US2664170A - Dual control separation of gas and oil - Google Patents

Dual control separation of gas and oil Download PDF

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US2664170A
US2664170A US300788A US30078852A US2664170A US 2664170 A US2664170 A US 2664170A US 300788 A US300788 A US 300788A US 30078852 A US30078852 A US 30078852A US 2664170 A US2664170 A US 2664170A
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oil
gas
valve
tank
chamber
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US300788A
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Jay P Walker
Clarence O Glasgow
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Cameron Solutions Inc
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National Tank Co
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B43/00Methods or apparatus for obtaining oil, gas, water, soluble or meltable materials or a slurry of minerals from wells
    • E21B43/34Arrangements for separating materials produced by the well
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T137/00Fluid handling
    • Y10T137/2931Diverse fluid containing pressure systems
    • Y10T137/3003Fluid separating traps or vents
    • Y10T137/3009Plural discriminating outlets for diverse fluids
    • Y10T137/3012Common actuator for control valves
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T137/00Fluid handling
    • Y10T137/7287Liquid level responsive or maintaining systems
    • Y10T137/7358By float controlled valve
    • Y10T137/7368Servo relay operation of control
    • Y10T137/7371Fluid pressure
    • Y10T137/7378From tank

Description

Dec. 29, 1953 Filed July 24. 1952 X E l` i s g u A s i" U3 g i n n i f V i n J. P. WALKER ET Ax. 2,664,170

DUAL CONTROL SEPARATION OF' GAS AND OII..

5 Sheets-Sheet l Jay P. Wr/ker @D WW@ Dec. 29, 1953 J. P. WALKER ET AL DUAL CONTROL SEPARATION OF GAS ANO OIL 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed July 24, 1952 J. P. WALKER ETAL DUAL CONTROL SEPARATION OF GAS AND OIL Dec. 29, 1953 3 Sheets-Sheet I5 Filed July 24, 1952 Jay P. Wa//rer C/arence 0. G/asgow` INVENTOI ATTORNEYS Patented Dec. 29, 1953 DUAL CONTROL SEPARATION OF GAS AND OIL Ja'y P. Walker and Clarence 0. Glasgow, Tulsa, Okla., assignors to National Tank Company, Tulsa, Okla., a corporation of Nevada Application July 24, 1952, Serial No. 300,788

9 Claims.

This invention relates to new and useful improvements in dual control separation of gas and cil.

One object of the invention is an improved dual control for oil and gas outlet valves particularly adapted to tanks having separate accumulating chambers.

Another object of the invention is to provide a dual control involving an oil accumulating chamber receiving oil from a horizontal stratum and having liquid level responsive means connected with dual actuating means for a gas outlet valve and an oil outlet valve connected with said chamber, whereby an independent oil level is maintained in said chamber and fluid pressure in the chamber is built up suiicient to elevate the discharged oil to the stock tanks.

A further object of the invention is to provide a tank having means for establishing oil and water strata and carrying oil water and an oil accumulating chamber separate therefrom, together with dual controlled valve means for discharging oil from the chamber and conducting it to the stock tanks and building up gas pressure in the chamber suiiicient to elevate the oil to said stock tanks.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a dual control for a tank having an oil accumulating chamber and a gas space therein and diaphragm-motor oil andV gas outlet valves in combination with a float in the chamber having operating connection with a pilot valve for 'controlling a supply of gas to the valves to open the oil valve and close or pinch the gas valve and build up a pressure in the chamber for expelling the oil.

A still further object of the invention is to provide an improved dual control wherein a tank is provided with an obstruction having a weir at its upper edge whereby a liquid stratum is Amaintained in the tnak and liquid is caused to overiiow to a lower level in an accumulating chamber which latter has a gas space above its liquid level, thus oil in overflowing 'or cascading from the upper stratum to the lower level is degassed under some conditions.

A construction designed to carry out the invention will be hereinafter described together with other features of the invention.

The invention will be more readily understood from a reading of the following specification and by reference to the accompanying drawings, wherein an example of the invention is shown, and wherein: y

Fig. 1 is a longitudinal sectional view -of a portion of a tank equipped with a dual control valve means constructed in accordance with the invention,

Fig. 2 is a transverse, sectional view through the tank showing the water discharge means,

Fig. 3 is an enlarged elevation of the pilot valve and its actuator,

Fig. 4 is a transverse, vertical, sectional view of fan upright separator having the dual control valve means,

Fig. 5 is a view, similar to Fig. 4 of a horizontal separator having the dual control valve means,

Fig. 6 is a view, similar to Fig. 1, showing a different application of the invention, and

Fig. 7 is a vertical, sectional view of the volume tank of the apparatus of Fig. 6.

This application is a continuation-in-part of our 'co-pending application, Serial No. 91,182, iiled May 3, 1949, now abandoned.

In the drawings, the numeral I0 designatesa horizontal tank which Imay be of the construction shown in the co-pending application of Jay P. Walker, Clarence O. Glasgow, and Alex W. Francis, Jr., led March 23, 1949, Serial No. 83,054, owned by applicants' assignee, or of some other form. In the tank a iilter section F is provided between two upright partitions II and I2, each occupying a complete transverse area of the tank and being perforated. The filtering ksection is completely iilled with filtering material M, such as wood excels'ior or suitable material.

A liquid overflow partition I3 terminates short of the top of the tank and its upper horizontal edge constitutes a weir I4, which determines the liquid level in the tank. The oil level is determined by the weir and the water level is determined by any suitable Water outlet means, such as an outside syphon box I5 connected with the tank by a water leg IG and containing an over-v flow nipple I'I which discharges into a water pipe I8. The longitudinal area above the oil level constitutes a gas space G. On top of the tank is a gas separator Svwhich is connected with the gas space rearwardly of the partition I2, by means of a pipe I9 which may act as a gas equalizer or a gas conductor. A rgas discharge pipe 20 leads from the separator.

The treater operates in any suitable manner so as to produce the water, oil and gas stratum as illustrated and this operation may be as set forth in co-pending application, supra. Since only oil overflows the weir I4, the chamber C, between the ,partition I3 and the end or head 'ZI of the tank, contains only oil and gas. An oil level is maintained -in the chamber by a oat 22,-

which is much lower than the oil level, forward of the partition I3. An oil discharge pipe 23 leads from the lower portion of the head 2l, well below the oil level in chamber C. A diaphragmmotor oil valve 24 of any suitable construction is connected to the pipe. This valve is periodically opened to discharge oil from the chamber and maintain the level therein. A diaphragmmotor gas outlet valve 25 is connected to the gas discharge pipe 20. These valves are both operated by means hereinafter described whereby dual control is set up.

Usually a horizontal treater is supported on the ground and since the inlet to the stock tanks is at a higher elevation than the oil outlet of the treater some means must be provided to elevate the discharged oil and deliver it to said tanks. An economical method is to employ gas pressure by means of dual control of the oil and gas outlet valves, whereby a pressure in the tank suflicient for this purpose may be maintained.

The float 22 is mounted on the end of an arm 26 which extends from a rigid connection with a rock shaft 21 journaled in a bonnet 28 suitably mounted on the head 2|. The shaft extends through one side of the bonnet and has fastened thereon a lever 29 extending in the opposite direction to the arm 26. An adjusting link 30 pivotally connects the outer end of the lever with the plunger 3I of a vertically disposed pilot valve 32. A gas supply line 33 leads from the gas discharge pipe 20 to the upper portion of the valve. A gas feed line 34 leads from the medial portion of the valve to the diaphragm motor of the outlet valve 24. A pressure regulator 35 is connected in the supply line 33. A second gas feed line 36 branches from the line 34 and is connected to the diaphragm motor of the gas outlet valve 25.

The diaphragm motors of the valves 24 and 25 are of the adjustable spring type which are in common use in this art. When the float 22 is in its normal or middle position, as is shown in the drawings, the oil will be at a static or normal level. With the float in this position the springs of the diaphragm-motors are adjusted so that approximately pound pressure per square inch will be carried in the tank, the lines and connections. So long as this pressure prevails, the oil outlet valve will remain closed and the gas valve will adjust itself to open, close or pinch the gas valve 25 so as to maintain said pressure.

It will be noted that the feed line 34 goes to the underside of the motor of the oil outlet valve 24; while the branch line 36 connects to the top side of the motor of gas valve 25, Thus when sufcient gas pressure is applied, the oil valve will be opened and the gas valve will be pinched or closed. When the float 22 is in its normal position the pilot valve will be closed or throttled to the point that not more than 10 p. s. i. (meaning pounds per square inch) gas pressure will be delivered to the valves. However, when the liquid level rises in the chamber C, the iioat will be elevated thus opening the pilot to increase the pressure of the gas supplied to the lines 34 and 36.

If the gas pressure is insuilicient to elevate the oil to the stock tanks, the float rises still higher and the gas pressure is increased so the gas valve 25 is pinched or closed, whereby the gas pressure in the tank is built up to the point where the oil is discharged to the stock tanks and the float lowered. It is obvious that once the springs of the diaphragm-motors have been adjusted to the desired static pressures, the operation thereafter becomes automatic. Of course, it is possible to adjust the spring of the gas valve so as to carry more than the pressure necessary to elevate the oil, because so long as the pilot valve 32 remains closed or is throttled, the oil outlet valve will remain closed.

This control is dependent upon an arrangement whereby the oil level is controlled entirely by the volume of oil accumulated in the chamber C, which means that said oil level is not subject to fluctuations such as would occur if the oil was carried on a bod;r of water. The chamber C serves as a surge chamber and thus the overflow partition and Weir I4 become important. The discharge of the oil from the tank is entirely independent of the operation of the treater or the volume of water handled. Further, the provision of the chamber C assures a substantial stabilization of the oil level in advance of the partition I3.

While we have shown diaphragm-motor valves it is obvious that other types may be used. The valves illustrated are arranged so that the outlet yvalve 24 will reach a full open position when the desired pressure is built up in the treater. The gas valve 25 has the dual function of both holding a predetermined pressure in the treater and building up a pressure suicient to elevate the oil to the stock tanks, It is obvious that while the pipe 9 is primarily for equalizing pressures between the tank and separator, gas may flow through said pipe to the separator and escape by way or" the pipe 25. While the invention has been described in connection with a horizontal emulsion treater, it is not to be so limited.

In Fig. 4, we have shown the invention in connection with a vertical tank or oil and gas separator. The details of the separator have been omitted. A stream of oil and gas and, in some instances, entrained water, is admitted through an inlet 40 and a gas discharge pipe 4I leads from the top of the tank 42. A downwardly inclined shield 43 extends across the tank and has a depending skirt 44, extending from wall to wall and forming with the wall of the tank, a ume 45.

lThe skirt 44 terminates short of the bottom of the tank and is spaced from an upright partition 45 extending from said bottom. This partition has a Weir 4'! at its upper edge. The space in advance or on the lefthand side of the partition 46 forms a receiving chamber R; while the space beyond said partition forms an accumulating chamber C'. Since the dual control mechanism is employed in this form, the same numerals are used in connection with the illustration. Drain pipes 53 lead from the bottoms of the chambers R and C' and connect with a manifold pipe 49 in which a cutoff valve 50 is connected. Since more or less water enters the tank through the inlet 49, such water will accumulate in the bottom of the chamber R and escape through the manifold 'pipe 48 and thus does not rise high enough to overfiow the Weir 4l. Over a period of time, sediment may collect in the bottom of the chamber C and may be drawn off through the connection 48 in the bottom of said chamber. The valve 48' permits withdrawal of water without draining chamber C.

In Fig. 5 a horizontal oil and gas separator is illustrated. This separator includes a tank 5I having an inlet 52 at its forward end which inlet, discharges into a scrubber box 53 in the upper portion of said tank. The oil or oil and water are collected in the bottom of the tank. An upright partition 54 causes the liquids to stratify and th top stratum which is oil to overflow a'weir 55 along the upper edge of said partition into an accumulating chamber C". vFor instance, a water drain similar to the drain 49 and 50 in Fig. 4 may be used to remove water from the vessel 5I. The gas escaping from the box 53 flows between the elongate baiiles 5S and is carried on by way of a discharge pipe 5'?. The gas is prevented from bil-passing the baffles by a partition 5.8, which depends therefrom into the liquid stratum. rihe cil is discharged from the chamber through an outlet pipe 59. The valve 24 is connected in the pipe 59 andthe valve 25 is connected in the pipe 5l, the dual control being the same as in the other forms.

In Figs. 6 and 7 is illustrated the application of the invention to the type of emulsion treater, or other vessel, disclosed in the co-pending application of Jay P. Walker, Clarence O. Glasgow and Alex Francis, Jr., Serial No. 220,476,1iled April l1, 1951, owned by applicants assignee. In this modication, the treater vessel or tank t0 has a gas outlet (not shown) leading to a condenser, scrubber, or other gas receiving enclosure ti. Water is withdrawn from the tank 60 through a water outlet tube 62 While the clean oil overflows through a skimmer or Weir box 63 and a pipe @it to a volume tank or enclosure 65. The tank 55 drains through a heat exchangert to the outlet pipe or oil discharge pipe 23 which leads to the oil valve 24, previously described. Certain of the other previously described elements are also employed and are numbered accordingly, the gas discharge pipe leading from the enclosure Bl to the gas valve 25.

The volume tank 65 is provided with a float 61, or other suitable liquid level responsive device, which is operatively connected to the pilot valve 32. The latter valve is supplied with gas and operates the valve 24 and 25 as set out hereinabove.

The operation of the modification `shown in Figs. 6 and 7 is substantially the same as the operation previously given. The clean oil overflows into the volume tank B5, raising the float Si, and accumulates until the float has been lifted enough to actuate the pilot valve 32. Operation of the latter causes closing of the gas valve 25 to build up the gas pressure in the tanks Sii and 55, and opening of the oil valve 24 to permit discharge of the oil to the stock tanks. In actual operation, the float and pilot valve normally stabilize at some i-ntermediate position at which the gas valve is closed sufficiently to hold on the treater, or other vessel, a pressure adecuate to flow the oi-ltherefrom, and the oil valve is opened sufficiently to accommodate such ow under the pressure applied. As the now of oil to the treater surges or decreases, the pilot valve is actuated to make appropriate adjustment in the positions of the gas and oil valves.

The foregoing description of the invention is explanatory thereof and various changes in the size, shape and materials, as well as in the details of the illustrated construction may be made, within the scope of the appended claims, without departing from the spirit of the invention.

We claim:

1. In combination, a single tank, an overflow partition in the tank defining a Weir at its upper edge, an oil accumulating chamber dened by said partition and walls of the tank, Water discharge means from the tank in advance of said partition, an oil outlet from the chamber on the other side of said partition, a gas separator connected with the tank', a `gas o'utletfrom `.they sep'- arator, an oil level responsive :element in .the chamber below the Weir, andiap'hragm oil valve connected to the oll outlet, -va diaphragm gas valve connected'to the gas outlet, va .pilot 'valve having 'inlet connection with the gas outlet, `an actuating connection between y lthe level-responsive'element and the vpilot valve, a glas outlet conductor leading from` the pilot vvalve vand connected with the gas outlet valve vabove its Adiaphragm for closing/said valve and -connected with the diaphragm of the oil'outle't valve below its diaphragm for opening Isaid oil outlet valve.

Y 2. In combination, a single tank, an overflow partition in the tank defini-ng aweir at its upper edge,l anA oil accumulating chamber defined by said partition and walls of the tank, Water Vdischarge means from the tank `in advance of said partition, `an oil'outlet from r'the ychamber on the other side of said partition, yafgas discharge 'having connection with the tank,a float in the charn-y ber, a pilotrvalve having a pressure fluid supply, an actuating connection between the iioat `and the-pilot valve, said float maintaining an oil level in the chamber belowy the Weir, a diaphragm'- motor gas valve connected to the gas discharge, a diaphragm-motor oil valve connected to the oil outlet, and pressure fluid conductors leading from the pilot valve to the gas valve above its diaphragm and to the oil valve below its diaphragm to close the gas valve and to open the oil Valve.

3. In combination, a single tank adapted 'to contain water, oil and gas, an oil accumulating chamber in the tank having an oil level therein, the tank having means for retaining water and oil levels outside of said chamber, means for ver.- cluding the water from the oil accumulating chamber, said chamber having Vanv oil inlet from the oil level yof the tank, van oiloutlet from the chamber, a gas outlet "having connection with the tank, water discharge means from the tank exterior of the oil chamber, a float in the chamber, a pilot valve having a pressure fluid supply, an actuating connection between the float and the pilot valve, said oat maintaining an oil level in the chamber, a diaphragm-motor gas valve connected to the gas outlet, a diaphragm-motor oil valve connected to the oil outlet, and pressure fluid conductors leading from the pilot valve to the gas valve above its diaphragm to close said valve to the oil valve below its diaphragm to open the latter.

4. In combination, a tank, an upright cross partition in the tank having an overow along its top edge and dividing the tank into an oil and Water stratifying section on one side of said partition and an oil chamber on the other side of said partition, water discharge means from the stratifying section, a main gas outlet pipe connected with the tank above the oil level therein, an oil outlet pipe connected with the chamber, below the oil level therein, a diaphragm vgas valve connected in the gas, outlet pipe, a

diaphragm oil outlet valve connected in the oil outlet pipe, a pilot valve connected on its inlet side With the gas pipe-in advance of the gas valve, a gas outlet line leading from the outlet side of the pilot valve and having branches connected with thefgas valve above its diaphragm and connected with the oil valve below its diaphragm, whereby the gas pressure tends to close the gas valve and tends to open the oil valve, and a oat in the oil in the tank having an actuator connected with the pilot valve.

Vmeans from the tank isolated from the oil accumulating enclosure, liquid level responsive means in the enclosure, a pilot valve having a.

Ypressure fluid supply, an actuating connection between the level responsive means and the pilot valve, said responsive means maintaining an oil level in the enclosure, a diaphragm-motor gas valve connected to the gas outlet, a diaphragm- .motor oil valve connected to the oil outlet, and pressure fluid conductors leading from the pilot valve to that side of the diaphragm motor of the `gas valve upon which the application of pressure fluid will close the gas valve and to that side of the diaphragm motor of the oil valve upon which the application of pressure fluid will open the oil valve.

7. In combination, a tank adapted to contain oil, water and gas, an oil accumulating enclosure having an oil level therein, the tank having means for retaining Water and oil levels outside of said enclosure, means for excluding the water from the oil accumulating enclosure, said enclosure having an oil inlet from the oil level of the tank, an oil outlet from the enclosure, a gas outlet having connection with the tank, water-discharge means from the tank isolated from the oil accumulating enclosure, a ioat in the enclosure, a pilot valve having a pressure iluid supply, an actuating connection between the float and the pilot valve, said float maintaining an oil level in the enclosure, a diaphragm-motor gas valve connected to the gas outlet, a diaphragm-motor oil valve connected to the oil outlet, and pressure fluid conductors leading from the pilot valve to that side of the diaphragm motor of the gas valve upon which the application of pressure fluid will close the gas valve and to that side of the diaphragm motor of the oil valve upon which the application of pressure fluid will open the oil valve.

8. In combination, a tank adapted to contain oil, water and gas, an oil accumulating enclosure carried by the tank and having an oil level therein, the tank having means for retaining Water and oil levels outside of said enclosure, means for excluding the water from the oil accumulating enclosure. said enclosure having an oil inlet from the oil level of the tank, an oil outlet from the enclosure, a gas outlet having connection with the tank, water discharge means from the tank isolated from the oil accumulating enclosure, liquid level responsive means in the enclosure, a pilot valve having a pressure uid supply, an actuating connection between the level responsive means and the pilot valve, said responsive means maintaining an oil level in the enclosure, a diaphragmmotor gas valve connected to the gas outlet, a diaphragm-motor oil valve connected to the oil outlet, and pressure fluid conductors leading from the pilot valve to that side of the diaphragm motor of the gas valve upon which the application of pressure fluid will close the gas valve and to that side of the diaphragm motor of the oil valve upon which the application of pressure iluid will open the oil valve.

9. In combination, a tank adapted to contain oil, water and gas, an oil accumulating enclosure external of the 'tank and having an oil level therein, the tank having means for retaining water and oil levels outside of said enclosure, means for excluding the water from the oil accumulating enclosure, said enclosure having an oil inlet from the oil level of the tank, an oil outlet from the enclosure, a gas outlet having connection with the tank, water discharge means from the tank isolated from the oil accumulating enclosure, liquid level responsive means in the enclosure, a pilot valve having a pressure lluid supply, an actuating connection between the level responsive means and the pilot valve, said responsive means maintaining an oil level in the enclosure, a diaphragni-motor gas valve connected to the gas outlet, a diaphragm-motor oil valve connected to the oil outlet, and pressure iluid conductors leading from the pilot valve to that side of the diaphragm motor of the gas valve upon which the application of pressure iluid will close the gas valve and to that side of the diaphragm motor of the oil valve upon which the application of pressure fluid will open the oil valve.

JAY P. WALKER. CLARENCE O. GLASGOW.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,048,717 Maywald Dec. 31, 1912 1,846,376 Walker Feb. 23, 1932 2,064,962 Waters Dec. 22, 1936 2,211,282 McKeever Aug. 13 1940 2,457,959 walker Jan. 4,J 1949 2,528,032 Candler et al. Oct. 31, 1950

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Cited By (29)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2726729A (en) * 1953-01-12 1955-12-13 Elmer R Williams Horizontal oil and gas separator and emulsion treater
US2748885A (en) * 1953-09-17 1956-06-05 Crown Cork & Seal Co Liquid deaerator
US2758717A (en) * 1952-05-31 1956-08-14 Stanley G Harwood Control for separator
US2783854A (en) * 1954-05-12 1957-03-05 Sivalls Tanks Inc Gas and multiple liquid separator apparatus
US2788080A (en) * 1955-02-24 1957-04-09 Delta Tank Mfg Co Inc Liquid and gas separator
US2803263A (en) * 1952-12-06 1957-08-20 Stanley G Harwood Fluid actuated control means
US2853149A (en) * 1956-08-15 1958-09-23 Martin A Nishkian Vapor recovery apparatus
US2872935A (en) * 1955-02-28 1959-02-10 Robert W Kenney Valve mechanism
US2899013A (en) * 1956-04-09 1959-08-11 Nat Tank Co Apparatus for recovery of petroleum vapors from run tanks
US2933191A (en) * 1958-06-12 1960-04-19 Fram Corp Bilge water separator
DE1084696B (en) * 1955-02-08 1960-07-07 Jacques Muller An apparatus for separating liquids
DE1085280B (en) * 1954-11-30 1960-07-14 Henry Arthur John Silley Apparatus for separating water from oils
US2952329A (en) * 1957-10-25 1960-09-13 Richard G Cunningham Device for de-aerating liquids
US2957490A (en) * 1955-11-03 1960-10-25 Liquid Controls Corp Fluid segregators
US2971376A (en) * 1957-10-07 1961-02-14 Nat Tank Co Metering emulsion treaters and treating methods
US2984360A (en) * 1957-03-25 1961-05-16 Oil Metering And Proc Equipmen Multipurpose separator
DE1108196B (en) * 1956-08-13 1961-06-08 Ici Ltd Arrangement for separating Salpetersaeureestern of the nitrating
US2989143A (en) * 1956-12-13 1961-06-20 Separator Ab Method and apparatus for removing volatile substances from liquids
US2998096A (en) * 1958-10-28 1961-08-29 Gulf Oil Corp Oil, gas, and water separator
US3009536A (en) * 1959-02-16 1961-11-21 Nat Tank Co Emulsion treaters and emulsion treating methods
US3010580A (en) * 1959-05-29 1961-11-28 Permanent Filter Corp Filtration equipment
US3040499A (en) * 1956-05-14 1962-06-26 H2 Oil Engineering Corp Heater stage treatment for hydrocarbon emulsions
US3076301A (en) * 1960-06-03 1963-02-05 Phillips Petroleum Co Gas separation system
US3116133A (en) * 1960-11-14 1963-12-31 Shell Oil Co Hydrocarbon seep detection separator
US3435595A (en) * 1967-09-08 1969-04-01 Skelton Corp The Apparatus for reclaming paraffin and other liquids from a gas flow line
US3630002A (en) * 1970-03-24 1971-12-28 Combustion Eng Separator control system
US3836000A (en) * 1970-07-13 1974-09-17 Int Pollution Control Systems Process and apparatus of handling water which is contaminated with an oillike liquid
US4355652A (en) * 1980-07-21 1982-10-26 Perkins Lawrence B Purging device
US6468335B1 (en) * 1999-04-12 2002-10-22 Shell Oil Company Device for separating a mixture of fluids

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US1048717A (en) * 1911-05-03 1912-12-31 Frederick J Maywald Oil-separator.
US1846376A (en) * 1929-12-05 1932-02-23 Guy O Marchant Fluid control for gas and liquid separators
US2064962A (en) * 1935-08-07 1936-12-22 Hanlon Waters Inc Oil and gas separator
US2211282A (en) * 1938-01-27 1940-08-13 Parkersburg Rig & Reel Co Liquid transferring apparatus
US2457959A (en) * 1942-01-19 1949-01-04 Nat Tank Co Filtering tank for water disposal systems
US2528032A (en) * 1947-08-06 1950-10-31 Arthur V B Candler Method of and apparatus for treating petroleum emulsions

Patent Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1048717A (en) * 1911-05-03 1912-12-31 Frederick J Maywald Oil-separator.
US1846376A (en) * 1929-12-05 1932-02-23 Guy O Marchant Fluid control for gas and liquid separators
US2064962A (en) * 1935-08-07 1936-12-22 Hanlon Waters Inc Oil and gas separator
US2211282A (en) * 1938-01-27 1940-08-13 Parkersburg Rig & Reel Co Liquid transferring apparatus
US2457959A (en) * 1942-01-19 1949-01-04 Nat Tank Co Filtering tank for water disposal systems
US2528032A (en) * 1947-08-06 1950-10-31 Arthur V B Candler Method of and apparatus for treating petroleum emulsions

Cited By (29)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2758717A (en) * 1952-05-31 1956-08-14 Stanley G Harwood Control for separator
US2803263A (en) * 1952-12-06 1957-08-20 Stanley G Harwood Fluid actuated control means
US2726729A (en) * 1953-01-12 1955-12-13 Elmer R Williams Horizontal oil and gas separator and emulsion treater
US2748885A (en) * 1953-09-17 1956-06-05 Crown Cork & Seal Co Liquid deaerator
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