US2642474A - Electrical connector - Google Patents

Electrical connector Download PDF

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US2642474A
US2642474A US11565249A US2642474A US 2642474 A US2642474 A US 2642474A US 11565249 A US11565249 A US 11565249A US 2642474 A US2642474 A US 2642474A
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shell
insulator
connector
end
portion
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Earl C Bowar
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Honeywell Inc
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Honeywell Inc
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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01RLINE CONNECTORS; CURRENT COLLECTORS
    • H01R24/00Two-part coupling devices, or either of their cooperating parts, characterised by their overall structure
    • H01R24/38Two-part coupling devices, or either of their cooperating parts, characterised by their overall structure having concentrically or coaxially arranged contacts
    • H01R24/40Two-part coupling devices, or either of their cooperating parts, characterised by their overall structure having concentrically or coaxially arranged contacts specially adapted for high frequency
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01RLINE CONNECTORS; CURRENT COLLECTORS
    • H01R2103/00Two poles
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S439/00Electrical connectors
    • Y10S439/907Contact having three contact surfaces, including diverse surface

Description

June 16, -1953 E. C. BOWAR ELECTRICAL CONNECTR Filed Sept. 14, 1949 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Snventor *EARL o. BowAR Cttomeg June 16, 1953 E. c. BOWAR 2,642,474

ELECTRICAL CONNECTOR Filed Sept. 14, 1949 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 ao 77 67 uo es 759' I los 14 |02 l0l |07 94 92 25 85 t as 95 93 Summer EAR L C. BOWAR Gttorneg Patented June 16, 1953 ELECTRICAL CONNECTOR Earl C. Bowar, Minneapolis, Minn., assigner to Minneapolis-Honeywell Regulator Company, Minneapolis, Minn., a corporation of Delaware Application `September 14, 1949, Serial No. 115,652

Claims.

This invention is concerned with electrical connectors and more specifically with fluid tight connectors.

Heretofore as far as applicant has been aware there have been no small, lightweight quickdisconnect type of electrical connectors which were fluid tight in aromatic fuels, gripped an insulated conductor tightly, and provided a long electrical leakage path between the metallic portions of the connector Iand the conductor.

It is therefore an object of the invention to provide a connector which will not permit liquid to seep through to the bared conductor within the connector.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a connector which has a long electrical leakage path between the metallic portions of the connector and the conductor.

Another object is to provide a connector in which the various portions of the connector are centered with respect to each other when the connector is put together. I

Another object is to provide a connector in which the insulated portions butt together with the mechanical stress on ythese portions maintained along the length of the insulators.

These objects are accomplished by providing the long insulators which are used in the connectors with tongues and grooves at the ends of these insulators which meet. long electrical leakage path between the metallic portions of the connector and the bared conductor inside. The tongue and groove point `between the insulators also serves tol center these insulators with respect to each other and also all other parts within these insulators and also causes an even distribution of the mechanical stress between these insulators. A compressed resilient insulator is placed along all joints along the insulation path between the metallic :portions of the connector and the bared conductor for the purpose of preventing liquid from seeping through.

Another object of the invention is to provide a connector which tightly grips the insulated conductor and removes any strain from the soldered joint between the conductor and the pin in the connector.

This object is accomplished by using a bushing in the connector which clamps down on the conductor and holds it rmly when the various parts of the connector are put together.

For a more complete understanding of the invention reference is made to the following detailed description taken in commotion With the accompanying drawings in which:

This provides a Figure 1 shows a pair of assembled connectors,

Description of Figures 1 and 2 Figure 1 shows a pair of conductors I9 and brought electrically together by a pair of con-` nectors. Conductor I0 is covered by insulation I2 and conductor II is covered by insulation |3. The upper connector in Figure 1, which is the connector shown at the left in Figure 2 will be described first.

A generally cylindrical ferrule I4 is shown to be turned inwardly at end I5 to form an annular abutment and the opposite end thereof is threaded internally at I6. Ferrule I4 also has a knurled portion I'| for ease in turning the ferrule manually when it is being threaded to a shell or plug 30.. p

Within the ferrule is a collet 20 having an annular base 2| which fits closely Within the confines of ferrule I4. Collet 20 also has a number of resilient arms 22 which clamp down upon the insulated portion of conductor I0. The

- end of each arm 22 opposite the annular ring 2| is enlarged as at head 23 which has bevelled surfaces 24 for a purpose presently to be described.

Also within ferruleV I4 is an annular actuator 25 which fits snugly within the ferrule I4 and abuts against a surface 25 of the turned-in portion I5 of the ferrule. The inner surface of the actuator is bevelled as at surface 2`| to make sliding contact with surfaces 24 of collet 20 to force the arms 22 inwardly against the insulated conductor l0 as the ferrule is tightened on the shell 30.

The shell has a threaded connection 3| with the upper ferrule. The shell 30 has a hexagonal surface 32 to facilitate holding the shell 30 when turning ferrule I4 with respect thereto. Shell 30 also has an internal shoulder 33 and an extending cylindrical portion 34 opposite the threaded end at 3|. A pair of ears 35 extend outwardly from the cylindrical portion 34 of the shell 30 and form part of a bayonet connection with the other connector as will appear hereinafter.

Located within shell 30 is an insulator 36 of relatively rigid material such as molded nylon having an enlarged portion 31 butting against the shoulder 33 within shell 30. At the lower end of the insulator 33 is an extending cylinder 45 having an outside diameter smaller than the inside diameter of the cylindrical portion 34 of shell 35. It should be noted that the inner surface of the cylindrical portion 34 on shell 3Q is bevelled so that the inside diameter of the end of the cylindrical portion 34 away from the hexagonal portion 32 is greater than the insidediameter of the end of the cylindrical portion adjacent the hexagonal portion 32. At the end of insulator 33 opposite the cylindrical portion 4l! is an annular tongue 4l for purposes presently to be described.

Inside insulator 36 is a pin 42 having an enlarged portionv 43 butting against a shoulder 44 of the insulator. The end of the pin 42 extends within the cylindrical portion 44 of the insulator andkcomes to a point 45 near the outer endof the cylindrical portion 45 of the insulator 35. On the other side of the enlarged portion 43 of the pin'is a solder pot 46 to which the conductor I is soldered.

Also within shell 30 is a second cylindrical insulator 41 which may be made of the same material as insulator 35 having an annular grooved end 50 for cooperating with tongue 4I of insulator 35. At the base of the groove 50 is a resilient washer I which is compressed when insulators 33 and 41 are forced together.

The end of insulator 41 opposite the grooved end is bevelled inwardly and engages a resilient gasket 52 which fits within an enlarged annular hollow portion within base 2l of collet 20 and is compressed against the insulated conductor l5 when compressed between insulator 41 and collet 23 to form a fluid tight seal between the insulator 41 and t-he wire insulation I2. The connector is assembled as follows. The conductor l0 is first passed through the ferrule i4 with the bared end of the conductor extending from the threaded end of the ferrule. The actuator 25, the collet 2D, the gasket 52 and the insulator 41 are then passed over the conductor.. The insulator 5I is placed within the grooved portion 50 of insulator 41. l

After the actuator, collet, gasket and insulator have been passed over the conductor the bared end of the conductor is soldered into the solder pot 46 of the pin 42.

The insulator 36 is placed withinthe shell 3l! from the threaded end 3l so that the enlarged portion 31 butts against shoulder 33 of the shell and the cylindrical portion 4B is within the cylindrical portion 34 of the shell. The ferrule and shell are then threaded together with the tongue 4l of insulator 355 tting into the grooved portion 5l! of insulator 41, the gasket 5l forming a. pressure tight seal between the insulators 36 and 41. The pin on the end of the conductor extends so that the point 45 of the pin is approximately flush with the end of the cylindrical portions 40 and 34 of insulator 36 and shell 30 respectively. f

Several parts of the connector shown in the lower portion of Figure 1 and in the right hand portion of Figure 2 are identical to parts already described and the same reference numerals are used for their designation. The ferrule I4, actuator 25, collet 20, gasket 52, insulator 41 and washer 5l are all identical to the corresponding parts in the connector in the upper portion of Figure 1 and left hand portion of Figure 2 and therefore a portion of these parts have been cut away in Figure 1 and are shown in the assembled position in Figure 2.

A socket 53 has an enlarged central portion 54 and a solder pot 55 on its lower end to which conductor Il is soldered. At the end of the socket opposite the solder pot is a cylindrical portion 56 which is bifurcated for most of its length and is adapted to grasp the pin 42 of the upper connector resiliently when the two connectors are fastened together to com-plete an electrical connection between conductors Il! and ll.

A shell 51 has an externally threaded portion 6B by which it is threaded to ferrule i4. The shell also has a hexagonal portion 6l for ease in threading the shell to the ferrule. The end of shell 51 opposite the threaded portion is cylindri- A ring 63 having an enlarged lower end B4 is fastened over the' shell 51. This is accomplished as follows. A washer 65 is passed over the cylindrical portion of the shell 51 and is followed by three yspring washers 55, and then by a split washer 51 which is fitted into a groove 15 in the shell. The ring is then passed over the various washers and is spun over the end of washer 55. The three spring washers 66 permit the ring a small freedom of longitudinal movement on the shell 51. This is for a purpose to be described later. The ring 53 has a pair of slanting grooves 1l" into which the ears 35 of shell 3G caribe inserted to lock the two connectors together. This type or" fasteningtwo connectors together is 01d in the art and is merely discussed here briefly.

An insulator 12 has an enlarged portion `13 which Yts against a shoulder 14 inside shell 51. Adjacent the enlarged portion of insulator 12 is an annularA tongue 15 which is fitted into the groove 5il-of the insulator 41 and against the washer 5I. At the end of insulator 12 opposite the tongue 15 is a cylindrical` portion 15 having an outside diameter approximately equal to the inside diameter of the cylindrical vportion 40 of insulator 36 in the first described connector and fits within it when the two connectors are joined together. The inside diameter of this cylindrical portion 16 is approximately equal to the outside diameter of the cylindrical portion 55 of socket 53. A shoulder 11 inside insulator 12 is butted against by the `enlarged portion 54 of socket 53 to hold the socket rmly in place against the upper end of insulator 41.

A gasket of resilient material is placed about the cylindrical portion 15 of insulator 12 and butts against a shoulder 8| of this insulator. Washer 80 is compressed between the shoulder 8| and the end of the cylindrical portion 4U of insulator 36 when the two connectors are fastened together to form a fluid tight seal between the insulators 36 and 12.

This connector is put together in the same manner as previously described in connection with the upper connector. 'The conductor Ii is passed through ferrule I4 and then the actuator, collet, grommet, and insulator 41 are passed over the conductor as has been ldescribed with respect to the previously described connector. The socket 53 is then soldered to the conductor Il and the insulator 12 is passed over the socket and the washer 80 is passed over the cylindrical porcal and is divided into a number of resilient arms tion of the insulator 12. The shell 5 1 is then threaded to the ferrule I4.

In certain respects both connectors operate in the same manner. When the ferrule is tightened on the shell the bevelled surface 21 of the collet actuator is forced against the bevelled surface 24 of the collet to cause the arms 22 of the collet to move inwardly to grasp firmly theinsulation on the conductors I or II. This holds the conductor rmly in the connector and prevents stress being applied to the soldered junction.

Tightening the ferrule on the shell also moves the collet longitudinally to compress the gasket 52 against the end of the insulator 41. The gasket expands laterally to engage the insulated surface of the lconductor and forms a fluid tight seal between the insulated surface of the conductorfand the gasket and between the gasket and the insulator 41. At the same time the washer is compressed between insulator 41 and either insulator 36 or 12 to form a fluid tight seal between these insulators. When the two connectors are joined together, washer 80 'is compressed between insulators 36 and 12 to form a fluid tight path between these two insulators. It is thus seen that all of the paths by which fluid might get to the bare metal conductors or the pin or socket from outside the connectors have been made fluid tight.

Wires having different diameter insulation may be used in these connectors merely by using collets 20 and gaskets 52 having appropriate inside diameters, the remaining parts of the connectors all being of single standard sizes. If a shielded cable is used a longitudinally split collet is substituted for the single member collet. The shielding is cut back suciently so that the collet grasps the shielded portion of the cable but the gasket 52 grasps the insulated portion of the cable and makes a nuid tight path between the gasket and the insulation. The shielding of the cable is continued through the outer portions of the connectors.

An electrical surface leakage path exists along all paths between two members of different protential. It is desirable to have as high a resistance along these paths as may be feasibly possible to keep the current drainage to a minimum. One method of increasing the resistance of this path is to increase the length of the path. The tongue and groove connection between the insulators of each connector provide a comparatively long electrical leakage path between the conductor and the outer portions of each connector and in addition increase the mechanical strength of the connector. A long electrical leakage path between the connection of the pin and socket of the connectors and the outer portions of the connectors is provided in that the path lies along almost the entire length of the cylindrical portions of insulators 36 and 12.

These connectors are also adaptable for connecting together tubing capable of carrying some sort of fluid. Theend of the tubing would extend past the gasket 52 which would effectively seal the end of the tubing from the ferrule end of the connector and prevent any fluid from escaping out along the tubing. The other paths from the center to the outside have already been shown to be fluid tight. The collet would clamp down on the tubing and hold it firmly in the connector.

Description of Figures 3, and 5 Figure 3 shows a T connector embodying vari-` ous features of this invention. Here again many discussed may -be used, and identical parts are given the same reference numerals.

The left arm of the T connector has a ferrule I4, a collet actuator 25, a collet 20, a grommet 52 and an insulator 41 all identicalwith those used in the connectors shown in Figures 1 and 2.

In the upper arm of the T connector parts identical with the lower connector shown in Figure 1 and the right hand connector shown in Figure 2 are the ring 63, the split Washer 61, the three spring washers 66, the washer 85, the resilient washer and the insulator 12.

The T connector here shown comprises a shell 82 having arms 83, 84 and 85 all of which are externally threaded. AS seen more clearly in Figure 4- the lower portion of the shell 82 is open but the lower portions 86 and 81 of the shell are bent inwardly to hold a plate 90.

A shell 9| is similar to shell 51 shown in the lower connector of Figure 1 and the right hand connector of Figure 2 with the exception that shell 9| is internally threaded rather than being externally threaded as is shell 51. The ring 63 is, however, fastened onto shell 9I in the same manner as it can be fastened onto shell 51. Shell 9| is threaded onto the upper arm of shell 82.

A shell or plug 92 having ears 93 is internally threaded as at 94 and is shown to be threaded onto the right hand arm 83 of shell 82. Plug 92 has a shoulder 95 on its inner surface. An insulator 96 lits within plug 92 and seats against the shoulder 95 which holds it in the connector. The outside diameter of the end of insulator 95 is decreased to permit the insertion of the resilient arms 62 of a shell 51 of a connector such as shown in the lower portion of Figure 1 when such a connector is joined to this arm of the T connector.

An insulator 91 having three arms |00, |0| and |02 is placed within shell 82 with arm |00 extending in the direction of arm 83 of the shell,

arm |0I extending in the direction of arm 84 of the shell and arm |02 extending in the direction of arm of the shell. Arms |00 and |02 have annular tongues |03 and |04 respectively, at their extremities. Arm IOI has an annular groove |05 at its extremity. On the side of the insulator away from arm IOI is a centrally positioned boss 98.

Tongue 03 of insulator 91 ts into a groove |06 of insulator 96 while groove |05 and tongue 'I5 of insulator 12 cooperate as do tongue |04 and groove 50 of insulator 41. The insulator 91 is molded of resilient material so no separate gaskets are required in the tongue and groove joints.

Within the insulator 91 and extending upward into arm I 0I of insulator 91 is a socket |01 having an enlarged portion IIO- which butts against shoulder 11 of insulator 12. Socket |01 has a screw-threaded portion III at the end within the insulator 91. A solder pot II2 to which a conductor extending through ferrule I4 may be soldered is shown to extend into arm |02 of insulator 91. This solder pot I|2 has an aperture at the `end within'the center of the insulator S1 such that it may be passed over the threaded portion III of socket I 01. AA pin |I3 extends fromarm |00 of insulator 91 and through the center of insulator 96. Pin II3 has a threaded aperture at its end within the center of the insulator 91 into which threaded portion III of socket `I0I is threaded.

This connector is assembled as follows. The insulator 91 is passed up into shell 82 through the open bottom of shell 82. The metal plate is then placed over the opening on the bottom of shell 82 and the ears 86 and 81 are crimpedl inwardly to hold the plate firmly in position and provides a seat for boss 98 to hold insulator 37 in position and provide a ilrm base for the threaded connection between socket |01 and pin H3. Solder pot H2 and pin H3 are placed into arms E and |02 of Vinsulator 91 and socket |01 is extended down through the upper arm IBI of the insulator, through the aperture in' the end of solder pot I I2 and threaded into theV aperture in the end of pin H3. The assemblying of the various arms of the connector is the same as that described for the connectors shown in Figures 1 and 2. f

Obviously, if it is so desired, an extension such as is on the left arm B5 of shell 82 may also be placed on the right armV 83 of the shell as the iittings are identical. Also if so desired an extension such as is on the right hand arm 83 of the shell could also be placed on the left arm 85.

A pin could replace socket Illl in the upper arm merely by replacing insulator 'i2 with insulator 36. It vshould also be obvious that in the connectors shown in Figures 1 and 2 the pin and socket could be interchanged merely by in'- terchanging insulators 36 and 12. Likewise, shell 5l', washers E5, and 6l and jack 63 could be substituted for plug Sii and vice versa. Thus it can be seen that a jack and pin or jack and socket or plug and pin or plug and socket type of connector can be made from a minimurn'number of parts. Also, various sizes of insulated conductors may be accommodated in the connector merely by using different sized collets and washers 52.

It can be seen with respect to the T connector that by use of the tongue and groove connection between insulators a long electrical leakage path has been obtained. Because insulator Eil is of a resilient material no Washer is required in the bottom of the groove of the insulators joining with this insulator in order to obtain a iiuid tight path. Because of the tongue and groove type of connection between the various insulators the stress against the insulators is maintained along the length of the insulators to increase their mechanical strength.

It is thus seen that I have provided a small, light weight quick-disconnect type of electrical connector which grips insulated conductors tightly, is iluid tight and provides a long electrical leakage path from the conductor to ground.

Though the above disclosure shows the preferred manner of using the present invention in connectors it is to be understood that I limit myself only to the extent of the appended claims.

I claim as my invention:

1. An electrical connector comprising in combination: a shell; a ferrule having one end to be joined to said shell, the end of the ferrule remote from the shell being turned inwardly to form an annular abutment; an actuator having a frusto-conically shaped inner surface at the inwardly turned portion of the ferrule; a pair of insulators carried by said shell and provided with a centrally extending contact, the insulators completely containing the contact, one of said insulators having an annular tongue at one end thereof and the other insulator having an annular groove at one end thereof for cooperating with the tongue on said one insulator; and a collet, one portion of which is frusto-conical in shape and the balance cylindrical and having a plurality of slots extending substantially the length of the collet, said collet being conned Within said ferrule with the frustoeconical por'- tion of said collet adjacent the innersurface of the actuator such that joining said shell and said ferrule together causes the collet to firmly grip a conductor entering said connector, seat the tongue and groove connection between the insulators to effect a uid tight seal therebetween, permit an even distribution of mechanical stress against'the sides of the groove and provide a substantially long electrical leakage path vbe tween said shell and said conductor,

`2. An electrical connector comprising in combination: a shell; a ferrule having one end to be joined'to saidshell, the end of the ferrule remote from the shell being turned inwardly to form an annular abutment; an actuator having a frusto-conically shaped innerfsurface at the inwardly turned portion of the ferrule; a pair of insulators carried by said shell and provided with a centrally extending contact, the insulators completely containing the contact, one of said insulators having an annular tongue at one end and the other insulator having an annular groove at one end `for cooperating with the tongue on said one insulator; -a gasket at the ferrule end of said insulators; anda collet, one portion of which is frusto-conical in shape and thebalance cylindrical and having `a plurality of slots extending substantially the length of the collet, said collet being conned within said ferrule with the frusto-conical portion of said collet adjacent the inner surface of the actuator Vsuch that'joining said shell `and said ferrule together causes the colletto firmly gripa conductor entering said connector, compress the gasket radially against the conductor to grip the conductor and form a fluid tight seal about the conductor, seat theI tongue and groove connection between the insulators to effect a uid tight seal therebetween, cause an even distribution of mechanical stress against the sides of the groove, and provide a substantially long electrical leakage path between said shell and said conductor.

Y 3. An electrical connector comprising in combination: a shell having a plurality of hollow extensions and an aperture on one side opposite one of the extensions and a detachable plate for covering the aperture; an insulator containing a plurality of hollow extensions, each extension of said insulator tting within an extension of said shell, various of said insulator extensions having tongued ends and the remainder having grooved ends, the insulator being insertable Within said shell through the aperture; further insulators joining said rst insulator at the ends of its extensions and cooperating with the tongued and grooved ends; a contact within each of said extensions, said contacts being electrically connected together within said connector; and a plurality of housings to be so connected to the extensions of Said shell as to force said insulators together and effect a fluid tight seal between said insulators.

4. An electrical connector comprising in coinbinationz'a shell having an internal abutment; a ferrule having one end tov be joined to said shell, the end of the ferrule remote from the shell being turned inwardly to form anannular abutment; an actuator having a frusto-conically shaped inner surface at the inwardly turned portion of the ferrule; a rst insulating member within said shell and having an abutment cooperating with the internal abutment on said shell and having an internal abutment and having an annular tongue at one end; a conducting member havingan external enlarged portion forming an 9 abutment cooperating with the internal abutment on said first insulating member; a second insulating member having an annular groove at one end for cooperating with the tongue on said one insulating member within said shell and having an internal abutment engaging the external abutment formed by the enlarged portion of said conducting member to retain said conducting member in fixed relation to said insulating members; a gasket engaging the second end of said second insulating member; and a collet, one portion of which is frusto-conical in shape and the balance cylindrical and having a plurality of slots extending substantially the length of the collet, said collet being confined within said ferrule with the frusto-conical portion of said collet adjacent the inner surface of the actuator such that joining said shell and said ferrule together causes the collet to rmly grip a conductor entering said connector, compress Y the gasket radially against the conductor to grip the conductor and form a tight seal about the conductor, seat the tongue and groove connection between the insulators to eiect a fluid tight seal therebetween, cause an even distribution of mechanical stress against the sides of the groove, and provide a substantially long electrical leakage path between said shell and said conductor.

5. An electrical connector comprising in combination: a shell having an internal abutment; a ferrule having one end to be joined to said shell, the end of the ferrule remote from the shell being turned inwardly to form an annular abutment; an actuator having a rusto-conically shaped inner surface at the inwardly turned portion of the ferrule; a iirst insulating member Within said shell and having an abutment cooperating with the internal abutment on said shell and having an internal abutment and having an annular tongue at one end; a conducting member having an external enlarged portion forming an abutment cooperating with the internal abutment on said first insulating member; a second insulating member having an annular groove at one end for cooperating with the tongue on said one insulating member within said shell and 10 having an internal abutment engaging the external abutment formed by the enlarged portion of said conducting member to retain said conducting member in xed relation to said insulating members; a gasket coacting with the second end of said second insulating member; and a collet, one portion of which is frusto-conical in shape and the balance cylindrical and having a plurality of slots extending substantially the length of the collet, said collet being confined within said ferrule with the frusto-conical portion of said collet adjacent the inner surface of the actuator such that joining said shell and said ferrule together causes the collet to firmly grip a conductor entering said connector and compress the gasket radially against the conductor to grip the conductor and form a fluid tight seal about the conductor.

EARL C. BOWAR.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 857,024 Bradshaw June 18, 1907 1,418,468 Raus June 6, 1922 1,997,081 Reynolds Apr. 9, 1935 2,014,853 Ley et al Sept. 17, 1935 2,059,008 Marquart Oct. 27, 1936 2,126,002 Gardner Aug. 9, 1938 2,177,508 Abbott Oct. 24, 1939 2,195,630 Papp et al Apr. 2, 1940 2,275,762 Horton Mar. 10, 1942 2,286,952 Cannon et al June 16, 1942 2,365,219 Rose Dec. 19, 1944 2,383,926 White Aug. 28, 1945 2,386,177 Andersen Oct. 9, 1945 2,411,861 Antony, Jr. et al. Dec. 3, 1946 2,422,982 Quackenbush June 24, 1947 2,440,279 Larkins, Jr. Apr. 27, 1948 2,443,654 Else et al June 22, 1948 2,448,509 Antony, Jr. et al. Sept.7, 1948 2,466,997 Morris Apr. 12, 1949 2,513,080 Buitt June 27, 1950

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US2754487A (en) * 1952-03-14 1956-07-10 Airtron Inc T-connectors for coaxial cables
US2767384A (en) * 1953-12-09 1956-10-16 Erico Prod Inc Quick connector
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US2730684A (en) * 1954-08-30 1956-01-10 Alfred S Gutman Electrical connectors
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US3112976A (en) * 1960-10-14 1963-12-03 Nat Company Inc Electrical connector
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US3792419A (en) * 1971-07-09 1974-02-12 G Spinner Coaxial cables
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US20050161246A1 (en) * 2002-01-18 2005-07-28 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Triaxial connector including cable clamp
CN100474706C (en) 2002-01-18 2009-04-01 Adc电信股份有限公司 Triaxial connector including cable clamp
US7197821B2 (en) 2002-01-18 2007-04-03 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Triaxial connector including cable clamp
US20070175027A1 (en) * 2002-01-18 2007-08-02 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Triaxial connector including cable clamp
US6846988B2 (en) 2002-01-18 2005-01-25 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Triaxial connector including cable clamp
US7480991B2 (en) 2002-01-18 2009-01-27 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Method of mounting a triaxial connector to a cable
US20070298661A1 (en) * 2006-06-21 2007-12-27 Noah Montena Filter Housing
US7442084B2 (en) 2006-06-21 2008-10-28 John Mezzalingua Associates, Inc. Filter housing
US20090103881A1 (en) * 2007-10-22 2009-04-23 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Fiber optic cable clamp
US20100215331A1 (en) * 2007-10-22 2010-08-26 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Fiber optic cable clamp
US8364000B2 (en) 2007-10-22 2013-01-29 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Fiber optic cable clamp
US7711236B2 (en) 2007-10-22 2010-05-04 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Fiber optic cable clamp
US20110061896A1 (en) * 2009-03-05 2011-03-17 Schott Ag Electrical power connection device
US8367935B2 (en) * 2009-03-05 2013-02-05 Schott Ag Electrical power connection device
EP2551966A3 (en) * 2011-07-26 2013-08-28 Tyco Electronics AMP Italia S.r.l. Electric connector with a cable clamping portion

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