US2390178A - Drilling rate recorder - Google Patents

Drilling rate recorder Download PDF

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Publication number
US2390178A
US2390178A US399082A US39908241A US2390178A US 2390178 A US2390178 A US 2390178A US 399082 A US399082 A US 399082A US 39908241 A US39908241 A US 39908241A US 2390178 A US2390178 A US 2390178A
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Prior art keywords
switch
solenoid
spring
pen
drilling
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US399082A
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Homer M Rutherford
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Homer M Rutherford
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B45/00Measuring the drilling time or rate of penetration

Description

Dec. 4, 1945. H. M. RUTHERFORD DRILLING RATE RECORDER 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 #7192777???" iii emery filli heg bf'd Filed June 21, 1941 1945- H. M. RUTHERFORD DRILLING RATE RECORDER 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed June 21, 1941 Dec. 4, 1945. H. M. RUTHERFORD DRILLING RATE RECORDER Filed June 21-, 1941 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 O O 0 O O O O O O O O O O jvl en 70w f mewm Raf/7e Jay 0644 Dec. 4, 1945. H. M. RUTHERFORD DRILLING RATE RECORDER 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed June 21, 1941 w E w W 1% v, 3 \w\ M .Q/N \K a i RAW HU W N R Dec. 4, 1945. H. M. RUTHERFORD DRILLING RATE RECORDER Filed June 21, 1941 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 PatentedDec. 4, 1945 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFKZE DRILLING RATE RECORDER Homer M. Rutherford, Centralia, 1]]. Application June 21, 1941, Serial No. 399,082
3 Claims.
This invention relates to well logging, and particularly to the production of a log which will indicate the rate of well drilling by which the nature of the successive strata may be determined.
The object of this invention is to provide a log or register indicating the rate at which each unit of the well is drilled, and to provide means therefor which are simple and efficient.
Various specific objects will be apparent from the following detail description, taken in connection with the accompanying drawings.
Fig. 1 is a plan view of apparatus embodying this invention: i
Fig. 2 is section on line 2-2, Fig. 1;
Fig. 3 is a section on line 3-3, Fig. 1;
Fig. 4 is a section on line 4-4, Fig. 1;
Fig. 5 is a section of a log;
Fig. 6 is a circuit diagram; and
Figs. 7 to are views showing devices for automatically controlling the apparatus by theprogress of the drill, Fig. 7 being a diagrammatical view, Fig. 8 a, detail elevational view, Fig. 9 a section on line 9-9, Fig. 8, and Fig. 10 a section on line Ill-I0, Fig. 8.
The invention contemplates the use of a strip of paper I upon which the log is inscribed by a series of parallel equally spaced lines, each line beginning along a marginal line, and each line being of a length proportional to the time required for drilling a unit of the well, for instance a foot. That is to say, the log will show a consecutive series of lines, each representing the time required to drill a particular foot of the well. The inscribed lines will represent respectively the units or feet of the well from top to bottom, and the time consumed in drilling each foot separately. Since the time used in drilling each particular unit, other things being equal, depends upon the hardness of the stratum encountered in that particular unit, such a log will give the trained technician accurate data, concerning the geological structures throughout the well bore.
The device as shown in the drawings includes means for carrying a strip of paper I over a platen 2. The paper is advanced either manually or automatically one space for each unit of depth after the unit has been completed. While that unit is being drilled a pen, or stylus 3, is advanced across the paper, step by step, in the specifically illustrated apparatus, the steps occurring at predetermined time intervals, for instance thirty seconds. As specifically shown the pen will be advanced from right to left, Fig. 1, while the drilling of the unit is progressing, and then when the unit has been completed the pen will be returned in one step the entire distance to the right margin line of the paper strip, and immediately the paper will be advanced one space so that the pen can trace the time consumed in drilling a succeeding unit of depth.
The device is controlled electrically. Having described the general results and functions, the electric circuits by which they are obtained may next be described. The specific construction and operation of the mechanism by which the electrical impulses are utilized to secure the results will appear later in detail. Electric energy is supplied by a battery 4, while a cutout switch 5 is arranged to disconnect the battery when drilling is not in progress. in progress, the switch 5 will be closed, and the circuit will lead through a line 6 to a clock-controlled switch I, then through a line 8, through a relay switch 9, and through a line In to a solenoid ll, whose function is to operate the pen 3 from right to left (Fig. 1), ste by step through mechanical apparatus which will be described later in detail, and which is shown in Figs. 1 and 4.
As specifically shown the switch I is closed once every thirty seconds, by means of pins l2 on a minute wheel l3. That is to say, the minute wheel I3 is rotated completely once in sixty seconds and causes the switch I to close twice during that period. Thus it will be understood that the solenoid II in the apparatus specifically illustrated moves the pen 3 from right to left a predetermined step once in every thirty seconds. The circuit of the solenoid II is completed to the battery by a line I.
When a predetermined unit of drilling, such as a foot, has been completed a switch I5 is closed, either manually or automatically. This switch connects the line 6 with a line l6 which leads to an electromagnet H, a relay l8, and a solenoid IS, the opposite sides of the electromagnet l'l, relay l8 and solenoid I! being connected with the line It to complete the circuit to the battery.
The function of the electro-magnet I 'l is to release the pen 3 permitting it, by mechanism which will be later described, to travel to the right marginline of the sheet I in one quick continuous step. The function of the relay is is to open the switch 9, thus preventing operation of the solenoid H while the switch I5 is closed, and to close the relay switch 20. The switch 20 connects with a lead 2| to a solenoid 22 for operating a counter or an accumulator, not shown.
Assuming that drilling is That is to say, the solenoid 22 operata a set of accumulator wheels and thus registers the number of times the switch i is closed. This is a matter of convenience and has no connection, except the electrical connection as described, with the logging apparatus.
The function of the solenoid 19 is to turn the platen 2 a predetermined distance, thus spacing the lines produced by the pen 3 on the sheet I. It may now be understood that when the switch 5 is closed, and the drilling is progressing, the pen 3 will be caused to move across the paper 1 from right to left, moving step by step, one step each thirty seconds. When a unit of drilling has been completed, such as a foot, the switch 15 will be closed. This may be done manually or it may be done automatically, by apparatus which will be described later in detail. When the switch I5 is closed the relay is is energized, thus cutting out by means of the switch 9 the solenoid I! and energizing the electro-magnet I1 and the solenoid 19. The electro-magnet H. permits the pen to be moved to the right of the sheet to start a new line while the solenoid IS causes the platen 2 to advance the sheet one space. At the same time the relay I8 closes the switch 20 to energize the solenoid 22, and thus operate a counter or accumulator, not otherwise shown.
In order to check the accuracy of the log a special indication or punch mark is placed upon the sheet I by a punch 23, when a. new connection to the drill stem is made The length of the drill stem sections are known accurately so that the distance between punch marks on the sheet I give a check of the drilling depth. The punch 23 is operated by an electro-magnet 24 connected by a line 25 through a switch 26 to the battery 4, and on its return side is connected to the battery by the line 14. It will be understood now that whenever a new section of drill Stem is connected the switch 26 will be manually operated to make a mark by the punch 22 on the left side of the sheet I.
The general operations and functions, and the electrical circuits responsible for those functions and operations, have been described. There will now be described the specific mechanical devices which are responsive to the electrical impulses or electrical devices and which complete the operations.
The platen 2 is mounted on a pair of frame members 21, which are secured to a base 28; that is, its shaft 29 is journalled in the frame members 21. Sprockets 30 are secured at the end of the platen and propel the strip l by meshing in holes 3| at the margins of the strip I. A roll of paper supply 32 is supported on a shaft 33 which is journalled in the frame members 21. The paper is wound on a reel 34 whose shaft is journalled in the frame members 21. A pulley 35 is attached to the reel 34 and connected by a belt 36 to a pulley 31 secured to the shaft 28 of the platen 2. An idling roll 38 is also iournalled in the frame members 21. I
The pen 3 is mounted on and moved by a rod 40 which is supported by and slides in the frame members 2'1. The rod 40 has a rack on its bottom surface meshing with a gear 4! on a shaft 42. An idling wheel 43 is spaced above the gear 41, holding the rod ll] in proper position with the gear 41. As shown in Figs. 1 and 4, the shaft 42 with the gear ii is mounted on and supported by a vertical plate 44, which in turn is supported by the base 28. A ratchet wheel 45 is secured to the shaft 42 and is, therefore, integrally connected with the gear 4| by which the gear is driven. A spring 46 is wound as the ratchet 65 is moved in a clockwise direction (Fig. 4). That is to say, the spring is wound as the pen is moved in a step by step movement from right to left, Fig. 1, and this spring serves as a means for returning the pen to the right marginal line of the sheet I in one'quick continuous stroke.
The means for moving the gear 4| to advance and retract the pen 3 are best shown in Fig. 4. The solenoid II is connected to a lever 41 to which is secured a, pawl 48 engaging the ratchet 45. By reference to Fig. 4, it will be understood that when an electrical impulse is applied to the solenoid II, the lever 41 and pawl 48 will be moved to theleft to move the ratchet 45 and gear ll one step, thereby advancing the rod 40 and the pen 3 one step. A spring-pressed detent lever 49 prevents, until released, any backward motion of the rod.
The electro-magnet I1 is arranged, when energized, to release the detent 49. A tappet 50 is secured to the armature of the electro-magnet l1 and strikes the free arm of the lever detent 49, thereby releasing the detent whenever the electro-magnet I1 is energized. When the detent 49 is released the spring 46 causes the gear 4| to move the rod 40 to return the pen to the right marginal line of the sheet I in one quick continuous stroke.
The driving mechanism operating on the shaft 29 of the platen 2 is shown in Fig. 1, and shown in more detail in Fig. 2. A gear 5| secured to the shaft 29 meshes with and is driven by a pinion 52 on a. shaft 53, to which is also secured a ratchet wheel 54. The ratchet 54 is driven by a pawl 55 on a lever 56 connected to the solenoid H3. The ratchet is held by a detent 51. The solenoid I9 is opposed by a spring 58, and the arrangement is such that the ratchet 54 and thereby ,the platen 2 is caused to move in response to the spring 58 after it has been put in tension by the solenoid 18, so that platen is not moved until the solenoid I9 has been de-energized and until after the pen has been returned to the starting line.
It may now be understood that when drilling has commenced, the switch 5 is closed and the clock operating the wheel I3 is placed in operation. As time progresses the pins l2 on the minute wheel l3 of the clock will close the switch 1 periodically, once every thirty seconds as specifically shown. Whenever the switch I is closed the solenoid H will be energized and the ratchet 45 with its gear 4| will be moved one step to advance the rod 40 with the pen 3 attached thereto across the paper one step from right to left, Fig. 1. This operation will be continued until the switch 15 is closed, either manually or automatically. Upon closing of this switch the relay I8 will disconnect the circuit to the solenoid II and will energize the electro-magnet I1 to release the detent 49, thereby permitting the spring 46 to move the rod 40 and the pen 3 back the full distance permitted. At the Same time that the electro-magnet H. has been energized the solenoid 19 will be energized, moving its armature to the left, Fig. 2, against the force of the spring 58. As soon as the switch 15 is opened again the spring 58 will return the pawl 55 to the right, Fig. 5, thereby advancing the platen one space.
A section of the chart or log'is illustrated in Fig. 5. The log lines begin at the lower marginal lines and comprise that series of uneven parallel lines clearly shown in the drawings. The numerals on the upper margin indicate the denth at which the log lines are made. The punchings produced by the punch 23 are indicated by the reference 23a, and are found in the upper margin which corresponds to the left margin Fig. l. Mechanism for automatically operating the distance switch to return the pen and to move the platen is indicated in Figs. 7, 8, 9 and 10. In this case a switch, indicated by reference I a, corresponds to the push button switch l5, as shown in the circuit diagram 6, and is arranged in the circuit precisely as is the manual switch IS. The devices shown in Figs. 7 to are provided for the purpose of intermittently closing the switch lie in accordance with the descent of the drill during the drilling operation. By way of illustration, it may be considered that the mechanism is arranged to close, then open the switch l5a, once for each foot of descent of the drill.
The switch lie is closed by a pin 60 on the rotating member 6| which is releasably connected to a sheave 62 about which is wound a cable or line 63, connected to the drill or drill stem. As specifically illustrated in Fig. 7, it is connected to the traveling block 64 which supports the drill stem.
The cable 63 is wound upon a spring propelled reel 65 and passes therefrom around the sheave 62 over a pulley 66 on the crown block of the derrick and down to a fastener on the traveling block 64. It will be understood then that, if the rotating member Si is caused to rotate with the sheave 62 and the sheave 62 has a circumference of one foot, the switch l5a will be closed once for each foot of descent of the drill. The rotating member GI and the sheave 62 are mounted for rotation on a common shaft 61.
The rotating member 6| is connected to the sheave'62 through clutch members 68 and 69, and an intermediate rotating member 10. The intermediate rotating member Ill with a sleeve is mounted on the shaft 61 and has a pin II, which is engaged by a spring pressed pawl 12 on the sheave. The arrangement is such that the pawl 12 will engage the pin II to rotate the member 10 as the sheave 62 rotates in a counterclockwise direction, Figs. 9 and 10, but will not back up the member 10 as the drill bounces, thus avoiding undesired closing of the switch lie. The arrangement of the pawl is such, however, that a substantial raising of the drill will permit the pawl 12 to slide over the pin I I,
The clutch member 69 is splined on the sleeve of the intermediate member 10, and is spring pressed to engage the clutch member 68 integrally with the rotating member 6|. It is movable out of engagement with the clutch member 68 by a solenoid I3. The clutch will be disconnected, for instance, by the solenoid 13 whenever it is desired to raise or lower the traveling block 6|,except when the drill is actually in operation.
It will be obvious from the foregoing that the invention accomplishes its objects. A method and apparatus has been provided for logging a well, which will give accurate and valuable information as to the strata traversed by the drill and in a form which can be read and understood at a glance.
I claim:
1. In a well logging device in which repeatedly a writing implement is moved across a strip of paper a distance corresponding to elapsed time, and then the implement is returned to the place of starting and the strip is advanced a space, the improvement comprising an electrical device and circuit for moving said implement across the strip, a switch in said circuit, a timing device constructed and arranged to periodically close said switch, a spring for returning the implement to the place of starting, a detent for holding the spring against action, an electromagnet forreleasing the detent, and a circuit therefor having a relay which when energized breaks the first circuit.
2. In a well logging device in which repeatedly a writing implement is moved across a strip of paper a distance corresponding to elapsed time, arid then the implement is returned to the place of starting and the strip is advanced a space, the improvement comprising a spring for returning the implement to the place of starting, a detent for holding the spring against action, an electromagnet for releasing the detent, a solenoid for advancing the strip, a circuit Supp ying the electromagnet and solenoid, and a switch in the circuit whereby the electromagnet and solenoid are energized simultaneously.
3. In a well logging device in which repeatedly a writing implement is moved across a strip of paper a distance corresponding to elapsed time, and then the implement is returned to the place of starting and the strip is advanced a space, the improvement comprising a springfor returning the implement to the place-f starting, a detent for holding the spring against action, an electromagnet for releasing the detent, a ratchet and pawl for advancing the strip, a second spring for operating the pawl, a solenoid for ratcheting the pawl and for tensioning the last mentioned spring, a circuit for supplying the electromagnet and solenoid, and a switch in the circuit whereby the electromagnet and solenoid are energized si multaneously to release the detent and tension the second mentioned spring, thereby returning the writing implement and then when the switch is opened permitting the second spring to move the strip. 7
HOMER M. RUTHERFORD.
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Cited By (21)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2502991A (en) * 1945-05-15 1950-04-04 Ibm Odograph
US2535096A (en) * 1946-08-23 1950-12-26 Herschell R Scivally Well logging recorder
US2565951A (en) * 1948-02-25 1951-08-28 Standard Oil Dev Co Drilling rate recorder
US2600336A (en) * 1950-11-02 1952-06-10 Herschell R Scivally Well logging apparatus
US2617947A (en) * 1947-03-28 1952-11-11 Texas Co Recording
US2651561A (en) * 1948-07-01 1953-09-08 Norman R Benham Production recording instrument
US2653853A (en) * 1949-11-26 1953-09-29 Allis Chalmers Mfg Co Speedgraph recorder
US2671346A (en) * 1946-05-28 1954-03-09 Jr Thomas A Banning Measuring and recording various well drilling operations
US2679161A (en) * 1949-11-03 1954-05-25 Jesse E Yancey Depth progress recording apparatus for wells
US2688871A (en) * 1949-01-03 1954-09-14 Lubinski Arthur Instantaneous bit rate of drilling meters
US2732276A (en) * 1956-01-24 Facsimile transmission system and apparatus
US2764464A (en) * 1952-07-02 1956-09-25 North American Aviation Inc Digital graph follower plotter
US2935871A (en) * 1956-04-10 1960-05-10 Geolograph Service Corp Well logging apparatus
US2957346A (en) * 1957-11-14 1960-10-25 Core Lab Inc Drilling rate measuring apparatus
US2981102A (en) * 1956-03-23 1961-04-25 Geolograph Co Well depth recorder
US3017770A (en) * 1957-06-26 1962-01-23 William G Green Drilling rate recorder
US3099152A (en) * 1961-03-01 1963-07-30 Us Industries Inc Stocking stretch measuring machine
US3124410A (en) * 1964-03-10 Well depth recorder
US3154367A (en) * 1961-10-23 1964-10-27 Don C Allred Drilling rate recording
US3220011A (en) * 1962-10-23 1965-11-23 Lorraine Houilleres Advance and position indicator for coal-cutter or like stoping machine
US5377540A (en) * 1990-08-31 1995-01-03 Songe, Jr.; Lloyd J. Oil and gas well logging system

Cited By (21)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2732276A (en) * 1956-01-24 Facsimile transmission system and apparatus
US3124410A (en) * 1964-03-10 Well depth recorder
US2502991A (en) * 1945-05-15 1950-04-04 Ibm Odograph
US2671346A (en) * 1946-05-28 1954-03-09 Jr Thomas A Banning Measuring and recording various well drilling operations
US2535096A (en) * 1946-08-23 1950-12-26 Herschell R Scivally Well logging recorder
US2617947A (en) * 1947-03-28 1952-11-11 Texas Co Recording
US2565951A (en) * 1948-02-25 1951-08-28 Standard Oil Dev Co Drilling rate recorder
US2651561A (en) * 1948-07-01 1953-09-08 Norman R Benham Production recording instrument
US2688871A (en) * 1949-01-03 1954-09-14 Lubinski Arthur Instantaneous bit rate of drilling meters
US2679161A (en) * 1949-11-03 1954-05-25 Jesse E Yancey Depth progress recording apparatus for wells
US2653853A (en) * 1949-11-26 1953-09-29 Allis Chalmers Mfg Co Speedgraph recorder
US2600336A (en) * 1950-11-02 1952-06-10 Herschell R Scivally Well logging apparatus
US2764464A (en) * 1952-07-02 1956-09-25 North American Aviation Inc Digital graph follower plotter
US2981102A (en) * 1956-03-23 1961-04-25 Geolograph Co Well depth recorder
US2935871A (en) * 1956-04-10 1960-05-10 Geolograph Service Corp Well logging apparatus
US3017770A (en) * 1957-06-26 1962-01-23 William G Green Drilling rate recorder
US2957346A (en) * 1957-11-14 1960-10-25 Core Lab Inc Drilling rate measuring apparatus
US3099152A (en) * 1961-03-01 1963-07-30 Us Industries Inc Stocking stretch measuring machine
US3154367A (en) * 1961-10-23 1964-10-27 Don C Allred Drilling rate recording
US3220011A (en) * 1962-10-23 1965-11-23 Lorraine Houilleres Advance and position indicator for coal-cutter or like stoping machine
US5377540A (en) * 1990-08-31 1995-01-03 Songe, Jr.; Lloyd J. Oil and gas well logging system

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