In course 33, the body yarn forms regular inside ribs and outside plain stitches and the wrap yarn 29 forms an outside plain stitch 37 of wrap yarn plated on the regular plain outside stitch of body yarn.
In the course 34, the body yarn forms regular inside rib stitches and in Wale 27 is tucked as at 3S along with the plated stitch 37. Also in courses 34, the other Wrap yarn 36 is formed into a stitch 39 drawn through plated stitch 37 and through the tucked portion 38 of body yarn 28. In the course 35, the body yarn forms regular inside rib and outside plain stitches and the wrap yarn 29 forms an outside plain stitch 4i) of Wrap yarn plated on an outside stitch of body yarn, similar to the plated stitch 37. In the course 36 the pattern is discontinued and the outside plain body yarn stitch is drawn through the plated stitch 4t) in the usual manner. It will be noted that whenever it is desired to knit one of the wrap yarn 29, it is plated upon outside plain stitches of body yarn, and that when it is desired to knit the other of the Wrap yarns, that is Wrap yarn 3i), it is not plated on the body yarn but is knit as a stitch of only Wrap yarn. The fabric of Figure 4 shows the plated stitches of one Wrap yarn on the body yarn alternating With the stitches of only wrap yarn, however depending upon the color pattern within each Wale, the plated stitches of one wrap yarn on body yarn or the stitches of only the other Wrap yarn may each extend for a number of successive fabric courses.
A still further stitch construction is shown in Figure 3 wherein a portion of seamless tubular rib fabric has inside rib wales 41 and 42 and an outside plain Wale 43, knit of body yarn 44 and of walewise extending wrap yarn 45 individual to the plain Wale 43. The courses 46, 47 and 51 are of regular inside rib and outside plain body yarn stitches, with the wrap yarn 45 floating rearwardly of the fabric. In course 48, the body yarn forms regular inside rib and outside plain stitches and the wrap yarn 45 forms an outside plain stitch 52 of Wrap yarn plated on the regular plain outside stitch of body yarn. In course 49, the body yarn forms regular inside rib and outside plain stitches and the Wrap yarn 4S forms an outside plain stitch 53 of Wrap yarn plated on the regular plain outside stitch 54 of body yarn. Also in course 49, the Wrap yarn 45 forms a stitch 55 drawn through the plated stitch of wrap yarn loop 53 on body yarn loop 54. In Figure 3, does not appear that wrap yarn loop 53 is coincident with body yarn loop 54, however, these two loops were plated upon each other during their knitting, having been drawn together. The reason for body yarn loop 54 appearing as smaller than Wrap yarn loop 53 is that stitch 5S, after being drawn through the plated stitch 53, 54 in course 49, was cast off the needle forming the same. This casting olf or freeing of wrap stitch 55 permitted the previously formed loops in Wale 43 to tend to ravel back under the course-wise tension on the fabric in the machine knitting the same. The raveling action would normally extend throughout the Wale so long as there Was sufficient course-Wise tension on the fabric, however, in the present instance the presence of wrap stitch 55 drawn Each which is diagrammatic, itY
It will be noted that two wrap yarns Vthrough body yarn stitch 4 54 prevents the latter from ravellng at all, although. it does. contract in size. The Wrap yarns and their stitches not being under coursewise tension do not tend to unravel, so that wrap stitch extends through shortened stitch 54 as a ravel stop member. The wrap stitch S3 remains substantially the size it was drawn, although body stitch 54 decreases in size. In this manner a pair of Wrap yarn stitches 53 and 55 extend outwardly from the outer face of the fabric as ornamental stitches. In course 50, the body yarn forms regular inside rib stitches in wales 41 and 42 and in Wale 43, the body yarn 44 and the wrap yarn 45 are tucked at 56, preparatory to the resumption of knitting in this Wale. In course 51, the body yarn forms regular inside rib and outside plain stitches, the plain stitch in Wale 43 being drawn through the tucked stitch 56 of course 50. It will be understood that the projecting Wrap loop ornamentation may be repeated as desired in each Wale of the fabric. As here shown, the wrap yarn is plated at 52 in the course. preceding the cast off wrap yarn stitch 55, however, the projecting loops may be made in a course Without a plated stitch being made in a preceding course. Similarly, the tucking of the wrap yarn 45 in the course 50, succeeding the course 49 in which the projecting loops appear, may be eliminated if desired so that the Wrap yarn will float rearwardly of the fabric from course 49 until it is plated upon a body yarn stitch in a spaced course.
In Figure 1 is illustrated a conventional hose or stocking 57 having a patterned top 58', preferably of seamless tubular rib fabric construction. The fabric top 58 may be ornamented with any of the special stitch constructions shown in Figures 2, 3 and 4.
The method of making the fabrics of Figures 2, 3 and 4 will now be described with reference to Figures 5, 6 and 7 which illustrate the special method of operating the needles and the machine required to make the said fabrics. As previously pointed out concerning the fabric of Figure 2, each of the fabrics illustrated are preferably made upon single body yarn feed rib machines, but may be made upon multiple body yarn feed rib machines, if so desired.
In Figure 5 a circular series of independent cylinder latch needles 57 are indicated as operating on a single main yarn feed rib knitting machine. The main knitting station of the single feed machine is indicated at A where body yarn is fed to the needles through yarn guide 58. At this knitting station, a stitch cam 59 operates on all the cylinder needles to draw them down to a full knitting position. Also at knitting station A, ahead of stitch cam 59, is a pattern or design wheel 60, of any conventional construction, which may be made inoperative, or operative to raise selected needles 57 from their normallevel at 61 to either the intermediate tuck level at 62 where the loops on the'needles are not moved below their latches, or to the upper knit level at 63 where the loops on the needles are moved below their latches. The needles not acted upon by design wheel pass by the same and are raised by the usual means on the rnachine used in conjunction with this type of design wheel 60 to a knit level to take the body yarn in the usual manner. The needles raised to the tuck level 62 by wheel 60 take the body yarn in tucked relation but do not knit as their old loops have not been cleared below the latches. The needles raised to the knit level 63 by wheel 60 take the body yarn and also a wrap yarn, in the manner set forth in said mentioned applications, and knit both yarns into a plated stitch under the action of stitch cam 59. The design wheel 60 is of the type which is adapted to be adjusted so that it raises selected cylinder needles 57 to tuck level 62 Without raising any of the needles to knit level 63; so that it raises selected cylinder needles to knit level 63 without raising any of the needles to tuck level 62; and so that it raises` selected cylinder needles to tuck level 62 and also raises selected cylinder needles to knit level 63.
The machine has an auxiliary knitting station B, circumferentially spaced from main station A at a place Where the dial needles are normally in withdrawn inactive position (Figure v7), provided with an auxiliary stitch drawing cam 64 adapted to act upon all of the needles but only to knit upon those raised to knit level 63 by a conventional design wheel 65 adapted to be made operative at station B. The remaining nonselected cylinder needles continue at level 61 to stitch cam 64 where they pass under the same Without knitting. Those cylinder needles raised by design Wheel 65 are at a level to clear their latches and to receive a wrap yarn, in the manner set forth in said mentioned patents, which is knit under action of stitch vcam 64 into a wrap yarn stitch interposed between a pair of walewise successive body yarn stitches knit at station A. No body yarn or other yarns are fed at station `B.
interposed between knitting stations A and B is a stitch casting ofi station C at which no yarnsare fed to the needles and at which selected cylinder needles are caused to drop or cast off their loops. This is accomplished by means of a conventional design wheel 66 adapted to be made operative to raise selected cylinder needles to knit level 63 to clear their latches and by draw down cam 67 adapted to lower these needles, without their taking any yarn, below the level'6l. The non-selected needles at station C pass beneath cam 67 without effect upon their loops.
summarizing the needle paths in Figure 5, vitwill be seen that with design Wheels 60, 65 and 66 Vmade inoperative, all of the cylinder needles 57 will follow the dotted line path 68, passing under cams 64 and 67 Without knitting effect, take body yarn from guide 58`and knit in the regular manner under stitch cam 59. The dial needles, not shown in Figure 5, but shown in Figures 6 and 7, also take the body yarn from guide 58.at the same time and in conjunction with the cylinder needles knit seamless tubular rib fabric in the conventional manner at main knitting station A. When it is desired to have certain cylinder needles tuck at station A, design Wheel 60 is made adjustably operative to cause these needles to deviate from dotted line path 68 and to follow the dash dot dot dot line path 69 at tuck level 62 to take body yarn in tucked position before rejoining the dotted line path 68. When it is desired to have certain cylinder needles take and knit their associated Wrap yarns at station A in addition to body yann-design wheel 60 is made adjustably operative to cause these needles to deviate from the dotted line path 68 and to follow the dash line path 70 at knit level 63 to take both wrap and body yarn before rejoining the-dotted line path 68. When it is desired to have certain cylinder needles cast off or drop their stitches at station C,` design wheel 66 is made adjustably operative to cause these needles to deviate from dotted line path 68 and to follow dash dot dot line path 71 at knit level 63 to knit off their stitches by the action of cam 67 before rejoining the dotted line path 68. Finally when it is desired to have certain cylinder needles take and knit only their associated wrap yarns at station B, design wheel 65 is made adjustably operative to cause these needles to deviate from the dotted line path 6 8 and to follow the dash dot line path 72 at knit level 63 to take wrap yarns to knit the same by the action of cam 64 beforerejoining the dotted line path 68. In the knitting action above summarized it is intended that for the formation of the fabric of Figure 2, station C will be inoperative and that stations A and B will be operative with design Wheel 65 causing the needles to follow path 72 at station B and design wheel 60 causing the same needles to follow path 69 at station A; for the formation of the fabric of Figure 4, station C will be inoperative and that stations A and B will be operative with design wheel 65 causing needles to follow path 72 at station'..B and design wheel 60 causing needles to follow paths 69 and 70 at station A; and for the formation of the fabric of Figure 3, stations A, B and C will be operative with design Wheel 65 causing needles to follow path 72 at station B, design wheel 66 causing needles to follow path 71 at station C and design Wheel 60 causing needles to follow path 70 at station A. Y
In the aforementioned patents, the knitting machine is constructed so that the wrap yarn lingers, one for each cylinder needle, are adapted to be operative to feed Wrap yarns to their associated cylinder needles only at the auxiliary knitting station during each course of body yarn knitting at the main knitting station. Inthe aforementioned applications, the knitting machine is constructed so that the wrap yarn fingers, one for each cylinder needle, are adapted to be made operativeto feed wrap yarns to their associated cylinder needles at the auxiliary knitting station and at the main knitting station during each course of body yarn knitting at the latter station. The wrap finger action of the machine of the said patents is satisfactory for the formation of the fabric of Figure 2, while the wrap nger action of the machine of the said applications is satisfactory for the formation of the fabric of Figure 3. However, for the formation of the fabric of Figure 4, the knitting machine 1s constructed so that there are two wrap fingers, and two wrap yarns for each cylinder needle. In this construction, shown in Figures 6 and 7, there is a long linger 73 and a short finger 74 in each slot 75 of a suitable finger cylinder 76. Accordingly, two circular series of independent lingers 73 and 74 are provided for the cylinder needles. All of the long ngers 73 are provided with butts 77 to be pivotally operated in the usual manner by a selectively operable cam 78 only at station B to cause Wrap yarn 30 to be fed to its cylinder needle, while all of the short fingers 74 are provided with butts 79, at a lower level, to be pivotally operated in the usual manner by a selectively operable cam 80 only at station A to cause Wrap yarn 29 to be fed to the same cylinder needle. The fingers 73 and 74 are undercut at different points 81 and 82 beneath the tensioned circular linger returning springs 83 and 84 to permit each" series of fingers to be held in Withdrawn position While the other series of lingers is operated. The Wrap yarns 29 and 30 may be guided through lany suitable openings such as 85, in linger cylinder 76, on their way to the usual cammed operating ends of lingers 73 and 74. The needle cylinder is indicated at 86, the needle dial at 87 and the dial needles at 88. It will be noted, as in Figure 6, that the dial as well as the cylinder needles are operated at station A to knit rib fabric of the body yarn fed through guide 58 and that the cylinder needles may at the same time knit a wrap yarn in addition to the body yarn for plating. It Will also be noted, as in Figure 7, that the dial needles are in withdrawn inactive position (holding the loops knit at station A) at station B during the time that the Wrap lingers feed their yarns to cylinder needles and the latter knit Wrap yarn stitches thereof. The machine herein illustrated has a stationary cylinder and dial for which the customary revolving cylinder cam ring (not shown) and dial cap (not shown) carry the needle actuating cams.
In the formation of the fabric of Figure 2, the body yarn 13 is knit at station A on both sets of needles for all of the courses 15 through 20. During courses l5, 16 and 20 no knitting takes place at station B. In course 17 the design Wheel 60 causes the needle forming Wale 12 to tuck the body yarn as at 21 at station A and the design wheel 65 causes this needle to knit Wrap yarn 14 at station B to form wrap yarn stitch 22 drawn through a loop and a tuck of body yarn. In course 18 the same needle is tucked at station A and is knit at station B to form wrap stitch 23 drawn through Wrap stitch 22 and through a tuck of body yarn. Similarly in course 19 the wrap yarn stitch 24 is formed. In course 20 the design Wheels 60 and 65 do not specially actuate this needle and regular knitting takes place at station A.
In the formation of the fabric of Figure 3, the body yarn 44 is knit at station A on both sets of needles for all of the courses 46 through 51. The stations B and C specially actuate the needle forming Wale 43 only during the knitting of course 49. In course 48 the design wheel 60 causes the needle forming Wale 43 to take and knit Wrap yarn 45 together with the body yarn 44 to form plated stitch 52. In course 49 the same neeedle is again specially actuated to form plated stitch 53 on body stitch 54. Then in the same course, as station B ,passes this needle, design Wheel 65 and cam 64 cause it to knit stitch 55 of Wrap yarn 45; and as station C passes this needle, design wheel 66 and cam 67 cause it to cast olf wrap yarn stitch 55, permitting body yarn stitch 54 to reduce in size under the tendency of the Wale to ravel, but being stopped by the stitch 55 of Wrap yarn drawn therethrough. ln course 50 regular knitting takes place at station A with the same needle, now bare, taking both the wrap yarn and the body yarn in tucked relation. In course 51 regular knitting again takes place at station A and the tucked yarns are knit off over a regular outside plain stitch.
In the formation of the fabric of Figure 4, the body yarn 28 is knit at station A on both sets of needles for all of the courses 31 through 36. During courses 31,- 32, 33, 35 and 36, no knitting takes place at station B. In course 33 the design Wheel 60 causes the needle forming wale 27 to take and knit wrap yarn 29 (cam 80 operating all of the short lingers 74 at station A) together with body yarn 28 to form the plated stitch 37. In course 34 the design Wheel 60 at station A causes the same needle to tuck the body yarn 28 as at 38 While retaining thereon plated stitch 37. Then in the same course, as station passes this needle, design wheel 65 and cam 64 cause 1t to take and knit'wrap yarn 30 (cam 78 operating all of the long lingers 73 at station B) to form the `stitch 39 of only wrap yarn drawn through plated stitch 37 and through tucked body'yarn portion 38. In course 35 the plated stitch 40 is formed at station A in a manner similar to the formation of plated stitch 37 of course 33. In the course 36 regular knitting of the body yarn takes place at station A. y
It Will be understood that each of the three fabrics shown in the. drawings and described herein may be made upon the same single feed rib knitting machine provided with an auxiliary knitting station and with a stitch cast-off station. vThe provision of design wheels which may be made operative at each of the aforesaid stations enables an operator to set up the machine for any type of fabric desired by appropriately makmg the proper design wheels operative. It is to be noted that the needle pull down cams at each of the stations may be fixed and still carry out the required needle manipulation. The Figures 6 and 7 show two wrap fingers per needle in each nger cylinder slot; by making cam 80 inoperative at. station A it is possible to feed wrap yarns only at station B by operating the long fingers 73 by means of cam 78; and by making cam 78 inoperative at station B it is possible to feed wrap yarns only at station A by operating the short fingers 74 by means of camv 80. It is also possible to thread up only one series of the wrap fingers, saylong fingers 73 (wrap fingers 74 not being threaded), then by means of a cam similar to cam 78 at the proper level at station A in addition to the cam 7S at station B, this one set of lingers 73 may be operated at both stations to feed wrap yarns at each station to the cylinder needles. Accordingly each of the described fabrics may be made upon the same circular rib knitting machine.
In connection with the fabrics shown in Figures 2, 3, and 4, it will be observed that the Wrap stitch constructions are applicable to plain Jersey fabrics as well as rib fabrics, and that in the case of the fabric of Figure 2, it will be observed that the body yarn 13 instead of being tucked as at 21 at feed A, may be missed entirely by this needle at this feed in lowered welt position where it does not take the body yarn at all, in which case the body yarn is said to be welted and will extend through a wrap stitch in back of the U-shaped front portion thereof and in back of the vertically extending back portion of the wrap stitch.
I claim:
1. A method of knitting on a'circular series of independent cylinder and dial needles to knit weft body yarn and wrap yarns individually associated with the cylinder needles, including the step of knitting the body yarn on the series of cylinder and dial needles at a knitting station, at the same time tuckng the body yarn on selected cylinder needles, and the step of simultaneously knitting only on said selected cylinder needles at another knitting station to knit off their tucked stitches over only their associated wrap yarns. f
2. A method of knitting on a circular series of independent cylinder and dial needles to knit weft body yarn and pairs of wrap yarns each associated with individual cylinder needles, including the step of knitting the body yarn on the series of cylinder and dial needles and of knitting one of a pair of wrap yarns on its cylinder needle at a knitting station, and the step of simultaneously knitting the other of said pair of wrap yarns on its cylinder needle and of not knitting on the dial and on the remaining cylinder needles at another knitting station.
3. A method of knitting on a circular series of independent cylinder needles to knit weft body yarn and pairs of wrap yarns each associated with individual cylinder needles, including the step of knitting the body yarn on the series of cylinder needles and of knitting one of a pair of wrap yarns on its cylinder needle at a knitting station, and the step of simultaneously knitting the other of said pair of wrap yarns on said needle and of not les knitting on the remaining cylinderr needles at another station. v
4. A method of knitting on a circularseries of independent cylinder needles to knit weft body yarn and pairs of wrap yarns each associated with individual cylinder needles, including the step of knitting the body yarn on the series of needles and of knitting one of a pair of wrap yarns on-its -cylinder needle at a knitting station, and the step of simultaneously vknitting only the other of said pair of Wrap yarns on said needle at another knitting station. Y
5. A method of knitting on a circular series of independent cylinder and dial needles to knit weft body yarn and wrap yarns individually associated'with the cylinder needles, including the step of knitting the body yarn on the series ofcylinder and dial needles and of knitting wrap yarns onV their cylinder needles at a knitting station to form plated stitches of wrap yarn on body yarn, the step of simultaneously knitting only wrap yarns on their cylinder needles and of not knitting on the dial and on the remainingV cylinder needles at another knitting station to form stitches of wrap yarn drawnv through said plated stitches, and the step of casting off said last formed stitches of wrap Vyarn from their needles.
6. A method of'knitting on a' circular series of independent cylinder needles to knit weft body yarn and wrap yarns individually associated with theV cylinder needles, including thefstep of knitting the body yarn on the series of cylinder needles and of knitting wrap yarns on their cylinder needles at a Vknitting station to form plated stitches vof wrap yarn on body yarn,- the step Yof simultaneously knitting only Wrap yarns on their cylinderl needles and of not knitting on the remaining cylinder needlesV at another knitting station to form stitches of wrap yarn drawn through said plated stitches, and the step of casting off said last formed stitches of wrap yarn from their needles.
7. In a circular rib knitting machine, having a circular series of independent cylinder and dial needles, a pair of knitting stations, means to feed individual wrap yarns to the cylinder needles at one of said stations, means at the other of said stationsV to knit body yarn on said series of cylinder and dial needles and atA the same time to tuck the body yarn on selected cylinder needles, and means at said one station to. knit only wrap yarns on said selected cylinder needles through said tucked stitches.
8. In a circular knitting machine having a circular series of independent cylinder needles, a pair of knitting stations, means to feed individual wrap yarns to the needles at each of said stations, means at one station to knit body yarn on said series of cylinder needles and to knit Wrap yarns on their cylinder needles to forni plated stitches of wrap yarn on body yarn, means at the other of said stations to knit only said wrap yarns on their cylinder needles and not to knit on, the remaining, cylinder needles to form/stitches of wrap yarn drawn through said plated stitches, and means to cast off said last formed Wrap yarn stitches.
9. In a circular knitting machine having a circular series of independent cylinder needles, a pair of knitting stations, means to feed one of a pair of individual wrap yarns to a cylinder needle at one of said stations, means to feed the other of the pair of wrap' yarns to said cylinder needle at the other of said stations, means at said one station to knit body yarn on said series of cylinder needles and to knit one of the pair of wrap yarns on the said cylinder needle, and means at the other of said stations to knit only the other of the pair of Wrap yarns on said cylinder needle and not to knit on the remaining cylinder needles.
References Cited in the file of this patent Levin Apr. 25, 1939.
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* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2774233A (en) * 1952-07-12 1956-12-18 Lombardi Vincent Knitted terry fabrics
US3142164A (en) * 1960-08-08 1964-07-28 Renfro Hosiery Mills Inc Knit ornamented fabric
DE2524827A1 (en) * 1974-06-12 1976-01-02 Giovanni Bessi TEXTILE MACHINE FOR THE MANUFACTURE OF MESH

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US1666784A (en) * 1927-05-28 1928-04-17 Fidelity Machine Co Vertical striper for wide-circular-rib-knitting machines
US1907185A (en) * 1931-05-29 1933-05-02 Brinton Company H Knitting machine and method of knitting
US1910717A (en) * 1930-09-04 1933-05-23 W B Davis & Son Vertical striper for circular ribbed knitting machines
US1936024A (en) * 1931-05-29 1933-11-21 Brinton Company H Tubular rib fabric
US1993248A (en) * 1930-07-22 1935-03-05 Brinton Company H Rib knitting machine
US2156185A (en) * 1930-04-26 1939-04-25 Brinton Company H Knitting machine

Patent Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1666784A (en) * 1927-05-28 1928-04-17 Fidelity Machine Co Vertical striper for wide-circular-rib-knitting machines
US2156185A (en) * 1930-04-26 1939-04-25 Brinton Company H Knitting machine
US1993248A (en) * 1930-07-22 1935-03-05 Brinton Company H Rib knitting machine
US1910717A (en) * 1930-09-04 1933-05-23 W B Davis & Son Vertical striper for circular ribbed knitting machines
US1907185A (en) * 1931-05-29 1933-05-02 Brinton Company H Knitting machine and method of knitting
US1936024A (en) * 1931-05-29 1933-11-21 Brinton Company H Tubular rib fabric

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2774233A (en) * 1952-07-12 1956-12-18 Lombardi Vincent Knitted terry fabrics
US3142164A (en) * 1960-08-08 1964-07-28 Renfro Hosiery Mills Inc Knit ornamented fabric
DE2524827A1 (en) * 1974-06-12 1976-01-02 Giovanni Bessi TEXTILE MACHINE FOR THE MANUFACTURE OF MESH

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