US2585946A - Child's sewing kit - Google Patents

Child's sewing kit Download PDF

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US2585946A
US2585946A US89700A US8970049A US2585946A US 2585946 A US2585946 A US 2585946A US 89700 A US89700 A US 89700A US 8970049 A US8970049 A US 8970049A US 2585946 A US2585946 A US 2585946A
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holes
pieces
cloth
panels
child
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US89700A
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Liberman Loretta
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Liberman Loretta
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D05SEWING; EMBROIDERING; TUFTING
    • D05BSEWING
    • D05B1/00General types of sewing apparatus or machines without mechanism for lateral movement of the needle or the work or both
    • D05B1/02General types of sewing apparatus or machines without mechanism for lateral movement of the needle or the work or both for making single-thread seams
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D05SEWING; EMBROIDERING; TUFTING
    • D05BSEWING
    • D05B91/00Tools, implements, or accessories for hand sewing

Description

Feb. 19, 1952 Filed April 26. 1949 A. LIBERMAN 2,585,946

CHILDS SEWING KIT 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 0 O O O O O O O O o o o o 0 c was an:

ADA LIBEEMAN INVENTOR. REYNOLDS & BEACH ATTORNEYS BY WAgM Feb. 19, 1952 V A. LIBERMAN 2,585,946

7 CHILDS SEWING KIT Filed April 26. 1949 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 A DA L IBEEMAN INVENTOR.

REYNOLDS & BEAC H A TTORNE Y5 Fig.4 BMW/$27M Feb. 19, 1952 1 2,585,946

CHILDS SEWING KIT Filed April 26. 1949 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 ADA LJBERMAN INVENTOR. REYNOLDS E BEACH ATTORNEYS ig; 11 a I Mw.9 --4 Patented Feb. 19, 1952 2,585,946 oHniDs' SEWING-KIT Ada Liberm-an', Seattle Wash-.;- nowby change of name Loretta Libermafi Application April 26, 1949,-S eriaI No.-89,700

4 Claims.

devotion of much time of a teacher to working withthe child has been required. A principal object of my invention, therefore, is to provide a sewing kit for children which, after very brief instruction, can be used by young children without assistance and witha minimum of guidance. At the same time the child receives continual encouragement by the rapid progress possible in making articles useful in the child's play, which can be made quite quickly even by a child.

Moreover, the stimulated by enabling a variety of articles to be constructed from a few basic pieces of material. With the same pieces, if desired, first one article can be made, then taken apart and another made instead. Not only can several alternative articles be made from a few pieces of material, but the creative ability of the child may be developed further by enabling the simple principles of my invention to be applied to the fabrication of a Wide variety of articles which may be conceived by a young child. By such versatility of my invention the child can be lead to undertake progressively more difficult tasks, to promote dexterity and ingenuity, while interest is maintained at a high level and monotony is entirely avoided.

A more specific object of my invention is to enable several different articles to be made from two pieces of cloth to initiate interest in sewing, the difiiculty of such fabrication being reduced and the work expedited by securing such pieces of cloth together in a temporary fashion so that they will be held properly to be worked upon. The articles thus produced will be not only attractive, but useful in childrens play. It is an additional object to apply the same principles of my invention to the construction of more intricate and more interesting articles to which a child may progress.

In the practice of my invention, it is an object not only to teach the child to sew stitches, but to teach related handicraft operations, such as the tieing of bows, the making of loops and braiding, which will generally improve; a child's versatility and dexterity.

creative ability of the child is The manner in which the various objects discussed above are accomplished will be understood from" the following detailed description of representative embodiments of my invention, asillustrated in'th'e accompanying drawing-s.

V Figure l is a face view oftwo pieces of cloth formed according to my invention.

Figure 2 is a face view of one article which may be'm'ade from the pieces of cloth shown in Figure 1 Figure 3 is aperspective view of another article which may be made from the pieces of cloth shown in- Figure I, and Figure 4 is a perspective view of still a diif'erent article which may be made-from such piecesof cloth. Figure 5 is a face viewof a further article which may bemade fromthe pieces of cloth shown in Figure. 1.

Figure 6 is a faceview of a different type of article embodying the principles of my invention, and Figure 7 is a face view of another type of article also madeaccord i'ng to the principles of my inven-tion.

Figure 8" is a-fra-gment'ary' face view of an article, such as shown in Figures 2 and 4, for example,- employing adifferent type of stitch.

Figure Q is-a-f'ace view, with parts broken away, of a more advanced type of article made in accorolanc'e-with my invention, shown partially'completed, and Figure I0 is a transverse sectional view through such article. Figure 11 is a face view of the article shown in Figures 9 and 10, in itscompl'et'ed form.

' The objective of stimulating. in the child a desire'to learn: the rudiments of sewing is accomplished bymy invention bymaki'ng it possible-for even a young' child-tomak'e quickly and easily an articleuseful to it; In accordance with this invention such article may, for example, take the formof a (1011 5 garment, such as an apron, a pair ofpanties, a skirt, a dress or a bunting. Other articles useful to a child, which can be made byth'e technique of" my invention, are a dblls pillowra pot holdei' or a rag. doll itself. These namedarticles constitute only representative articles which can be made by the use of the followingdescribed technique.

In the fabrication of most of the articles mentioned the principal operation required is the edge-joining of two pieces of limp material, such as cloth, for example, asillustrated in Figure 1. More" complicated articles may require the pieces of suchmaterial to beof different shapes, but several of sii'charticles may be made from pieces of cloth sands of single rectangular form. Of

these the piece labelled I may be considered to be the front panel of a garment or other article, and the piece labelled 2 the back panel. About the margin of each of these pieces of cloth holes 3 are formed at convenient, rather widely spaced, locations. These holes may be punched in the cloth material by suitable machinery which preferably is capable of punching such holes through a considerable number of like pieces of cloth simultaneously.

The arrangement of these tools is of paramount importance in carrying out my invention, such arrangement being in a row along a line spaced inward somewhat from the border of the piece of cloth, and parallel to such border. The spacing of the holes should be uniform, and such that a length of yarn, embroidery silk, ribbon or other coarse threadlike material may be threaded in and out through successive holes, as illustrated in Figure 2, for example. The holes should be located sufficiently close together so that, when two pieces of cloth are joined by such stitching technique, the edges will be held together reasonably tightly and at fairly close points. The holes should be spaced far enough apart to enable the stitching to move quickly along the line of holes, as the child works, so that the sewing progress will be quite rapid.

The size of the holes 3 should be selected to pass readily a blunt ended needle having an eye large enough to receive easily rather heavy yarn. Thus the child is protected from injury by avoiding the use of a sharp pointed needle, yet it will have the experience of threading a needle in the usual fashion. Because of the large eye which such needle should have and the coarseness of the threadlike material used, however, such threading operation can be accomplished easily even by a young child.

In making a dolls apron, or even a child's apron, in accordance with my invention, a single piece of cloth only of the shape shown in Figure 1 maybe used, such an apron being illustrated in Figure 2. The apron will hold its shape better, however, if the two pieces of cloth I and 2 are sewn together edge-to-edge in overlying registry, as will be explained later. It is preferred that the number of holes across a long side of this material be even, so that, as a threadlike element is stitched through such a line of holes, the opposite ends will come out on the same side of the material and a section of the threadlike material will be centered between the ends of the piece. Across the ends of the piece, however, the number of holes may be either odd or even, although it is preferred that the spacing of these holes be equal to the spacing of the holes bordering the longer edges of the piece.

In making the apron, therefore, the yarn 4 is knotted suitably at one end, or looped through adjacent holes and tied, and then is worked back and forth through the holes 3 along the two short sides and one long side of the rectangular piece of material I, leaving the holes free along the other longer side of the cloth piece, constituting the top of the apron. Through the holes along this last side then is worked a ribbon 5 which may be of a length adequate to leave long ends for tieing when the apron is placed about a doll or a child, depending upon the size of the apron. The yarn 4 then constitutes decoration for the apron, and the yarn and ribbon may be in matching or contrasting colors.

If it is desired to make the apron more substantial, instead of the yarn being worked, in the manner described, through only one cloth panel, the two pieces of cloth I and 2 may be secured together in overlying registry such that the holes 3 of the two pieces will coincide. To hold the pieces of cloth in such relationship staples 6, as shown in Figure 3, may be placed one in each corner between the ends of the pieces and the adjacent rows of holes. The yarn 4 may then be worked in and out through the holes about three sides of the pieces of material, as described, which will hold these pieces in registry. Similarly the ribbon 5 may be sewn through the holes of the row along the other long side of these pieces in the same manner. After the cloth pieces I and 2 have thus been secured together the wire staples ,6 may be removed, if desired.

Pieces of cloth of the type shown in Figure 1 may also be used to construct any one of the articles shown in Figures 3, 4 and 5, when used together. A common feature of each of these three articles, as well as of the double thickness apron described, is that the edges of the two cloth blanks I and 2 are secured together at least along their short edges to hold such blanks together with their apertures 3 in registry, enabling the threadlike material to be worked in and out through such apertures without having to bother about holding the pieces of cloth in proper relationship to each other during such operation. It is preferred that the two panels be secured together, at least temporarily, by clinched wire staples 6. In order to leave the long edges of the pieces free to form an opening or openings extending over their entire length these staples should be placed parallel to the shorter edges of the rectangular cloth blanks. Conveniently they may be located between such short edges and the adjacent rows of holes 3 parallel to these edges, in the manner shown in Figures 3, 4 and 5.

To make the dolls skirt shown in Figure 3, it is then merely necessary to sew together the short edges of the material by working yarn, for example, in and out of the holes 3 in the rows along the short edges, as shown in this figure, defining the seam lines. The yarn would be suitably knotted at one side of the material, or caught in the material, or tied in a loop through the two end holes of a row, as may be preferred. The holes along the edges forming the bottom of the dolls skirt may be worked on the two pieces separately to form decoration, if desired, or this operation can simply be omitted as in Figure 3. The staples 6 may now be removed, if preferred.

In order to secure the dolls skirt upon a doll, a ribbon 6 in this instance is worked from the center of one long side of the front panel I to an end of such piece, then across to the back panel 2 and along the holes in it to its opposite end, and then back through the holes in the other half of the top row in piece I. The ends of the ribbon thus brought together at the center of the skirt front may be pulled to draw and gather the skirt top to any desired extent to fit the doll. The child may obtain practice in tieing bows by tieing the ends of the ribbon 5 into a bow at the front of the doll.

Much the same sewing technique is employed to make a purse such as shown in Figure 4. Here again the pieces of cloth I and 2 are held together temporarily to facilitate stitching, by the staples -6 interconnecting the corner of the pieces to form a double panel blank as described above. In this instance the yarn 4 is sewed around the two short sides and the bottom long side of the two pieces to connect their corresponding edges together. The ribbon5, instead of being started from the center of a long side as in making the skirt of Figure 3, in this instance has one end secured in any convenient manner, or sewing with it is merely started from the inside face at any location along the top edges of pieces I and 2, but preferably at an end hole. then worked through the holes along the entir top edges of both front panel I' and back panel 2 to bring the other end of the ribbon adjacent to the first end. These ends may then be tied, leaving considerableslack in the ribbon. If, now, the center sections of the ribbon extending through each of the pieces I and 2 are grasped and pulled, the result will be to form two loops 7 at the centers of the sides, as shown in Figure 4. As these loops are pulled farther the knot joining the ends of the ribbon 5 will be drawn snugly into an internal corner between the open sides of the purse formed by the panels l and 2, and the edges of these pieces will be gathered to close the open side of the purse.

. The dolls pillow or childs pillow shown in Figure 5 may be made from the same rectangular double panel blank composed of the two pieces of cloth 1 and 2 shown in Figure 1, stapled together temporarily, as previously described. While again yarn could be used to sew together the front and back panels I and 2, a ribbon 5 threaded through the marginal rows of holes to extend entirely about the edges of the pillow may be considered to be more decorative. In constructing the pillow such ribbon may be started in any desired pair of registering holes in panels I and 2 about the margin of the blank, and the sewing is continued uninterruptedly until the other end of the ribbon is brought adjacent to the first end. Before this sewing is quite completed, but preferably after at least three edges have been thus sewed together, any suitable stuffing for the pillow may be inserted between the two cloth panels l and 2, and then the stitching of the ribbon completed and its ends tied in a bow 8, as shown in Figure 5. In connection with this sewing exercise again practice in tieing bows is thus afforded to the child.

While the articles thus far described have been constructed from rectangular pieces of cloth, it is not necessary that the pieces be of such an elementary shape, as will be evident by reference to the garments shown in Figures 6 and 7. Both of these garments, however, are made of two main pieces of cloth, sewed together with yarn or other threadlike material stitched through holes along the edges in accordance with the same principles used in making the articles described above. Thus in providing a double panel blank for the dolls panties shown in Figure 6, two cloth pieces of identical shape are provided, one being a front panel designated 9 and the other a like back panel underlying it. Along the tops and sides of these pieces, as well as around the crotch, are arranged holes close to the edges of the pieces and parallel to them, as described previously. The front and back panels are held in registry with the holes in the two panels coinciding to facilitate sewing by staples 6, disposed one in each corner. The crotch portions of these pieces and the side edges are then sewn together, according to the technique previously described, with yarn or other suitable threadlike material. When the garment is completed the staples may be removed, if de- The ribbon is sired. As in making the dolls skirt shown in Figure. 3, a ribbon 5 isv worked in and out through the holes around the top edges of both panels I. and 2 and the ends of the ribbon are brought together at the center of the front, so that they may be tied ina bow 8.

Again the same principles of construction and assembly technique may be applied to a dolls dress or nightdress such as shown in Figure. 7. Here the cloth pieces Ill and H, constituting the front and back. panels of the blank and finished garment, are of similar shape except, to improve the neck line, the upper edge of the front panel preferably is cut lower than that of the back panel, as illustrated. Again the holes 3 are arranged in rows parallel to but spaced slightly from the edges of the cloth pieces, to define seam lines, and such pieces are held in registry with their edges and holes 3 coinciding by staples 6 located judiciously about their edges, such as one at each corner and one under each armpit, to form the blank. Yarn l, or other threadlike material, having its ends secured in any suitable manner, is worked through the holes, leaving the bottom and the sleeve ends open. Along the top edge of the garment blank the yarn is threaded through the holes in both panels on the upper sides of the sleeves, and then through the holes along the neck portion of the front panel it) only, leaving the neck opening between it and the back piece. At the front of the neck opening the ends of the yarn may be tied in a bow.

In making the dress shown in Figure 7, or, in fact, in making any of the articles described herein, for a more decorative effect the yarn may be passed from one hole in a seam line to the next with an overcast stitch, such as formed by the yarn i2 shown in Figure 8, instead of with the in-and-out or runnin stitch described. Not only is this technique suitable for seam lines along separate edges, but such stitching can be carried around the corner of a blank in the manner shown.

To such a garment as the dress of Figure 7 a patch pocket l3 of any desired shape may be secured, utilizing the same technique in producing the securing seams as for joining the main panels of the garment together. Holes about the margin of the pocket are arranged in rows along seam lines corresponding to holes in panel It] at the location of the pocket, and the pocket piece is held in proper position on the panel by staples 6. The pocket is sewn by the child to the panel by yarn, ribbon, or other threadlike material it, preferably somewhat smaller in size than the yarn it used to stitch together the front and back main panels of the garment. The two ends of the threadlike element I4 may be brought together across the upper edge of the pocket and tied in a bow I5 at its center.

A somewhat more difficult type of article to make, which nevertheless can be furnished in the form of an assembled blank and sewn by a child, using the same techniques discussed above, is represented in the potholder shown in Figures 9, 10 and 11. Bag dolls, potholders of other shapes and other cloth articles can be made similarly. Again this article is composed of principal front and back panels t6 and E? which are secured together initially by staples '6 to form a double panel blank with holes 3 arranged about the periphery of the two panels held in registry. In this instance the potholder simulates a face, and the main panels are of circular shape so that the rows of holes 3 arranged along the such construction is employed additional staples.

6 are utilized about the margin of the padding, inwardly of the seam line holes 3, to prevent it from shifting into the marginal portions of the blank.

In this particular article, in addition to the holes 3, several rows of holes, preferably three in number, are arranged in parallel relationship in the form of circular arcs around approximately one half the periphery of the panels l6 and Il. Preferably these holes I9 are somewhat larger than the holes 3 to enable reasonably large ribbons 20 to be threaded through them. Each row should contain an odd number of holes I9 so that the ends of all the ribbons will emerge at the same side of the article.

In fabricating such a potholder, yarn 4 or similar threadlike material again is threaded in and out of the marginal holes 3 to sew the edges of the two panels 16 and I! together as shown in Figure 11. When the panels are thus secured together ribbons 20 are threaded into place, leaving three dangling ends adjacent to each other at opposite ends of a diameter of the circular potholder. The child may then obtain practice in braiding by weaving the three ribbon ends at opposite sides of the potholder together to form the braids 2|, as shown in Figure 11. The ends of these braids may be tied in bows or otherwise suitably secured.

The arrangement of the ribbons 20 in the holes i9, about substantially semi-circular arcs, simulates hair, and the braids 2| correspond to braids at the opposite sides of a face. The panel [6 may actually be worked with yarn 23 as a face by providing additional holes 22 at appropriate cations to form eyes, nose and a mouth. It is not necessary that holes corresponding to those used to form the features of the face be provided in the panel IT, for the yarn 23 may merely be looped through adjacent holes at one location and one end tied, and then the blunt ended needle threaded through the single layer of the panel I 6 from one hole to the next until the facial features have been completed. The other end of the yarn may then be secured by tieing a loop through a pair of adjacent holes.

From the foregoing description it will be understood that by use of my invention a child may be taugh readily to sew together the edges of two panels of cloth in registering relationship along seams indicated by marginal rows of holes which are parallel and adjacent to all or certain edges of the panels. Other unique and pleasing effects may be made by judicious use of ribbons instead of yarn, and a wide variety of articles produced by utilizing a relatively few pieces of cloth of basic shape. An important feature of the procedure is the initial preparation of the double panel blank to be sewed by securing two pieces together initially by retaining means, such as staples, in the manner described. When an article has been completed by sewing the panels together these staples may be removed, if desired, or they may be left in place so that the yarn can be removed 8 and the same blank used for making a different article, according to the whim of the child.

I claim as my invention:

1. A childs sewing kit blank comprising, in overlying registry, front and back panels of limp material, of similar shapes and having corresponding marginal rows of holes adapted to receive threadlike material therethrough to sew aid panels together, and means spaced from 10 such holes and interconnectin said panels to hold them together with said holes in registry.

2. A childs sewing kit blank comprising, in overlying registry, front and back cloth panels of similar shapes and having corresponding marginal rows of holes adapted to receive threadlike material therethrough to sew said panels together, and a plurality of wire staples spaced from such holes and interconnecting said panels to hold them together with said holes in registry.

3. A sewing kit blank comprising front and back panels of limp material and having a marginal row of spaced holes in their edges adapted to receive a threadlike member threaded therethrough to sew the edges of the panels together, filling material between said panels spaced inwardly from such row of holes, and temporary securing means interposed between such row of holes and said filling material securing said panels together with such holes in registry.

4. A sewing kit blank comprising circular front and back cloth panels having a marginal row of spaced holes in their edges and a plurality of parallel arcuate rows of spaced holes spaced inwardly from said marginal row of holes, the holes of said parallel rows being adapted to receive ribbons therethrough, and the holes of said marginal row being adapted to receive a threadlike member threaded therethrough to secure together such front and back panels, filling material disposed between the central portions of said front and back panels, and a plurality of wire staples interposed between the inner one of said rows of holes and said filling material, securing such panels with corresponding holes thereof in registry and restraining displacement of said filling material from between the central portions of such panels into the space between the portions of said panels having said holes therein.

ADA LIBERMAN.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 602,222 Kimble Apr. 12, 1898 645,440 Thurston Mar. 13, 1900 1,329,850 Pye Feb. 3, 1920 1,736,209 Millard Nov. 19, 19 9 1,850,115 McCarthy Mar. 22, 1932 2,375,129 Norton May 1, 1945 OTHER REFERENCES Montessori Method (1912), pages 22, 145, 146, 200.

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Cited By (21)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2904792A (en) * 1957-09-24 1959-09-22 Elliott Robert Hugh Protective sleeve
US2949611A (en) * 1958-04-03 1960-08-23 Bemis Bro Bag Co Bibs
US2982242A (en) * 1957-02-06 1961-05-02 Wolf Oscar Sewing method and apparatus and article made thereby
US3118801A (en) * 1959-06-16 1964-01-21 Lamport Sol Method of preparing sail fabric strips of synthetic resin material
US3589322A (en) * 1969-07-23 1971-06-29 Ryozo Hirokawa Motif piece
US4608939A (en) * 1985-07-01 1986-09-02 Nancy Lampley Quilting or sewing guide
US4642923A (en) * 1984-02-06 1987-02-17 Helga Mueller Mounting board for needlework designs
US4870999A (en) * 1989-01-03 1989-10-03 Dennis Linda H Process for forming embellished fabric by core yarn removal
US4882788A (en) * 1988-08-05 1989-11-28 Made With Love, Inc. Precut and partially assembled clothing
US5738559A (en) * 1996-08-26 1998-04-14 Ostrar; Leah Beth Levin Personalized needleless puppet blank kit
US5915530A (en) * 1998-01-30 1999-06-29 Hager; Ciry Disposable bib and garbage bag
US6155189A (en) * 1997-10-31 2000-12-05 Beautiful Publications Llc Stitching guide
US20050061330A1 (en) * 2003-09-19 2005-03-24 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc Surgical drape system with pouch
US20080000116A1 (en) * 2006-06-30 2008-01-03 Sharon Linda Last Photo/greeting card memento basket kit
US20090107017A1 (en) * 2006-05-25 2009-04-30 Junichi Kuwabara Auxiliary tool for handcrafting
US20110068033A1 (en) * 2009-09-23 2011-03-24 Moffat Violeta C Novel Method for Manufacturing Articles Made with Aluminum Pull Tabs
US20140065922A1 (en) * 2012-09-03 2014-03-06 Ms. Barbara Ann Smith Weavable Construction toys for Young children
US20170124913A1 (en) * 2015-11-02 2017-05-04 Adina Levin Threading substrate
US9957650B1 (en) 2015-06-14 2018-05-01 Tammy L. Roussell Tactile sewing system and methods of use
US10022642B1 (en) * 2017-05-16 2018-07-17 Jamie Adams Hand sewn toy kit
US10755603B1 (en) * 2019-08-12 2020-08-25 Styles Down The Aisle, Inc. Color-coded instructional wigs for teaching braiding techniques

Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US602222A (en) * 1898-04-12 Educational
US645440A (en) * 1899-12-16 1900-03-13 Mynna Thruston Educational appliance.
US1329850A (en) * 1917-09-01 1920-02-03 Charles Benedict De Bibra Combination of devices for teaching infants
US1736209A (en) * 1928-01-16 1929-11-19 Ind Gloves Corp Hand pad
US1850115A (en) * 1929-08-28 1932-03-22 Edward W Mccarthy Educational toy
US2375129A (en) * 1943-08-05 1945-05-01 Lionel W Norton Pot holder

Patent Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US602222A (en) * 1898-04-12 Educational
US645440A (en) * 1899-12-16 1900-03-13 Mynna Thruston Educational appliance.
US1329850A (en) * 1917-09-01 1920-02-03 Charles Benedict De Bibra Combination of devices for teaching infants
US1736209A (en) * 1928-01-16 1929-11-19 Ind Gloves Corp Hand pad
US1850115A (en) * 1929-08-28 1932-03-22 Edward W Mccarthy Educational toy
US2375129A (en) * 1943-08-05 1945-05-01 Lionel W Norton Pot holder

Cited By (23)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2982242A (en) * 1957-02-06 1961-05-02 Wolf Oscar Sewing method and apparatus and article made thereby
US2904792A (en) * 1957-09-24 1959-09-22 Elliott Robert Hugh Protective sleeve
US2949611A (en) * 1958-04-03 1960-08-23 Bemis Bro Bag Co Bibs
US3118801A (en) * 1959-06-16 1964-01-21 Lamport Sol Method of preparing sail fabric strips of synthetic resin material
US3589322A (en) * 1969-07-23 1971-06-29 Ryozo Hirokawa Motif piece
US4642923A (en) * 1984-02-06 1987-02-17 Helga Mueller Mounting board for needlework designs
US4608939A (en) * 1985-07-01 1986-09-02 Nancy Lampley Quilting or sewing guide
US4882788A (en) * 1988-08-05 1989-11-28 Made With Love, Inc. Precut and partially assembled clothing
US4870999A (en) * 1989-01-03 1989-10-03 Dennis Linda H Process for forming embellished fabric by core yarn removal
US5738559A (en) * 1996-08-26 1998-04-14 Ostrar; Leah Beth Levin Personalized needleless puppet blank kit
US6155189A (en) * 1997-10-31 2000-12-05 Beautiful Publications Llc Stitching guide
US5915530A (en) * 1998-01-30 1999-06-29 Hager; Ciry Disposable bib and garbage bag
US20050061330A1 (en) * 2003-09-19 2005-03-24 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc Surgical drape system with pouch
US6874505B1 (en) * 2003-09-19 2005-04-05 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Surgical drape system with pouch
US20090107017A1 (en) * 2006-05-25 2009-04-30 Junichi Kuwabara Auxiliary tool for handcrafting
US8074384B2 (en) * 2006-05-25 2011-12-13 Clover Mfg. Co., Ltd. Auxiliary tool for handcrafting
US20080000116A1 (en) * 2006-06-30 2008-01-03 Sharon Linda Last Photo/greeting card memento basket kit
US20110068033A1 (en) * 2009-09-23 2011-03-24 Moffat Violeta C Novel Method for Manufacturing Articles Made with Aluminum Pull Tabs
US20140065922A1 (en) * 2012-09-03 2014-03-06 Ms. Barbara Ann Smith Weavable Construction toys for Young children
US9957650B1 (en) 2015-06-14 2018-05-01 Tammy L. Roussell Tactile sewing system and methods of use
US20170124913A1 (en) * 2015-11-02 2017-05-04 Adina Levin Threading substrate
US10022642B1 (en) * 2017-05-16 2018-07-17 Jamie Adams Hand sewn toy kit
US10755603B1 (en) * 2019-08-12 2020-08-25 Styles Down The Aisle, Inc. Color-coded instructional wigs for teaching braiding techniques

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