US2637873A - Automatic car washer with airactuated agitator - Google Patents

Automatic car washer with airactuated agitator Download PDF

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US2637873A
US2637873A US97389A US9738949A US2637873A US 2637873 A US2637873 A US 2637873A US 97389 A US97389 A US 97389A US 9738949 A US9738949 A US 9738949A US 2637873 A US2637873 A US 2637873A
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strips
conduit
air
nozzle
automobile
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US97389A
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Mischa N Berezny
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DAVID R SHUSETT
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DAVID R SHUSETT
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60SSERVICING, CLEANING, REPAIRING, SUPPORTING, LIFTING, OR MANOEUVRING OF VEHICLES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • B60S3/00Vehicle cleaning apparatus not integral with vehicles
    • B60S3/04Vehicle cleaning apparatus not integral with vehicles for exteriors of land vehicles

Description

12, 1953 M. N. BEREZNY 2,537,873
AUTOMATIC CAR WASHER WITH AIR-ACTUAfrED AGITATOR Filed Jun@ 6, 1949 Patented May 12, 1953 VENT OFFICE AUTOMATIC CAR WASHER-WITHIR- ACTUATED AGITATOR Mischa N. Bgrezny, Humiiigtqn Park, Calif., assignor to l1)'avid`1t.Slliusett,` Beverly Hills, Calif.
Application June c, 194erserial- 1%.r 97,389
The present inventionrelates generally'to automatic washers ofthetype .used primarilyito wash automobiles, and is of a general type where'- in the surface'tcbe washed is sprayed fwitha strong detergent solution and then scoured or scrubbed by the beating action of the tip endsof a pluralityof closely spaoed,.relatively thin strips of soft, iexible materialwhich are whipped into a uttering .vibrational movement by a high velocity stream of air or liquid,.orbymechanical means. f 4 1 In this type ofmachine there is employed a fringe-like member of` rubber or other soft. and resilient material, one edge of which is attached to a supporting" airconduit structure, `andithe other edge being slit to` form long slenderr strips. A blast of air issuing from a nozzleextending along the length of the conduit carries the-free ends of the strips out with it, `yieldinglyopressing the same against the surface to be Washed, and atthe same time whipping thentip ends .of the strips into a fluttering vibration so .that .the said tip ends are causedy toA beat againstthe surface.y This beating. action 0f-the ltip-@ends of the strips, together with a certain amount of rubbing action against the surface which has been found to take place, produces a scouring or scrubbing effect similar to that obtained with a rotary brush.
I have found. that the effectivenessof this type of washer is greatly increased by oscillating or reciprocating the fringe-like scrubberffwith respect to the surface to be Washed as thelatter moves through the machine; due, apparently,
to the increased rubbingor .wiping action .of-the tip ends of the strips against the surface, which results from such movement. -It is thetprirnary object of the present invention, therefore, to pro'- vide a washer of the type referred to,vvvherein the fringedike scrubber is mountedforfniove- L Another, discoveryjthat Ilhave madeis that k the, effetveness-Ofthefrillgedike scrubber is. considerably improved .if eachrof, the;-.strpsis 5 crains. (cllisfsosi roughenedyas by, tasseling or bristling its free endfeitherrby slitting the end of the strip to forma pluralityofr thread-like strips, or by providing fibrous threads or bristles at the end ofthe-strip.; said lthreads being either cemented to., or embedded vin the strips with just their ends-(exposed, or being `fastened as tufts to the ends :of the strips;v The beating and rubbing of these tasseledlor bristled ends of the strips against the surfacev to be washed produces a gentle yet thorough scrubbing and wipingaction that effectively loosens andremoves vallsoil over the entire surface, leaving the surface spotlessly clean: Another object'of the invention, therefore, isftoprovidela scrubbing device for autokmatic'carjvvashers of 'the class described, comprising a plurality `of closely spaced, relatively ,thinl `stripsnof soft, flexible material, such as rubbencwherein the vfree ends of the strips are tasseledaor bristl'ed with threads or bers or otherwisejroughened. 1 y
Thefiforegoing and other objects and advan- .tagesv o fjthe present invention will become apparentto those skilled inthe art upon considerationfofythefollowing detailed description of the preferrediembodiment thereof, reference being hadto the-accompanying drawings, wherein:
Figurelis Van elevational view of one of the side units; of an automatic car Washerpembodying the principles `of the invention;
Figure `:2 is` a top planv viewof the same;
y Figure 3fisia transversesectienal view through the-air; conduit structure and fringe-like scrubber,l taken at 3e- 3f iny Figure 1;
Nj-*Figure 4" is a perspective view of a portion of the` iiexibleA scrubbing member removed from the;arLCQIIdutixand s f @Figureisganenlarged sectional view taken through .ihegtip end o'f one of the strips of the flexiblefscrubbing member, i'showing one method whereby 'fibrous threads or bristles may be attached to' ;the,. strip.
In the drawings, the yside unit of the autornaticgcar washer` ,is designated in its entirety by the reference ,numeral I0, and. is seen to comprise a verticallydisposed air conduit l! of relatively 1argediamete11which is vconnected to a motor driven lllower` ,l2 mountedfon a bracket or shelf I3 `projecting outwardly from a Wall Ill. Formed v along one side of the conduit l l is a longitudinally extendinginozzleportion lwhich is directed so as;,todischarge'ra-,blastof-air against the surface of .an automobile fA as thelatter is pulled through themachiine-.f'i ic f #A typicalzf installation for an' automatic car washer cf the type referred to is illustrated and described in more detail in my pending application, Serial No. 75,611, now abandoned, to which reference may be had. It is believed that a more detailed description of the car washing installation is unnecessary here, other than to add that there is another side unit similar to unit l@ located on the other side of the'automobile, while a third unit is suspended overhead, transverse to the line of travel of the automobiles, to wash the top surfaces thereof. The automobiles are drawn through the car washer between theside units ii! by a conveyor chain running in a channel in the door; 'ie said conveyor chain being connected to the bumper of the automobile by a short length of tow chain which is adapted to be hooked over the bumper, in a manner well known in the art. A low concrete curb E6 projects upwardly from the iioor parallel to the conveyor chain, and engages the inside wall of the tires on one side of the car to guide the saine through the washer. On the outside of the tire is an angle iron guide rail Il which engages the outside wall of the tire to hold the wheels to their course..
The fringe-like scrubbing member'of the invention is designated in its entirety by the reference numeral i9, and is preferably, although not necessarily, attached tothe inside surface of a lip 2i) forming one side of the nozzle I5; The member i9 is illustratively shown as being clamped to the lip- 2i] by a plate 2i which is clamped tightly'against the member l'by'bolts 22.
The preferred form of the fringe-like's'crubbing member it is best shownin the perspective view of Figure 4, wherein it will be seen that the inember comprises a relatively fiat stripl 25 of soft rubber or other flexible, rubber-like material'which tapers in thickness from oneedge tothe other. The thicker or base edge portion of the member i9 is attached to the nozzle lip 20 and the thinner edge thereof projects'for a considerable distance beyond the nozzle, as best shown in` Figure 3. The body 2% of the member IS'is slit back for a considerable distance from thethin edge thereof, forming a plurality of long, relatively narrow, closely spaced flexible strips or whips 26'which :are adapted to contact the surface to Ibe washed.
The strips 2@ maytalre any of several forms.
For example, they may be smoothly tapered out to their tip ends, or provided'with knob-like enlargements on their ends, such as I have shown in my aforementioned application; the-*purpose of suoli enlargements being `to increasethe'mass at the outer ends of the strips sovthat the tip i ends of the strips beat against/the surface to be washed with greater force than wouldotherwise be the case. However, I have found that `the effectiveness of the fringe-like scrubber'lgis considerably improved if each of the strips 26 is roughened on its outer surfaces, or if the strips are bristled with coarse, fibrous threads, or tasseled with tufts of fibrous threads.
The strip illustrated in Figure 5 is typical of the preferred formof my invention, and shows a twisted, multi-strand cord 30 that is embedded centrally in the strip 26`and extends lengthwise thereof. Adjacent the outer end of the strip, the strands of the cord 3i) are progressively unwound and brought out through opposite sidesof the strip 25, forming projecting bristles or threads 3G which are preferably about one inch in length, although the exact length is not believed to be important. The bristles 3l may be'st-iffened by imprcgnating themwith rubber or'one of the 4 resins, either natural or synthetic, or they may be left soft and pliable. Preferably, the long bristles 3i project outwardly from the surface of the strips 26 for about one-third of the length of the strip back from the outer tip ends thereof. Above this point, each of the strips 26 is bristled for the balance of its length with shorter bristles or fibers 32 which are preferably embedded in the strip at the time the member ii! is molded. The shorter bristles 32 may be only one-eighth to one-quarter of an inch in length, and therefore are-relatively stiffer than the longer bristles 3i.
When a blast of air issues from the nozzle l5, the strips 2t are carried outwardly with the stream and are agitated violently, setting up a fluttering, whipping action of the strips which causes the tip end portions thereof to beat against the surface of automobile. The direction of travel of the automobile A through the machine is indicated by the `arrow B, and it will be noted from Figures 2 and B'that the fringe-like scrubhing member i9 is directed rearwardly against the side of the automobile and at an angle thereto, with the outer` end portions of the strips 26 lying fiat against the side of the automobile. The snapping fluttering motion of the ends of the strips 26 'causes the latter to beat and rub agains the surface of the automobile, producing a scouring or scrubbing effect similar to that of a rotary brush, so that any loosened particles of soil are and either carried away by the air stream or rinsed off by the rinsing spray which is also discharged against' the side of the automobile.
In the broadest aspect of the invention, itis contemplated that the whipping vibration of the strips 26 might also be produced by the'action of ya high velocity jet of water or other fluid discharged alongside the strips, or by mechanical n the case of mechanical vibrationfof the strips, it would be necessary, of course, to provide sufficient stiffness in the strips 26 to main'- tain the tip end thereof in yielding contactI with the surface to be washed. It should be understood also that the strips 25 need not necessarily be joined to a common body 25, but might be entirely separate from one another.
Preferably, the car washer is providedwitha series of spray nozzles (not shown) arranged ahead of the apparatus depicted in Figures 1 and 2, which spray the car with strong detergent solution so that grease, road oil, and other surface films are einulsiiied and loosened before the car is advanced to the scrubbing station. Each of the units it! is preferably, although not necessarily, provided with a liquid supply piped!) having spray nozzles il connected thereto atintervals. The pipe di! extends parallel to the conduit l! and may be located on the inside of the conduit, as shown in Figure 3, or it may be attached to the outside thereof by suitable mounting' brackets. In either case, the nozzles 4l are directed into the blasts of air issuing,` from the nozzle I5, so that the liquid spray is mingled'with the stream of air and carried thereby to the surface being washed.
The liquid supply pipe 4Q may carry detergent solution to aid in emulsifying stubborn grease or oil nlms or it may carry clear rinse water which serves to rinse olf the detergent solution applied previously, together with particles of soil loosened by the beating and rubbing of the strips 26 against the surface of the automobile. If the liquid supply pipe et carries detergent solution, it will be necessary, of course, to provide a rinsing station ing'i of blower I2.
beyond the apparatus shown in Figures 1 and 2y which might consist either of a series of nozzles arranged to direct a spray of clear rinse Water at the car from all sides, or the rinsing station might consist of another arrangement of conduits I I, fringe-like scouring members I9, and rinse water.supply `pipes 40, together with nozzles di. Ineach case, thebottomA end of the liquid supply p-ipe 4D is bent to pass outwardly through the wall of the conduit II, and is connected bya exible hose42 to a liquid supply valve 43.
The conduit II, with its attached scrubber, I9, is pivotally mounted for oscillation about its longitudinal axis. To this endtxthere is a shank 45 xed to the bottom end of ther conduit I I and projecting downwardly therefrom, and mounted on the bottom end of the shanklliis a ballv '46'which is seated in a socket 41 in abase plate 50. .A cover plate di is bolted to the, top surface of the'base plate Eli, and confines the ball 46 to its socket.
4The 'top 'end of the conduit I'I is rotatably held by a collar'd' at the discharge end of .'th'e hous- Blower IZ is preferably "of the centrifugal type, and comprises a squirrel cage rotor 54 mounted within the housing on a shaft'55 `which is operativelyconnected to the drive shaft of an electric motor 56.
The other end of the motor drive shaft is connected to a right-angle-drive, speed-reduction gear box 60, the output shaft 6I of which has a crank 62 mounted thereon. At the outer end of the arm 62 is a crank pin 63, to which is attached one end of a connecting rod 64. The other end of the connecting rod 64 is attached to a pin 65 on a bell crank arm 66, the latter being mounted at one end of a shaft 10. The shaft 10 is journaled on a bracket 1I projecting outwardly from one side of the shelf I3, and fixed to the outer end of the shaft is a downwardly extending arm 12. by a exible ball and socket joint 13 to one end of a rod 14; the other end of said rod being connected by another ball and socket joint 15 to the outer end of an arm 16 xed to and projecting outwardly from the top end of the conduit I I.
Operation of the electric motor 56 drives the blower I2, forcing a large volume of air at high velocity down into the conduit I I and out through the nozzle I5, and thereby causing the strips 26 to beat against the side of the automobile.
At the same time, the crank arm 62 is driven by the motor 56 at a reduced speed, and the rotary motion of the crank arm is transmitted by the connecting rod 64, bell crank arms 86, 12, rod 14, and arm 16, to the conduit II to oscillate the same, preferably through an angular distance in the neighborhood of about The range of oscillation is typically illustrated in Figure 3, wherein the solid line portion of the drawing shows the conduit at one end of its angular travel, while the phantom line portion of the drawing shows the same at the other extremity of its angular travel. It will be noted in Figure 3 that the outer ends of the strips 26 tend to lie flat against the outside surface of the automobile A, although it will be understood that the strips are fluttering and whipping violently in the air stream, with the tip ends of the strips beating and rubbing against the automobile surface. The oscillatory movement of the conduit II causes the strips 26 to rub against the surface of the automobile, giving a brushing action which is extremely eiective in dislodging stubborn soil.
While I have shown and described an apparatus wherein the conduit II is disposed with its axis The outer end of the arm 12 is connected perpendicular to the floor, it is also contemplated that the conduit might be inclined along a vertical plane parallel to the line of travel of the automobile, or it might be inclined inwardly toward the car. It is also contemplated that the crank arm 62 for oscillating the conduit I I might be independently driven by separate motors, and that the linkagefor oscillating the conduit II might be entirely different from that shown.
. Inasmuch as the embodiment described herein is merely one illustrative form of the invention, it will be obvious that Various other changes may be made in the shape and arrangement of the severall parts without departing from the broad scope of the invention, as defined in the appended claims.
I claim :i i
1. An automatic washer of the class described comprising an air conduit adapted to be arranged generally parallel to the surface to be washed, said conduit being mounted-for movement with respectto said surface, a nozzle extending lengthwise of said conduitand directed so as to "discharge a blast of air against said surface, a plu*- rality of closely spaced, relatively thin strips of soft, `iiekible material attached at one e'nd to said conduit adjacent said nozzle, the free ends of said strips being adapted to be carried outwardly and agitated violently by said blast of air, thereby producing a whipping Vibration at the til ends of said strips, said air conduit when in operative position being disposed at a distance from the surface to be washed such that the outer end portions of said strips contact said surface, whereby the beating and rubbing action of said strips acts to scrub said surface, and means for moving said conduit continuously so as to rub said strips against said surface.
2. An automatic washer of the class described comprising an air conduit adapted to be arranged generally parallel to the surface to be washed, said conduit being mounted for oscillation about its longitudinal axis, a nozzle extending lengthwise of said conduit and directed so as to discharge a blast of air against said surface, a plurality of closely spaced, relatively thin strips of soft, exible material attached at one end to said conduit adjacent said nozzle, the free ends of said strips being adapted to be carried outwardly and agitated violently by said blast of air, thereby producing a whipping vibration at the tip ends of said strips, said conduit when in operative position being disposed at a distance from the surface to be washed such that the outer end portions of said strips contact said surface, whereby the beating and rubbing action of said strips acts to scrub said surface, and means for oscillating said conduit through a limited angular distance so as to rub said strips against said surface.
3. An automatic washer of the class described comprising an air conduit adapted to be arranged generally parallel to the surface to be washed, said conduit being :mounted for oscillation about its longitudinal axis, e, nozzle extending lengthwise of said conduit and directed so as to discharge a blast of air against said surface, a fringed scrubbing member of iieXible material attached along one edge to said conduit adjacent said nozzle, the opposite edge of said member being slit into a plurality of long, relatively narrow strips that are adapted to contact said surface with their tip ends, said strips being so positioned relatively to said nozzle as to be in the path of said blast of air, whereby a whipping action is obtained at the tip ends thereof,
7 0 and motor-driven means for oscillating said con'- a blower connected to said conduit, and wherein duit through a limitedangular distance so as to the crankfor oscillating the conduit is driven rub said strips againstsaid surface.V through aspeed-reduction gear box-by a motor 4. An automatic car washer of the class dealso connected to drive the blower. scribed comprising an air conduit adapted to be 5 MISCHA N BEREZNY arranged generally parallel to one of the outside surfaces of a. car as the latter is advanced through References Cited in the me of this patent the machine, said conduit being mounted for oscillation about its longitudinal axis, a nozzle ex- UNITED STATES PATENTS tending lengthwise of said conduit and directed l0 Number Name Date so as to discharge a blast of air against said sur- 27,730 Cutler et al. Apr. 10, 1860 face, a fringed scrubbing member of flexible ma- 176,853 Freeman May 2, 1876 teria-l attached alongcne edge to one lipof said 538,430 Cadman Apr. 80, 1895 nozzle, the opposite edge of said member' being 671,197 Rieker Apr. 2, 1901 slit into a plurality of long, relatively narrow 15 894,919 Turner Aug. 4, 1908 strips that are adapted to contact said surface 1,034,260 Lichtenberg July 30, 1912 with their outer ends, said strips being so posi- 1,197,915 Dance1 Y Sept. 12, 1916 tione'd relatively to said nozzle as' to be in the 1,370,256 Adams Mar. 1, 1921 path of said' blast of ain'whereby a Whipping 1,588,735 Hoops June 15, 1926 action is obtained at the tip ends thereof, an 20 1,621,909 Smith Mai-.22, 1927 arm projecting outwardly from said conduit, and 1,661,111 Coy Feb. 28I 1928 a motor-driven crank operatively connected by 1,823,222 Whitsitt Sept. 15, 1931 link meansto said arm, whereby said conduit is 2,109,621 Kirby .'l'ar. 1, 1938 oscillated through a limited angular distance so 2,178,903 Smellie Oct. 31, 1939 as to rub said strips against said surface. 2,280,077 Owen Apr. 21, 1942 5. The invention deiined in claim 4, including 2,280,610 Young Apr, 21, 1942
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Cited By (15)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2876472A (en) * 1954-04-12 1959-03-10 Minit Man Inc Portable vehicle washing machine
US2982985A (en) * 1957-03-25 1961-05-09 Kulicke & Soffa Mfg Co Automatic case cleaning machine
US3336622A (en) * 1964-03-20 1967-08-22 Kullwitz Georg Von Cleaning device for motor vehicles for the automatic cleaning of motor cars
US3337896A (en) * 1964-02-28 1967-08-29 Russell B Allen Car wash system
US3487490A (en) * 1965-12-22 1970-01-06 Heinrich Wuster Apparatus for automatically cleaning motor and other vehicles
US3705435A (en) * 1969-12-15 1972-12-12 Kleindienst & Co Apparatus for washing vehicles
US4468835A (en) * 1982-12-20 1984-09-04 Rhodes William A Air vibrated dust brush
US4685169A (en) * 1985-08-26 1987-08-11 Ryko Manufacturing Company Vehicle wash and dryer
USRE33334E (en) * 1985-08-26 1990-09-18 Ryko Manufacturing Company Vehicle wash and dryer
US5134742A (en) * 1990-02-08 1992-08-04 N/S Corporation Vehicle washing apparatus
US5367739A (en) * 1993-07-13 1994-11-29 Johnson; Archie L. Oscillating air blowers for drying vehicles
WO1994027484A1 (en) * 1993-06-01 1994-12-08 Johnson Edward P Method and apparatus for rejuvenating a drainfield or dry well
US5778485A (en) * 1995-01-19 1998-07-14 Tokyo Electron Limited Probe card cleaning apparatus, probe apparatus with the cleaning apparatus, and probe card cleaning method
US5960564A (en) * 1998-02-27 1999-10-05 Proto-Vest, Inc. Side shot two car wash dryer
US6282746B1 (en) 1999-12-22 2001-09-04 Auto Butler, Inc. Blower assembly

Citations (16)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US27780A (en) * 1860-04-10 Improved carpet beater and cleaner
US176853A (en) * 1876-05-02 Improvement in carpet-beaters
US538480A (en) * 1895-04-30 Dust-beater
US671197A (en) * 1901-01-02 1901-04-02 George F Ricker Carpet-beating machine.
US894919A (en) * 1907-12-30 1908-08-04 Josiah B Gathright Car-cleaning apparatus.
US1034260A (en) * 1909-11-26 1912-07-30 William L Hall Pneumatic cleaning apparatus.
US1197915A (en) * 1915-08-14 1916-09-12 Clifford C Dance Vacuum-cleaner.
US1370256A (en) * 1920-08-21 1921-03-01 James P N Adams Carpet-sweeper brush
US1588735A (en) * 1923-05-01 1926-06-15 Morgan Mfg Company Shoe-polishing machine
US1621909A (en) * 1925-09-21 1927-03-22 Sidney L Smith Drying mop
US1661111A (en) * 1927-01-18 1928-02-28 Homer G Coy Automatic eraser
US1823222A (en) * 1927-08-19 1931-09-15 William B Whitsitt Apparatus for cleaning railroad cars
US2109621A (en) * 1931-07-20 1938-03-01 James B Kirby Suction cleaner
US2178003A (en) * 1931-04-22 1939-10-31 Hoover Co Suction cleaner
US2280077A (en) * 1940-10-29 1942-04-21 Julius H Kiel Machine for cleaning and treating floors
US2280610A (en) * 1935-07-02 1942-04-21 Gene E Rogers Vibratory electrical tool

Patent Citations (16)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US27780A (en) * 1860-04-10 Improved carpet beater and cleaner
US176853A (en) * 1876-05-02 Improvement in carpet-beaters
US538480A (en) * 1895-04-30 Dust-beater
US671197A (en) * 1901-01-02 1901-04-02 George F Ricker Carpet-beating machine.
US894919A (en) * 1907-12-30 1908-08-04 Josiah B Gathright Car-cleaning apparatus.
US1034260A (en) * 1909-11-26 1912-07-30 William L Hall Pneumatic cleaning apparatus.
US1197915A (en) * 1915-08-14 1916-09-12 Clifford C Dance Vacuum-cleaner.
US1370256A (en) * 1920-08-21 1921-03-01 James P N Adams Carpet-sweeper brush
US1588735A (en) * 1923-05-01 1926-06-15 Morgan Mfg Company Shoe-polishing machine
US1621909A (en) * 1925-09-21 1927-03-22 Sidney L Smith Drying mop
US1661111A (en) * 1927-01-18 1928-02-28 Homer G Coy Automatic eraser
US1823222A (en) * 1927-08-19 1931-09-15 William B Whitsitt Apparatus for cleaning railroad cars
US2178003A (en) * 1931-04-22 1939-10-31 Hoover Co Suction cleaner
US2109621A (en) * 1931-07-20 1938-03-01 James B Kirby Suction cleaner
US2280610A (en) * 1935-07-02 1942-04-21 Gene E Rogers Vibratory electrical tool
US2280077A (en) * 1940-10-29 1942-04-21 Julius H Kiel Machine for cleaning and treating floors

Cited By (15)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2876472A (en) * 1954-04-12 1959-03-10 Minit Man Inc Portable vehicle washing machine
US2982985A (en) * 1957-03-25 1961-05-09 Kulicke & Soffa Mfg Co Automatic case cleaning machine
US3337896A (en) * 1964-02-28 1967-08-29 Russell B Allen Car wash system
US3336622A (en) * 1964-03-20 1967-08-22 Kullwitz Georg Von Cleaning device for motor vehicles for the automatic cleaning of motor cars
US3487490A (en) * 1965-12-22 1970-01-06 Heinrich Wuster Apparatus for automatically cleaning motor and other vehicles
US3705435A (en) * 1969-12-15 1972-12-12 Kleindienst & Co Apparatus for washing vehicles
US4468835A (en) * 1982-12-20 1984-09-04 Rhodes William A Air vibrated dust brush
USRE33334E (en) * 1985-08-26 1990-09-18 Ryko Manufacturing Company Vehicle wash and dryer
US4685169A (en) * 1985-08-26 1987-08-11 Ryko Manufacturing Company Vehicle wash and dryer
US5134742A (en) * 1990-02-08 1992-08-04 N/S Corporation Vehicle washing apparatus
WO1994027484A1 (en) * 1993-06-01 1994-12-08 Johnson Edward P Method and apparatus for rejuvenating a drainfield or dry well
US5367739A (en) * 1993-07-13 1994-11-29 Johnson; Archie L. Oscillating air blowers for drying vehicles
US5778485A (en) * 1995-01-19 1998-07-14 Tokyo Electron Limited Probe card cleaning apparatus, probe apparatus with the cleaning apparatus, and probe card cleaning method
US5960564A (en) * 1998-02-27 1999-10-05 Proto-Vest, Inc. Side shot two car wash dryer
US6282746B1 (en) 1999-12-22 2001-09-04 Auto Butler, Inc. Blower assembly

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