US2679161A - Depth progress recording apparatus for wells - Google Patents

Depth progress recording apparatus for wells Download PDF

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US2679161A
US2679161A US125291A US12529149A US2679161A US 2679161 A US2679161 A US 2679161A US 125291 A US125291 A US 125291A US 12529149 A US12529149 A US 12529149A US 2679161 A US2679161 A US 2679161A
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tape
drilling
movement
arm
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Jesse E Yancey
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Jesse E Yancey
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B45/00Measuring the drilling time or rate of penetration

Description

May Z5, 1954 J. E. YANCEY DEPTH PRoGREss RECORDING APPARATUS FOR wELLs 4 Sheets-Sheet l Filed Nov. 3, 1949 May 25, 1954 .1. E. YANcEY K 2,679,161
DEPTH PROGRESS RECORDING APPARATUS FOR WELLS Filed Nov. 3, 1949 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 A TTRNEK May 25, 1954 J. E. YANCEY 2,679,161
DEPTH PROGRESS RECORDING APPARATUS FOR WELLS Filed Nov. 5, 1949 y 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 E JNVENToR.
Jesse 5 )/zcey ff A May 25, 1954 J. E. YANCEY 2,679,161
DEPTH PROGRESS RECORDING APPARATUS FOR WELLS Filed Nov. s, 1949 4 sheets-sheet 4 INVENToR. EL?. 9. Je sse .E Va/:'q/
I i ATTORNEY.
Patented May 25, 1954 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE DEPTH PROGRESS RECORDING APPARATUSl FOR WELLS 10 Claims.
l This invention relates to an instrument particularly adapted for use in the drilling of oil wells for recording the progress of the drilling operations whereby to indicate the s eed of drilling, the character of the earthen ormations through which the drilling takes place; the number of feet drilled within a given period of time; and the time spent in servicing the drilling equip- :f ment and other activities necessitating temporary Y cessation of actual drilling operations.
It is the primary object of the present invention to provide a recording device capable of indicating the above information and including a clock-driven tape provided with a stylus swingably mounted for movement with respect to the path of travel of the tape, there being structure operably interconnecting the stylus and the well drilling equipment for imparting swinging movement to the stylus each time the drilling assembly descends a predetermined distance whereby to indicate on the tape the number of feet drilled in any given period of time.
Another important object of the present invention is to provide structure as above set forth and including limiting or control means for the swinging movement of the stylus for marking the tape to render the same easily read by showing through marks of diifering lengths, each foot of drilling, each two foot descent of the drilling assembly and each ten foot progress during a given period of time as determined by the speed of A movement of the tape.
Another important object of the present invention is to provide a recorder wherein the stylus is mounted for a secondary swinging movement or indicating on the chart each time the drill is moved from the bottom of the well by lines marked on the tape on one side of the aforesaid footage marks, all movements of the stylus with;v respect to the tape being automatic and without the necessity of operator attention.
A further object of the present invention is to provide a rotatable member operably interconnected with the well drilling equipment for rotative movement in accordance with the extent of downward movement of the drilling bit, such rotative member being provided with structure to periodically close an electric circuit having a sole-1y noid or like prime mover therein for actuating the stylus and indicating on the advancing tape the",l fact that the rotative member has progressed a specified distance.
A still further object of the present invention is to provide a novel clutching arrangement so formed as to automatically become inoperable from the standpoint of actuating the stylus to indicate drilling progress, the clutch having parts associated therewith for energizing another electrical circuit also provided with an electric prime mover for swinging the stylus in an altogether differing manner whereby to indicate on the chart that the drilling assembly has been moved from the bottom of the well toward a fully withdrawn position with respect thereto.
Other objects of the present invention include the way in which the prime movers for the stylus are controlled for momentary energization; the way in which the stylus is locked on one side of a main indicating line on the tape while the drillinfr assembly is in an inoperative position; the
way in which manual control means is provided for releasing the locking assembly when the drilling operation is resumed; the manner of providing a specially formed combination rotatable cam and ratchet assembly for controlling the swinging movement of the stylus during normal operation; and the way in which a pair of stops or limiting means is provided in connection with the cam to produce the desired markings on the tape as alcove set forth.
Many other more minor objects including details of construction will be made clear or become apparent as the following specification progresses, reference being had to the. accompanying drawings, wherein:
Fig. 1 is a top plan view, parts being broken away showing the stylus and tape assembly of a depth progress recording apparatus for wells made in accordance with the present invention.
Fig. 2 is a vertical, cross-sectional view taken on line II-II of Fig. 1 looking in the direction of the arrows.
Fig. 3 is an enlarged, detailed, fragmentary, cross-sectional view taken on line III- Ill of Fig. 2.
Fig. 4 is a fragmentary, detailed, cross-sectional View taken on line IV-IV of Fig. 3.
Fig. 5 is a view partially in section and partially in elevation showing the stylus control assembly forming a part of the recorder and adapted for operable connection with the well drilling equipment.
Fig. 6 is a transverse, cross-sectional view taken on line VI-VI of Fig. 5 looking in the direction of the arrows.
Fig. 7 is a vertical, cross-sectional view taken on irregular line VII-VII of Fig. 6 looking in the direction of the arrows.
Fig. 8 is a substantially central, vertical, crosssectional view through a piston-type switch actuating mechanism forming a part of the stylus control.
Fig. 9 is a transverse, detailed, cross-sectional view taken on line IX-IX of Fig. 8; and
Fig. 10 is a wiring diagram showing the electrica-l components of the recorder.
Those skilled in this field are well aware of the imminent need for an accurate and satisfactory automatic recording means capable of logging the formations penetrated particularly in the rotary method of sinking wells where it is difficult to obtain accuracy through conventional method such as coring of the formations. Furthermore, a progress report from day to day is extremely desirable, that will not only indicate the speed at which drilling takes place, but the time consumed in progressing a predetermined distance, which, of course, depends on many factors including the nature of the formations as well as time consumed in repair, servicing and other activities as a consequence of the well drilling operation itself.
While instruments have heretofore been developed capable of indicating such progress, such instruments have not been entirely satisfactory from the standpoint of accuracy and furthermore, have been incapable of recording all of the data that is needed and desired.
The instrument about to be described is entirely automatic and will record all of the aforesaid data for each full days operation and present a permanent record for the well from the beginning of the drilling thereof until such time as the same is complete and ready for pumping.
The recorder hereof is adapted for the automatic operation and actuation by the well drilling equipment and can easily be coupled therewith in the conventional manner. As is known, such equipment (not shown) includes a derrick having a platform for supporting the usual drilling apparatus having rotary motion imparted thereto through a drive stem or Kelly joint. The derrick has a crown block provided with a plurality of sheaves at the uppermost end thereof and the derrick also supports a hoisting reel and a traveling block, all operably connected with the drill stem for controlling the reciprocable movement thereof.
As rotary movement is imparted to the drilling string that is suspended by tackle construction and swivel means, such string and the bit thereon are permitted to descend within the well in accordance with the progress of the bit. The control assembly of the instant recorder illustrated in Figs. 5 to 9 inclusive, is adapted for operable connection with such drilling equipment in any suitable conventional manner not shown.
A housing, broadly designated by the numeral I2, has a horizontal shaft I4 journaled therein, shaft I4 being provided with a sheave I6. Rotative movement is imparted to the sheave I6 and consequently to the shaft I4 by means of a cable I8 trained therearound and as aforesaid, attached to the well drilling assembly.
As the drilling string descends within the well, sheave I6 is rotated in the direction indicated by the arrow in Fig. 7 and manifestly, as such drilling string is elevated to move the bit thereof from its normal operating position at the bottom of the well, rotative movement is imparted to sheave I6, through cable I8 in a direction opposite to the arrow shown in Fig. 7.
A clutching assembly within the housing I2 is provided on shaft I4 and includes a wheel 26 provided with a bearing 22 for rotatably mounting wheel 20 on shaft I4, bearing 22 having a bushing 24 reciprocable longitudinally on shaft I4.
Wheel 20 is provided with a disc 26 rigidly secured to the normally innermost face thereof and made from any suitable non-conductive, frictional material such as cork. A secondary wheel 28 provided with a bearing 38 for mounting the same on shaft I4 and for rotation with respect thereto, is disposed adjacent the disc 26.
Wheel 28 is formed from a non-conducting material and is provided with a band 32 forming the circumference thereof made from brass or other electrical conductor.
A spring 34 coiled about the shaft I4 and held in place by a nut 36 on shaft I4, bears against the outermost end of bushing 24 and normally holds wheels 20 and 28 biased inwardly with the bearing 30 of wheel 28 against an enlarged boss 38 forming a part of shaft I4. Boss 38 of shaft I4 is provided with an outwardly extending radial pin 40 disposed to contact either of a pair of diametrically opposed outwardly extending pins 42 and 44 mounted on the wheel 28 as the shaft I4 rotates relative to the wheel 28. Pin 44 is connected with the metallic band 32 by means of a conductor 46.
A metallic spring 48 mounted on a bracket 56 within case I2 is biased in wiping engagement with the metallic band 32- and coupled within the electric circuit illustrated in Fig. 10 by a wire 52 joined with an electric switch 54. Corresponding indicating numerals have been used in Fig. 10, but further explanation of the wiring diagram of Fig. 10 will hereinafter appear.
A cam member 56 is mounted on the periphery of the wheel 28 and, as illustrated in Fig. 'l of the drawings, the member 56 is provided with a radial leg 58 and an integral tangential leg 60. An elongated, vertical arm 62 is pivotally mounted for swinging movement on a horizontal axis at 64, arm 62 being provided with a flange 66 adjacent its lowermost end. The uppermost end of the flange 66 is within the path of travel of the cam member 56 and as the wheel 20 rotates in the direction shown by the arrow in Fig. 7, cam 56 will move the arm 62 on pivot 64 to the position shown by dotted lines in Fig. 7. The lowermost end of the arm 62 is bifurcated for slidably receiving a horizontally reciprocable shaft 68 having a head III on one end thereof. Consequently, as the arm 62 swings to the dotted line position shown in Fig. 7, shaft 68 will be moved to the dotted line position thereof.
A spring 'I2 coiled about the shaft 68 is interposed between a bracket 'I4 for reciprocably mounting shaft 68 and a collar 'I6 on shaft 68 for yieldably holding the shaft 68 and the arm 62 biased in the normal position shown by full lines in Fig. 7. Bracket 14 secured to the innermost face of the bottom wall of case I2 also mounts a cylinder I8 having the ends thereof open and one end provided with a stop 80.
A cylindrical cup 82 is reciprocably mounted within the cylinder` 'I8 and extends beyond the An air leakage port 88 is provided in the cup 82 adjacent the outermost end thereof.
It is clear that as the arm 62 is swung to the dotted line position shown in Fig. 7, shaft 68 and its piston 86 will likewise be moved to the dotted line position shown in Fig. 7 Movement of the cup 82 however, in such direction is limited by the stop 80 on cylinder 18. As soon as the cam member 56 moves upwardly to clear the uppermost end of the ange 66, arm 62 will return to the normal position shown by full lines in Fig. '7 under inuence of the spring 12 and such quick snap-like return movement of arm 62 and the shaft 68, will cause movement of the cup 82 away from the stop 80 because of the air within the cup 82 drawn thereinto by piston 86 through port 88. Cup 82 will immediately return toward the stop 80 as such air escapes from the port 88 until the stop 88 is reached.
Cup 82 serves to close a normally open switch 90 by its end wall 84 engaging plunger 92 of switch 90 as cup 82 is forced away from the Stop 80. Consequently, switch 90 is held closed only momentarily by the cup 82 and as the latter returns to the normal position within cylinder 18, spring-loaded plunger 92 will automatically reopen switch 90. Normal rotative motion is imparted to the wheel 20 and its cam 56 to actuate switch 90 as just above described, by rotation of sheave I6 and shaft |4 as the bit of the well drilling assembly progresses downwardly.
It is contemplated that sheave I6 and the wheel 20 rotate one revolution for each foot of downward movement of the drilling bit, consequently switch 90 will be closed each and every time such progress is made. Spring 34 on shaft I4, holding the disc 26 and the wheel 28 in frictional engagement, causes shaft I4 to impart rotative movement to both wheels 20 and 28 when pin 40 contacts pin 42. When however, the sheave I6 and shaft I4 rotate in the direction opposite to the arrow in Fig. 7, pin 40 will be moved into contacting relationship with the pin 44, thereby closing an electric circuit through a pair of solenoids 94 and 96 mounted upon one vertical end wall of the case I2 in attracting relationship to the outermost face of the metallic wheel 20. When the solenoids 94 and 96 are thus energized to attract wheel 20, the latter will move longitudinally with respect to the shaft I4 against the action of spring 34, thereby moving the gripping disc 26 out of engagement with the proximal face of the wheel 28. Continued rotation of the sheave I6 and shaft I4 in such direction will continue to rotate wheel 28 by virtue of pin 40 engaging pin 44, but such counter-rotative move- 54, it being noted in Fig. 5 that the plunger |04 contacts the uppermost face of arm 98. The wheel 20 is unlocked and permitted to return to the normal operating position shown in Figs. 5 and 6 and the switch 54 is closed through the medium of energization of a solenoid |66 mounted within the case I2 above a transverse metallic attracting plate |08 on the arm 98.
The assembly of parts of the recorder that is controlled by the mechanisms just above described, is illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2 of the drawing and further in detail, by Figs. 3 and 4.
A hollow, open top housing ||0 is provided with an elongated, substantially horizontal at table II2 extending longitudinally thereof adjacent its open top, table II2 being supported by a number of brackets II4 secured to one side wall of the housing ||0.
A strip of tape ||6 is coiled upon a reel II8 rotatably mounted on upstanding brackets |20 on the bottom wall of housingl |I0 below table II2. Tape ||6 is threaded upwardly from the reel ||8 about a horizontally rotatable drum |22 adjacent one end of table II2. From drum |22, tape I I6 is extended across the uppermost surface of the table II2 and thence downwardly along an apron |24 at the opposite end of table II2.
A hollow cylinder |26 suitably mounted within the housing I0 below the table I I2 and adjacent the apron |24, has an opening |28 for receiving the tape II6 as the same is advanced along the table II2 in the direction indicated by the arrow in Fig. 1. The tape I|6 is automatically formed into a roll within the cylinder |26 as indicated in Fig. 2.
A suitable clock or other timing mechanism of conventionalv character and designated by the numeral |30, is rigidly mounted within the housing I|0 with its drive shaft |32 parallel with the ment of the wheel 28 will have no effect upon the retracted wheel 20.
A resilient locking arm 98 mounted at one end thereof immediately below the switch 54, is normally biased against the circumference of wheel 20 as indicated in Fig. 5 and as the wheel 20 is retracted toward the nut 36 by solenoids 94 and 96, arm 98 automatically drops to a position riding upon a circumferential portion |00 of reduced diameter and forming a part of the wheel 20. Such portion|00 presents an annular shoulder |02 facing inwardly and as solenoids 94 and 96 are de-energized, return movement of the wheel 20 under influence of the spring 34 toward the wheel 28, is limited by shoulder |02, contacting the proximal outermost free end of the arm 98. Such movement of arm 98 also causes opening of the switch 54 by permitting downward movement of spring-loaded plunger |04 of switch axis of rotation of drum |22.
A train of gears (not shown) interconnects the drive shaft |32 of timing mechanism |30 with the drum |22 and as drum |22 is thus caused to rotate, tape II6 is advanced along the table II2 by virtue of sprockets |34 on drum |22 and corresponding marginal rows of perforations |36 formed in the tape IIS. The tape ||6 is held taut on the table II2 through the medium of a frictional roller |38 rotatably mounted in the cylinder |26 and in a position to hold the tape I I6 against the cylinder |26 adjacent inlet opening |28.
Roller |38 is driven by the drum |22 through the medium of an endless belt |40, trained about a pulley |42 on drum |22, a pulley |44 on roller |38 and an idler pulley |46 mounted within the case ||0 below table II2 to hold belt |40 in a tight condition.
A plurality of standards |48 mounted on the bottom wall of housing IIO, carry a horizontal plate |50 on the uppermost end thereof and disposed beneath the table II2 adjacent apron |24. Plate |50 mounts a pair of solenoids |52 and |54 together with a substantially Z-shaped member |56 by means of a. pivotal connection |58. Member |56 extends outwardly in a horizontal plane from the bracket |50 and swings on its vertical axis |58 in spaced relationship below the table II2.
Member |56 carries a solenoid |60 adjacent the outermost free end thereof remote from pivot point |58, together with a relatively short metallic arm |62`pivotally secured to the member |56 intermediate its ends as at |64.
An elongated stylus |66 is adjustably secured to the arm |62 on one side of the pivot point |64, the outermost free end of the stylus |66 being in constant marking engagement with the uppermost face of tape ||6. Stylus |66 and the arm |62 are held biased toward one end of their swinging paths of travel by a spring |68 interconnecting the stylus |66 and the member |56.
A substantially J-shaped rod |10, a screw |12 and a spring member |14 are all adjustably mounted on the arm |62 adjacent that end thereof opposite to stylus |66 and all extend in the same direction toward the member |56.
A cam member |16, detailed in Figs. 3 and 4, is rotatably mounted upon the member |56. Cam member |16 has an annular row of ratchet teeth |18 thereon in alignment with the spring member |14, a row of indentations |80, there being five of such indentations |80 illustrated and in alignment with the screw |12, and a single indentation |82 between the teeth |18 and the indentations |80 in alignment with the J-shaped rod |10. As shown in Fig. 3 of the drawings, the single indentation |82 for the J-shaped rod |10, is aligned with one of the five indentations |80. It is noted in Fig. 3 that the indentation |82 is a continuation of one of the indentations |80 and that it extends therefrom, toward the teeth |18, in alignment with the rod |10. All of the indentations |80 and |82 are provided with flat chord-like bottom walls as shown in Fig. 4 of the drawing. The spring member |14 is biased against the teeth |18 and serves to impart rotative movement to the cam member |16 when the arm |62 is swung in one direction toward the cam |16. A second spring member |84 on the member |56 is also biased against the teeth |18 and serves to prevent counter-rotative movement of the cam |16.
Swinging movement is imparted to the member |56 on its pivot point |58 by energization of the solenoid |52. Solenoid |52 attracts a metallic plate |86 secured to that end of the member |56 adjacent pivot point |58. When plate |86 is thus attracted by solenoid |52 to swing the member |56, a latch |88 pivotally mounted upon the uppermost end of a standard |90 is swung to an operative position by spring |92 interconnecting the member |56 and the latch |88` As soon as solenoid |52 is de-energized, spring |92 serves to swing member |56 back toward the normal position shown in Fig. 1 but such return movement is limited by virtue of a stop |94 adjustably mounted on the member |56 in a position to contact the proximal end of latch |88.
Metallic latch member |88 is released from such locked position with respect to the member |56 by energization of the solenoid |54 to attract latch |68 and withdraw the same from its interlocked position with respect to the stop |94.
Solenoids 94, 96, |06, |52, |54 and |60 may all be energized through a suitable source of electrical energy |96, the entire electrical circuit shown in Fig. being initially placed in condition ready for use by closing of manual switch |98. It is seen in Fig. 10 that the solenoid |60 is energized upon closing of the switch 90 and that solenoids 94 and 96 are energized simultaneously upon closing of the switch that includes pins 40 and 44, it being remembered that switch 54 is normally in the closed position shown in Fig. 10. Interengagement of the contact points 40 and 44 also energizes the solenoid |52 simultaneously with the energization of solenoids 94 and 96.
Solenoids |06 and |54 are in a separate circuit and are energized simultaneously through the medium of a manual switch 200. It is also to be noted in Fig. 10 that solenoids 94, 96 and |52 may be energized as desired by the operator irrespective of the condition of contact points 40 and 44 by the closing of a third manual switch 202.
Assuming the well drilling structure to be in an operating condition with the drilling string lowered into the well and with the bit thereof at the lowermost end thereof, the operation of the recorder above described is as follows:
Tape ||6 moving at a constant speed and being driven by the timing mechanism |30, has a 1ongitudinal, rectilinear line 204 marked thereon by the stylus |66. Inasmuch as the wheels 2l and 28 are held operably interengaged by the spring 34, downward movement of the drilling string and its bit will progressively rotate the shaft I4, the wheels 20 and 28 and the cam member 56 in the direction of the arrow in Fig. 7. As soon as the bit of the drilling assembly has descended one foot, wheel 20 will have rotated a complete revolution, bringing the cam 56 into operative engagement with the arm 62. Arm 62 will, as above described, actuate the shaft 68 and the cup 82 as cam 56 moves to a position clearing flange 68 and the switch 90 will thereby be momentarily closed.
Referring therefore, to Fig. 10, it is seen that solenoid |60 will accordingly be energized for only a moment and referring next to Fig. 1, it is seen that energization of the solenoid |60 will attract the metallic arm |62. As arm |62 is thus moved toward the solenoid |60 and swings on pivot point |64, the stylus |66 will be shifted or swung with respect to the path of travel of the tape ||6. A relatively short oblique mark 206 will then appear upon the tape ||6 extending to one side of the rectilinear line 204.
As soon as solenoid |60 is de-energized, spring |68 will return the arm |62 and the stylus |66 to the normal position where stylus |66 is again in a position to mark the line 204. Each time the arm |62 is thus swung by solenoid |60, the spring |14 in engagement with the teeth |18 of cam |16, will impart rotative movement to cam |16. Such step-by-step movement of the cam |16 continues and inasmuch as ten teeth |18 are provided on the cam |16, the latter will rotate a complete revolution each time the drilling bit has progressed ten feet.
The extent of movement of the arm |62 toward the solenoid |60 is governed by the screw |12 coming into contact with the cam member |16, and therefore, the cam member |16 operates as stop means within the path of travel of stylus |66 to limit the extent of swinging move'- ment of stylus |16 in both directions. Since cam member |16 rotates, the extent of movement of stylus |16 is varied. If the cam member |16 is in a position when arm |62 is swung to receive the proximal end of screw |12 at a point thereon between the annular row of indentations |80, then the oblique line 206 will appear on the tape ||6. If however, cam |16 is in a position to receive the screw |12 by the latter moving into one of the five indentations |80, then obviously, arm |62 will move closer to the energized solenoid |60 and the extent of travel of stylus |66 will be greater. During such movement of the arm |62 and stylus |66, longer oblique lines 208 will be marked on tape ||6 by stylus |66.
Cam |16 is so formed as to cause the presentation of alternate indicating markings 206 and 208 on the tape ||6 since the indentations |80 are equally spaced around the cam member |16 and the flat bottom wall thereof is substantially the same as the distance between the indentations |80. Outward swinging movement of the arm |62 away from the de-energized solenoid |60 under influence of the spring |68, is limited by the J-shaped rod having its outermost free end normally in contact with the cam member |16 in alignment with the indentation |82. Consequently, whenever cam |16 is in a position with the indentation |82, aligned with rod |10, arm |62 will swing a greater distance outwardly when solenoid |60 is de-energized.
Such operation will cause the stylus |66 to override to the side of line 204 opposite to indicating marks 206 and 208. Thereafter, while the sheave I6 is revolving for an additional cycle, stylus |66 will produce a relatively short straight line 2I0 parallel with the line 204. Inasmuch as only one indentation |82 is provided on the cam |16, and further because of the fact that cam |16 completes one revolution for each ten feet, the lines 2 I 0 will indicate each ten feet of drilling.
In reading the charted tape II6 therefore, it is seen that the number of feet drilled in a given period of time can easily and quickly be determined by counting the number of markings 2I0, each indicating a ten foot descent of the drilling bit. Between the ten foot indications 2|0, each two feet may be counted by virtue of the marks 208 and each one foot of progress is indicated by the marks 206.
Such operation continues as long as the drilling bit remains at the bottom of the well in an operating condition. If however, such bit is withdrawn from the bottom of the well to impart a counter-rotative motion to the sheave I6, then the pin 40 will move from its engaged position with respect to the pin 42 until the same comes into contact with the electrical contact pin 44. As soon as such electrical connection is established, the circuit is closed through solenoids 94, 96 and |52 because of the fact that switch 54 is still in the normally closed position.
Immediately upon the energization of solenoids 94 and 96, wheel 20 will be attracted against spring 34 moving the same out of frictional contact with the wheel 28 and thereby stopping further rotative movement of wheel 20. As soon as wheel '20 clears the spring member 98, the latter will snap into place upon the annular portion |00 and the switch 54 will be opened.
Opening of the switch 54 as seen in Fig. 10., deenergizes solenoid 94 and 06 which releases the wheel 20 whereupon spring 34 moves Wheel 20 toward the wheel 28 until the same is stopped by the spring member 98 contacting the annular shoulder |02.
During the time that the drilling string is being retracted and the sheave I6 consequently rotated in a direction counter to its normal rotative movement, contact points 40 and 44 will remain closed and solenoid |52 will continue to be energized. As solenoid |52 attracts plate |86 to swing the member |56, stylus |66 will again be moved to a position on the tape II6 on one side of line 204 opposite to markings 206 and 208. Until such time as the drilling string is again lowered, stylus |66 will produce a straight mark 2 I2 on the tape I I6 parallel with the lines 204 and 2I0, the line 2|2 being spaced further from line 204 than that of line '2|0.
As soon as the drilling string is lowered, pin 40 will move away from the pin 44 to break the circuit through solenoid |52, whereupon vspring |92 will retract member |56 until the stop I 94 comes into contact with latch |88. Since stylus |66 moves only part of its way back toward the line 204, another straight line 2 I4 will be formed on the tape I6 in parallelism with the line 204, but spaced therefrom. If the drilling string is again raised before reaching the bottom of the well, another line 2I6 comparable to line 2|2 will be formed on the tape II6. When the operator again lowers the drilling string and decides to permit the bit thereof to return to an operative position at the bottom of the well, switch 200 is closed to energize solenoids |06 and |54. Energization of the solenoid |54 Will release the latch |88 and the stylus |66 will return to the normal position for marking line 204.
Energization of the solenoid |06 by closing of the switch 200 will attract the arm 98 and release the wheel 20, whereupon switch 200 is again opened and operation is continued. In the event the operator lowers the drilling string only partially and thereupon decides to continue such lowering of the same to the full operative position without again raising the same to the fully raised position, such operation will be indicated by a diagram 2I8 on the tape II6.
It is clear from the foregoing that the distance between the alternate markings 206 and '208 indicate the time consumed in drilling each foot and obviously, as such distances are increased, diiiiculty in drilling is indicated whether the same is caused by relatively hard formations or for other reasons. The lines 2| 2, 2|4 and 2I6, as Well as the diagram 2 I8, will indicate immediately each and every period of inoperation and the time consumed thereby.
It is clear that the entire recorder is automatic and requires very little operator attention, for as long as the drilling apparatus is in operation, lines 204, 206, 268 and 2|0 will be automatically marked upon the moving tape I I6. The only time the operator must attend to the recorder is after withdrawal of the drilling string and such attention will constitute merely the closing and opening of the manual switch 200.
Having thus described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:
1. In a recorder, tape advancing mechanism; a swingable member; a stylus swingable on the member and in engagement with said tape; a prime mover for said member and for said stylus respectively; a rotatable assembly; structure operably connected with said assembly for energizing the prime mover for said stylus upon a predetermined number of cycles of rotation of said assembly in one direction; and apparatus operably connected with said assembly for energizing the prime mover forI said member upon rotation of said assembly in the opposite direction.
2. In a recorder, tape advancing mechanism; a swingable member; a stylus swingable on the member and in engagement with said tape; a prime mover for said member and for said stylus respectively; a rotatable assembly; structure operably connected with said assembly for energizing the prime mover for said stylus upon a predetermined number of cycles of rotation of said assembly in one direction; and apparatus operably connected with said assembly for energizing the prime mover for said member upon rotation of said assembly in the opposite direction, said prime mover for the stylus being disposed to swing the stylus in a direction with respect to the tape opposite from the direction of swinging movement of said member by its prime mover with respectl to the tape.
3. In a recorder, tape advancing mechanism; a swingable member; a stylus swingable on the member and in engagement with said tape; a prime mover for said member and for said stylus respectively; a rotatable assembly; structure operably connected with said assembly for energizing the prime mover for said stylus upon a predetermined number of cycles of rotation of said assembly in one direction; apparatus operably connected with said assembly for energizing the prime mover for said member upon rotation of said assembly in the opposite direction; and releasable means for limiting the extent of return movement of said member on de-energization of its prime mover.
4. In well drilling equipment having a reciprocable drilling string, a recorder including a rotatable member adapted for connection with and rotation by said drilling string in opp-osite directions as said string is reciprocated; an electric circuit having a switch; an element mounted for rotation by said member for closing said switch upon a predetermined number of cycles of rotation of said member in one direction; marking structure having a movable stylus provided with an electric prime mover in said circuit whereby movement is imparted to the stylus upon each closing of the switch, said element being releasably connected with said member; means for releasing said element upon rotation of the member in the opposite direction; means for swinging said stylus separate from said rst-mentioned movement thereof; and mechanism operably interconnecting said member and said last-mentioned means for swinging the stylus as the member rotates in said opposite direction.
5. A recorder comprising mechanism for continuously advancing a tape at a constant speed; shiftable apparatus having a stylus in marking engagement with said tape; structure for shifting said apparatus in one direction with respect to the path of travel of said tape; a movable member; means operably connected with said member for actuation thereby and coupled with said structure for motivating the latter upon each movement of said member a predetermined distance; means connected with said apparatus for yieldably holding the same biased in the opposite direction; a movable element having stop means within the path of travel of said apparatus in each direction respectively; and means operaably interconnecting said apparatus and said element for moving the latter as the apparatus shifts whereby to move the stop means and thereby vary the extent of shifting movement of the apparatus from one end of its path of travel to the opposite end thereof.
6. A recorder for drilling equipment comprising mechanism for continuously advancing an elongated tape at a predetermined, constant speed on its longitudinal axis; a swingable arm; a stylus mounted on the arm in marking engagement with the tape for swinging movement transversely of the tape; an elongated member on the arm; a rotatable cam having a circumferential surface within the path of travel of the member as said arm is swung in one direction, there being a number of equally spaced indentations in said surface of the cam; means on the arm for stepping the cam each time the arm is swung whereby to alternately dispose the indentations for engagement by the member and thereby vary the extent of swinging movement of the arm; electrical means for swinging the arm, the stylus and. the member as a unit in one direction; means coupled with the stylus for swinging the same in the opposite direction; an electric circuit for said electrical means; a normally open switch in said circuit; rotatable structure operably coupled with said equipment for rotation thereby in one direction as the drilling bit thereof is advanced; and means mounted on said structure for periodic engagement with the switch as the structure is rotated to close the switch and thereby swing the stylus in said one direction.
7. A recorder for drilling equipment comprising mechanism for continuously advancing an elongated tape at a predetermined, constant speed on its longitudinal axis; a stylus in marking engagement with the tape and mounted for swinging movement transversely of the tape; electrical means for swinging the stylus in one direction; means coupled with the stylus for swinging the same in the opposite direction; an electric circuit for said electrical means; a normally open switch in said circuit; rotatable structure operably coupled with said equipment for rotation thereby in one direction as the drilling bit thereof is advanced; and means mounted on said structure for periodic engagement with the switch as the structure is rotated to close the switch and thereby swing the stylus in said one direction, there being a movable member for limiting the extent of swinging movement of the stylus in said one direction, and means coupling the stylus with said member for moving the latter each time the stylus is swung by said electrical means, whereby to vary the extent of swinging movement of the stylus.
8. A recorder as set forth in claim 7, wherein is provided a rotatable cam member having a plurality of circumferentially-arranged indentations, an element mounted on the stylus for movement toward and away from the member as the stylus is swung, and means on the stylus for stepping the cam member each time the stylus is swung, to alternately dispose the indentations within the path of said element, whereby to vary the extent of swinging movement of the stylus.
9. A recorder comprising mechanism for continuously advancing a tape at a. constant speed; shiftable apparatus having a stylus in marking engagement with said tape; structure for shifting said apparatus in one direction with respect to the path of travel of said tape; a movable member; means operably connected with said member for actuation thereby, and coupled with said structure for motivating the latter upon each movement of said member, a predetermined distance; stop means within the path of travel of said apparatus, said stop means being movable to vary the extent of shifting movement of the apparatus in said one direction; and means operably connecting said apparatus and the stop means for moving the latter upon each shifting movement of the apparatus.
10. A recorder comprising mechanism for continuously advancing a tape at a constant speed; shiftable apparatus having a stylus in marking engagement with said tape; structure for shifting said apparatus in one direction with respect to the path of travel of said tape; a movable member; means operably connected with said member for actuation thereby, and coupled with said structure for motivating the latter upon each movement of said member a predetermined distance; movable stop means within the path of travel of said apparatus for limiting,` the extent of shifting movement thereof, in said. one direction; and means operably interconnecting said apparatus and said stop means, for moving the latter as the apparatus shifts, whereby to vary said extent of shifting movement of the apparatus.
References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,222,502 Wiley Apr. 10, 1917 1,322,148 Sprague Nov. 18, 1919 1,404,580 Choppinet et a1. Jan. 24, 1922 Number 14 Name Date Frazer Feb. 19, 1924 Williams Apr. 25, 1933 Ferguson July 18, 1933 Nichols June 30, 1942 Keeler Dec. 8, 1942 Hayward Aug. 10, 1943 Sikes, Jr Sept. 28, 1943 McLaine Aug. 29, 1944 Silverman Dec. 12, 1944 Rutherford Dec. 4, 1945 Ericsson Oct. 22, 1946 Crookston Aug. 28, 1951
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Cited By (13)

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US2831347A (en) * 1954-08-23 1958-04-22 Drillograph Company Inc Apparatus for recording drilling operations
US2883256A (en) * 1955-02-24 1959-04-21 Geolograph Co Depth recorder
US2935871A (en) * 1956-04-10 1960-05-10 Geolograph Service Corp Well logging apparatus
US2974523A (en) * 1953-11-12 1961-03-14 Star Recorder Corp Depth and operation recorder for earth bore drilling rigs
US2980486A (en) * 1956-04-05 1961-04-18 Geolograph Co Recorder
US3005525A (en) * 1957-09-30 1961-10-24 Geotex Corp Recording apparatus clutch for earth bore drilling equipment
US3076966A (en) * 1957-10-07 1963-02-05 Technical Oil Tool Corp Ltd Rate of penetration and weight recorder
US3125399A (en) * 1964-03-17 Figure
US3159448A (en) * 1956-03-07 1964-12-01 Star Recorder Corp Of Denver Recording apparatus for use with well drilling equipment
US3180548A (en) * 1962-10-23 1965-04-27 Schlumberger Well Surv Corp Film tensioning apparatus
US3216019A (en) * 1963-02-20 1965-11-02 Geolograph Co Operations recorder
US3381383A (en) * 1966-04-29 1968-05-07 Racine Hydraulics & Machinery Track gauger
US3739888A (en) * 1972-01-31 1973-06-19 Technical Oil Tool Corp Apparatus for driving a recording instrument

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US3125399A (en) * 1964-03-17 Figure
US2974523A (en) * 1953-11-12 1961-03-14 Star Recorder Corp Depth and operation recorder for earth bore drilling rigs
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US2883256A (en) * 1955-02-24 1959-04-21 Geolograph Co Depth recorder
US3159448A (en) * 1956-03-07 1964-12-01 Star Recorder Corp Of Denver Recording apparatus for use with well drilling equipment
US2980486A (en) * 1956-04-05 1961-04-18 Geolograph Co Recorder
US2935871A (en) * 1956-04-10 1960-05-10 Geolograph Service Corp Well logging apparatus
US3005525A (en) * 1957-09-30 1961-10-24 Geotex Corp Recording apparatus clutch for earth bore drilling equipment
US3076966A (en) * 1957-10-07 1963-02-05 Technical Oil Tool Corp Ltd Rate of penetration and weight recorder
US3180548A (en) * 1962-10-23 1965-04-27 Schlumberger Well Surv Corp Film tensioning apparatus
US3216019A (en) * 1963-02-20 1965-11-02 Geolograph Co Operations recorder
US3381383A (en) * 1966-04-29 1968-05-07 Racine Hydraulics & Machinery Track gauger
US3739888A (en) * 1972-01-31 1973-06-19 Technical Oil Tool Corp Apparatus for driving a recording instrument

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