US2651871A - Method of painting and decorating - Google Patents

Method of painting and decorating Download PDF

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US2651871A
US2651871A US356439A US35643953A US2651871A US 2651871 A US2651871 A US 2651871A US 356439 A US356439 A US 356439A US 35643953 A US35643953 A US 35643953A US 2651871 A US2651871 A US 2651871A
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stencil
paint
color
applying
composite
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US356439A
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Charles P Lynden
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Charles P Lynden
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B05SPRAYING OR ATOMISING IN GENERAL; APPLYING FLUENT MATERIALS TO SURFACES, IN GENERAL
    • B05CAPPARATUS FOR APPLYING FLUENT MATERIALS TO SURFACES, IN GENERAL
    • B05C17/00Hand tools or apparatus using hand held tools, for applying liquids or other fluent materials to, for spreading applied liquids or other fluent materials on, or for partially removing applied liquids or other fluent materials from, surfaces
    • B05C17/06Stencils

Description

Se t. 15, 1953 c. P. LYNDEN METHOD OF PAINTING AND DECORATING 2 Sheets-Shet 1 Filed May 21, 1953 INVENTOR.
mamas P. LYNDEN.
Sept. 15, 1953 c. P. LYNDEN METHOD OF PAINTING AND DECORATING 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed May 21, 1953 INVENTOR. CHARLES P. LYNDEN,
WQM.
n'rronuey.
Patented Sept. 15, 1953 UNITED SET-YATES PATENT OFFICE OF PAINTING AND DECORATING Charles P. Lynden, Detroit, Mich.
Ajllplication May-21, 1953, Serial No. 356,439
,3 Claims; 1
This application is-acontinuation-impart of my co-pending applicationSerialI Number 103,- 080, filed July 5, 1949,110w abandoned.-
This invention relates to ajnovel method of painting anddecorating and more particularly to a method of stenciling Walls and other surfaces in a plurality'of colors.
It is the objectcf'this' invention'to" employ a plurality of stencils; each of which'havecut-out portions which forma part of' a-composite' design, and separately applying such sten'cils to a surface, and applying a -different. colored paint for each such stencil, saidepaint having, the characteristic of spontaneouslygdrying to a mat surface, after which another,- stencil is-applied to the same surface with said stencil having a plurality of cut-out portions:=also;-forming-a part of said composite design and: thereafter polishing or brushing without removing;:thevrespective paints through said last stencil to thereby achieve a gloss or sheen at.therareasqpolished a two-tone color efiect for'eachcf vthe original colorsused in the composite design.
It is thefurther object:oftthisinvention toprovide multi-colored designs-upon surfaces which can be effected intheminimumbf'time.
It is the further-object of: this invention to provide a simple process-whereby designs in a plurality of colors may: beapplied to. a surface such as a wall with aiminimu-m of effort.
These and other objects-will beiseen from the following .specificationand claims in conjunction with the appended drawingsi. in. which:
Figure 1' is a fragmentary. front] elevational view of. a. wall surface uponwhich a stencil is applied, and with the. firstcolor shown painted upon the surface through the openings in said stencil.
Figure 2 is a similar view with the first stencil removed and a second stencilapplied to the same surface and with a' second color shownipainted upon the surface'through the openings in said second stencil.
Figure 3 is a' similar view" but with a third stencil appliedtothe. same surface and with the portions of the painteddesign showing through said stencil having been'polished:
Figure 4 is a front elevational view of the composite multi-colored' design produced by the proccss hereinafter described detail; and
Figure 5 is a'front' elevational Viewof the stencil shown in Figure 3'.
It will be understood that the above-drawings illustrate merely one preferred! embodiment illustrating the stepstof JthBL-PIOQCSS; herein described,
and that otherxembodimentsiare: contemplated 2 within the scope of the'claims-hereafter set out.
The present method provides for the stenciling of multi-colored designs upon walls and other surfaces, and may be applied either to a plain or to a painted surface.
Referring to Figure 1, a wall E i is fragmentarily shown, which for the purpose of this application is plain, but which could just as well he painted. The stencil i2, is preferably constructed of an oiled and shellacked paper which is approximately .010 of an inch in thickness. This stencil has been initially cut out at 3 to form'a part of a composite design to be applied in multiple colors to said surface ll.
It is contemplatedthat almost any type of design or configuration may be cut out of the stencil blank to form a part of the" composite design contemplated.
As the initial step in the present process, the stencil I2 is placed over the surface H at a predeterminedposition and heldin place with masln ing tape, for example, or may be held in place by hand.
As a next step, a preferably flat paint is applied to the surface ll through the openings E3 in the stencil 12 to provide the painted portions i l, which as shown are green, for example.
Generally, any paint may be used which has the characteristic of' spontaneously drying to a mat surface, which can be changed in appearance to show a degree of gloss orsheen if polished while in a partially set condition.
For example, any flat paint may be employed, or'any paint which does not normally dry to give a glossy appearance. As the'p'resent method contemplates a polishingstep' to'produce a sheen'or glossy effect, normally those paints which dry to a shiny surface would notbe employed, such as enamel or house paint.
A flat paint containingvarnish'and wax will produce a pleasing effect, such as the type of paint disclosed in United States Patent No. 2,125,237, dated July 26,- 1938.
While the paint l lma'y be'applied with a brush, it has been foundthat-it'may be rolled onto the surface Ii by a small carpet roller, stippler, or similar device. The rollerisinitiallydipped into the paint of the desired" color and consistency and" is first rolled backand forth upon a newspaper, forexample, to obtain an even distribution of-color upon the roller. Thereafter, the paint is rolled onto the surface ll through the silhouette or cut-out portions I3 formed Within the stencil l2.
Stencil I2 is then removed and may he placed in another previously planned position" and the 3 same color can be rolled onto the surface I I, and this operation may be repeated for about a dozen or more placings, easily reached without changing ones operating position.
Thereafter and as the next step in the present process or method, a second stencil l5, preferably of paper, and with cut-out portions 16, is applied to the surface ll being superimposed upon the original design achieved from the first stencil.
It must be remembered, however, that there should be a sufficient time interval elapsed before application of the second stencil IS in order that the first applied paint will have become sufiiciently set or i partially set.
Figure 2 illustrates the position of the stencil l5 over the design obtained from the stencil l2, said latter design being indicated in dotted lines by the numerals l4, corresponding to Figure 1. It is necessary that there be a proper registry of the design from stencil l5 with respect to the design of stencil l2, and for this purpose, some slight marking or indication may be necessary to assure the proper positioning of stencil 15, after which, it is properly secured in position with masking paper, for example or may be held in place by hand.
As a next step in the present method, a second color of paint of the same character, as for instance, red, is applied to a second roller and this paint is then rolled upon the surface ll through the cut-out portion I5 of stencil 15 to achieve the painted designs I! shown in Figure 2. Thereafter the stencil I5 is removed and may then be reapplied to each of the other designs which have been painted upon the surface H by the original positionings of stencil l2.
Now after sufficient time has elapsed so that this second application of color has set and is partially dry, a third stencil l8, normally larger than stencils l2 and I5 will be applied to the surface H and will be properly aligned with the initial design obtained from stencils l2 and I5.
This latter stencil I8 shown in Figure 5 is preferably constructed of Celluloid and has formed therein a series of cut-out portions I9 adapted to represent veins of leaves, petals of flowers, shadows, deeper edges or any other smaller markings that may be required to make all of the previously applied color designs show up in their natural forms.
As a next step in the present method, the multi-painted portions of the composite design are brushed or polished through the silhouetted portions IQ of stencil [8 to thereby produce a darker tone for each of the colors applied to the composite design in the polished areas.
This polishing is done by the application of friction to the painted surfaces, after said paint has partially set. Preferably, a brush having rather stiff bristles is used.
Normally the polishing will not take place until after the paint has set so that it has lost its original sheen. The brushing or polishing thus produces a glossy portion to the painted design, so that in effect for any one color you have produced a two-color effect.
The present method does not contemplate the obtaining of the two-color effect in itself as shown in United States Patent No. 2,082,050, dated June 1, 1937, but only the provision of such two-color effects for each of the colors initially applied to and forming a part of the composite design.
In other words, for every color of paint initially applied to the composite design, the final polishing operation through stencil l8 will achieve dou-' ble the number of colors in the final design, such as shown in Figure 4. It is understood that the polishing is such that the paint so polished is not removed.
It will be noted that polishing through sten-- oil It; shows the green portion 14 together with the glossy or shaded green elements 20 of a darker tone, which are indicated by darker shading. Furthermore, the red portions H whichform a part of the design contain therein theglossy or second shade of red, i. e., elements H of a darker tone, which are also shown by heavier vertical shading.
Thus, while only the two colors red and green: were applied to the design, the present method provides for the four color effect shown in Figure 4.
Naturally, the present method may be carried further by employing additional paper stencils: of the type shown in Figures 1 and 2 and by using. additional colors. The same result will follow in the final design inasmuch as there will be double the number of visible color effects pro duced.
The designs which may include murals, wall paper designs, wood carvings, scenic designs, landscapes, flowers, or any desired wall decorations, will be produced in multiple colored elements, and the entire design will have a longlasting washable surface, and the time required for producing the multi-colored designs will be considerably less than the time normally required by other methods in producing multi-colored de- Slgl'lS.
Having described my invention, reference should now be had to the claims which follow for determining the scope thereof.
I claim:
1. The method of painting and decorating walls and ceilings which comprises applying a stencil to such surface, applying a paint of one color to such surface through said stencil, said paint having the quality of spontaneously drying to a mat surface which can be changed to show a gloss if polished, permitting the paint to partially set, applying a second stencil to the same surface area, applying paint of the same character but of a second color to said surface through said second stencil, permitting the latter paint to partially set, applying a third stencil to the same surface area, and brushing the paints through the silhouette of said third stencil without removal of said paints to obtain a darker tone at the polished areas for each color of paint applied.
2. The method of painting and decorating a structural surface which comprises applying a stencil to such surface, the stencil being cut-out to outline part of a Composite design, applying a paint of one color to said surface through said stencil, said paint having a quality of spontaneously drying to a mat surface which can be changed to show a gloss if polished, permitting the paint to partially set, applying a second stencil to said surface, which stencil is cut-out to outline another part of said design, applying paint of the same character but of another color to said surface through said second stencil, permitting the latter paint to partially set, applying a third stencil to said surface, which stencil is cut-out to outline another part of said composite design, and brushing the paints through the cut-out portions of said third stencil without removal of said paint to obtain a darker tone at the polished areas for each color of paint applied throughout said design.
3. The method of painting and decorating a structural surface which comprises separately applying to a surface a plurality of stencils, each of which is cut-out to outline a part of a composite design, applying a difierent colored paint to said surface respectively through each of the cut-out portions of each of said stencils, said paint having the quality of spontaneously drying to a mat surface which can be changed to show a gloss if polished, permitting the paint to partially set, applying to said painted surface another 6 stencil whose cut-out portions outline another part of said composite design, and brushing the paints without removal thereof through th cutout portions of said latter stencil to obtain a darker-tone at the polished areas for each of the colors throughout the complete design.
CHARLES P. LYN DEN Name Date Ernst June 1, 1937 Number
US356439A 1953-05-21 1953-05-21 Method of painting and decorating Expired - Lifetime US2651871A (en)

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Cited By (25)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2704905A (en) * 1952-02-18 1955-03-29 Bro Kade Wall Finish Co Inc Method of painting and decorating
US2842464A (en) * 1953-03-02 1958-07-08 Saint Gobain Method of producing an electrical resistance on glass
US2934479A (en) * 1957-01-22 1960-04-26 Leon L Deer Process for masking printed circuits before plating
US2959525A (en) * 1957-10-11 1960-11-08 Melpar Inc Method for plating at least two different kinds of metals on printed circuits
US3061881A (en) * 1959-05-05 1962-11-06 George W Woelfel Methods for producing three dimensional signs
US3665889A (en) * 1971-01-18 1972-05-30 Anita Wagenvoord Stencils for producing composite display
US3978265A (en) * 1973-11-10 1976-08-31 Dowty Seals Limited Gasket material
US4029831A (en) * 1975-06-19 1977-06-14 Masonite Corporation Method of making a multi-gloss panel
US4335163A (en) * 1980-09-25 1982-06-15 Wong Jack Y High gloss water-base coating composition
US4384065A (en) * 1980-09-25 1983-05-17 Wong Jack Y High gloss water-base coating composition
US5462768A (en) * 1991-08-09 1995-10-31 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Screen printing process using water-based chemical composition
GB2290055A (en) * 1994-06-04 1995-12-13 Oasis Art & Craft Products Ltd Producing a piece of artwork and a paint kit
US5788873A (en) * 1996-07-02 1998-08-04 Warsaw; Nick E. Snow mold
US5791252A (en) * 1995-11-22 1998-08-11 Cpe, Inc. Method and stamping device for creating an aligned design
WO2001078904A1 (en) 2000-04-14 2001-10-25 One Heart...One Mind Masking apparatus and method
US20040043221A1 (en) * 2002-08-30 2004-03-04 3M Innovative Properties Company Method of adhering a film and articles therefrom
US20040081844A1 (en) * 2002-08-30 2004-04-29 Vivek Bharti Method of making erasable articles and articles therefrom
US20040202820A1 (en) * 2002-08-30 2004-10-14 3M Innovative Properties Company Perforated electret articles and method of making the same
US6805048B2 (en) 2002-08-30 2004-10-19 3M Innovative Properties Company Method of marking a substrate using an electret stencil
US20050042580A1 (en) * 2003-08-05 2005-02-24 Bihua Liu Novel method for paintings
US20090176019A1 (en) * 2003-08-05 2009-07-09 Bihua Liu Flowing colors oil paint and its use
US20100015419A1 (en) * 2003-08-05 2010-01-21 Bihua Liu Flowing Colors Oil Painting (Waterless)
US20100239760A1 (en) * 2009-03-17 2010-09-23 Bihua Liu Flowing colors oil paint and its use
EP2239139A2 (en) 2009-04-10 2010-10-13 Plaid Enterprises, Inc. Composite stencils, methods of making, and methods of decorating with composite stencils
US9193144B2 (en) 2009-04-10 2015-11-24 Procraft Development B.V. Composite stencils, methods of making, and methods of decorating with composite stencils

Citations (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2082050A (en) * 1936-12-21 1937-06-01 Otto F Gargen Method of painting and decorating

Patent Citations (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2082050A (en) * 1936-12-21 1937-06-01 Otto F Gargen Method of painting and decorating

Cited By (28)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2704905A (en) * 1952-02-18 1955-03-29 Bro Kade Wall Finish Co Inc Method of painting and decorating
US2842464A (en) * 1953-03-02 1958-07-08 Saint Gobain Method of producing an electrical resistance on glass
US2934479A (en) * 1957-01-22 1960-04-26 Leon L Deer Process for masking printed circuits before plating
US2959525A (en) * 1957-10-11 1960-11-08 Melpar Inc Method for plating at least two different kinds of metals on printed circuits
US3061881A (en) * 1959-05-05 1962-11-06 George W Woelfel Methods for producing three dimensional signs
US3665889A (en) * 1971-01-18 1972-05-30 Anita Wagenvoord Stencils for producing composite display
US3978265A (en) * 1973-11-10 1976-08-31 Dowty Seals Limited Gasket material
US4029831A (en) * 1975-06-19 1977-06-14 Masonite Corporation Method of making a multi-gloss panel
US4335163A (en) * 1980-09-25 1982-06-15 Wong Jack Y High gloss water-base coating composition
US4384065A (en) * 1980-09-25 1983-05-17 Wong Jack Y High gloss water-base coating composition
US5462768A (en) * 1991-08-09 1995-10-31 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Screen printing process using water-based chemical composition
GB2290055A (en) * 1994-06-04 1995-12-13 Oasis Art & Craft Products Ltd Producing a piece of artwork and a paint kit
US5791252A (en) * 1995-11-22 1998-08-11 Cpe, Inc. Method and stamping device for creating an aligned design
US5788873A (en) * 1996-07-02 1998-08-04 Warsaw; Nick E. Snow mold
US6841337B1 (en) 2000-04-14 2005-01-11 Becki Speakman Masking apparatus and method
WO2001078904A1 (en) 2000-04-14 2001-10-25 One Heart...One Mind Masking apparatus and method
US20040081844A1 (en) * 2002-08-30 2004-04-29 Vivek Bharti Method of making erasable articles and articles therefrom
US20040202820A1 (en) * 2002-08-30 2004-10-14 3M Innovative Properties Company Perforated electret articles and method of making the same
US6805048B2 (en) 2002-08-30 2004-10-19 3M Innovative Properties Company Method of marking a substrate using an electret stencil
US20040043221A1 (en) * 2002-08-30 2004-03-04 3M Innovative Properties Company Method of adhering a film and articles therefrom
US20050042580A1 (en) * 2003-08-05 2005-02-24 Bihua Liu Novel method for paintings
US20090176019A1 (en) * 2003-08-05 2009-07-09 Bihua Liu Flowing colors oil paint and its use
US7572126B2 (en) * 2003-08-05 2009-08-11 Bihua Liu Flowing colors oil painting
US20100015419A1 (en) * 2003-08-05 2010-01-21 Bihua Liu Flowing Colors Oil Painting (Waterless)
US20100239760A1 (en) * 2009-03-17 2010-09-23 Bihua Liu Flowing colors oil paint and its use
EP2239139A2 (en) 2009-04-10 2010-10-13 Plaid Enterprises, Inc. Composite stencils, methods of making, and methods of decorating with composite stencils
US9193144B2 (en) 2009-04-10 2015-11-24 Procraft Development B.V. Composite stencils, methods of making, and methods of decorating with composite stencils
US10449567B2 (en) 2009-04-10 2019-10-22 Procraft Development B.V. Composite stencils, methods of making, and methods of decorating with composite stencils

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